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Leibniz: Metaphysics
  1. Leibniz’s Mirror Thesis. Solipsism, Private Perspectives and Conceptual Holism.Antonio Nunziante - 2017 - Facta Universitatis 16 (3):185-199.
    One of the symbolic images to which Leibniz constantly entrusted the synthesis of his philosophy regards the idea of considering one and the same city from various visual perspectives. Such an image is diffused throughout all Leibniz’s writings and clearly reflects the philosopher’s interest for matters regarding perspective as well as optical phenomena. The point of view of its inhabitants can therefore be compared to a mirror that reflects some different portions of reality. But what do the city-viewers really see? (...)
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  2. The Lingua Franca of Nominalism: Sellars on Leibniz.Antonio Nunziante - 2018 - In Luca Corti & Antonio Nunziante (eds.), Sellars and the History of Modern Philosophy. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 36-58.
    Leibniz can be counted among the remote, but still significant, sources of Sellars's philosophy. Such thesis, however, is meaningless unless its conceptual relevance is displayed. Therefore, it will be immediately added that Sellars's relation with Leibniz is focused on three main fundamental issues, which respectively concern (1) the concept of nature, (2) the concept of truth and (3) the concept itself of nominalism. Besides, there are other seemingly minor topics, which actually refers to the definition of abstract entities, of predicates, (...)
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  3. Self and Substance in Leibniz.Marc Elliott Bobro - 2004 - Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.
    "We are omniscient but confused," says Leibniz. He also says that we live in the best of all possible worlds, yet do not causally interact. So what are we? Leibniz is known for many things, including the ideality of space and time, calculus, plans for a universal language, theodicy, and ecumenism. But he is not known for his ideas on the self and personal identity. This book shows that Leibniz offers an original, internally coherent theory of personal identity, a theory (...)
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  4. On the Non-Idealist Leibniz.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2018 - The Leibniz Review 28:97-101.
    This is a reply to Samuel Levey's fine review of my Monads, Composition and Force (Oxford UP, 2018) in the same issue of the Leibniz Review. In it I take up various difficulties raised by Levey that may be thought to collapse Leibniz's position into idealism after all, and attempt to provide convincing responses to them.
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  5. The Hegelian Roots of Russell's Critique of Leibniz.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2018 - The Leibniz Review 28:9-42.
    At the turn of the century Bertrand Russell advocated an absolutist theory of space and time, and scornfully rejected Leibniz’s relational theory in his Critical Exposition of the Philosophy of Leibniz. But by the time of the second edition, he had proposed highly influential relational theories of space and time that had much in common with Leibniz’s own views. Ironically, he never acknowledges this. In trying to get to the bottom of this enigma, I looked further at contemporary texts by (...)
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  6. Monads, Composition, and Force: Ariadnean Threads Through Leibniz’s Labyrinth.Samuel Levey - 2018 - The Leibniz Review 28:83-95.
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  7. Organism and Harmony.Tamar Levanon - 2018 - The Leibniz Review 28:67-79.
    This paper examines the role that Leibniz’s philosophy played in the debate between the Idealists and their opponents at the turn of the twentieth century. While it is Russell’s The Philosophy of Leibniz which is most frequently referred to in this context, this paper focuses on John Dewey’s Leibniz’s New Essays which was written twelve years earlier, during the Hegelian phase of Dewey’s career. It is important to shift our attention to Dewey’s commentary not only because it has been almost (...)
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  8. Leibniz on Place.Jen Nguyen - 2018 - The Leibniz Review 28:43-66.
    Although scholars have given much attention to Leibniz’s view of space, they have given far less attention to his view of place. This neglect is regrettable because Leibniz holds that place is more fundamental than space. What is more, I argue that Leibniz’s view of place is novel, strange and yet, appealing. To have a Leibnizian place is to have a point of view. And nothing more. Because this reading is likely to sound counterintuitive, the first half of the paper (...)
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  9. Spinoza’s Parrot, Socinian Syllogisms, and Leibniz’s Metaphysics: Leibniz’s Three Strategies of Defending Christian Mysteries.Ursula Goldenbaum - 2002 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (4):551-574.
