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  1. Ca2+ -Dependent Hyperpolarization Pathways in Sleep Homeostasis and Mental Disorders.Shoi Shi & Hiroki R. Ueda - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (1):1700105.
    Although we are beginning to understand the neuronal and biochemical nature of sleep regulation, questions remain about how sleep is homeostatically regulated. Beyond its importance in basic physiology, understanding sleep may also shed light on psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders. Recent genetic studies in mammals revealed several non-secretory proteins that determine sleep duration. Interestingly, genes identified in these studies are closely related to psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders, suggesting that the sleep-wake cycle shares some common mechanisms with these disorders. Here we review (...)
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  2. A Link Between Alzheimer's and Type II Diabetes Mellitus? Ca+2 -Mediated Signal Control and Protein Localization.Yuko Tsutsui & Franklin A. Hays - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (6):1700219.
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  3. Hunger and Satiety Signaling: Modeling Two Hypothalamomedullary Pathways for Energy Homeostasis.Kazuhiro Nakamura & Yoshiko Nakamura - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (8):1700252.
    The recent discovery of the medullary circuit driving “hunger responses” – reduced thermogenesis and promoted feeding – has greatly expanded our knowledge on the central neural networks for energy homeostasis. However, how hypothalamic hunger and satiety signals generated under fasted and fed conditions, respectively, control the medullary autonomic and somatic motor mechanisms remains unknown. Here, in reviewing this field, we propose two hypothalamomedullary neural pathways for hunger and satiety signaling. To trigger hunger signaling, neuropeptide Y activates a group of neurons (...)
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  4. How Polycomb‐Mediated Cell Memory Deals With a Changing Environment.Federica Marasca, Beatrice Bodega & Valerio Orlando - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (4):1700137.
    Cells and tissues are continuously exposed to a changing microenvironment, hence the necessity of a flexible modulation of gene expression that in complex organism have been achieved through specialized chromatin mechanisms. Chromatin-based cell memory enables cells to maintain their identity by fixing lineage specific transcriptional programs, ensuring their faithful transmission through cell division; in particular PcG-based memory system evolved to maintain the silenced state of developmental and cell cycle genes. In evolution the complexity of this system have increased, particularly in (...)
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  5. mRNA Traffic Control Reviewed: N6-Methyladenosine Takes the Driver's Seat.Abhirami Visvanathan & Kumaravel Somasundaram - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (1):1700093.
    Messenger RNA is a flexible tool box that plays a key role in the dynamic regulation of gene expression. RNA modifications variegate the message conveyed by the mRNA. Similar to DNA and histone modifications, mRNA modifications are reversible and play a key role in the regulation of molecular events. Our understanding about the landscape of RNA modifications is still rudimentary in contrast to DNA and histone modifications. The major obstacle has been the lack of sensitive detection methods since they are (...)
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  6. Data Science and Molecular Biology: Prediction and Mechanistic Explanation.Ezequiel López-Rubio & Emanuele Ratti - 2019 - Synthese:1-26.
    In the last few years, biologists and computer scientists have claimed that the introduction of data science techniques in molecular biology has changed the characteristics and the aims of typical outputs (i.e. models) of such a discipline. In this paper we will critically examine this claim. First, we identify the received view on models and their aims in molecular biology. Models in molecular biology are mechanistic and explanatory. Next, we identify the scope and aims of data science (machine learning in (...)
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  7. Das ELSI-Programm des U.S.-Amerikanischen Humangenomprojekts – Neue Perspektiven Für Die Medizinethik?The ELSI Program of the US-American Human Genome Project – New Perspectives for Medical Ethics?Nikola Biller-Andorno - 2001 - Ethik in der Medizin 13 (4):243-252.
    Definition of the problem: The ELSI (Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues) program of the Human Genome Project is the biggest bioethical research project to date. However, it has met with fairly critical reception. Arguments: ELSI is nevertheless an important element in current bioethics. We can learn not just from the results and methodology of the numerous studies that received ELSI funding, but also by looking at the pros and cons of its close institutional integration into the Human Genome Project. Finally, (...)
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  8. On the Origins of Symmetry and Modularity in the Proteasome Family.Adrian C. D. Fuchs & Marcus D. Hartmann - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (5):1800237.
