Genes

Edited by Yafeng Shan (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology)
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  1. Star Trek: The Next Generation as Philosophy: Gene Roddenberry’s Argument for Humanism.Kevin S. Decker - 2022 - In David Kyle Johnson (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook of Popular Culture as Philosophy. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 65-92.
    Star Trek: The Next Generation (TNG, 1987–1994) is a very close second to Star Trek (TOS, 1966–1969) in the hearts and minds of fans of televised science fiction. Although both series are examples of space opera that focus on the exploration of the cosmos by a group of Starfleet officers and their crew, TNG is notably different in execution. It explores the interests and backgrounds of its ensemble cast more thoroughly, for example. It also entertains inter-season story arcs and fleshes (...)
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  2. Gene Modification in Non-Human Animal for Developing Human Compatible Organs: Ethical, Legal, Clinical and Societal Issues.Arif Jamil, Shamima Parvin Lasker, Ahmed Ragib Chowdhury & See Ming Seow - 2023 - Bangladesh Journal of Bioethics 14 (2):13-18.
    CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) as a gene editing tool is a precise and promising technology. By CRISPR technology, human gene can be introduced into the animal gene pool to develop chimera for human like cells/tissue. However, the long term effects of gene editing in human is unknown. After revisiting the state-of-the-art publications in this discipline, it appears that the possibility of development to full-term chimeric/non-human animal by CRISPR technic for xenotransplantation is a future reality. Concern over the (...)
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  3. The Racialization of Killer Whales: An Application of Gene-Culture Coevolutionary Theory.David Golding - forthcoming - Perspectives on Science:1-61.
    An expanding body of research aims to identify culture in cetaceans, often positing killer whales as an exemplar species. To this end, gene-culture coevolutionary theory provides a conceptual language with which whales are discussed in raciological terms. It renders killer whale ecotypes as discrete cultures that are intrinsically xenophobic and evolutionarily divergent. Such research on whale culture intends to substantiate theories of divergent natural selection between human cultures as well. This effort furthers the essentialism, simultaneously biological and cultural, that has (...)
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  4. Ingenious Genes: How Gene Regulation Networks Evolve to Control Development.Roger Sansom - 2011 - MIT Press.
  5. Reflection on Gene Editing from the Perspective of Biopolitics.Yuan Chen & Xiaoliang Luo - 2024 - NanoEthics 18 (1):1-7.
    The study examines the creation of gene-edited infants from the perspective of biopolitics. Through an analysis at the level of “body-power”, we show that the infants are a product of an advanced stage of biopolitics. On the other hand, considering the level of “space-power”, we indicate that the mechanism of space deepens the governance of population through biopower, leading to real conflicts between past and future in the present. The infants can be seen as “heterotopias of mirrors”, where super-reality replaces (...)
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  6. A new cultural theory of aesthetics: genes, memes, symbols, and simulacra.Roberto Terrosi - 2023 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    This book develops a theory of aesthetics that criticizes scientific and philosophical reductionism that denies the importance of culture in art and taste, but its theory accepts some fundamental aspects of Neo-Darwinist theory of culture by addressing points of convergence among the notions of meme, simulacrum, and symbol.
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  7. Gene–environment interaction: why genetic enhancement might never be distributed fairly.Sinead Prince - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (4):272-277.
    Ethical debates around genetic enhancement tend to include an argument that the technology will eventually be fairly accessible once available. That we can fairly distribute genetic enhancement has become a moral defence of genetic enhancement. Two distribution solutions are argued for, the first being equal distribution. Equality of access is generally believed to be the fairest and most just method of distribution. Second, equitable distribution: providing genetic enhancements to reduce social inequalities. In this paper, I make two claims. I first (...)
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  8. Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy in a Patient with Heterozygous Mutation in the Slco2a1 Gene: A Case Report.Ilke Coskun Benlidayi, Kubra Tuncer & Tunay Sarpel - 2023 - Central Asian Journal of Medical Hypotheses and Ethics 4 (3):159-162.
    Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is a condition characterized by aberrant skin and osseous tissue proliferation in the distal extremities. Mutations in the 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase gene (HPGD) and the soluble carrier organic anion carrier family member 2A1 gene (SLCO2A1) were associated with primary HOA. Secondary HOA, which is also called as 'hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy' is responsible for 95-97% of cases. Herein, we present a 19-year-old female patient with primary HOA and heterozygous mutation in the SLCO2A1 gene.
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  9. Exploring diverse food system actor perspectives on gene editing: a systematic review of socio-cultural factors influencing acceptability.Katie Henderson, Bodo Lang, Joya Kemper & Denise Conroy - forthcoming - Agriculture and Human Values:1-25.
    Despite the promise of new gene editing technologies (GETs) (e.g., CRISPR) in accelerating sustainable agri-food production, the social acceptability of these technologies remains unclear. Prior literature has primarily addressed the regulatory and economic issues impacting GETs ongoing acceptability, while little work has examined socio-cultural impacts despite evolving food policies and product commercialisation demanding input from various actors in the food system. Our systematic review across four databases addresses this gap by synthesising recent research on food system actors’ perspectives to identify (...)
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  10. Specificity as a Guide for the Safe Use of Human Germline Gene Editing—A Response to Sarkar’s Cut and Paste Genetics.Janella Baxter - 2023 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), International Public Health Policy and Ethics. Springer Verlag. pp. 349-354.
    For human germline gene editing to be a viable technique for preventing disease, it must meet a baseline level of safety. This commentary unpacks Sahotra Sarkar’s concept of specificity outlined in Cut and Paste Genetics, which he proposes as a guide for when human germline gene editing can be performed safely. The commentary raises conceptual questions to how specificity is intended to work and raises further epistemic questions for how evidenceEvidence meets the demands of specificity.
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  11. Shaping eukaryotic epigenetic systems by horizontal gene transfer.Irina R. Arkhipova, Irina A. Yushenova & Fernando Rodriguez - 2023 - Bioessays 45 (7):2200232.
    DNA methylation constitutes one of the pillars of epigenetics, relying on covalent bonds for addition and/or removal of chemically distinct marks within the major groove of the double helix. DNA methyltransferases, enzymes which introduce methyl marks, initially evolved in prokaryotes as components of restriction‐modification systems protecting host genomes from bacteriophages and other invading foreign DNA. In early eukaryotic evolution, DNA methyltransferases were horizontally transferred from bacteria into eukaryotes several times and independently co‐opted into epigenetic regulatory systems, primarily via establishing connections (...)
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  12. Gene Editing Technologies, Utopianism, and Disability Politics.Amber Knight - 2023 - Journal of Philosophy of Disability 3:93-115.
    Scholars have long speculated about what a future affected by gene editing technologies might hold. This article enters current debates over the future of gene editing and the place of disability within it. Specifically, I evaluate contemporary utopian thinking about gene editing found in two different schools of thought: transhumanism and critical disability studies, ultimately judging the latter to be richer and more politically promising than the former. If we take it as our goal to protect and promote future people’s (...)
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  13. La brevetabilité des gènes au niveau national et international.Emmanuel Baud & Thomas Bouvet - 2017 - Archives de Philosophie du Droit 1:31-37.
    La brevetabilité du vivant suscite d’importantes questions car elle confronte le droit des brevets à certaines de ses limites comme, la non brevetablité des découvertes, l'interdiction d'appropriation du corps humain et la protection de l'intégrité du génome humain. Le présent article identifie ces limites et d'autres problématiques connexes, dans l'attente d'un article de fond plus complet sur le sujet.
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  14. Le pouvoir des gènes : analyse historique et épistémologique.Michel Morange - 2017 - Archives de Philosophie du Droit 59 (1):3-15.
    Le chemin vers de Nouvelles Humanités passera-t-il par la modification du génome? Si la réponse est encore incertaine, il est évident que le pouvoir des gènes est au coeur de nombreuses interrogations, de peurs et d’espoirs. Nous montrerons que ce pouvoir des gènes, encore appelé « déterminisme génétique » a connu son apogée au milieu du xx e siècle, puis a perdu, avec la description précise des mécanismes moléculaires par lesquels les gènes exercent leurs effets, sa force et sa simplicité. (...)