    This paper intends to show the connection between the theological, logical and epistemological ideas in Leibniz’s thinking. The paper will focus on the reasons for Leibniz’s fundamental decision to defend the Christian mysteries and his three different strategies for doing so. Each of these strategies is an answer to a particular challenge: to the Socinian who claims that the mysteries are contradictory; to the mechanical philosophy which denies the possibility of the mysteries, and to Spinoza’s parrot argument which demands that (...)
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  10. Schleiermacher Between Kant and Leibniz.Jacqueline Mariña - 2004 - In Christine Helmer & Marjorie Suchocki (eds.), Schleiermacher and Whitehead: Open Systems in Dialogue.
    This paper takes stock of Leibnizian influences on Schleiermacher's thought through an examination and comparison of the views of Leibniz, Kant, and Schleiermacher on predication. I analyze each thinker's foundational ontological and epistemological commitments and their implications for their understanding of predication. More specifically, I explore whether Schleiermacher's adoption of Leibiniz' theory of the complete concept and the theory of prediction it entails conflicts with his adoption of Kant's two-source theory of knowledge. I conclude that it does, and that it (...)
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  11. Possible Worlds in the Precipice: Why Leibniz Met Spinoza?Vassil Vidinsky - 2017 - Facta Universitatis 16 (3):213-223.
    The main objective of the paper is to give initial answers to three important questions. Why did Leibniz visit Spinoza? Why did his preparation for this meeting include a modification of the ontological proof of God? What is the philosophical result of the meeting and what do possible worlds have to do with it? In order to provide answers, three closely related manuscripts by Leibniz from November 1676 have been compared and the slow conceptual change of his philosophical apparatus has (...)
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  12. “Emancipating Forms Of Death With Polanyi And Leibniz”.Erik Sherman Roraback - 2016 - In Charles Tandy (ed.), Death and Anti Death, vol. 14: Four Decades after Michael Polanyi, Three Centuries after G. W. Leibniz. Ann Arbor, MI, USA: pp. 267–94.
    This chapter demonstrates that G.W. Leibniz and Michal Polanyi’s creative work in multiple fields of attention may serve a twenty first century in need of scholars willing to put daring and speculative imaginative inter–disciplinary risks in play. Such a cultural development would activate a general and cross–cultural sensibility that may salvage knowledge work, which is often predicated on property and power, for instead intellectual work that would serve the production of multiple truths that may enliven the world and inspire it.
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  13. Leibniz's Monadological Positive Aesthetics.Pauline Phemister & Lloyd Strickland - 2018 - In Pauline Phemister & Jeremy William Dunham (eds.), Monadologies. London: Routledge.
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  14. Leibniz's Mirrors: Reflecting the Past.Pauline Phemister - 2017 - In Wenchao Li (ed.), Vortrage des X. Internationalen Leibniz-Kongress, vol. 6. Hannover: Olms. pp. 93-108.
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  15. Monadologies.Pauline Phemister & Jeremy William Dunham (eds.) - 2018 - London: Routledge.
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  16. Why Leibniz Was Not an Eclectic Philosopher?Ursula Goldenbaum - 2017 - In Wenchao Li (ed.), Für unser Glück oder das Glück anderer (=Keynotes of the Xth International Leibniz-Congress). Hildesheim-Zürich-New York: Olms. pp. 153-174.
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  17. Monads.Donald Rutherford - 2018 - In Maria Rosa Antognazza (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Leibniz. Oxford University Press. pp. 356-380.
    This article discusses the final development of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz’s metaphysics: the theory of monads. It examines Leibniz’s arguments for monads as mindlike “simple substances,” his description of the properties of monads, and the distinction he draws among different types of monads. The remainder of the article focuses on two problems that attend Leibniz’s claim that reality ultimately consists solely of monads and their internal states (perceptions and appetitions). The first problem is whether a relation among monads can account for (...)
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  18. The Actual World.Donald Rutherford - 2018 - In Maria Rosa Antognazza (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Leibniz. Oxford University Press. pp. 65-85.
    This chapter discusses Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz’s theory of the actual world as the best of all possible worlds. The chapter opens with Leibniz’s response to the two most basic questions of metaphysics: Why is there something rather than nothing? And, why do certain things exist while other equally possible things do not? It examines Leibniz’s critique of Baruch Spinoza’s metaphysics, with particular reference to the argument that God must make a choice among possible worlds because not all possibles are “compossible.” (...)
