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  1. Essence in the Age of Evolution: A New Theory of Natural Kinds.Christopher J. Austin - 2018 - London, UK: Routledge.
    This book offers a novel defence of a highly contested philosophical position: biological natural kind essentialism. This theory is routinely and explicitly rejected for its purported inability to be explicated in the context of contemporary biological science, and its supposed incompatibility with the process and progress of evolution by natural selection. Christopher J. Austin challenges these objections, and in conjunction with contemporary scientific advancements within the field of evolutionary-developmental biology, the book utilises a contemporary neo-Aristotelian metaphysics of "dispositional properties", or (...)
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  2. Heritability.Stephen M. Downes & Lucas J. Matthews - 2019 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Lucas Matthews and I substantially revised my SEP entry on Heritability. This version includes discussion of the missing heritability problem and other issues that arise from the use of Genome Wide Association Studies by Behavioral Geneticists.
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  3. Causal Reasoning About Genetics: Synthesis and Future Directions.Kate E. Lynch, Ilan Dar Nimrod, Paul Edmund Griffiths & James Morandini - 2019 - Behavior Genetics 2 (49):221-234.
    When explaining the causes of human behavior, genes are often given a special status. They are thought to relate to an intrinsic human 'essence', and essentialist biases have been shown to skew the way in which causation is assessed. Causal reasoning in general is subject to other pre-existing biases, including beliefs about normativity and morality. In this synthesis we show how factors which influence causal reasoning can be mapped to a framework of genetic essentialism, which reveals both the shared and (...)
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  4. El gen de la monogamia podría actuar también en humanos.Luis Santiago Lario Herrero - 2008 - Tendencias21 2008.
    Una investigación realizada en humanos ha desvelado la existencia de ciertas variantes genéticas en la conformación del gen AVPR1A que se traducirían en una mayor o menor disposición y aptitud hacia la vida en pareja. Eso significa que la actividad de ese gen influiría en la calidad de la vida conyugal y muy probablemente interferiría en la orientación de nuestro mundo afectivo.
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  5. The Monogamy Gene Could Also Act in Humans.Luis Santiago Lario Herrero - 2008 - Tendencias21 2008.
    Research has revealed that genetic variations in the human gene AVPR1A affect the disposition and aptitude of individuals to live in a relationship. Thus the activity of this gene could influence the quality of marital relationships and very likely our emotional inclinations.
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  6. A Review Of: “David H. Smith and Cynthia B. Cohen , A Christian Response to the New Genetics: Religious, Ethical and Social Issues.”: New York, NY: Rowman and Littlefield, 2003. 208 Pp. $24.95, Paperback. [REVIEW]Lisa Sowle Cahill - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):78-79.
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  7. Genetics, From A to Z. A Dictionary of Genetics. By Robert C. King and William D. Stansfield. O.U.P., 1985 . Pp. 480. £25. [REVIEW]J. R. S. Fincham - 1986 - Bioessays 4 (2):91-91.
  8. Book ReviewsWasserman, David, and Wachbroit, Robert, Eds. Genetics and Criminal Behavior.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001. Pp. 335. $65.00. [REVIEW]David L. Hull - 2002 - Ethics 113 (1):185-187.
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  9. Allen Buchanan, Dan Brock, Norman Daniels, and Daniel Wikler, From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice: Buchanan, Allen ; Brock, Dan ; Daniels, Norman ; and Wikler, Daniel . From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. Pp. 398. $33.00 (Cloth); $23.00 (Paper). [REVIEW]Baruch Brody - 2002 - Ethics 112 (2):358-361.
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  10. The Evolving Landscape of Imprinted Genes in Humans and Mice: Conflict Among Alleles, Genes, Tissues, and Kin.Jon F. Wilkins, Francisco Úbeda & Jeremy Van Cleve - 2016 - Bioessays 38 (5):482-489.
    Three recent genome‐wide studies in mice and humans have produced the most definitive map to date of genomic imprinting (gene expression that depends on parental origin) by incorporating multiple tissue types and developmental stages. Here, we explore the results of these studies in light of the kinship theory of genomic imprinting, which predicts that imprinting evolves due to differential genetic relatedness between maternal and paternal relatives. The studies produce a list of imprinted genes with around 120–180 in mice and ∼100 (...)
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  11. RNA Meets DNA: The Potential for Gene Expression to Produce Short RNA Molecules Capable of Generating DNA Mutation and Driving Genome Evolution.Robert S. Young - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (10):1700141.
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  12. Consanguinity, Genetics and Definitions of Kinship in the Uk Pakistani Population.A. H. Bittles & N. A. Small - 2016 - Journal of Biosocial Science 48 (6):844-854.