    The proteasome family of proteases comprises oligomeric assemblies of very different symmetry. In different sizes, it features ring‐like oligomers with dihedral symmetry that allow the stacking of further rings of regulatory subunits as observed in the modular proteasome system, but also less symmetric helical assemblies. Comprehensive sequence and structural analyses of proteasome homologs reveal a parsimonious scenario of how symmetry may have emerged from a monomeric ancestral precursor and how it may have evolved throughout the proteasome family. The four characterized (...)
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  9. BioEssays 4∕2019.Ayelet Arbel‐Eden & Giora Simchen - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (4):1970041.
    In sexual organisms, haploid gametes are produced from diploid germ cells through meiosis. Chromosome reassortment and recombination generate ample genetic variation, augmented by newly arising mutations. Meiotic mutations are associated with recombination, initiated by DNA breakage, and may lead to faster evolution and sequence heterogeneity around recombination hotspots. More details can be found in the Review article 1800235 by Ayelet Arbel‐Eden and Giora Simchen, Elevated Mutagenicity in Meiosis and Its Mechanism, DOI: 10.1002/bies.201970041.
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  10. Elevated Mutagenicity in Meiosis and Its Mechanism.Ayelet Arbel‐Eden & Giora Simchen - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (4):1800235.
    Diploid germ cells produce haploid gametes through meiosis, a unique type of cell division. Independent reassortment of parental chromosomes and their recombination leads to ample genetic variability among the gametes. Importantly, new mutations also occur during meiosis, at frequencies much higher than during the mitotic cell cycles. These meiotic mutations are associated with genetic recombination and depend on double‐strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate crossing over. Indeed, sequence variation among related strains is greater around recombination hotspots than elsewhere in the genome, (...)
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  11. Impact of RNA–Protein Interaction Modes on Translation Control: The Versatile Multidomain Protein Gemin5.Rosario Francisco‐Velilla, Embarc‐Buh Azman & Encarnacion Martinez‐Salas - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (4):1800241.
    The fate of cellular RNAs is largely dependent on their structural conformation, which determines the assembly of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. Consequently, RNA‐binding proteins (RBPs) play a pivotal role in the lifespan of RNAs. The advent of highly sensitive in cellulo approaches for studying RNPs reveals the presence of unprecedented RNA‐binding domains (RBDs). Likewise, the diversity of the RNA targets associated with a given RBP increases the code of RNA–protein interactions. Increasing evidence highlights the biological relevance of RNA conformation for recognition (...)
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  12. Too Many False Targets for MicroRNAs: Challenges and Pitfalls in Prediction of miRNA Targets and Their Gene Ontology in Model and Non‐Model Organisms.Arie Fridrich, Yael Hazan & Yehu Moran - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (4):1800169.
    Short (“seed”) or extended base pairing between microRNAs (miRNAs) and their target RNAs enables post‐transcriptional silencing in many organisms. These interactions allow the computational prediction of potential targets. In model organisms, predicted targets are frequently validated experimentally; hence meaningful miRNA‐regulated processes are reported. However, in non‐models, these reports mostly rely on computational prediction alone. Many times, further bioinformatic analyses such as Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment are based on these in silico projections. Here such approaches are reviewed, their caveats are highlighted (...)
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  13. Extracellular Vesicles From Mesenchymal Stem Cells Exert Pleiotropic Effects on Amyloid‐Β, Inflammation, and Regeneration: A Spark of Hope for Alzheimer's Disease From Tiny Structures?Chiara A. Elia, Morris Losurdo, Maria L. Malosio & Silvia Coco - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (4):1800199.
    No cure yet exists for devastating Alzheimer's disease (AD), despite many years and humongous efforts to find efficacious pharmacological treatments. So far, neither designing drugs to disaggregate amyloid plaques nor tackling solely inflammation turned out to be decisive. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and, in particular, extracellular vesicles (EVs) originating from them could be proposed as an alternative, strategic approach to attack the pathology. Indeed, MSC‐EVs—owing to their ability to deliver lipids/proteins/enzymes/microRNAs endowed with anti‐inflammatory, amyloid‐β degrading, and neurotrophic activities—may be exploited (...)
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  14. Stress‐Induced Evolutionary Innovation: A Mechanism for the Origin of Cell Types.Günter P. Wagner, Eric M. Erkenbrack & Alan C. Love - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (4):1800188.