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  19. Leibniz's Principle of Identity of Indiscernibles, by Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, Pp. Viii + 215, US$65. [REVIEW]Samuel Levey - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (2):405-408.
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  20. A Premature Farewell to Leibnizian Essences.Richard Brian Davis - 2004 - Philosophia Christi 6 (1):87-94.
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  21. Natureza e artifício: Leibniz e os modernos sobre a concepção dos corpos orgânicos como máquinas.Celi Hirata - 2018 - Dois Pontos 15 (1):95-109.
    In modernity, the distinction between nature and artifice disappears, so that machines made by men become privileged models for the explanation of natural bodies, as can be observed in Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, among others. This new relationship between nature and artifice is correlated with the mechanization and refutation of finality in nature, insofar as the adoption of mechanics as a model of nature’s explanation is associated to the rejection of the use of final causes in physics and to the conception (...)
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  22. Leibniz’s Key Philosophical Writings: A Guide.Paul Lodge & Lloyd Strickland - forthcoming - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  23. The Correspondence with Arnauld.Julia Jorati - forthcoming - In Paul Lodge & Lloyd Strickland (eds.), Leibniz’s Key Philosophical Writings. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Leibniz’s correspondence with Antoine Arnauld is one of the clearest and most comprehensive expressions of Leibniz’s philosophy in the so-called middle period. This chapter will explore the philosophical content of this correspondence. It will concentrate on four of the most central topics: (a) complete concepts and contingency, (b) substance and body, (c) causation, and (d) the special status of rational souls in God’s plan.
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  24. Embodied Cognition Without Causal Interaction in Leibniz.Julia Jorati - forthcoming - In Dominik Perler & Sebastian Bender (eds.), Causation and Cognition: Perspectives on Early Modern Philosophy. New York, USA: Routledge.
    My aim in this chapter is to explain how and why all human cognition depends on the body for Leibniz. I will show that there are three types of dependence: (a) the body is needed in order to supply materials, or content, for thinking; (b) the body is needed in order to give us the opportunity for the discovery of innate ideas; and (c) the body is needed in order to provide sensory notions as vehicles of thought. The third type (...)
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  25. Why Monads Need Appetites.Julia Jorati - 2016 - In Wenchao Li (ed.), ‘Für unser Glück oder das Glück anderer’: Vorträge des X. Internationalen Leibniz-Kongresses Hannover, 18.–23. Juli 2016, Vol. 5. Hildesheim, Germany: Olms. pp. 121–129.
    The mature Leibniz often describes monads as having two types of modifications: perceptions and appetites. But why would monads need appetites? When reading secondary literature about Leibniz, it can easily look as if appetites are superfluous: some scholars describe the inner workings of monads without saying much, if anything, about appetites. Instead, they focus on perceptions and explain the transition to new perceptions by reference to prior perceptions together with the underlying primitive force or law of the series. These interpretations (...)
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  26. Leibniz's Ontology of Force.Julia Jorati - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 8:189–224.
    Leibniz portrays the most fundamental entities in his mature ontology in at least three different ways. In some places, he describes them as mind-like, immaterial substances that perceive and strive. Elsewhere, he presents them as hylomorphic compounds. In yet other passages, he characterizes them in terms of primitive and derivative forces. Interpreters often assume that the first description is the most accurate. In contrast, I will argue that the third characterization is more accurate than the other two. If that is (...)
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  27. Stephen Voss (Ed.), The Leibniz-Arnauld Correspondence: With Selections From the Correspondence with Ernst, Landgrave of Hessen-Rheinfels by G. W. Leibniz. [REVIEW]Julia Jorati - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):757-758.
    In February 1686, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz sent a letter to Antoine Arnauld, via their mutual friend Ernst, the Landgrave of Hessen-Rheinfels. This letter contained a short summary of Leibniz's most recent philosophical work, the Discourse on Metaphysics, and asked Arnauld for his reaction to it. Arnauld's response was extremely harsh: he called Leibniz's views shocking and useless and advised him to stop engaging in metaphysical speculations. Yet, Leibniz did not let this discourage him. In the exchange that followed, Leibniz was (...)
