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  1. Imagery in action. G. H. Mead’s contribution to sensorimotor enactivism.Guido Baggio - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-21.
    The aim of the article is to outline several valuable elements of Mead’s pragmatist theory of perception in action developed in his The Philosophy of the Act, in order to strengthen the pragmatist legacy of the enactivist approach. In particular, Mead’s theory of perception in action turns out to be a forerunner of sensorimotor enactivist theory. Unlike the latter, however, Mead explicitly refers to imagery as an essential capacity for agency. Nonetheless, the article argues that the ways in which Mead (...)
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  2. George H. Mead and Luigi Pirandello: Some Parallels Between the Theoretical and Artistic Presentation of the Social Role Concept.Bed̆ich Baumann - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
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  3. The Past is Not What It Used to Be: An Introduction to GH Mead's Radical Emergentism.J. Goldstein - forthcoming - Emergence: Complexity and Organization.
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  4. Sociality and Act in George Herbert Mead.Edward Stevens - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
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  5. Temporality and Role-Taking in GH Mead.Mary Katherine Tillman - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
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  6. Pragmatism's Evolution: Organism and Environment in American Philosophy.Trevor Pearce - 2020 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    In Pragmatism’s Evolution, Trevor Pearce demonstrates that the philosophical tradition of pragmatism owes an enormous debt to specific biological debates in the late 1800s, especially those concerning the role of the environment in development and evolution. Many are familiar with John Dewey’s 1909 assertion that evolutionary ideas overturned two thousand years of philosophy—but what exactly happened in the fifty years prior to Dewey’s claim? What form did evolutionary ideas take? When and how were they received by American philosophers? Although the (...)
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  7. Core Aspects of Dance: Condillac and Mead on Gesture.Joshua M. Hall - 2017 - Dance Chronicle 36 (1):352-371.
    This essay—part of a larger project of constructing a new, historically informed philosophy of dance, built on four phenomenological constructs that I call “Moves”—concerns the second Move, “gesture,” the etymology of which reveals its close connection to the Greek word “metaphor.” More specifically, I examine the treatments of gesture by the philosophers George Herbert Mead and Etienne Bonnot de Condillac, both of whom view it as the foundation of language. I conclude by showing how gesture can be used in analyzing (...)
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  8. Peirce on Perception and Reasoning: From Icons to Logic.Kathleen A. Hull & Richard Kenneth Atkins (eds.) - 2017 - New York, USA: Routledge.
    The founder of both American pragmatism and semiotics, Charles Sanders Peirce is widely regarded as an enormously important and pioneering theorist. In this book, scholars from around the world examine the nature and significance of Peirce’s work on perception, iconicity, and diagrammatic thinking. Abjuring any strict dichotomy between presentational and representational mental activity, Peirce’s theories transform the Aristotelian, Humean, and Kantian paradigms that continue to hold sway today and, in so doing, forge a new path for understanding the centrality of (...)
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  9. Mead and Husserl on the Self and Identification of the Subject.Alexei Krioukov - 2017 - Vestnik SPbSU. Philosophy and Conflict Studies 33 (4):477-489.
  10. Peirce, Mead, and the Theory of Extended Mind.Rossella Fabbrichesi - 2016 - The Commens Encyclopedia: The Digital Encyclopedia of Peirce Studies.
    In 1998, Clark and Chalmers addressed a question that remained pivotal in the discussion afterwards: “Where does the mind stop and the rest of the world begin?” Their inquiry, developed by many others, led to a questioning of the idea of the mind as a thing – a simple res cogitans – with a precise localization. I will discuss their theses, trying to show that the views of the pragmatists can provide us with a different scenario. For example, Peirce doesn’t (...)
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  11. Naturalism and Despair: George Herbert Mead and Evolution in the 1880s.Trevor Pearce - 2016 - In Hans Joas & Daniel R. Huebner (eds.), The Timeliness of George Herbert Mead. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. pp. 117-143.
    Trevor Pearce examines Mead’s early intellectual development and shows in detail how difficult it was for a young Christian at the time to integrate Darwin into his worldview. Pearce explores the deep existential crisis that resulted from these difficulties. Based on new and newly reevaluated biographical material, Pearce traces the development of Mead’s views through his years in college, in a longer phase of existential reorientation, and as a student of philosophy and psychology. Pearce also shows how Mead’s education with (...)
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  12. Extended Mind and Representation.F. Thomas Burke - 2014 - In John R. Shook & Tibor Solymosi (eds.), Pragmatist Neurophilosophy: American Philosophy and the Brain. Bloomsbury Academic. pp. 177-202.
