About this topic
Summary Genetic ethics is the study of the moral and political implications of (A) discoveries in the field of genetics (B) advances in genetic technology. For example, a study of the ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) of (A) and (B) was funded as part of the Human Genome Project, started in 1986 and concluded in 2003, whose main goal was to identify all the genes in the human DNA and determine the sequence of all DNA chemical bases of a human being. Genes are units of biological hereditary information, which can be coded by different molecules (sharing similar characteristics), the most stable of which is the DNA. Since the information stored in genes influences the development of a whole organism, it is often regarded as having special importance, thus raising issues of privacy protection or discrimination. It is also apt to be used in controversial ways, e.g. deciding whether a future human person ought to exist or not (such as in selective preimplantation genetic diagnosis or abortion).  
Key works Harris 1992 argues that it is mandatory to use advances in gene therapy to remove vulnerability to infections and pollutants or to radiation damage. It advances an argument that, beside removing the genetic causes of what we regard today as "disability", it is equally mandatory to retard the ageing process, remove predispositions to heart disease, destroy carcinogens and permit human beings to tolerate other environmental pollutants.  Buchanan et al 2000 focuses on justice in the access to human genetic technology, but considers a broad range of themes and arguments: the moral heredity of eugenics, the distinction between therapy and enhancement, constrains and permissions on parental choices of genetic selection, and the disability critique of liberal eugenics. It maintains a position that is liberal, in that it permits individuals a wide range of choices concerning the genetic endowments of their future children, yet constrains it by blocking interventions which would harm the future person (by reducing future options) or society (by causing an unfair distribution of social goods). Fukuyama 2002 regards genetic technology the practice that will radically change human nature with irreversible moral implications. Genetic technology is thus objectionable, in that undermines the natural presuppositions of egalitarian liberalism. Habermas 2003 defends a principled distinction between gene-therapy to cure disease and genetic manipulation allowing parents to select the traits of future children. The latter is seen as incompatible with egalitarian relationships between human beings and their freedom of choice. 
Introductions Buchanan et al manuscript; Brock 2003.
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  1. GEM Anscombe, Faith in a Hard Ground: Essays on Religion, Philosophy and Ethics. [REVIEW]Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2009 - Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 101 (4):587-590.
    I discuss this collection of published and unpublished essays on religion and ethics by GEM Anscombe edited by Mary Geach and Luke Gormally. My main doubt concerns the criteria on which papers have been included in this volume. I argue that, while part of the material included typically belongs to a discussion between believers, some of these are good examples of applied ethics with no direct link with the Christian faith and addressed to a universal audience of reasonable partners of (...)
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  2. Genetic Selective Abortion: Still a Matter of Choice.Bruce P. Blackshaw - forthcoming - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-11.
    Jeremy Williams has argued that if we are committed to a liberal pro-choice stance with regard to selective abortion for disability, we will be unable to justify the prohibition of sex selective abortion. Here, I apply his reasoning to selective abortion based on other traits pregnant women may decide are undesirable. These include susceptibility to disease, level of intelligence, physical appearance, sexual orientation, religious belief and criminality—in fact any traits attributable to some degree to a genetic component. Firstly, I review (...)
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  3. From Dusk Till Dawn: Bioethical Insights Into the Beginning and the End of Life.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2019 - Berlin, Germany: Logos Verlag.
    From Dawn till Dusk embraces the conceptual challenges often associated with Bioethics by taking the reader on a journey that embodies the circle of life and what it means to be human. The beginning and the end of life have always been an impossible riddle to humans. Bioethics does not aspire to unveil utter truths regarding the purpose of our existence; on the contrary, its task is to settle controversial issues that arise within this finite, very fragile and vulnerable life, (...)
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  4. Nonideal Theory, Self-Respect, and Preimplantation Genetic Technologies.Clair Morrissey & Elena Neale - 2019 - In E. Sills & Gianpiero Palermo (eds.), Human Embryos and Preimplantation Genetic Technologies. pp. 67-74.
    We suggest a fuller understanding of the obligation to respect patient autonomy can be gained by recognizing patients as historically and socially situated agents, whose values are developed, challenged, and changed, rather than merely applied, in their decision-making about their use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis or preimplantation genetic screening (PGD/PGS). We ground this discussion in empirical research on the patients experiences with PGD/PGS, and conclude by suggesting that promoting patients’ self-respect is a useful ethical standard for providers and practices to (...)