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  28. Leibniz on Time and Duration.Geoffrey Gorham - 2017 - In W. Li (ed.), Für unser Glück oder das Glück anderer: Vorträge des X. Internationalen Leibniz-Kongresses Hannover, 18.-23. Juli 2016,. Hildesheim, Germany:
  29. How to Connect Physics with Metaphysics: Leibniz on the Conservation Law, Force, and Substance.Shohei Edamura - 2018 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 74 (2-3):787-810.
    Leibniz once argued that scholastic substantial forms do not exist, but he later emphasized that bodies have substantial forms. This implies that he assumed that bodies have intrinsic powers to act by themselves. In order to understand the change of his metaphysics, we need to identify the resources of his motivation to introduce a new view. On the basis of Leibniz’s early works in the 1670s and 80s, this paper explores how his discovery of the law that the quantity of (...)
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  30. The Preface to the Translation of K. Kaehler’s Article “Consciousness and its Phenomena: Leibniz, Kant, Husserl”.A. Patkul & O. Bashkina - 2014 - HORIZON. Studies in Phenomenology 3 (1):165-170.
  31. Leibniz et l'invention des phénomènes.Daniel Schulthess - 2009 - Paris: PUF.
    LES APPARENCES: ANALYSES PREALABLES L'ontologie des apparences I : questions terminologiques L'ontologie des apparences II : les entia apparentia La sémantique des apparences DES APPARENCES AUX FONDEMENTS Aspects catégoriels : la substance La simplicité comme condition de la substance L'activité comme condition de la substance DES FONDEMENTS AUX APPARENCES La production des apparences I : l'étendue La production des apparences II : la diffusion La production des qualités sensibles I BILAN Dire ce qu'il en est du corps Les propositions réduplicatives.
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  32. Leibniz and The Best of All One-Monad Universes.Richard Mather - 2018
    The purpose of this essay is to make the case for a heterodox reading of Leibniz’s The Monadology (published 1720) through the lens of Professor John Wheeler’s hypothesis of the one-electron universe (proposed in 1940). My conjecture is this: That there exists in the knowable universe only one monad; that this monad traverses time in both directions, eventually criss-crossing the entire past and future history of the universe; and that this singular monad interacts with itself countless times, thereby filling the (...)
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  33. Spontaneity in Philosophical System of Kant and Leibniz.Amrolah Moein - 2016 - Metaphysik 8 (22):1-18.
    spontaneity is a key concept of freedom in Kant and Leibniz philosophy. Leibniz defends spontaneity as a necessary condition for freedom, and defines it generally in terms of the absence of constraint. According to Leibniz, every substance is sole cause of all of its own states thus every change that occurs in it occurs spontaneously. Two type of spontaneity in Leibniz is determined by his commentators monadic spontaneity and agent spontaneity. Kant, from the Leibnizian tradition took the idea that spontaneity (...)
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  34. Fuerza primitiva y fuerza derivativa en G. W. Leibniz. Modificación y limitación.Leonardo Ruiz - 2015 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 48:141-168.
    La fuerza derivativa es descrita por Leibniz como modificación o limitación de la entelequia o fuerza primitiva. Sin embargo, la describe también como perteneciente a los fenómenos y como causante del movimiento físico. Algunos comentadores han encontrado en este punto un conflicto irresoluble dentro del sistema leibniziano, mientras que otros han ensayado algunas soluciones. Este artículo presenta un análisis de la noción de “modo”, tal como es utilizada en la descripción de la relación entre fuerza primitiva y fuerza derivativa. A (...)
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  35. 5. “Parfaits Miroirs de L’Univers”: A “Virtual” Interpretation of Leibnizian Metaphysics.William Boos - 2018 - In Metamathematics and the Philosophical Tradition. De Gruyter. pp. 160-185.
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  36. Cause and Effect in Leibniz’s Brevis Demonstratio.Laurynas Adomaitis - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science:000-000.
    Leibniz’s argument against Descartes’s conservation principle in the Brevis demonstratio (1686) has traditionally been read as passing from the premise that motive force must be conserved to the conclusion that motive force is not identical to quantity of motion and, finally, that quantity of motion is not conserved. In a lesser-known draft of the same year, Christiaan Huygens claimed that Descartes had in fact never held the view that Leibniz was attacking. Huygens is right as far as the traditional reading (...)
