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  1. Phantom Premise and a Shape-Shifting Ism: Reply to Hassoun.Kyle Ferguson & Arthur Caplan - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    In ‘Against vaccine nationalism’, Nicole Hassoun misrepresents our argument, distorts our position and ignores crucial distinctions we present in our article, ‘Love thy neighbor? Allocating vaccines in a world of competing obligations’. She has created a strawman that does not resemble our position. In this reply, we address two features of ‘Against vaccine nationalism’. First, we address a phantom premise. Hassoun misattributes to us a thesis, according to which citizen-directed duties are stronger than noncitizen-directed duties. This thesis is a figment (...)
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  2. Love Thy Neighbour? Allocating Vaccines in a World of Competing Obligations.Kyle Ferguson & Arthur L. Caplan - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-106887.
    Although a safe, effective, and licensed coronavirus vaccine does not yet exist, there is already controversy over how it ought to be allocated. Justice is clearly at stake, but it is unclear what justice requires in the international distribution of a scarce vaccine during a pandemic. Many are condemning ‘vaccine nationalism’ as an obstacle to equitable global distribution. We argue that limited national partiality in allocating vaccines will be a component of justice rather than an obstacle to it. For there (...)
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  3. Discounting Future Health.Hilary Greaves - forthcoming - In Emanuel Norheim (ed.), Global health priority-setting: Cost-effectiveness and beyond. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    In carrying out cost-benefit or cost-effective analysis, a discount rate should be applied to some kinds of future benefits and costs. It is controversial, though, whether future health is in this class. I argue that one of the standard arguments for discounting (from diminishing marginal returns) is inapplicable to the case of health, while another (favouring a pure rate of time preference) is unsound in any case. However, there are two other reasons that might support a positive discount rate for (...)
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  4. Costa, Cancer and Coronavirus: Contractualism as a Guide to the Ethics of Lockdown.Stephen David John & Emma J. Curran - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-107103.
    Lockdown measures in response to the COVID-19 pandemic involve placing huge burdens on some members of society for the sake of benefiting other members of society. How should we decide when these policies are permissible? Many writers propose we should address this question using cost-benefit analysis, a broadly consequentialist approach. We argue for an alternative non-consequentialist approach, grounded in contractualist moral theorising. The first section sets up key issues in the ethics of lockdown, and sketches the apparent appeal of addressing (...)
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  5. Ethical Considerations for Global Health Decision-Making: Justice-Enhanced Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of New Technologies for Trypanosoma Brucei Gambiense.Maria W. Merritt, C. Simone Sutherland & Fabrizio Tediosi - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics:phy013.
    We sought to assess formally the extent to which different control and elimination strategies for human African trypanosomiasis Trypanosoma brucei gambiense would exacerbate or alleviate experiences of societal disadvantage that traditional economic evaluation does not take into account. Justice-enhanced cost-effectiveness analysis is a normative approach under development to address social justice considerations in public health decision-making alongside other types of analyses. It aims to assess how public health interventions under analysis in comparative evaluation would be expected to influence the clustering (...)
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  6. Intervening on Behalf of the Human Right to Health: Who, When, and How?Kathryn Muyskens - forthcoming - Human Rights Review:1-19.
    A common understanding of the political function of human rights is as a trigger for international intervention, with states typically understood to be duty bound by these rights claims. The unique character of the human right to health raises some complications for these conventional views. In this paper, I will argue that because of the unique character of the human right to health, intervention on its behalf can be justified not only in response to outright violation, but also due to (...)
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  7. Ebola Virus Disease : A Case for Shared National and Global Responsibilities in Global Health Crisis.Evaristus Obi - forthcoming - Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine: An International Journal.
  8. Global Health Gateway: Ethics in Global Health.Shilpi Shah, Shishir Shah, Shobhit Jain, Tejal Sheth & Mihir Shah - forthcoming - Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine: An International Journal.