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  13. Revealing Rate-Limiting Steps in Complex Disease Biology: The Crucial Importance of Studying Rare, Extreme-Phenotype Families.Aravinda Chakravarti & Tychele N. Turner - 2016 - Bioessays 38 (6):578-586.
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  14. Desperately Seeking Perfection: Christian Discipleship and Medical Genetics 1.J. Shuman - 1999 - Christian Bioethics 5 (2):139-153.
    The question of what, if anything, Christian theology as theology might contribute to ethical debates about appropriate uses of medical genetics has often been ignored. The answer is complex, and the author argues it is best characterized by an explanation of the analogous aspirations of the two: both have as their goal the perfection of the human being, both assert that the present disposition of the human body is on a fundamental level more often than not other than it ought (...)
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  15. Illness, Disease, and Sin: The Connection Between Genetics and Spirituality—A Response.Pia Matthews - 2007 - Christian Bioethics 13 (1):91-104.
    In responding to Mathias Beck's thought-provoking article, it seems helpful to begin with an outline and comments on Beck's case as I understand it. For me, this overview throws up three problematic areas that I explore further under the headings of 1. examining the New Testament evidence, 2. sin as disobedience, and 3. obedience, grace, and freedom. Clearly, the author's thoughts in all their nuances are not always adequately accessible in translation. Nevertheless, I hope that I have grasped the main (...)
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  16. Illness, Disease and Sin: The Connection Between Genetics and Spirituality.Matthias Beck - 2007 - Christian Bioethics 13 (1):67-89.
    The New Testament, while rejecting any superficial connection between illness and sin, does not reject a possible connection between illness and a person's relationship with God. An example can be seen in the story of the young blind man who was healed (St. John 9:3). His blindness does not result from any fault he or his parents had committed but apparently from God's wish to reveal his own healing power. The inner blindness of the Pharisees is a different type of (...)
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  17. Research Ethics: An Investigation of Patients’ Motivations for Their Participation in Genetics-Related Research.N. Hallowell, S. Cooke, G. Crawford, A. Lucassen & M. Parker - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (1):37-45.
    Design: Qualitative interview study. Participants: Fifty-nine patients with a family history of cancer who attend a regional cancer genetics clinic in the UK were interviewed about their current and previous research experiences. Findings: Interviewees gave a range of explanations for research participation. These were categorised as social—research participation benefits the wider society by progressing science and improving treatment for everyone; familial—research participation may improve healthcare and benefit current or future generations of the participant’s family; and personal—research participation provides therapeutic or (...)
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  18. Genetics and the Philosophy of Biology.Edward Manier - 1965 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 39:124.
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  19. Book Review: John Swinton and Brian Brock (Eds), Theology, Disability and the New Genetics: Why Science Needs the Church (London: Continuum/T&T Clark, 2007). X + 251 Pp. 19.99 (Pb), ISBN 978--0--567--04558--. [REVIEW]Amos Yong - 2009 - Studies in Christian Ethics 22 (1):120-122.
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  20. Review of Theory Change in Science: Strategies From Mendelian Genetics by Lindley Darden. [REVIEW]Bradley E. Wilson - 1994 - Philosophy of Science 61 (1):153-155.
  21. Genetics and the Origin of the Species.R. T. Eddison - 1954 - Philosophy of Science 21 (3):272-272.
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  22. Styles of Scientific Thought: The German Genetics Community 1900–1933: Jonathan Harwood (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1993), Xix+ 423 Pp. ISBN 0-226-31881-8 Cloth $74.75/£ 51.95, ISBN 0-226-31882-6 Paperback $27.50/£ 17.95. [REVIEW]Nick Hopwood - 1994 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (2):237-250.
  23. Genetics and Insurance: Accessing and Using Private Information*: A. M. CAPRON.A. M. Capron - 2000 - Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (2):235-275.
    Is information about a person's genome, whether derived from the analysis of DNA or otherwise, protected by the right to privacy? If it is, why and in what manner? It often appears that some people believe that the answer to this question is to be found in molecular genetics itself. They point to the rapid progress being made in basic and applied aspects of this field of biology; this progress has remarkably increased what is known about human genetics. Since knowledge (...)
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  24. Wrestling with Behavioral Genetics: Science, Ethics and Public Conversation. [REVIEW]Bonnie Steinbock - 2006 - Social Theory and Practice 32 (3):511-516.
  25. Man — Genetics — Ethics.I. T. Frolov - 1976 - Dialectics and Humanism 3 (3/4):121-130.
  26. Mental Disorders and Genetics: The Ethical Context: Nuffield Council on Bioethics, London, Nuffield Council on Bioethics, 1998, 116 Pages, Pound20. [REVIEW]Christopher Howard - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (5):412-413.