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  15. Agir sur les gènes est- ce suffisant?Catherine Bourgain - 2017 - Archives de Philosophie du Droit 59 (1):39-52.
    La génétique est une science qui s’est constituée pour l’action, et dont la légitimité s’est largement construite par l’action, dans des contextes appliqués. Chez l’Homme, l’utilité de ce savoir pour l’action fait pourtant de la résistance. Les projets de modification directe de l’ADN par thérapie génétique se révèlent complexes à maîtriser en dehors de quelques situations particulières. Si la quantification a priori de l’effet des gènes sur un caractère humain est impossible, une mesure – l’héritabilité – sème le trouble. Développée (...)
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  16. Gene Jockeys: life science and the rise of biotech enterprise.Stuart Hogarth - 2017 - New Genetics and Society 36 (2):195-196.
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  17. Assisting reproduction, testing genes: global encounters with new biotechnologies.Sandi Dheensa - 2017 - New Genetics and Society 36 (4):400-401.
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  18. Part of my story. The meaning and experiences of genes and genetics for sperm donor-conceived offspring.Astrid Indekeu & Kristien Hens - 2019 - New Genetics and Society 38 (1):18-37.
    Existing empirical research often do not explain which concepts about genetics underlie the assumption that genetic information is deemed important for donor-conceived offspring. This study focused on how donor-conceived individuals following anonymous sperm donation give meaning to and make sense of genes and genetics. Analysis is based on focus groups and interviews with adult donor-conceived offspring. Findings suggest that genes are part of their specific context of being donor-conceived but also play a role in daily life. Genes make sense on (...)
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  19. The gene: from genetics to postgenomics.Michelle Lynne LaBonte - 2019 - New Genetics and Society 38 (2):246-247.
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  20. Shifting metaphors in direct-to-consumer genetic testing: from genes as information to genes as big data.Paula Saukko - 2017 - New Genetics and Society 36 (3):296-313.
    This article analyses shifts in metaphors in direct-to-consumer genetic testing, analyzing the websites and select media coverage of the nutrigenetic testing company Sciona (2000–2009) and the personal genome service 23andMe (2006–). Sciona represented genes and communication through the classical metaphor of information; genes coded for disease, and this information was transmitted from the expert company to the consumers. 23andMe represented genes and communication through a new metaphor of big data; genes were digital data or a resource that was browsed, correlated (...)
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  21. Bench, bedside, boardroom: negotiating translational gene therapy.Courtney Addison - 2017 - New Genetics and Society 36 (1):22-42.
    This article presents ethnographic material from a London-based group of gene therapists who received the opportunity to trial a device that, its makers claimed, would expedite and improve their cell work. The Vanguard cell processor elicits both enthusiasm and ambivalence from group members, which I seek to understand by examining the group’s current manner of working alongside the device and its purported virtues. I show that cell processing currently involves complex practices of recognition, attention, care, and involvement, which answer to (...)
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  22. Commercialization of the gene-edited crop and morality: challenges from the liberal patent law and the strict GMO law in the EU.Li Jiang - 2020 - New Genetics and Society 39 (2):191-218.
    The EU aspires to utilize the economic advantages of gene-editing technology on one hand and ensure human health and environmental safety on the other. Surrounding the fierce debates over emerging gene-edited plant, the current debate focused on the issue of whether the gene-edited crop should be within or outside the GMO law and its implication for innovation. It should not be forgotten that it is also involved in the complex patentability issues pertaining to the legal interpretation of the patent law. (...)
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  23. “If relatives inherited the gene, they should inherit the data.” Bringing the family into the room where bioethics happens.Deborah R. Gordon & Barbara A. Koenig - 2022 - New Genetics and Society 41 (1):23-46.