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  9. Pursuit to Post: Ethical Issues of Social Media Use by International Medical Volunteers.Zachary Tabb, Laurel Hyle & Heather Haq - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
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  10. Following the Science: Pandemic Policy Making and Reasonable Worst-Case Scenarios.Richard Bradley & Joe Roussos - 2021 - LSE Public Policy Review 1 (4):6.
    The UK has been ‘following the science’ in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in line with the national framework for the use of scientific advice in assessment of risk. We argue that the way in which it does so is unsatisfactory in two important respects. Firstly, pandemic policy making is not based on a comprehensive assessment of policy impacts. And secondly, the focus on reasonable worst-case scenarios as a way of managing uncertainty results in a loss of decision-relevant information and (...)
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  11. E-Cigarettes: The Long-Term Liberal Perspective.Kalle Grill - 2021 - Nicotine and Tobacco Research 23 (1):9-13.
    The debate for and against making e-cigarettes available to smokers is to a large extent empirical. We do not know the long-term health effects of vaping and we do not know how smokers will respond to e-cigarettes over time. In addition to these empirical uncertainties, however, there are difficult moral issues to consider. One such issue is that many smokers in some sense choose to smoke. Though smoking is addictive and though many start young, it does not seem impossible to (...)
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  12. Eating Meat and Not Vaccinating: In Defense of the Analogy.Ben Jones - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):135-142.
    The devastating impact of the COVID‐19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic is prompting renewed scrutiny of practices that heighten the risk of infectious disease. One such practice is refusing available vaccines known to be effective at preventing dangerous communicable diseases. For reasons of preventing individual harm, avoiding complicity in collective harm, and fairness, there is a growing consensus among ethicists that individuals have a duty to get vaccinated. I argue that these same grounds establish an analogous duty to avoid buying and (...)
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  13. Community Engagement and Ethical Global Health Research.Bipin Adhikari, Christopher Pell & Phaik Yeong Cheah - 2020 - Global Bioethics 31 (1):1-12.
    Community engagement is increasingly recognized as a critical element of medical research, recommended by ethicists, required by research funders and advocated in ethics guidelines. The benefits of community engagement are often stressed in instrumental terms, particularly with regard to promoting recruitment and retention in studies. Less emphasis has been placed on the value of community engagement with regard to ethical good practice, with goals often implied rather than clearly articulated. This article outlines explicitly how community engagement can contribute to ethical (...)
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  14. Legal and ethical framework for global health information and biospecimen exchange - an international perspective.Lara Bernasconi, Selçuk Şen, Luca Angerame, Apolo P. Balyegisawa, Damien Hong Yew Hui, Maximilian Hotter, Chung Y. Hsu, Tatsuya Ito, Francisca Jörger, Wolfgang Krassnitzer, Adam T. Phillips, Rui Li, Louise Stockley, Fabian Tay, Charlotte von Heijne Widlund, Ming Wan, Creany Wong, Henry Yau, Thomas F. Hiemstra, Yagiz Uresin & Gabriela Senti - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-8.
    The progress of electronic health technologies and biobanks holds enormous promise for efficient research. Evidence shows that studies based on sharing and secondary use of data/samples have the potential to significantly advance medical knowledge. However, sharing of such resources for international collaboration is hampered by the lack of clarity about ethical and legal requirements for transfer of data and samples across international borders. Here, the International Clinical Trial Center Network reports the legal and ethical requirements governing data and sample exchange (...)
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  15. Ethical Rationale for Better Coordination of Clinical Research on COVID-19.Francois Bompart - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (3-4):1-10.
    Hundreds of clinical trials of potential treatments and vaccines for the “coronavirus 19 disease” have been set up in record time. This is a remarkable reaction to the global pandemic, but the absence of a global coordination of clinical research efforts raises serious ethical concerns. Some COVID-19 patients might carry the burden of clinical trial involvement even though their trial cannot be completed as researchers are competing for patients. A shortage of medicines can occur when existing drugs are diverted for (...)
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  16. Guiding Principles of Community Engagement and Global Health Research: Solidarity and Subsidiarity.Sarah-Vaughan Brakman - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (5):62-64.
    Volume 20, Issue 5, June 2020, Page 62-64.