    Understanding the evolutionary role of environmentally induced phenotypic variation (i.e., plasticity) is an important issue in developmental evolution. A major physiological response to environmental change is cellular stress, which is counteracted by generic stress reactions detoxifying the cell. A model, stress‐induced evolutionary innovation (SIEI), whereby ancestral stress reactions and their corresponding pathways can be transformed into novel structural components of body plans, such as new cell types, is described. Previous findings suggest that the cell differentiation cascade of a cell type (...)
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  15. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription‐Associated Genome Instability.Zivkos Apostolou, Georgia Chatzinikolaou, Kalliopi Stratigi & George A. Garinis - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (4):1800201.
    Transcription is a potential threat to genome integrity, and transcription‐associated DNA damage must be repaired for proper messenger RNA (mRNA) synthesis and for cells to transmit their genome intact into progeny. For a wide range of structurally diverse DNA lesions, cells employ the highly conserved nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway to restore their genome back to its native form. Recent evidence suggests that NER factors function, in addition to the canonical DNA repair mechanism, in processes that facilitate mRNA synthesis or (...)
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  16. Code Biology, Peircean Biosemiotics, and Rosen’s Relational Biology.Marcello Barbieri - 2019 - Biological Theory 14 (1):21-29.
    The classical theories of the genetic code claimed that its coding rules were determined by chemistry—either by stereochemical affinities or by metabolic reactions—but the experimental evidence has revealed a totally different reality: it has shown that any codon can be associated with any amino acid, thus proving that there is no necessary link between them. The rules of the genetic code, in other words, obey the laws of physics and chemistry but are not determined by them. They are arbitrary, or (...)
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  17. Isolability as the Unifying Feature of Modularity.Lucas J. Matthews - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (2):20.
    Although the concept of modularity is pervasive across fields and disciplines, philosophers and scientists use the term in a variety of different ways. This paper identifies two distinct ways of thinking about modularity, and considers what makes them similar and different. For philosophers of mind and cognitive science, cognitive modularity helps explain the capacities of brains to process sundry and distinct kinds of informational input. For philosophy of biology and evolutionary science, biological modularity helps explain the capacity of random evolutionary (...)
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  18. Ribosomal Proteins Control Tumor Suppressor Pathways in Response to Nucleolar Stress.Frédéric Lessard, Léa Brakier‐Gingras & Gerardo Ferbeyre - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (3):1800183.
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  19. Coordination of Timers and Sensors in Cell Signaling.Junbin Qian, Lendert Gelens & Mathieu Bollen - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (3):1800217.
    Timers and sensors are common devices that make our daily life safer, more convenient, and more efficient. In a cellular context, they arguably play an even more crucial role as they ensure the survival of cells in the presence of various extrinsic and intrinsic stresses. Biological timers and sensors generate distinct signaling profiles, enabling them to produce different types of cellular responses. Recent data suggest that they can work together to guarantee correct timing and responsiveness. By exploring examples of cellular (...)
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  20. Back From the Brink: Retrieval of Membrane Proteins From Terminal Compartments.Matthew N. J. Seaman - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (3):1800146.
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  21. Microtubule Plus End Dynamics − Do We Know How Microtubules Grow?Jeffrey van Haren & Torsten Wittmann - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (3):1800194.
    Microtubules form a highly dynamic filament network in all eukaryotic cells. Individual microtubules grow by tubulin dimer subunit addition and frequently switch between phases of growth and shortening. These unique dynamics are powered by GTP hydrolysis and drive microtubule network remodeling, which is central to eukaryotic cell biology and morphogenesis. Yet, our knowledge of the molecular events at growing microtubule ends remains incomplete. Here, recent ultrastructural, biochemical and cell biological data are integrated to develop a realistic model of growing microtubule (...)
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  22. Recurrent Noncoding Mutations in Skin Cancers: UV Damage Susceptibility or Repair Inhibition as Primary Driver?Steven A. Roberts, Alexander J. Brown & John J. Wyrick - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (3):1800152.