    Good old-fashioned cognitive science characterizes human thinking as symbol manipulation qua computation and therefore emphasizes the processing of symbolic representations as a necessary if not sufficient condition for “general intelligent action.” Recent alternative conceptions of human thinking tend to deemphasize if not altogether eschew the notion of representation. The present paper shows how classical American pragmatist conceptions of human thinking can successfully avoid either of these extremes, replacing old-fashioned conceptions of representation with one that characterizes both representatum and representans in (...)
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  13. Becoming Mead: The Social Process of Academic Knowledge.Daniel R. Huebner - 2014 - University of Chicago Press.
    In short, he is known in a discipline in which he did not teach for a book he did not write. In Becoming Mead, Daniel R. Huebner traces the ways in which knowledge has been produced by and about the famed American philosopher.
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  14. Mead and Bergson on Inner States, Self-Knowledge, and Expression.Guido Baggio - 2013 - In F. Thomas Burke & Krzysztof Piotr Skowronski (eds.), George Herbert Mead in the Twenty-First Century. Lexington Press. pp. 71.
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  15. George Herbert Mead in the Twenty-First Century.F. Thomas Burke & Krzysztof Skowronski (eds.) - 2013 - Lexington Press.
    This volume is composed of extended versions of selected papers presented at an international conference held in June 2011 at Opole University—the seventh in a series of annual American and European Values conferences organized by the Institute of Philosophy, Opole University, Poland. The papers were written independently with no prior guidelines other than the obvious need to address some aspect of George Herbert Mead’s work. While rooted in careful study of Mead’s original writings and transcribed lectures and the historical context (...)
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  16. Mead's Understanding of Movements of Thought.James Campbell - 2013 - In F. Thomas Burke & Krzysztof Piotr Skowronski (eds.), George Herbert Mead in the Twenty-First Century. Lexington Press. pp. 21.
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  17. Resolving Two Key Problems in Mead's Mind, Self and Society.Gary A. Cook - 2013 - In F. Thomas Burke & Krzysztof Piotr Skowronski (eds.), George Herbert Mead in the Twenty-First Century. Lexington Press. pp. 95.
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  18. The Self as a Center of Ethical Gravity: A Constructive Dialogue Between Søren Kierkegaard and George Herbert Mead.Christian Hjortkjær & Søren Willert - 2013 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2013 (1):451-472.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook Jahrgang: 2013 Heft: 1 Seiten: 451-472.
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  19. George H. Mead as an Empirically Responsible Philosopher: The “Philosophy of the Act” Reconsidered.Erkki Kilpinen - 2013 - In F. Thomas Burke & Krzysztof Piotr Skowronski (eds.), George Herbert Mead in the Twenty-First Century. Lexington Press. pp. 3.
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  20. The Concept of Rule-Following in the Philosophy of George Herbert Mead.Roman Madzia - 2013 - In F. Thomas Burke & Krzysztof Piotr Skowronski (eds.), George Herbert Mead in the Twenty-First Century. Lexington Press. pp. 61.
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  21. Games People Play. George Herbert Mead's Concept of Game and Play in a Contemporary Context.Núria Sara Miras Boronat - 2013 - In T. Burke & K. Skwronski (eds.). Lexington Books. pp. 163-171.
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  22. Mead's Interpretation of Relativity Theory.Jake E. Stone - 2013 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (2):153-171.
    Scholars who engage with texts that were written by George Herbert Mead (e.g., 1925e.g., 1926e.g., 1929e.g., 1932e.g., 1938) in the latter half of the 1920s are faced with the task of comprehending Mead’s interpretation of relativity theory and also understanding why relativity theory was considered by Mead to have such profound implications for his own philosophy. As several scholars of Mead’s work have explained (e.g., Joas 1997; Martin 2007; Rosenthal and Bourgeois 1991), Mead was a realist. Mead opposed psychophysical dualism (...)
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  23. G.H. Mead's Understanding of the Nature of Speech in the Light of Contemporary Research.Timothy J. Gallagher - 2012 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 42 (1):40-62.
    The following analysis demonstrates that G.H. Mead's understanding of human speech is remarkably consistent with today's interdisciplinary field that studies speech as a natural behavior with an evolutionary history. Mead seems to have captured major empirical and theoretical insights more than half a century before the contemporary field began to take shape. In that field the framework known as “Tinbergen's Four Questions,” developed in ecology to study naturally occurring behavior in nonhuman animals, has been an effective organizing framework for research (...)
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  24. G.H. Mead: A Reader.George Herbert Mead - 2011 - Routledge.
    Mead is an exceptional case amongst sociological classics in that, until now, there has been no comprehensive reader of his work. As the first one-volume, comprehensive edited collection of Mead’s published and unpublished writing, this book fills this gap. It is the first to critically assess all of Mead's writings and draw out the aspects that are central to his system of thought. The book is divided into three parts (social psychology, science and epistemology, and democratic politics), comprising a total (...)