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  17. Global Health with Justice: Controlling the Floodgates of the Upstream Determinants of Health Through Evidence-Based Law.John Coggon & Lawrence O. Gostin - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):4-9.
    This article introduces a special issue on the legal determinants of health, following the publication of the Lancet–O’Neill Institute of Georgetown University Commission’s report on the subject. We contextualize legal determinants as a significant and vital aspect of the social determinants of health, explain the work of the Lancet–O’Neill Commission and outline where consequent research will usefully be directed. We also introduce the papers that follow in the special issue, which together set out in greater detail the work of the (...)
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  18. The Complex Structure of Health Rights.Michael Da Silva - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):99-110.
    Research on how to understand legally recognized socio-economic rights produced many insights into the nature of rights. Legally recognized rights to health and, by extension, health care could contribute to health justice. Yet a tension remains between widespread international and transnational constitutional recognition of rights to health and health care and compelling normative conditions for rights recognition from both philosophers seeking to identify the scope and structure of the rights and policy scholars seeking to understand how to practically realize such (...)
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  19. Solidarity in Global Health Research—Are the Stakes Equal?Amrita Daftary & A. M. Viens - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (5):59-62.
    Volume 20, Issue 5, June 2020, Page 59-62.
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  20. An Ethical Framework for Global Vaccine Allocation.Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Govind Persad, Adam Kern, Allen E. Buchanan, Cecile Fabre, Daniel Halliday, Joseph Heath, Lisa M. Herzog, R. J. Leland, Ephrem T. Lemango, Florencia Luna, Matthew McCoy, Ole F. Norheim, Trygve Ottersen, G. Owen Schaefer, Kok-Chor Tan, Christopher Heath Wellman, Jonathan Wolff & Henry S. Richardson - 2020 - Science 1:DOI: 10.1126/science.abe2803.
    In this article, we propose the Fair Priority Model for COVID-19 vaccine distribution, and emphasize three fundamental values we believe should be considered when distributing a COVID-19 vaccine among countries: Benefiting people and limiting harm, prioritizing the disadvantaged, and equal moral concern for all individuals. The Priority Model addresses these values by focusing on mitigating three types of harms caused by COVID-19: death and permanent organ damage, indirect health consequences, such as health care system strain and stress, as well as (...)
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  21. Measuring the Global Burden of Disease: Philosophical Dimensions.Nir Eyal, Samia A. Hurst, Christopher J. L. Murray, S. Andrew Schroeder & Daniel Wikler (eds.) - 2020 - New York, USA: Oup Usa.
    The Global Burden of Disease Study is one of the largest-scale research collaborations in global health, producing critical data for researchers, policy-makers, and health workers about more than 350 diseases, injuries, and risk factors. Such an undertaking is, of course, extremely complex from an empirical perspective. But it also raises complex ethical and philosophical questions. In this volume, a group of leading philosophers, economists, epidemiologists, and policy scholars identify and discuss these philosophical questions. Better appreciating the philosophical dimensions of a (...)
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  22. Health Inequalities.Lawrence O. Gostin & Eric A. Friedman - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (4):6-8.
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  23. Has Global Health Law Risen to Meet the COVID-19 Challenge? Revisiting the International Health Regulations to Prepare for Future Threats.Lawrence O. Gostin, Roojin Habibi & Benjamin Mason Meier - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (2):376-381.
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  24. Socially Constructed Determinants of Health: The Case for Synergies to Arrive at Gendered Global Health Law.Sarah Hawkes & Kent Buse - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):16-28.
    Both gender and the law are significant determinants of health and well-being. Here, we put forward evidence to unpack the relationship between gender and outcomes in health and well-being, and explore how legal determinants interact and intersect with gender norms to amplify or reduce health inequities across populations. The paper explores the similarities between legal and health systems in their response to gender—both systems portray gender neutrality but would be better described as gender-blind. We conclude with a set of recommendations (...)
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  25. Global Disparity and Solidarity in a Pandemic.Anita Ho & Iulia Dascalu - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):65-67.