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  5. Enhancement, Authenticity, and Social Acceptance in the Age of Individualism.Nicolae Morar & Daniel R. Kelly - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):51-53.
    Public attitudes concerning cognitive enhancements are significant for a number of reasons. They tell us about how socially acceptable these emerging technologies are considered to be, but they also provide a window into the ethical reasons that are likely to get traction in the ongoing debates about them. We thus see Conrad et al’s project of empirically investigating the effect of metaphors and context in shaping attitudes about cognitive enhancements as both interesting and important. We sketch what we suspect is (...)
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  6. Artificial and Natural Genetic Information Processing.Guenther Witzany - 2017 - In Mark Burgin & Wolfgang Hofkirchner (eds.), Information Studies and the Quest for Transdisciplinarity. Singapore: World Scientific. pp. 523-547.
    Conventional methods of genetic engineering and more recent genome editing techniques focus on identifying genetic target sequences for manipulation. This is a result of historical concept of the gene which was also the main assumption of the ENCODE project designed to identify all functional elements in the human genome sequence. However, the theoretical core concept changed dramatically. The old concept of genetic sequences which can be assembled and manipulated like molecular bricks has problems in explaining the natural genome-editing competences of (...)
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  7. A Review Of: “David H. Smith and Cynthia B. Cohen , A Christian Response to the New Genetics: Religious, Ethical and Social Issues.”: New York, NY: Rowman and Littlefield, 2003. 208 Pp. $24.95, Paperback. [REVIEW]Lisa Sowle Cahill - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):78-79.
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  8. Leonardo’s Choice – Genetic Technologies and Animals, by Carol Gigliotti.Richard Twine - 2009 - Genomics, Society and Policy 5 (2):1-4.
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  9. Natürlichkeit und Künstlichkeit: Bemerkungen zur ethischen Problematik der Manipulierbarkeit des humangenetischen Substrats.Jan Szaif - 2015 - In G. Rager & G. Wegner (eds.), Synthetische Biologie – Leben als Konstrukt. Freiburg, Germany: pp. 161-195.
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  10. Review of Challenging Nature: The Clash of Science and Spirituality at the New Frontiers of Life by Lee M. Silver. [REVIEW]W. Malcolm Byrnes - 2007 - Worldviews: Environment, Culture, Religion 11:248-253.
  11. Rethinking Reprogenetics: Enhancing Ethical Analyses of Reprogenetic Technologies.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2017 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.
    Reprogenetic technologies, which combine the power of reproductive techniques with the tools of genetic science and technology, promise prospective parents a remarkable degree of control to pick and choose the likely characteristics of their offspring. Not only can they select embryos with or without particular genetically-related diseases and disabilities but also choose embryos with non-disease related traits such as sex. -/- Prominent authors such as Agar, Buchanan, DeGrazia, Green, Harris, Robertson, Savulescu, and Silver have flocked to the banner of reprogenetics. (...)
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  12. At Law: Who's Afraid of the Human Genome?George J. Annas - 1989 - Hastings Center Report 19 (4):19.
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  13. Chimeras and Odysseys Toward Understanding the Technology-Dependent Child.Arthur F. Kohrman - 1994 - Hastings Center Report 24 (5):S4.
  14. Genetic Affinity and the Right to ‘Three-Parent IVF’.G. Owen Schaefer & Markus Labude - 2017 - Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics 34 (12):1577-1580.
    With the recent report of a live birth after use of Mitochondrial replacement therapy, sometimes called ‘Three-parent IVF’, the clinical application of the technique is fast becoming a reality. While the United Kingdom allows the procedure under regulatory scrutiny, it remains effectively outlawed in many other countries. We argue that such prohibitions may violate individuals’ procreative rights, grounded in individuals’ interest in genetic affinity. The interest in genetic affinity was recently endorsed by Singapore’s highest court, reflecting an emphasis on the (...)
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  15. Review of Biotechnology and the Human Good. [REVIEW]David B. Resnik - 2008 - Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 2 (1).