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  25. G.George Herbert Mead - 2011 - Routledge.
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  26. School and Democracy. A Reassessment of G. H. Mead’s Educational Ideas.Filipe da Silva - 2010 - Etica E Politica 12 (1):181-194.
    In this paper I wish to provide a re-examination of G. H. Mead’s educational ideas and their radical democratic import. Drawing on both published and unpublished materials, I discuss how Mead applies his social psychological insights to a number of educational matters. In particular, I will focus on the relation between the family and the school, the role model performed by the problem-solving attitude of experimental science for teaching activities, the relation between the school and the industrial world, the importance (...)
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  27. Self, War, and Society: George Herbert Mead's Macrosociology. By Mary Jo Deegan.James Campbell - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (5):710-719.
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  28. Transforming Ren : The De of George Herbert Mead’s Social Self.Heather E. Keith - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (1):69-84.
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  29. Self and Society: Central European Pragmatist Forum, Volume Four.Alexander Kremer & John Ryder (eds.) - 2009 - Rodopi.
    This book is the fourth volume of selected papers from the Central European Pragmatist Forum . It deals with the general question of self and society, and the papers are organized into sections on Self and History, Self and Society, Self and Politics, Self and Neopragmatism, and an Interview with Richard Rorty. The authors are among the leading specialists in American philosophy from universities across the US and in Central and Eastern Europe.
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  30. George Herbert Mead.Mitchell Aboulafia - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    George Herbert Mead (1863-1931), American philosopher and social theorist, is often classed with William James, Charles Sanders Peirce, and John Dewey as one of the most significant figures in classical American pragmatism. Dewey referred to Mead as “a seminal mind of the very first order” (Dewey, 1932, xl). Yet by the middle of the twentieth-century, Mead's prestige was greatest outside of professional philosophical circles. He is considered by many to be the father of the school of Symbolic Interactionism in sociology (...)
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  31. (Anti)Realist Implications of a Pragmatist Dual-Process Active-Externalist Theory of Experience.F. Thomas Burke - 2008 - Philosophia Scientiae 12 (1):187-211.
    Realism/antirealism issues are considered in light of a pragmatist dual-process active-externalist theory of experience. This theory posits two kinds of experience such that mentality (as a capacity for thinking, hypothesizing, theorizing, reasoning, deliberating) constitutes one of the two kinds of experience. The formal correspondence of theory with facts is characterized in terms of a functional correspondence between these two kinds of experience. Realist and constructivist aspects of this view are then discussed. Active externalism guarantees a kind of ecological realism that (...)
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  32. Individual and Sociality in Science: G.H. Mead's “Social Realism”: Indivíduo E Socialidade Na Ciência: O “Realismo Social” de G.H. Mead. [REVIEW]Rosa Calcaterra - 2008 - Cognitio 9 (1).
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  33. Mead and Modernity: Science, Selfhood, and Democratic Politics.Filipe Carreira da Silva - 2008 - Lexington Books.
    Mead and Modernity is one of the most detailed and ambitiously conceived studies of G. H. Mead's work to appear in years. Filipe Carreira da Silva addresses the basic questions "How should we read Mead?" and "Why should we read Mead today?" by showing that the history of ideas and theory-building are closely related endeavors. Mead and Modernity is a methodological innovation with sweeping theoretical implications.
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  34. Mead and Modernity: Science, Selfhood, and Democratic Politics.Filipe Carreira da Silva - 2008 - Lexington Books.
    Mead and Modernity is one of the most detailed and ambitiously conceived studies of G. H. Mead's work to appear in years. Filipe Carreira da Silva addresses the basic questions 'How should we read Mead?' and 'Why should we read Mead today?' by showing that the history of ideas and theory-building are closely related endeavors. Mead and Modernity is a methodological innovation with sweeping theoretical implications.
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  35. A Pragmatist World View: George Herbert Mead's Philosophy of the Act.Cornelis De Waal - 2008 - In Cheryl Misak (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of American Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This article focuses on George Herbert Mead's life and his philosophy of the act. Mead divides the act into four stages: impulse, perception, manipulation, and consummation. The impulse sets the organism in motion, whereas consummation marks the satisfaction of the desire that initiated the act. Hence, consummation brings the act to a close. This should not be taken as a linear chain of responses to neatly self-contained problematic situations. Organisms often multitask, and problematic situations are typically nested, as when an (...)
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  36. The Evolution of the Psychical Element: George Herbert Mead at the University of Chicago: Lecture Notes by H. Heath Bawden 1899–1900: Introduction. [REVIEW]Kevin S. Decker - 2008 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (3):pp. 469-479.