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  26. The Lancet–O’Neill Institute/Georgetown University Commission on Global Health and Law: The Power of Law to Advance the Right to Health.Jenny C. Kaldor, Lawrence O. Gostin, John T. Monahan & Katie Gottschalk - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):9-15.
    The Lancet–O’Neill Institute/Georgetown University Commission on Global Health and Law published its report on the Legal Determinants of Health in 2019. The term ‘legal determinants of health’ draws attention to the power of law to influence upstream social and economic influences on population health. In this article, we introduce the Commission, including its background and rationale, set out its methodology, summarize its key findings and recommendations and reflect on its impact since publication. We also look to the future, making suggestions (...)
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  27. Decolonising Ideas of Healing in Medical Education.Amali U. Lokugamage, Tharanika Ahillan & S. D. C. Pathberiya - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (4):265-272.
    The legacy of colonial rule has permeated into all aspects of life and contributed to healthcare inequity. In response to the increased interest in social justice, medical educators are thinking of ways to decolonise education and produce doctors who can meet the complex needs of diverse populations. This paper aims to explore decolonising ideas of healing within medical education following recent events including the University College London Medical School’s Decolonising the Medical Curriculum public engagement event, the Wellcome Collection ’s Ayurvedic (...)
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  28. Why Have Non-Communicable Diseases Been Left Behind?Florencia Luna & Valerie A. Luyckx - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (1):5-25.
    Non-communicable diseases are no longer largely limited to high-income countries and the elderly. The burden of non-communicable diseases is rising across all country income categories, in part because these diseases have been relatively overlooked on the global health agenda. Historically, communicable diseases have been prioritized in many countries as they were perceived to constitute the greatest disease burden, especially among vulnerable and poor populations, and strategies for prevention and treatment, which had been successful in high-income settings, were considered feasible and (...)
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  29. Legal Determinants of Health: Regulating Abortion Care.Sheelagh McGuinness & Jonathan Montgomery - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):34-40.
    In The legal determinants of health: Harnessing the power of law for global health and sustainable development, Gostin et al. provide a sustained account of how law can and should be used as an instrument of health promotion. We pick up on the themes of this report with a specific focus of the importance of abortion for women’s sexual and reproductive health and the impact that particular ways of framing abortion in law can have on the lives of women and (...)
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  30. Ethical Dimensions of the Global Burden of Disease.Christopher J. L. Murray & S. Andrew Schroeder - 2020 - In Nir Eyal, Samia Hurst, Christopher J. L. Murray, S. Andrew Schroeder & Daniel Wikler (eds.), Measuring the Global Burden of Disease: Philosophical Dimensions. New York, NY, USA: pp. 24-47.
    This chapter suggests that descriptive epidemiological studies like the Global Burden of Disease Study can usefully be divided into four tasks: describing individuals’ health states over time, assessing their health states under a range of counterfactual scenarios, summarizing the information collected, and then packaging it for presentation. The authors show that each of these tasks raises important and challenging ethical questions. They comment on some of the philosophical issues involved in measuring health states, attributing causes to health outcomes, choosing the (...)
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  31. Introduction: Framing ‘Post-AIDS’ and Global Health Discourses in 2015 and Beyond.Gráinne O’Connell - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):89-94.
    This special issue, entitled “Post-AIDS’ and Global Health Discourses: Interdisciplinary Perspectives,’ emerged from a one day Medical Humanities symposium at the Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities, at the University of Leeds, England, on February 27th 2015. This special issue focusses on the perceived deprioritising of HIV and AIDS in the Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs, that were launched in 2015. The SDGs function as policy benchmarks for all entities within the United Nations system and they supersede the Millennium Development Goals, (...)
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  32. Spiritual Universal Ethical Values for a Global Health System Using Change Theory: Results of a Disintegrated Approach in the 2020 Pandemic.Suma Parahakaran - 2020 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 30 (3):93-96.
    Despite powerful strategic approaches in the health systems in many afTluent countries, the pandemic that has hit us has cascaded beyond the imagination of many civil societies around the world. There is a call for a higher understanding and practice as the contents in the social media reTlected an urgency to understand more on the healing effects of the body, mind and spirit. In fact, contents in social media highlighted many coping mechanisms which were related to religious, cultural and spiritual (...)