    Somatic mutations arising in human skin cancers are heterogeneously distributed across the genome, meaning that certain genomic regions (e.g., heterochromatin or transcription factor binding sites) have much higher mutation densities than others. Regional variations in mutation rates are typically not a consequence of selection, as the vast majority of somatic mutations in skin cancers are passenger mutations that do not promote cell growth or transformation. Instead, variations in DNA repair activity, due to chromatin organization and transcription factor binding, have been (...)
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  23. Targeted Proteomics Comes to the Benchside and the Bedside: Is It Ready for Us?Anjali Arora & Kumaravel Somasundaram - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (2):1800042.
    While mass spectrometry (MS)‐based quantification of small molecules has been successfully used for decades, targeted MS has only recently been used by the proteomics community to investigate clinical questions such as biomarker verification and validation. Targeted MS holds the promise of a paradigm shift in the quantitative determination of proteins. Nevertheless, targeted quantitative proteomics requires improvisation in making sample processing, instruments, and data analysis more accessible. In the backdrop of the genomic era reaching its zenith, certain questions arise: is the (...)
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  24. Natural History Collections as Inspiration for Technology.David W. Green, Jolanta A. Watson, Han‐Sung Jung & Gregory S. Watson - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (2):1700238.
    Living organisms are the ultimate survivalists, having evolved phenotypes with unprecedented adaptability, ingenuity, resourcefulness, and versatility compared to human technology. To harness these properties, functional descriptions and design principles from all sources of biodiversity information must be collated − including the hundreds of thousands of possible survival features manifest in natural history museum collections, which represent 12% of total global biodiversity. This requires a consortium of expert biologists from a range of disciplines to convert the observations, data, and hypotheses into (...)
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  25. RNA Binding Proteins as Regulators of Retrotransposon‐Induced Exonization.John LaCava - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (2):1800263.
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  26. Genomic Accumulation of Retrotransposons Was Facilitated by Repressive RNA‐Binding Proteins: A Hypothesis.Jan Attig & Jernej Ule - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (2):1800132.
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  27. Moving Past the Levels of Selection Debates.Stephen M. Downes - 2009 - Biology and Philosophy 24 (5):703-709.
  28. Lamarckian or Not, CRISPR-Cas is an Elaborate Engine of Directed Evolution.Eugene V. Koonin - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (1):17.
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  29. Philosophy of CRISPR-Cas: Introduction to Eugene Koonin’s Target Paper and Commentaries.Thomas Pradeu - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (1):16.
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  30. CRISPR-Cas Changing Biology?Janella Baxter - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (1):15.
    Eugene V. Koonin argues that fundamental research of CRISPR-Cas mechanisms has illuminated “fundamental principles of genome manipulation.” Koonin's discussion provides important philosophical insights for how we should understand the significance of CRISPR-Cas systems. Yet the analysis he provides is only part of a larger story. There is also a human element to the CRISPR-Cas story that concerns its development as a technology. Accounting for this part of CRISPR's history reveals that the story Koonin provides requires greater nuance. I'll show how (...)
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  31. Lamarckian Realities: The CRISPR-Cas System and Beyond.Eva Jablonka - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (1):14.
    In his target article, Koonin discusses the insights into the evolution of bacterial genomes provided by the CRISPR-Cas system. This evolved defense system is based on intrinsic processes of genome engineering which, as he argues, enable Lamarckian inheritance. In this commentary I discuss some historical and conceptual issues that pertain to Koonin’s analysis of this aspect of the CRISPR-Cas system, extending and qualifying his discussion.
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  32. Mutationism, Not Lamarckism, Captures the Novelty of CRISPR–Cas.Jeremy G. Wideman, S. Andrew Inkpen, W. Ford Doolittle & Rosemary J. Redfield - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (1):12.
    Koonin, in an article in this issue, claims that CRISPR–Cas systems are mechanisms for the inheritance of acquired adaptive characteristics, and that the operation of such systems comprises a “Lamarckian mode of evolution.” We argue that viewing the CRISPR–Cas mechanism as facilitating a form of “directed mutation” more accurately represents how the system behaves and the history of neoDarwinian thinking, and is to be preferred.
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  33. Striving for Clarity About the “Lamarckian” Nature of CRISPR-Cas Systems.Sam Woolley, Emily C. Parke, David Kelley, Anthony M. Poole & Austen R. D. Ganley - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (1):11.