    Biological kin share up to half of their genetic material, including predisposition to disease. Thus, variants of clinical significance identified in each individual’s genome can implicate an exponential number of relatives at potential risk. This has renewed the dilemma over family access to research participant’s genetic results, since prevailing US practices treat these as private, controlled by the individual. These individual-based ethics contrast with the family-based ethics – in which genetic information, privacy, and autonomy are considered to be familial – (...)
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  24. A genetic unraveling: book review of Making Sense of Genes by Kostas Kampourakis. [REVIEW]David S. Moore - 2021 - New Genetics and Society 40 (2):242-245.
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  25. Assessing public opinions on the likelihood and permissibility of gene editing through construal level theory.Derek So, Robert Sladek & Yann Joly - 2021 - New Genetics and Society 40 (4):473-497.
    Anticipatory policy for gene editing requires assessing public opinion about this new technology. Although previous surveys have examined respondents’ views on the moral acceptability of various hypothetical uses of CRISPR, they have not considered whether these scenarios are perceived as plausible. Research in construal level theory indicates that participants make different moral judgments about scenarios seen as likely or near and those seen as unlikely or distant. Therefore, we surveyed a representative sample of 400 Americans and Canadians about both the (...)
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  26. Editorial: themed issue: understanding the technical and social landscape of gene editing.Rebecca Dimond, Jamie Lewis & Gareth Thomas - 2021 - New Genetics and Society 40 (4):361-366.
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  27. Sequencing BGI: the evolution of expertise and research organisation in the world’s leading gene sequencing facility.Kai Wang, Xiaobai Shen & Robin Williams - 2021 - New Genetics and Society 40 (3):305-330.
    The increasing importance of computational techniques in post-genomic life science research calls for new forms and combinations of expertise that cut across established disciplinary boundaries between computing and biology. These are most marked in large scale gene sequencing facilities. Here new ways of organising knowledge production, drawing on industrial models, have been perceived as pursuing efficiency and control to the potential detriment of academic autonomy and scientific quality. We explore how these issues are played out in the case of BGI (...)
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  28. Gene drive communication: exploring experts’ lived experience of metaphor use.Brigitte Nerlich & Aleksandra Stelmach - 2022 - New Genetics and Society 41 (1):3-22.
    Metaphors have been crucial in making genetics and genomics public, from the code and the book of life to genetic scissors and gene surgery. A new field is emerging called “gene drive” – a range of controversial technologies that can potentially be used for the eradication or conservation of animal species. At the same time, metaphors are emerging to talk about the promises and dangers of “gene drive”. In this article we use thematic analysis to examine thirty interviews with gene (...)
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  29. The unexpected and unanticipated announcement of the “world’s first” gene edited babies: breaching, repairing and strengthening community boundaries.Rebecca Dimond, Jamie Lewis & Alice Sumner - 2023 - New Genetics and Society 42 (1).
    The 2018 announcement that the world’s first babies had been born following gene editing was unexpected and unanticipated. In this article, we focus on the reaction to the announcement and explore how this revealed implicit and explicit assumptions about the role and responsibilities of scientists and scientific standards. Through analysis of media coverage and public commentary about the birth of the “world’s first,” we identify how the event was constructed as a breach of scientific norms. We begin by identifying the (...)
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  30. An Exploration of the Effects of Gene-Editing Technology on Human Identity.Ava Allwardt - 2023 - Voices in Bioethics 9.
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  31. The Strategy of the Genes: A Discussion of Some Aspects of Theoretical Biology.C. H. Waddington - 2014 - Routledge.
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  32. Gene2vec : Distributed Representation of Genes Based on Co-Expression.Jingcheng Du, Peilin Jia, Yulin Dai, Cui Tao, Zhongming Zhao & Degui Zhi - 2019 - 20 (Suppl 1).
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  33. The Extended Phenotype: The Long Reach of the Gene.Richard Dawkins - 1982 - Oxford University Press.
    In The Selfish Gene, Richard Dawkins crystallized the gene's eye view of evolution developed by W.D. Hamilton and others. The book provoked widespread and heated debate. Written in part as a response, The Extended Phenotype gave a deeper clarification of the central concept of the gene as the unit of selection; but it did much more besides. In it, Dawkins extended the gene's eye view to argue that the genes that sit within an organism have an influence that reaches out (...)