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  33. The Case for Valuing Non-Health and Indirect Benefits.Govind Persad & Jessica du Toit - 2020 - In Ole F. Norheim, Ezekiel J. Emanuel & Joseph Millum (eds.), Global Health Priority-Setting: Beyond Cost-Effectiveness. New York, NY, USA: pp. 207-222.
    Health policy is only one part of social policy. Although spending administered by the health sector constitutes a sizeable fraction of total state spending in most countries, other sectors such as education and transportation also represent major portions of national budgets. Additionally, though health is one important aspect of economic and social activity, people pursue many other goals in their social and economic lives. Similarly, direct benefits—those that are immediate results of health policy choices—are only a small portion of the (...)
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  34. Developing a Toolkit for Engagement Practice: Sharing Power with Communities in Priority-Setting for Global Health Research Projects.Bridget Pratt - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-14.
    BackgroundCommunities’ engagement in priority-setting is a key means for setting research topics and questions of relevance and benefit to them. However, without attention to dynamics of power and diversity, their engagement can be tokenistic. So far, there remains limited ethical guidance on how to share power with communities, particularly those considered disadvantaged and marginalised, in global health research priority-setting. This paper generates a comprehensive, empirically-based “ethical toolkit” to provide such guidance, further strengthening a previously proposed checklist version of the toolkit. (...)
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  35. Solidarity and Community Engagement in Global Health Research.Bridget Pratt, Phaik Yeong Cheah & Vicki Marsh - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (5):43-56.
    Community engagement is gaining prominence in global health research. A number of ethical goals–spanning the instrumental, intrinsic, and transformative–have been ascribed to CE in global heal...
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  36. Is Solidarity Possible in Global Health Policy and Systems Research?Abbas Rattani - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (5):67-69.
    Volume 20, Issue 5, June 2020, Page 67-69.
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  37. Intersectionality and Community Engagement: Can Solidarity Alone Solve Power Differences in Global Health Research?Salla Sariola - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (5):57-59.
    Volume 20, Issue 5, June 2020, Page 57-59.
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  38. What Healthcare Professionals Owe Us: Why Their Duty to Treat During a Pandemic is Contingent on Personal Protective Equipment.Udo Schuklenk - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (7):432-435.
    Healthcare professionals’ capacity to protect themselves, while caring for infected patients during an infectious disease pandemic, depends on their ability to practise universal precautions. In turn, universal precautions rely on the availability of personal protective equipment. During the SARS-CoV2 outbreak many healthcare workers across the globe have been reluctant to provide patient care because crucial PPE components are in short supply. The lack of such equipment during the pandemic was not a result of careful resource allocation decisions in the global (...)
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  39. Antimicrobial Footprints, Fairness, and Collective Harm.Anne Schwenkenbecher - 2020 - In Euzebiusz Jamrozik & Michael Selgelid (eds.), Ethics and Drug Resistance: Collective Responsibility for Global Public Health. Springer. pp. 379-389.
    This chapter explores the question of whether or not individual agents are under a moral obligation to reduce their ‘antimicrobial footprint’. An agent’s antimicrobial footprint measures the extent to which her actions are causally linked to the use of antibiotics. As such, it is not necessarily a measure of her contribution to antimicrobial resistance. Talking about people’s antimicrobial footprint in a way we talk about our carbon footprint may be helpful for drawing attention to the global effects of individual behaviour (...)
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  40. Community Empowerment Through Education: The Inherent Foundation of Promoting Solidarity in Global Health Research.Gregory C. Valentine, Krystle Perez & Elliott Mark Weiss - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (5):77-79.
    Volume 20, Issue 5, June 2020, Page 77-79.
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  41. The Role of Solidarity in Research in Global Health Emergencies.Katharine Wright & Julian Sheather - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (5):4-6.
    Volume 20, Issue 5, June 2020, Page 4-6.