    Koonin argues that CRISPR-Cas systems present the best-known case in point for Lamarckian evolution because they satisfy his proposed criteria for the specific inheritance of acquired adaptive characteristics. We see two interrelated issues with Koonin’s characterization of CRISPR-Cas systems as Lamarckian. First, at times he appears to confuse an account of the CRISPR-Cas system with an account of the mechanism it employs. We argue there is no evidence for the CRISPR-Cas system being “Lamarckian” in any sense. Second, it is unclear (...)
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  34. CRISPR: A New Principle of Genome Engineering Linked to Conceptual Shifts in Evolutionary Biology.Eugene V. Koonin - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (1):9.
    The CRISPR-Cas systems of bacterial and archaeal adaptive immunity have become a household name among biologists and even the general public thanks to the unprecedented success of the new generation of genome editing tools utilizing Cas proteins. However, the fundamental biological features of CRISPR-Cas are of no lesser interest and have major impacts on our understanding of the evolution of antivirus defense, host-parasite coevolution, self versus non-self discrimination and mechanisms of adaptation. CRISPR-Cas systems present the best known case in point (...)
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  35. Book Review: Coping with Methuselah: The Impact of Molecular Biology on Medicine and Society.Hugh Long - 2004 - Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing 41 (4):470-471.
  36. Book Review: Coping with Methuselah: The Impact of Molecular Biology on Medicine and Society.Hugh Long - 2004 - Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing 41 (4):470-471.
  37. The LKB1‐AMPK and mTORC1 Metabolic Signaling Networks in Schwann Cells Control Axon Integrity and Myelination.Bogdan Beirowski - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (1):1800075.
    The Liver kinase B1 with its downstream target AMP activated protein kinase (LKB1‐AMPK), and the key nutrient sensor mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) form two signaling systems that coordinate metabolic and cellular activity with changes in the environment in order to preserve homeostasis. For example, nutritional fluctuations rapidly feed back on these signaling systems and thereby affect cell‐specific functions. Recent studies have started to reveal important roles of these strategic metabolic regulators in Schwann cells for the trophic support (...)
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  38. HIV Disease Progression: Overexpression of the Ectoenzyme CD38 as a Contributory Factor?Juan C. Rodríguez‐Alba, Amayrani Abrego‐Peredo, Carlos Gallardo‐Hernández, Jocelyn Pérez‐Lara, Wendolaine Santiago‐Cruz, Wei Jiang & Enrique Espinosa - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (1).
    Despite abundant evidence associating CD38 overexpression and CD4 T cell depletion in HIV infection, no causal relation has been investigated. To address this issue, a series of mechanisms are proposed, supported by evidence from different fields, by which CD38 overexpression can facilitate CD4 T cell depletion in HIV infection. According to this model, increased catalytic activity of CD38 may reduce CD4 T cells’ cytoplasmic nicotin‐amide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), leading to a chronic Warburg effect. This will reduce mitochondrial function. Simultaneously, CD38's (...)
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  39. Chromatin Stability as a Target for Cancer Treatment.Katerina V. Gurova - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (1):1800141.
    In this essay, I propose that DNA‐binding anti‐cancer drugs work more via chromatin disruption than DNA damage. Success of long‐awaited drugs targeting cancer‐specific drivers is limited by the heterogeneity of tumors. Therefore, chemotherapy acting via universal targets (e.g., DNA) is still the mainstream treatment for cancer. Nevertheless, the problem with targeting DNA is insufficient efficacy due to high toxicity. I propose that this problem stems from the presumption that DNA damage is critical for the anti‐cancer activity of these drugs. DNA (...)
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  40. Can All Major Ros Forming Sites of the Respiratory Chain Be Activated by High FADH2/NADH Ratios?Peter Schönfeld - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (1):1800225.
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  41. Are SMC Complexes Loop Extruding Factors? Linking Theory With Fact.Jonathan Baxter, Antony W. Oliver & Stephanie A. Schalbetter - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (1):1800182.
    The extreme length of chromosomal DNA requires organizing mechanisms to both promote functional genetic interactions and ensure faithful chromosome segregation when cells divide. Microscopy and genome‐wide contact frequency analyses indicate that intra‐chromosomal looping of DNA is a primary pathway of chromosomal organization during all stages of the cell cycle. DNA loop extrusion has emerged as a unifying model for how chromosome loops are formed in cis in different genomic contexts and cell cycle stages. The highly conserved family of SMC complexes (...)
