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  1. George Herbert Mead.E. S. A. - 1931 - The Monist 41 (3):471-471.
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  2. The Social Psychology of George Herbert Mead. [REVIEW]R. A. - 1956 - Review of Metaphysics 9 (4):707-707.
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  3. George Herbert Mead.Mitchell Aboulafia - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    George Herbert Mead (1863-1931), American philosopher and social theorist, is often classed with William James, Charles Sanders Peirce, and John Dewey as one of the most significant figures in classical American pragmatism. Dewey referred to Mead as “a seminal mind of the very first order” (Dewey, 1932, xl). Yet by the middle of the twentieth-century, Mead's prestige was greatest outside of professional philosophical circles. He is considered by many to be the father of the school of Symbolic Interactionism in sociology (...)
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  4. Expressivism and Mead's Social Self.Mitchell Aboulafia - 2006 - In John R. Shook & Joseph Margolis (eds.), A Companion to Pragmatism. Blackwell.
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  5. The Cosmopolitan Self: George Herbert Mead and Continental Philosophy.Mitchell Aboulafia - 2001 - University of Illinois Press.
    This important volume appreciably advances the dialogue between continental thought and classical American philosophy.
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  6. Was George Herbert Mead a Feminist?Mitchell Aboulafia - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (2):145 - 158.
    George Herbert Mead was a dedicated progressive and internationalist who strove to realize his political convictions through participation in numerous civic organizations in Chicago. These convictions informed and were informed by his approach to philosophy. This article addresses the bonds between Mead's philosophy, social psychology, and his support of women's rights through an analysis of a letter he wrote to his daughter-in-law regarding her plans for a career.
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  7. Mead, Sartre: Self, Object, and Reflection.Mitchell Aboulafia - 1986 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 11 (2):63-86.
    Sartre seeks both to overcome solipsism and clarify how the individual becomes an object—with a seemingly fixed char acter—through his account of The Look in Being and Nothingness. While his description of how The Look of the other transforms one into an object may at first appear to be confirmed by experience, the account proves to be inade quate as a refutation of solipsism and in showing exactly how one becomes an object. On the other hand, G.H. Mead has a (...)
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  8. George Herbert Mead.George Allan - 1974 - Process Studies 4 (1):42-51.
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  9. Zen to Mead.Van Meter Ames - 1959 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 33:27 - 42.
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  10. Mead and Sartre on Man.Meter Amevans - 1956 - Journal of Philosophy 53 (6):205-219.
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  11. Mead and Husserl on the Self.Meter Amevans - 1955 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 15 (3):320-331.
  12. Professor Bawden's Functional Theory: A Rejoinder.Grace Mead Andrus - 1904 - Philosophical Review 13 (6):660-665.
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  13. Professor Bawden's Interpretation of the Physical and the Psychical.Grace Mead Andrus - 1904 - Philosophical Review 13 (4):429-444.
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  14. A Mead Project Source Page.James Rowland Angell - unknown
    General Psychophysical Account of Re-presentation.-- In the last chapter we saw that even in those psychophysical processes where the sense organs were most obviously engaged, the effects of past experience were very conspicuous. This fact will suggest at once the probable difficulty of establishing any absolute line of demarcation between processes of perception and those which, in common untechnical. language, we call memory and imagination. We shall find as we go on that this difficulty is greater rather than less than (...)
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  15. Equivocal Predication George Herbert's Way to God.Heather A. R. Asals - 1981
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  16. Radical Interactionism: Going Beyond Mead.Lonnie Athens - 2007 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (2):137–165.
    George Herbert Mead argues that human society is comprised of six basic institutions—language, family, economics, religion, polity, and science. I do not believe that he can be criticized for making institutions the cornerstones of a society, but he can definitely be criticized for his explanation of how our basic institutions originate, how these institutions operate in society after their inception, and how they later change, modifying society in the process. The problem with Mead's explanation of these three critical matters is (...)
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  17. Ideological Dimensions of George H. Mead's Social Relativity: A Critique.Thomas Carl Ayers - 1982 - Dissertation, Columbia University Teachers College
    The leitmotif of this disertation is that any authentic ideology consists of two logical dimensions; namely, a metaphysics , and a physics . Now, while each of these dimensions reciprocally determines the unity and structure of the other, the former logically antedates the latter. Metaphysics--which encompasses both a history or implicit ethic, and a prophecy or explicit ethic--thus embraces physics. In Chapter I, "Introduction," this non-evaluative, analytic-yet-synthetic schema is developed in conjunction with what is termed Mead's social relativity. ;Chapter II, (...)
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  18. George Herbert Mead.M. B. - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 28 (1):128-129.