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  34. Responsible risking, forethought, and the case of germline gene editing.Madeleine Hayenhjelm - 2024 - In Adriana Placani & Stearns Broadhead (eds.), Risk and Responsbility in Context. New York and London: Routledge. pp. 149-169.
    This chapter addresses a general question: What is responsible risking? It explores the notion of "responsible risking" as a thick moral concept, and it argues that the notion can be given moral content that could be action-guiding and add an important tool to our moral toolbox. To impose risks responsibly, on this view, is to take on responsibility in a good way. A core part of responsible risking, this chapter argues, is some version of a Forethought Condition. Such a condition (...)
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  35. The sociobiology of genes: the gene’s eye view as a unifying behavioural-ecological framework for biological evolution.Alexis De Tiège, Yves Van de Peer, Johan Braeckman & Koen B. Tanghe - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):1-26.
    Although classical evolutionary theory, i.e., population genetics and the Modern Synthesis, was already implicitly ‘gene-centred’, the organism was, in practice, still generally regarded as the individual unit of which a population is composed. The gene-centred approach to evolution only reached a logical conclusion with the advent of the gene-selectionist or gene’s eye view in the 1960s and 1970s. Whereas classical evolutionary theory can only work with (genotypically represented) fitness differences between individual organisms, gene-selectionism is capable of working with fitness differences (...)
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  36. Why the Gene Was (Mis)Placed at the Center of American Health Policy.Kellie Owens & Arthur L. Caplan - 2023 - Hastings Center Report 53 (4):44-45.
    In Tyranny of the Gene: Personalized Medicine and Its Threat to Public Health (Knopf, 2023), James Tabery traces the ascendance of personalized or precision medicine in America, arguing that America's emphasis on genetics offers more hype than transformational power. In his examination of the power struggles, social relationships, and technological advances that centered the gene in American health policy, Tabery demonstrates how an intensive focus on genetics draws attention away from both the fundamental causes of health disparities and more‐effective changes (...)
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  37. Lumpy Heads and Violent Genes: Moving Beyond Simple-Minded Explanations for Complex-Minded Folk.Kevin N. Lala - 2023 - Biological Theory 18 (3):225-229.
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  38. Moral enhancement, the virtues, and transhumanism : moving beyond gene editing.Braden Molhoek - 2022 - In Arvin M. Gouw, Brian Patrick Green & Ted Peters (eds.), Religious Transhumanism and Its Critics. Lanham: Lexington Books.
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  39. Germline Gene Editing Applications and the Afro-communitarian Ubuntu Philosophy.Cornelius Ewuoso - 2023 - Filosofia Theoretica: Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions 12 (1):1-12.
    Germline gene editing has many applications or uses. This article focuses on specific applications. Specifically, the article draws on a moral norm arising from the thinking about the value of communal relationships in the Afro-communitarian _ubuntu_ philosophy to interrogate key issues that specific applications of germline gene editing – for xeno-transplantation, agriculture and wildlife – raise. The article contends that the application of germline gene editing in these areas is justified to the extent that they foster the capacity to relate (...)
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  40. Connected: How Trains, Genes, Pineapples, Piano Keys, and a Few Disasters Transformed Americans at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century by Steven Cassedy (review).John Mariana - 2017 - Environment, Space, Place 9 (2):138-146.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:138 In 2010 the city of Colorado Springs was strapped for cash. Government officials announced that they would either have to raise revenue through increased taxation or cut public services—­ in some cases rather severely—­ including, perhaps, police and fire protection, and even more basic bits of municipal infrastructure. The city shut down one-­ third of residential streetlights and closed public restrooms. Citi­ zens were outraged, but a majority (...)
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  41. Neither Human Normativity nor Human Groupness Are in Humanity’s Genes: A Commentary on Cecilia Heyes’s “Rethinking Norm Psychology.”.Kati Kish Bar-On & Ehud Lamm - 2023 - Perspectives on Psychological Science 20.