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  37. Eternal Punishment, Universal Salvation and Pragmatic Theology in Leibniz.Paul Lodge - 2017 - In Lloyd Strickland, Erik Vynckier & Julia Weckend (eds.), Tercentenary Essays on the Philosophy & Science of G.W. Leibniz. London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 301-24.
    This paper explores the issue of Leibniz's commitment to the doctrines of eternal punishment and universal salvation. I argue against the dominant view that Leibniz was committed to eternal punishment, but rather than defending the minority position that Leibniz believed in universal salvation, I suggest that the evidence for his adherence to each is indicative of the way in which he regards religious doctrine as instrumentally valuable. My hypothesis is that Leibniz thought that the appropriateness of advocating eternal damnation, universal (...)
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  38. Alguns Aspectes No Cartesians Del Racionalisme de Spinoza I de Leibniz. Sobre la Naturalesa Dels Cossos.Bernardino Orio de Miguel - 2017 - Enrahonar: Quaderns de Filosofía 59:71-90.
    https://revistes.uab.cat/enrahonar/article/view/v59-orio.
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  39. Necessitat i optimisme metafísic en Leibniz o la glòria de la raó.Maria José de Torres Gómez-Pallete - 1995 - Enrahonar: Quaderns de Filosofía 24:35-46.
    https://revistes.uab.cat/enrahonar/article/view/v24-de-torres-gomez.
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  40. Necessity, a Leibnizian Thesis, and a Dialogical Semantics.Mohammad Shafiei - 2017 - South American Journal of Logic 3 (1):1-23.
    In this paper, an interpretation of "necessity", inspired by a Leibnizian idea and based on the method of dialogical logic, is introduced. The semantic rules corresponding to such an account of necessity are developed, and then some peculiarities, and some potential advantages, of the introduced dialogical explanation, in comparison with the customary explanation offered by the possible worlds semantics, are briefly discussed.
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  41. Leibniz, Complexidade E Incompletude.Gregory J. Chaitin & Virginia Maria F. Gonçalves Chaitin - 2016 - Veritas – Revista de Filosofia da Pucrs 61 (2):295-305.
    Este artigo é uma versão traduzida, revisada e expandida do artigo de G. J. Chaitin publicado em língua inglesa no American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Philosophy and Computers em 2009, uma palestra proferida em junho de 2008 na Universidade de Roma “Tor Vergata”, cujos trechos preservados aparecem aqui em primeira pessoa. Discutimos as ideias de Leibniz sobre a complexidade, e os desenvolvimentos três séculos mais tarde.
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  42. Freedom and the Possible Worlds From the Viewpoint of Leibniz.Mohammad Ali Ejei & Amrolla Moeen - 2008 - Journal of Philosophical Investigations at University of Tabriz 2 (205):23-53.
    One of the most important topics in Leibniz's thoughts is thoughs is the nature of freedom. Here, he attempted to develop an analysis of freedom by which he can show how God and human beings can be free in the same sense. To solve the problems of freedom in God and human beings. Leibniz highlights some important points, such as: the distinction between absolute and hypothetical necessity, and the theory of possible worlds. This essay shows that Leibiz’s attempts for solving (...)
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  43. Bayle E Leibniz: O Sistema da Harmonia Preestabelecida No Verbete “Rorarius” Do Dictionnnaire Historique Et Critique.Marcelo de Sant'Anna Alves Primo - 2017 - Revista de Filosofia Moderna E Contemporânea 5 (1):57-76.
    A hipótese da harmonia preestabelecida é vista por Bayle, especificamente na nota L do verbete “Rorarius” na segunda edição do seu Dictionnaire historique et critique, como uma conquista fundamental uma vez que amplia os horizontes da Filosofia. Se antes de Leibniz só era possível escolher entre dois caminhos para refletir acerca das relações entre a alma e o corpo – a hipótese escolástica e a hipótese dos cartesianos – agora há uma outra via proposta pelo pensador alemão. A harmonia preestabelecida, (...)
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  44. Lotman, Leibniz, and the Semiospheric Monad: Lost Pages From the Archives.Pietro Restaneo - 2018 - Semiotica 2018 (224):313-336.