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  42. Cura“X”Ing Cancer and Beyond.Vassilis G. Gorgoulis & Athanassios Kotsinas - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (1):1800223.
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  43. Phase Separation and Transcription Regulation: Are Super‐Enhancers and Locus Control Regions Primary Sites of Transcription Complex Assembly?Aishwarya Gurumurthy, Yong Shen, Eliot M. Gunn & Jörg Bungert - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (1):1800164.
    It is proposed that the multiple enhancer elements associated with locus control regions and super‐enhancers recruit RNA polymerase II and efficiently assemble elongation competent transcription complexes that are transferred to target genes by transcription termination and transient looping mechanisms. It is well established that transcription complexes are recruited not only to promoters but also to enhancers, where they generate enhancer RNAs. Transcription at enhancers is unstable and frequently aborted. Furthermore, the Integrator and WD‐domain containing protein 82 mediate transcription termination at (...)
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  44. A Perspective on the Potential Utility of a Viscosupplement Multifunctional Biotherapeutic.James Melrose - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (1):1800215.
  45. Proteoglycan 4: From Mere Lubricant to Regulator of Tissue Homeostasis and Inflammation.Nabangshu Das, Tannin A. Schmidt, Roman J. Krawetz & Antoine Dufour - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (1):1800166.
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  46. Multidrug Therapy for HIV Infection: Dynamics of Immune System.Deepmala Kamboj & M. D. Sharma - 2019 - Acta Biotheoretica 67 (2):129-147.
    A mathematical model of the dynamics of the immune system is considered to illustrate the effect of its response to HIV infection, i.e. on viral growth and on T-cell dynamics. The specific immune response is measured by the levels of cytotoxic lymphocytes in a human body. The existence and stability analyses are performed for infected steady state and uninfected steady state. In order to keep infection under control, roles of drug therapies are analyzed in the presence of efficient immune response. (...)
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  47. Whose Turn? Chromosome Research and the Study of the Human Genome.Soraya de Chadarevian - 2018 - Journal of the History of Biology 51 (4):631-655.
    A common account sees the human genome sequencing project of the 1990s as a “natural outgrowth” of the deciphering of the double helical structure of DNA in the 1950s. The essay aims to complicate this neat narrative by putting the spotlight on the field of human chromosome research that flourished at the same time as molecular biology. It suggests that we need to consider both endeavors – the human cytogeneticists who collected samples and looked down the microscope and the molecular (...)
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  48. Stephen Hilgartner, Reordering Life: Knowledge and Control in the Genomics Revolution , 368 pp., $35.00 Hardcover ISBN: 9780262035866. [REVIEW]Robin Wolfe Scheffler - 2018 - Journal of the History of Biology 51 (4):879-881.
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  49. External Noise and External Signal Induced Transition of Gene Switch and Coherence Resonance in the Genetic Regulatory System.Chu-Sheng Huang, Tao Dong, Min Luo & Jian-Cheng Shi - 2017 - Acta Biotheoretica 65 (2):135-150.
    The transition of gene switch induced by external noises and external signals is investigated in the genetic regulatory system. Results show that the state-to-state transition of gene switch as well as resonant behaviors, such as the explicit coherence resonance, implicit coherence resonance and control parameter coherence biresonance, can appear when noises are injected into the genetic regulatory system. The ECR is increased with the increase of the control parameter value when starting from the supercritical Hopf bifurcation parameter point, and there (...)
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  50. The Poitiers School of Mathematical and Theoretical Biology: Besson–Gavaudan–Schützenberger’s Conjectures on Genetic Code and RNA Structures.Alain Miranville, Rémy Guillevin, Jean-Pierre Françoise & Hermine Biermé - 2016 - Acta Biotheoretica 64 (4):403-426.
    The French school of theoretical biology has been mainly initiated in Poitiers during the sixties by scientists like J. Besson, G. Bouligand, P. Gavaudan, M. P. Schützenberger and R. Thom, launching many new research domains on the fractal dimension, the combinatorial properties of the genetic code and related amino-acids as well as on the genetic regulation of the biological processes. Presently, the biological science knows that RNA molecules are often involved in the regulation of complex genetic networks as effectors, e.g., (...)
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