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  27. Behavioral Genetics. The Clash of Culture and Biology: Edited by Ronald A Carson and Mark A Rothstein, Baltimore and London, The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999, 206 Pages, Pound33.00. [REVIEW]Dan Egonsson - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (1):68-69.
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  28. The Troubled Helix: Social and Psychological Implications of the New Human Genetics: Edited by Theresa Marteau and Martin Richards, Cambridge, UK, Cambridge University Press, 1999, 359 Pages, Pound18.95/US$29.95 (Pb). [REVIEW]Anneke Lucassen - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (6):479-479.
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  29. The Ethics of Genetics in Human Procreation: Edited by H Haker, D Beyleveld. Ashgate Publishing Co, 2000, Pound45.00 (Hb), Pp 335. ISBN 0 7546 1021. [REVIEW]A. Clarke - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):329-330.
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  30. The Illusory Riches of Sober's Monism.Philip Kitcher, Kim Sterelny & C. Kenneth Waters - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (3):158-161.
  31. From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice. [REVIEW]Pascal Couillard - 2003 - Dialogue 42 (2):408-411.
    Dans un avenir plus ou moins rapproché, les percées scientifiques en matière de génétique permettront une multitude de possibilités jusqu’ici considérées comme appartenant exclusivement au domaine de la science fiction: la détection et le traitement de maladies et de handicaps transmissibles génétiquement, le clonage d’êtres humains, la modification des gènes,etc. Sans aucun doute, les applications éventuelles des nouvelles connaissances en ce domaine soulèvent de nombreuses difficultés éthiques et morales nouvelles qui imposent ainsi une profonde réflexion. Avec From Chance to Choice, (...)
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  32. Genetics of the Evolutionary Process.Theodosius Dobzhansky - 1970 - Columbia University Press.
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  33. Scientific Discrimination and the Activist Scientist: L. C. Dunn and the Professionalization of Genetics and Human Genetics in the United States.Melinda Gormley - 2009 - Journal of the History of Biology 42 (1):33-72.
    During the 1920s and 1930s geneticist L. C. Dunn of Columbia University cautioned Americans against endorsing eugenic policies and called attention to eugenicists' less than rigorous practices. Then, from the mid-1940s to early 1950s he attacked scientific racism and Nazi Rassenhygiene by co-authoring Heredity, Race and Society with Theodosius Dobzhansky and collaborating with members of UNESCO on their international campaign against racism. Even though shaking the foundations of scientific discrimination was Dunn's primary concern during the interwar and post-World War II (...)
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  34. History in the Gene: Negotiations Between Molecular and Organismal Anthropology.Marianne Sommer - 2008 - Journal of the History of Biology 41 (3):473-528.
    In the advertising discourse of human genetic database projects, of genetic ancestry tracing companies, and in popular books on anthropological genetics, what I refer to as the anthropological gene and genome appear as documents of human history, by far surpassing the written record and oral history in scope and accuracy as archives of our past. How did macromolecules become "documents of human evolutionary history"? Historically, molecular anthropology, a term introduced by Emile Zuckerkandl in 1962 to characterize the study of primate (...)
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  35. R. A. Fisher and His Advocacy of Randomization.Nancy S. Hall - 2007 - Journal of the History of Biology 40 (2):295-325.
    The requirement of randomization in experimental design was first stated by R. A. Fisher, statistician and geneticist, in 1925 in his book Statistical Methods for Research Workers. Earlier designs were systematic and involved the judgment of the experimenter; this led to possible bias and inaccurate interpretation of the data. Fisher's dictum was that randomization eliminates bias and permits a valid test of significance. Randomization in experimenting had been used by Charles Sanders Peirce in 1885 but the practice was not continued. (...)
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  36. Human Genetics and Politics as Mutually Beneficial Resources: The Case of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics During the Third Reich.Sheila Faith Weiss - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):41-88.
    This essay analyzes one of Germany's former premier research institutions for biomedical research, the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics (KWIA) as a test case for the way in which politics and human heredity served as resources for each other during the Third Reich. Examining the KWIA from this perspective brings us a step closer to answering the questions at the heart of most recent scholarship concerning the biomedical community under the swastika: (1) How do we explain (...)
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  37. Introduction and Institutionalization of Genetics in Mexico Ana Barahona, Susana Pinar and Francisco J. Ayala.Ana Barahona, Susana Pinar & Francisco J. Ayala - 2005 - Journal of the History of Biology 38 (2):273-299.