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  19. Mead and Bergson on Inner States, Self-Knowledge, and Expression.Guido Baggio - 2013 - In F. Thomas Burke & Krzysztof Piotr Skowronski (eds.), George Herbert Mead in the Twenty-First Century. Lexington Press. pp. 71.
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  20. Mead and Skinner: Agency and Determinism.John D. Baldwin - 1988 - Behaviorism 16 (2):109-127.
    Few contemporary behaviorists are aware of the importance of George Herbert Mead's contributions to the philosophy of behaviorism. Mead's work on agency and determinism are presented to provide a sample of his ideas on issues that are of significant importance to current debates in behaviorism. His ideas are then compared with Skinner's positions on related issues, revealing significant similarities in their scientific thinking. One major difference between the two behaviorists is identified, and the relative merits of the two different positions (...)
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  21. George H. Mead and Luigi Pirandello.Bedric Baumann - 1967 - Social Research 3.
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  22. George H. Mead and Luigi Pirandello: Some Parallels Between the Theoretical and Artistic Presentation of the Social Role Concept.Bed̆ich Baumann - forthcoming - Social Research.
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  23. The Evolution of the Psychical Element, By George Herbert Mead (Dec. 1899–March 1900 or 1898–1899).H. . . Heath Bawden & Kevin S. Decker - 2008 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (3):480-507.
    George Herbert Mead's lectures at the University of Chicago are more important to understanding Mead's views on social psychology than some commentators, such as Hans Joas, have emphasized. Mead's 1898-99 lecture series, preserved through the notes of his student H. Heath Bawden, demonstrate his devotion to Hegelianism as a method of thinking and how this influenced his non-reductive approach to functionalist psychology. In addition, Mead's breadth of historical knowledge and his commitments in the natural and social sciences are on display (...)
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  24. Secretary of Praise the Poetic Vocation of George Herbert.Diana Benet - 1984
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  25. Chomsky Versus Mead.Albert J. Bergesen - 2004 - Sociological Theory 22 (3):357-370.
    G. H. Mead's model of language and mind, while perhaps understandable at the time it was written, now seems inadequate. First, the research evidence strongly suggests that mental operations exist prior to language onset, conversation of gestures, or social interaction. Second, language is not just significant symbols; it requires syntax. Third, syntax seems to be part of our bioinheritance, that is, part of our presocial mind/brain-what Noam Chomsky has called our language faculty. Fourth, this means syntax probably is not learned (...)
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  26. "The Philosophy of George Herbert Mead," Ed. Walter Robert Corti, with Preface by S. Morris Eames.Joseph Betz - 1975 - Modern Schoolman 52 (3):312-316.
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  27. Redefining the Subject, Redefining the Social, Reconsidering Education: George Herbert Mead's Course on Philosophy of Education at the University of Chicago.Gert J. J. Biesta - 1999 - Educational Theory 49 (4):475-492.
  28. Mead, Intersubjectivity, and Education: The Early Writings. [REVIEW]Gert J. J. Biesta - 1998 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (2/3):73-99.
    This article seeks to reconstruct the early writings of George Herbert Mead in order to explore the significance of his work for the development of an intersubjective conception of education. The reconstruction takes its point of departure in Mead's claim that reflective consciousness has a social situation as its precondition. In a mainly chronological account of Mead's writings on psychology and philosophy from the period 1900–1925, it is shown how Mead explains the social origin of conscious reflection and self-consciousness. It (...)
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  29. "Four Pragmatists: A Critical Introduction to Peirce, James, Mead, and Dewey," by Israel Scheffler.Richard J. Blackwell - 1976 - Modern Schoolman 54 (1):96-96.
  30. A Mead Project Source Page.John E. Boodin - unknown
    Our scientific concepts generally are in the melting-pot. They are all infected by relativity. This is as true in psychology and philosophy as in the physical sciences. In each case we must be willing to reconstruct our concepts on the basis of new evidence. Psychology has too long been hampered by a false tradition, and incidentally it has dragged philosophy with it into the slough of subjectivism. Brilliant discoveries in the realms of physiology and pathology throw new light on many (...)
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  31. The Roman Steps to the Temple: An Examination of the Influence of Robert Southwell, SJ, Upon George Herbert.Gary M. Bouchard - 2007 - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España] 10 (3).
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  32. Role Taking, Corporeal Intersubjectivity, and Self.Patrick L. Bourgeois & Sandra B. Rosenthal - 1990 - Philosophy Today 34 (2):117-128.
  33. Scientific Time and the Temporal Sense of Human Existence: Merleau-Ponty and Mead.Patrick L. Bourgeois & Sandra B. Rosenthal - 1990 - Research in Phenomenology 20 (1):152-163.