    George Herbert Mead's early lectures at the University of Chicago are more important to understanding the genesis of his views in social psychology than some commentators, such as Hans Joas, have emphasized. Mead's lecture series "The Evolution of the Psychical Element," preserved through the notes of student H. Heath Bawden, demonstrate his devotion to Hegelianism as a method of thinking and how this influenced his non-reductionistic approach to functional psychology. In addition, Mead's breadth of historical knowledge as well as his (...)
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  37. The Foundation of an Interpretative Sociology: A Critical Review of the Attempts of George H. Mead and Alfred Schutz.Christian Etzrodt - 2008 - Human Studies 31 (2):157-177.
    George H. Mead and Alfred Schutz proposed foundations for an interpretative sociology from opposite standpoints. Mead accepted the objective meaning structure a priori. His problem became therefore the explanation of the individuality and creativity of human actors in his social behavioristic approach. In contrast, Schutz started from the subjective consciousness of an isolated actor as a result of a phenomenological reduction. He was concerned with the problem of explaining the possibility of this isolated actor’s perceiving other actors in their existence, (...)
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  38. Mead and the International Mind.Marilyn Fischer - 2008 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (3):pp. 508-531.
    In this paper I analyze the conceptions of internationalism and the international mind that Mead uses in "The Psychological Bases of Internationalism" (1915); in his 1917 Chicago Herald columns defending U.S. entry into the war; in Mind, Self, and Society (1934); and in "National Mindedness and International Mindedness" (1929). I show how the terms "internationalism" and "the international mind" arose within conversations among some Anglo-American thinkers. While Mead employs these terms in his own philosophical and sociological theorizing, he draws their (...)
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  39. The Intellectual Legacy of George Herbert Mead.Jason Hannan - 2008 - Intellectual History Review 18 (2):207-224.
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  40. A Pragmatist World View: George Herbert Mead's Philosophy.Luigi Pirandello - 2008 - In C. J. Misak (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of American Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  41. Radical Interactionism: Going Beyond Mead.Lonnie Athens - 2007 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (2):137–165.
    George Herbert Mead argues that human society is comprised of six basic institutions—language, family, economics, religion, polity, and science. I do not believe that he can be criticized for making institutions the cornerstones of a society, but he can definitely be criticized for his explanation of how our basic institutions originate, how these institutions operate in society after their inception, and how they later change, modifying society in the process. The problem with Mead's explanation of these three critical matters is (...)
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  42. The Roman Steps to the Temple: An Examination of the Influence of Robert Southwell, SJ, Upon George Herbert.Gary M. Bouchard - 2007 - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España] 10 (3).
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  43. I-SELF: A Connectionist Model of the Self or Just a General Learing Model? Comment on "Connectionism and Self: James, Mead, and the Stream of Enculturated Consciousness" by Kashima Et Al.Bettina Hannover & Ulrich Kühnen - 2007 - Psychological Inquiry 18 (2):102-107.
  44. Communication.Brendan Hogan - 2007 - In John Lachs Robert Talisse (ed.), American Philosophy: an encyclopedia. Routledge.
    This encyclopedia article traces the concept of communication from the classical pragmatists to contemporary philosophers association with pragmatism. Special emphasis on Peirce, Mead, Dewey, and Habermas.
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  45. Connectionism and Self: James, Mead, and the Stream of Enculturated Consciousness.Yoshihisa Kashima, Aparna Kanakatte Gurumurthy, Lucette Ouschan, Trevor Chong & Jason Mattingley - 2007 - Psychological Inquiry 18 (2):73-96.
  46. The Potential and the Actual: Mead, Honneth, and the 'I'.Patchen Markell - 2007 - In Bert van den Brink & David Owen (eds.), Recognition and Power: Axel Honneth and the Tradition of Critical Social Theory. Cambridge University Press. pp. 100--132.
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  47. Educating Communal Agents: Building on the Perspectivism of G.H. Mead.Jack Martin - 2007 - Educational Theory 57 (4):435-452.
    In their search for more communal forms of agency that might guide education, contemporary educational psychologists have mostly neglected the theorizing of George Herbert Mead. In this essay, Jack Martin aims to remedy such oversight by interpreting Mead’s social‐psychological and educational theorizing of selfhood and agency through the lenses of the perspectival realism Mead developed in the last decade of his life. This interpretation understands education as concerned with the cultivation and coordination of cultural, societal, interpersonal, and personal perspectives. Within (...)
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  48. Expressivism and Mead's Social Self.Mitchell Aboulafia - 2006 - In John R. Shook & Joseph Margolis (eds.), A Companion to Pragmatism. Blackwell.
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  49. George H. Mead.Gary A. Cook - 2006 - In John R. Shook & Joseph Margolis (eds.), A Companion to Pragmatism. Blackwell.
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  50. Mead, George Herbert (1863-1931).W. Desmonde - 2006 - In D. Borchert (ed.), Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Macmillan Reference.
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