    Heyes presents a compelling account of how cultural evolutionary processes shape and create “rules,” or norms, of social behavior. She suggested that normativity depends on implicit, genetically inherited, domain-general processes and explicit, culturally inherited, domain-specific processes. Her approach challenges the nativist point of view and provides supporting evidence that shows how social interactions are responsible for creating mental processes that assist in understanding and behaving according to rules or norms. We agree. In our commentary, we suggest that it is not (...)
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  42. Guerrilla eugenics: gene drives in heritable human genome editing.Asher D. Cutter - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing can and has altered human genomes, bringing bioethical debates about this capability to the forefront of philosophical and policy considerations. Here, I consider the underexplored implications of CRISPR-Cas9 gene drives for heritable human genome editing. Modification gene drives applied to heritable human genome editing would introduce a novel form of involuntary eugenic practice that I term guerrilla eugenics. Once introduced into a genome, stealth genetic editing by a gene drive genetic element would occur each subsequent generation irrespective (...)
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  43. Selfish Genes, Evil Nature: The Christian Echoes in Neo-Atheism.Ole Sandberg - 2021 - In Catherine Malabou, Daniel Rosenhaft Swain, Petr Kouba & Petr Urban (eds.), Unchaining Solidarity: On Mutual Aid and Anarchism with Catherine Malabou. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. pp. 179-198.
    In The Selfish Gene, Richard Dawkins’ argues that evolution, being a process of ruthless competition, results in selfish behavior. Human nature is short-sighted and amoral due to our genes. But he also insists humans have a unique capacity for moral behavior: Using reason we can suppress the natural instincts and act against our nature. In this chapter I show that Dawkins view is as old as the theory of evolution itself. It was first advocated by T.H. Huxley and criticized by (...)
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  44. Correction: Gene Drives as Interventions into Nature: the Coproduction of Ontology and Morality in the Gene Drive Debate.Keje Boersma, Bernice Bovenkerk & David Ludwig - 2023 - NanoEthics 17 (2):1-1.
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  45. Difference in Kind: Observations on the Distinction of the Megista Gene.David Ambuel - 2013 - In Beatriz Bossi & Thomas M. Robinson (eds.), Plato's "Sophist" Revisited. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter. pp. 247-268.
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  46. Der Mensch als Summe seiner Gene: Herausforderung und Chance.Hans Lehrach - 2003 - In Ludger Honnefelder, Dietmar Mieth, Peter Propping, Ludwig Siep, Claudia Wiesemann, Dirk Lanzerath, Rimas Cuplinskas & Rudolf Teuwsen (eds.), Das genetische Wissen und die Zukunft des Menschen. De Gruyter. pp. 36-37.
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  47. 13 Developmental Emergence, Genes, and Responsible Science.Brian C. Goodwin - 2006 - In Eva M. Neumann-Held, Christoph Rehmann-Sutter, Barbara Herrnstein Smith & E. Roy Weintraub (eds.), Genes in Development: Re-reading the Molecular Paradigm. Duke University Press. pp. 337-348.
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  48. 14 Nothing Like a Gene.Jackie Leach Scully - 2006 - In Eva M. Neumann-Held, Christoph Rehmann-Sutter, Barbara Herrnstein Smith & E. Roy Weintraub (eds.), Genes in Development: Re-reading the Molecular Paradigm. Duke University Press. pp. 349-364.
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  49. 11 Beyond the Gene but Beneath the Skin.Evelyn Fox Keller - 2006 - In Eva M. Neumann-Held, Christoph Rehmann-Sutter, Barbara Herrnstein Smith & E. Roy Weintraub (eds.), Genes in Development: Re-reading the Molecular Paradigm. Duke University Press. pp. 290-312.
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  50. 9 Genes—Causes—Codes: Deciphering dna’s Ontological Privilege.Eva M. Neumann-Held - 2006 - In Eva M. Neumann-Held, Christoph Rehmann-Sutter, Barbara Herrnstein Smith & E. Roy Weintraub (eds.), Genes in Development: Re-reading the Molecular Paradigm. Duke University Press. pp. 238-271.
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