    We explore the distinctive characteristics of Mexico's society, politics and history that impacted the establishment of genetics in Mexico, as a new disciplinary field that began in the early 20th century and was consolidated and institutionalized in the second half. We identify about three stages in the institutionalization of genetics in Mexico. The first stage can be characterized by Edmundo Taboada, who was the leader of a research program initiated during the Cárdenas government (1934-1940), which was primarily directed towards improving (...)
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  38. Technique, Task Definition, and the Transition From Genetics to Molecular Genetics: Aspects of the Work on Protein Synthesis in the Laboratories of J. Monod and P. Zamecnik.Richard M. Burian - 1993 - Journal of the History of Biology 26 (3):387-407.
    In biology proteins are uniquely important. They are not to be classed with polysaccharides, for example, which by comparison play a very minor role. Their nearest rivals are the nucleic acids....The main function of proteins is to act as enzymes....In the protein molecule Nature has devised a unique instrument in which an underlying simplicity is used to express great subtlety and versatility; it is impossible to see molecular biology in proper perspective until this peculiar combination of virtues has been clearly (...)
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  39. A Female Contribution to Early Genetics: Tine Tammes and Mendel's Laws for Continuous Characters.Ida H. Stamhuis - 1995 - Journal of the History of Biology 28 (3):495-531.
  40. The Struggle of Genetics for Independence.Raphael Falk - 1995 - Journal of the History of Biology 28 (2):219-246.
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  41. How Unknown Was Mendel's Paper?Alexander Weinstein - 1977 - Journal of the History of Biology 10 (2):341-364.
  42. The Dominance of Traits in Genetic Analysis.Raphael Falk - 1991 - Journal of the History of Biology 24 (3):457-484.
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  43. Hugo de Vries and the Reception of The?Mutation Theory?Garland E. Allen - 1969 - Journal of the History of Biology 2 (1):55-87.
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  44. The Role of Liberty Hyde Bailey and Hugo de Vries in the Rediscovery of Mendelism.Conway Zirkle - 1968 - Journal of the History of Biology 1 (2):205-218.
    The almost simultaneous and overlapping discoveries of Mendel's forgotten work by Hugo de Vries, Carl Correns, and Erik von Tschermak gave rise to an intense rivalry, some jealousy, and more than a little illfeeling. De Vries, the first to announce the discovery, has been subjected to the charge that he wished to conceal his discovery and to obtain for himself the credit for having discovered what we now call Mendelism. This charge involves the statement that de Vries gave credit to (...)
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  45. Francis Galton's Contribution to Genetics.Ruth Schwartz Cowan - 1972 - Journal of the History of Biology 5 (2):389-412.
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  46. Opposition to the Mendelian-Chromosome Theory: The Physiological and Developmental Genetics of Richard Goldschmidt.Garland E. Allen - 1974 - Journal of the History of Biology 7 (1):49-92.
    We may now ask the question: In what historical perspective should we place the work of Richard Goldschmidt? There is no doubt that in the period 1910–1950 Goldschmidt was an important and prolific figure in the history of biology in general, and of genetics in particular. His textbook on physiological genetics, published in 1938, was an amazing compendium of ideas put forward in the previous half-century about how genes influence physiology and development. His earlier studies on the genetic and geographic (...)
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  47. The Long Neglect of Genetic Discoveries and the Criterion of Prematurity.Bentley Glass - 1974 - Journal of the History of Biology 7 (1):101-110.
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  48. Selling Pure Science in Wartime: The Biochemical Genetics of G. W. Beadle.LilyE Kay - 1989 - Journal of the History of Biology 22 (1):73 - 101.
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  49. Biology and Ideology From Descartes to Dawkins.Denis R. Alexander & Ronald L. Numbers (eds.) - 2010 - University of Chicago Press.
    Over the course of human history, the sciences, and biology in particular, have often been manipulated to cause immense human suffering. For example, biology has been used to justify eugenic programs, forced sterilization, human experimentation, and death camps—all in an attempt to support notions of racial superiority. By investigating the past, the contributors to _Biology and Ideology from Descartes to Dawkins_ hope to better prepare us to discern ideological abuse of science when it occurs in the future. Denis R. Alexander (...)
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  50. Genetics and Criminal Behavior.David Wasserman & Robert Wachbroit (eds.) - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this 2001 volume a group of leading philosophers address some of the basic conceptual, methodological and ethical issues raised by genetic research into criminal behavior. The essays explore the complexities of tracing any genetic influence on criminal, violent or antisocial behavior; the varieties of interpretations to which evidence of such influences is subject; and the relevance of such influences to the moral and legal appraisal of criminal conduct. The distinctive features of this collection are: first, that it advances public (...)
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