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  42. Precarity, Clinical Labour and Graduation From Ebola Clinical Research in West Africa.Arsenii Alenichev & Vinh-Kim Nguyen - 2019 - Global Bioethics 30 (1):1-18.
    ABSTRACTThe provision of gifts and payments for healthy volunteer subjects remains an important topic in global health research ethics. This paper provides empirical insights into theoretical debat...
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  43. Artificial Intelligence in Global Health.Sara E. Davies - 2019 - Ethics and International Affairs 33 (2):181-192.
  44. Asbestos Neglect: Why Asbestos Exposure Deserves Greater Policy Attention.Thomas Douglas & Laura Van den Borre - 2019 - Health Policy 123 (5):516-519.
    While many public health threats are now widely appreciated by the public, the risks from asbestos exposure remain poorly understood, even in high-risk groups. This article makes the case that asbestos exposure is an important, ongoing global health threat, and argues for greater policy efforts to raise awareness of this threat. It also proposes the extension of asbestos bans to developing countries and increased public subsidies for asbestos testing and abatement.
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  45. Synthetic Biology and the Translational Imperative.Raheleh Heidari Feidt, Marcello Ienca, Bernice Simone Elger & Marc Folcher - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (1):33-52.
    Advances at the interface between the biological sciences and engineering are giving rise to emerging research fields such as synthetic biology. Harnessing the potential of synthetic biology requires timely and adequate translation into clinical practice. However, the translational research enterprise is currently facing fundamental obstacles that slow down the transition of scientific discoveries from the laboratory to the patient bedside. These obstacles including scarce financial resources and deficiency of organizational and logistic settings are widely discussed as primary impediments to translational (...)
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  46. Synthetic Biology and the Translational Imperative. [REVIEW]Marc Folcher, Bernice Elger, Marcello Ienca & Raheleh Heidari Feidt - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (1):33-52.
    Advances at the interface between the biological sciences and engineering are giving rise to emerging research fields such as synthetic biology. Harnessing the potential of synthetic biology requires timely and adequate translation into clinical practice. However, the translational research enterprise is currently facing fundamental obstacles that slow down the transition of scientific discoveries from the laboratory to the patient bedside. These obstacles including scarce financial resources and deficiency of organizational and logistic settings are widely discussed as primary impediments to translational (...)
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  47. Global Health Ethics: Critical Reflections on the Contours of an Emerging Field, 1977–2015.Nathan Gibson Gail Robson, Solomon Benatar Alison Thompson & Avram Denburg - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-10.
    Background The field of bioethics has evolved over the past half-century, incorporating new domains of inquiry that signal developments in health research, clinical practice, public health in its broadest sense and more recently sensitivity to the interdependence of global health and the environment. These extensions of the reach of bioethics are a welcome response to the growth of global health as a field of vital interest and activity. Methods This paper provides a critical interpretive review of how the term “global (...)
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  48. Saving People From the Harm of Death.Espen Gamlund & Carl Tollef Solberg (eds.) - 2019 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Death is something we mourn or fear as the worst thing that could happen―whether the deaths of close ones, the deaths of strangers in reported accidents or tragedies, or our own. And yet, being dead is something that no one can experience and live to describe. This simple truth raises a host of difficult philosophical questions about the negativity surrounding our sense of death, and how and for whom exactly it is harmful. The question of whether death is bad has (...)
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  49. Assessing National Public Health Law to Prevent Infectious Disease Outbreaks: Immunization Law as a Basis for Global Health Security.Tsion Berhane Ghedamu & Benjamin Mason Meier - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (3):412-426.
    Immunization plays a crucial role in global health security, preventing public health emergencies of international concern and protecting individuals from infectious disease outbreaks, yet these critical public health benefits are dependent on immunization law. Where public health law has become central to preventing, detecting, and responding to infectious disease, public health law reform is seen as necessary to implement the Global Health Security Agenda. This article examines national immunization laws as a basis to implement the GHSA and promote the public's (...)
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  50. Introducing Global Health Law.Lawrence O. Gostin & Benjamin Mason Meier - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (4):788-793.
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