    Biotechnology and the Human Good by C. Ben Mitchell, Edmund D. Pellegrino, Jean Bethke Elshstain, and Scott B. Rae is a thoughtful, carefully argued perspective on the ethics of new developments in biotechnology, such as human enhancement, human germ-line engineering, cloning, nanotechnology, and cybernetics.
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  16. The Mitochondrial Replacement ‘Therapy’ Myth.Tina Rulli - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (4):368-374.
    This article argues that two forms of mitochondrial replacement therapy, maternal spindle transfer and pro-nuclear transfer, are not therapies at all because they do not treat children who are coming into existence. Rather, these technologies merely create healthy children where none was inevitable. Even if creating healthy lives has some value, it is not to be confused with the medical value of a cure or therapy. The article addresses a recent Bioethics article, ‘Mitochondrial Replacement: Ethics and Identity,’ by Wrigley, Wilkinson, (...)
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  17. The Mitochondrial Replacement ‘Therapy’ Myth.Tina Rulli - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (4):368-374.
    This article argues that two forms of mitochondrial replacement therapy, maternal spindle transfer and pro-nuclear transfer, are not therapies at all because they do not treat children who are coming into existence. Rather, these technologies merely create healthy children where none was inevitable. Even if creating healthy lives has some value, it is not to be confused with the medical value of a cure or therapy. The article addresses a recent Bioethics article, ‘Mitochondrial Replacement: Ethics and Identity,’ by Wrigley, Wilkinson, (...)
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  18. Transhumanist Dreams and Dystopian Nightmares: The Promise and Peril of Genetic Engineering, by Maxwell J. Mehlman.Sheryl de Lacey - 2013 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (2):198-200.
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  19. Desperately Seeking Perfection: Christian Discipleship and Medical Genetics 1.J. Shuman - 1999 - Christian Bioethics 5 (2):139-153.
    The question of what, if anything, Christian theology as theology might contribute to ethical debates about appropriate uses of medical genetics has often been ignored. The answer is complex, and the author argues it is best characterized by an explanation of the analogous aspirations of the two: both have as their goal the perfection of the human being, both assert that the present disposition of the human body is on a fundamental level more often than not other than it ought (...)
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  20. Foundations of the Culture Wars: Compassion, Love, and Human Dignity.M. J. Cherry - 2001 - Christian Bioethics 7 (3):299-316.
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  21. Globalization and Universality: Chimera and Truth.G. Mantzarides - 2002 - Christian Bioethics 8 (2):199-207.
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  22. Control and Ethics - Commissions Into Controversies: Genetic Manipulation in The Netherlands.M. B. H. Visser - unknown
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  23. Review of Ronald Cole-Turner, Ed., Design and Destiny: Jewish and Christian Perspectives on Human Germline Modification. 1. [REVIEW]Thomas D. Williams - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):84-85.
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  24. The Disclosure of Genetic Information: A Human Research Ethics Perspective.Danielle E. Dye, Leanne Youngs, Beverley McNamara, Jack Goldblatt & Peter O’Leary - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (1):103-109.
    Increasing emphasis on genetic research means that growing numbers of human research projects in Australia will involve complex issues related to genetic privacy, familial information and genetic epidemiology. The Office of Population Health Genomics (Department of Health, Western Australia) hosted an interactive workshop to explore the ethical issues involved in the disclosure of genetic information, where researchers and members of human research ethics committees (HRECs) were asked to consider several case studies from an ethical perspective. Workshop participants used a variety (...)
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  25. Genetic Theory of Reality, Being the Outcome of Genetic Logic as Issuing in the Aesthetic Theory of Reality Called Pancalism.E. L. Hinman - 1916 - International Journal of Ethics 26 (4):564-567.
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  26. Genetic Databases and Pharmacogenetics: Introduction.Richard E. Ashcroft & Adam M. Hedgecoe - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (3):499-502.
    Since the inception of the Human Genome Project, human genetics has frequently been conducted through big science projects, combining academic, state and industrial methods, interests and resources. The legitimacy of such projects has been linked to national prestige and images of the nation, the purity of scientific endeavour, the entrepreneurial spirit, medical progress and the public health. A key complication in these discourses is that large-scale genetic research has yet to show major results when considered in terms of the objectives (...)