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  34. Meaning and Nature: George H. Mead's Theory of Objects.Andrew Lawrence Bowman - 1951 - Dissertation, Columbia University
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  35. Mead's Ethical Theory.John Broyer - 1973 - In Walter Robert Corti (ed.), The Philosophy of George Herbert Mead. Amriswiler Bücherei. pp. 171--192.
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  36. George Herbert Mead on Science, Technology and Man.John A. Broyer - 1975 - Proceedings of the XVth World Congress of Philosophy 5:639-643.
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  37. George Herbert Mead.John Albin Broyer - 1978 - Dialectics and Humanism 5 (4):27-32.
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  38. The Ethical Theory of George Herbert Mead.John Albin Broyer - 1967 - Dissertation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
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  39. Hunter Mead 1907-1961.Charles E. Bures - 1961 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 35:110 -.
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  40. Extended Mind and Representation.F. Thomas Burke - 2014 - In John R. Shook & Tibor Solymosi (eds.), Pragmatist Neurophilosophy: American Philosophy and the Brain. Bloomsbury Academic. pp. 177-202.
    Good old-fashioned cognitive science characterizes human thinking as symbol manipulation qua computation and therefore emphasizes the processing of symbolic representations as a necessary if not sufficient condition for “general intelligent action.” Recent alternative conceptions of human thinking tend to deemphasize if not altogether eschew the notion of representation. The present paper shows how classical American pragmatist conceptions of human thinking can successfully avoid either of these extremes, replacing old-fashioned conceptions of representation with one that characterizes both representatum and representans in (...)
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  41. (Anti)Realist Implications of a Pragmatist Dual-Process Active-Externalist Theory of Experience.F. Thomas Burke - 2008 - Philosophia Scientiae 12 (1):187-211.
    Realism/antirealism issues are considered in light of a pragmatist dual-process active-externalist theory of experience. This theory posits two kinds of experience such that mentality (as a capacity for thinking, hypothesizing, theorizing, reasoning, deliberating) constitutes one of the two kinds of experience. The formal correspondence of theory with facts is characterized in terms of a functional correspondence between these two kinds of experience. Realist and constructivist aspects of this view are then discussed. Active externalism guarantees a kind of ecological realism that (...)
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  42. George Herbert Mead in the Twenty-First Century.F. Thomas Burke & Krzysztof Skowronski (eds.) - 2013 - Lexington Press.
    This volume is composed of extended versions of selected papers presented at an international conference held in June 2011 at Opole University—the seventh in a series of annual American and European Values conferences organized by the Institute of Philosophy, Opole University, Poland. The papers were written independently with no prior guidelines other than the obvious need to address some aspect of George Herbert Mead’s work. While rooted in careful study of Mead’s original writings and transcribed lectures and the historical context (...)
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  43. G. H. Mead and the Problem of Metaphysics.Richard Burke - 1962 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 23 (1):81-88.
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  44. Individual and Sociality in Science: G.H. Mead's “Social Realism”: Indivíduo E Socialidade Na Ciência: O “Realismo Social” de G.H. Mead. [REVIEW]Rosa Calcaterra - 2008 - Cognitio 9 (1).
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  45. Mead's Understanding of Movements of Thought.James Campbell - 2013 - In F. Thomas Burke & Krzysztof Piotr Skowronski (eds.), George Herbert Mead in the Twenty-First Century. Lexington Press. pp. 21.
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  46. Self, War, and Society: George Herbert Mead's Macrosociology. By Mary Jo Deegan.James Campbell - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (5):710-719.
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  47. Hegel's Influence on George Herbert Mead.James Campbell - 1988 - Southwest Philosophy Review 4 (2):1-6.
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  48. George Herbert Mead: Philosophy and the Pragmatic Self.James Campbell - 1985 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 19:91-114.
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  49. George Herbert Mead: Philosophy and the Pragmatic Self: James Campbell.James Campbell - 1985 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 19:91-114.
    George Herbert Mead was born at the height of America's bloody Civil War in 1863, the year of Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation and the Gettysburg Address. He was born in New England, in the small town of South Hadley, Massachusetts; but when he was seven years old his family moved to Oberlin, Ohio, so that his father, Hiram Mead, a Protestant minister, could assume a chair in homiletics at the Oberlin Theological Seminary. After his father's death in 1881, Mead's mother, Elizabeth (...)
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  50. Mead and Modernity: Science, Selfhood, and Democratic Politics.Filipe Carreira da Silva - 2008 - Lexington Books.
    Mead and Modernity is one of the most detailed and ambitiously conceived studies of G. H. Mead's work to appear in years. Filipe Carreira da Silva addresses the basic questions 'How should we read Mead?' and 'Why should we read Mead today?' by showing that the history of ideas and theory-building are closely related endeavors. Mead and Modernity is a methodological innovation with sweeping theoretical implications.
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