    Journal Name: Semiotica Issue: Ahead of print.
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  45. Het spatium: Leibniz en Deleuze over ruimte en uitgebreidheid.Florian Vermeiren - forthcoming - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie.
    This paper aims to show that Deleuze’s ideas on space and extension are heavily in debt to Leibniz. The focus is on chapter five, ‘the Asymmetrical Synthesis of the Sensible’, of Difference and Repetition. Concepts such as ‘intensive magnitude’, ‘distance’, ‘order’ and most importantly ‘spatium’ are shown to have their origin in Leibniz’s philosophy. In order to do so, the article starts with Leibniz’s critique on Cartesian mechanics and how this leads Leibniz to a conception of space that goes beyond (...)
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  46. Une difficulté dans la théorie leibnizienne du temps.Daniel Schulthess - 1988 - In I. Marchlewitz (ed.), Leibniz: Tradition und Aktualität - Vorträge des V. Int. Leibniz-Kongresses (Hannover, 14-19 November 1988). Hannover: G.-W.-Leibniz-Gesellschaft. pp. p.878-882..
    The article deals with the problem of how works indexical reference to temporal moments (especially to the present) in the philosophy of Leibniz. Leibniz refutes Newton's and Clarke’s theory of absolute time: since there is no sufficient reason to consider the universe as having being created at one absolute moment rather than at another, temporal moments can be individuated only through their reciprocal relation. What then distinguishes reference to the present from reference to the past and to the future? There (...)
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  47. Zur Infinitisierung der Automaten: Descartes Und Leibniz.Daniel Schulthess - 1997 - In J. Soering & R. Sorgg (eds.), Die Androiden: Zur Poetologie der Automaten. Francfort: P. Lang. pp. p.85-98..
    The article compares Descartes’ and Leibniz’ use of the concept of a machine. For Descartes, the activity of the engineers rises to become the model for the scientific enterprise: one proceeds from the simple and the familiar to explain the complex. In this way one can escape the sheer astonishment about the complexity of the machines and their effects. This mechanical model is extended also to the explanation of the living beings. Also Leibniz regards living beings as machines. The difference (...)
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  48. La réhabilitation des apparences sensibles - Eléments d'un programme leibnizien.Daniel Schulthess - 2002 - In Hans Poser (ed.), Nihil sine ratione: VII. Internationaler Leibniz-Kongress, Berlin, 10.-14. September 2001, Nachtragsband,. Hannover: G.-W. Leibniz-Gesellschaft. pp. p.358-368..
    The article reconstructs Leibniz’s theory of the relation between perceptions and reality. Leibniz’s position is different both from that of Descartes, according to whom the perceptions of the senses, unlike those of the mind, are never perceptions of reality, and from that of Locke, according to whom only the perceptions of primary qualities have a resemblance to reality, whereas secondary qualities do not correspond to anything real. The author shows that, according to Leibniz, the expressive link between perception and reality (...)
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  49. Leibniz - A Freedom Libertarian.Ori Beck - 2015 - Studia Leibnitiana 47:67-85.
    Leibniz's views about human freedom are much debated today. While traditionalists hold that Leibniz was a compatibilist about freedom, some commentators are now suggesting that Leibniz can be read as an incompatibilist. This exciting new reading is often based on Leibniz's "Necessary and Contingent Truths" (AVI, 4 B, 1514-1524; henceforth: NCT). This paper shall argue that NCT supports not only an understanding of Leibniz as a freedom incompatibilist, but more radically, as embracing a particularly intriguing kind of libertarianism. On this (...)
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  50. Leibniz Reinterpreted.Lloyd Strickland - 2006 - London, UK: Continuum.
    Leibniz Reinterpreted tackles head on the central idea in Leibniz's philosophy, namely that we live in the best of all possible worlds. Strickland argues that Leibniz's theory has been consistently misunderstood by previous commentators. In the process Strickland provides both an elucidation and reinterpretation of a number of concepts central to Leibniz's work, such as 'richness', 'simplicity', 'harmony' and 'incompossibility', and shows where previous attempts to explain these concepts have failed. This clear and concise study is tightly focussed and assumes (...)
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