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  27. Beneficence In Utero: A Framework for Restricted Prenatal Whole-Genome Sequencing to Respect and Enhance the Well-Being of Children.I. I. W. Kevin Conley, Douglas C. McAdams, G. Kevin Donovan & Kevin T. FitzGerald - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (1):28-29.
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  28. Self-Critical Federal Science? The Ethics Experiment Within the U.S. Human Genome Project: ERIC T. JUENGST.Eric T. Juengst - 1996 - Social Philosophy and Policy 13 (2):63-95.
    On October 1, 1988, thirty-five years after co-discovering the structure of the DNA molecule, Dr. James Watson launched an unprecedented experiment in American science policy. In response to a reporter's question at a press conference, he unilaterally set aside 3 to 5 percent of the budget of the newly launched Human Genome Project to support studies of the ethical, legal, and social implications of new advances in human genetics. The Human Genome Project, by providing geneticists with the molecular maps of (...)
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  29. Genetic Information: Acquisition, Access, and Control: Edited by Alison K Thompson and Ruth F Chadwick, New York, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 1999, 348 Pages, $115 (Hc). [REVIEW]Lenore Abramsky - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (3):213-214.
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  30. Genes, Nanobots, and the Human Future: High-Tech’s Quest for Moral Responsibility —An Allegory in One Act.William C. Frederick - 2000 - Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 8 (3/4):101-122.
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  31. Ethics of Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques: A Habermasian Perspective.César Palacios‐González - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (1):27-36.
    Jürgen Habermas is regarded as a central bioconservative commentator in the debate on the ethics of human prenatal genetic manipulations. While his main work on this topic, The Future of Human Nature, has been widely examined in regard to his position on prenatal genetic enhancement, his arguments regarding prenatal genetic therapeutic interventions have for the most part been overlooked. In this work I do two things. First, I present the three necessary conditions that Habermas establishes for a prenatal genetic manipulation (...)
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  32. Human Nuclear Genome Transfer : Clearing the Underbrush.Françoise Baylis - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (1):7-19.
    In this article, I argue that there is no compelling therapeutic ‘need’ for human nuclear genome transfer to prevent mitochondrial diseases caused by mtDNA mutations. At most there is a strong interest in this technology on the part of some women and couples at risk of having children with mitochondrial disease, and perhaps also a ‘want’ on the part of some researchers who see the technology as a useful precedent – one that provides them with ‘a quiet way station’ in (...)
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  33. Skepticism in the Genomic Era.Rachel L. Zacharias - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (6):inside front cover-inside front.
    I joined The Hastings Center this past summer, after graduating from Duke University, where I researched advancements in neuroscience and genomics and their import for law, ethics, and policy. This research required, to an extent, faith in the idea that researchers can identify pathways by which genes combine with epigenetic and environmental factors to affect neuronal activity and influence behaviors. Throughout my first months here, I have puzzled over broad critiques of “genomic hype” in recent literature, which clash with the (...)
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  34. More Than 15 Years of Human Behaviour Genetic Research at the University of Warsaw.Wlodzimierz Oniszczenko - 2009 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 40 (3):117-120.
    More than 15 years of human behaviour genetic research at the University of Warsaw Human behaviour genetic research has been conducted at the University of Warsaw for more than 15 years. The main focus of this work have been the origins of individual differences in temperament and other personality traits. Other areas of interest include attitudes, risk factors for human health, and posttraumatic stress disorder. The majority of the research is conducted using quantitative genetic methods although recently work using molecular (...)
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  35. Genetic Optimization Methods for Traffic Engineering Problems in Multi-Service High Speed Optical Networks.V. Pasias, D. A. Karras, R. C. Papademetriou & B. Prasad - 2007 - Journal of Intelligent Systems 16 (4):339-358.
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  36. A Consequentialist Examination of the Circumvention of the Public Will in U.S. Genetic and Biotechnology Law.Adam T. Goodstone - 2013 - Binghamton Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):67-86.
    The introduction of biotechnology and genetic patents into law in the United States and the European Union has taken two startlingly different approaches. In the United States, it was the judicial system that granted these patents legitimacy. In Europe, the patenting of organic material became a continent wide discussion; with individuals having very strong opinions on how ethical these patents were, as well as questioning their legality. Unlike the United States, genetic and biotechnological patents were granted legitimacy in Europe through (...)
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  37. Leveling the Playing Field: Closing the Gap in Public Awareness of Genetics Between the Well Served and Underserved.Johnny Kung & Chao-Ting Wu - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (5):17-20.
    The impact of genetic technologies is being felt in many aspects of society, including medicine and the legal system, as well as the personal lives of individuals. How do we make sure that all segments of the population are equally aware of these technologies and have ample opportunity to voice opinions and shape the future? One ongoing effort, which began ten years ago and in which we are directly involved, is the Personal Genetics Education Project, a nonprofit initiative housed within (...)
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  38. Religious Scholars’ Attitudes and Views on Ethical Issues Pertaining to Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) in Malaysia.A. Olesen, S. N. Nor & L. Amin - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (3):419-429.
    Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis represents the first fusion of genomics and assisted reproduction and the first reproductive technology that allows prospective parents to screen and select the genetic characteristics of their potential offspring. However, for some, the idea that we can intervene in the mechanisms of human existence at such a fundamental level can be, at a minimum, worrying and, at most, repugnant. Religious doctrines particularly are likely to collide with the rapidly advancing capability for science to make such interventions. This (...)
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  39. Genetic Aspects of the Genitive in the Semitic Languages.Meïr M. Bravmann & Meir M. Bravmann - 1961 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 81 (4):386.
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  40. Human Dignity and the Creation of Human–Nonhuman Chimeras.César Palacios-González - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (4):487-499.
    In this work I present a detailed critique of the dignity-related arguments that have been advanced against the creation of human–nonhuman chimeras that could possess human-like mental capacities. My main claim is that the arguments so far advanced are incapable of grounding a principled objection against the creation of such creatures. I conclude that these arguments have one, or more, of the following problems: they confuse the ethical assessment of the creation of chimeras with the ethical assessment of how such (...)
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  41. Moderate Eugenics and Human Enhancement.Michael J. Selgelid - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (1):3-12.
    Though the reputation of eugenics has been tarnished by history, eugenics per se is not necessarily a bad thing. Many advocate a liberal new eugenics—where individuals are free to choose whether or not to employ genetic technologies for reproductive purposes. Though genetic interventions aimed at the prevention of severe genetic disorders may be morally and socially acceptable, reproductive liberty in the context of enhancement may conflict with equality. Enhancement could also have adverse effects on utility. The enhancement debate requires a (...)
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  42. Genetics and Christian Ethics.Celia Deane-Drummond - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    In the immediate future we are likely to witness significant developments in human genetic science. It is therefore of critical importance that Christian ethics engages with the genetics debate, since it affects not just the way we perceive ourselves and the natural world, but also has wider implications for our society. This book considers ethical issues arising out of specific practices in human genetics, including genetic screening, gene patenting, gene therapy, genetic counselling as well as feminist concerns. Genetics and Christian (...)
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  43. Biotechnology - the Making of a Global Controversy.M. W. Bauer & G. Gaskell (eds.) - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    Biotechnology is one of the fastest-growing areas of scientific, technical and industrial innovation and one of the most controversial. As developments have occurred such as genetic test therapies and the breeding of genetically modified food crops, so the public debates have become more heated and grave concerns have been expressed about access to genetic information, labelling of genetically modified foods and human and animal cloning. Across Europe, public opinion has become a crucial factor in the ability of governments and biotech (...)
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  44. Petersen, James C. Genetic Turning Points: The Ethics of Human Genetic Intervention.Scott B. Rae - 2002 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 2 (1):187-189.
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  45. Genetic Anthropology: Understanding of Human Nature in Consilience.Eul-Sang Lee - 2012 - Journal of Ethics 1 (85):103-132.
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  46. Why Is Studying the Genetics of Intelligence So Controversial?James Tabery - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (S1):S9-S14.
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  47. Genetic Prediction.Eric Turkheimer - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (S1):S32-S38.
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  48. Classical and Molecular Genetic Research on General Cognitive Ability.Matt McGue & Irving I. Gottesman - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (S1):S25-S31.
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  49. What Does Behavioral Genetics Offer for Improving Education?Aaron Panofsky - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (S1):S43-S49.
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  50. An Introduction to Thinking About Trustworthy Research Into the Genetics of Intelligence.Erik Parens & Paul S. Appelbaum - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (S1):S2-S8.
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