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  1. Schleiermacher Between Kant and Leibniz.Jacqueline Mariña - 2004 - In Christine Helmer & Marjorie Suchocki (eds.), Schleiermacher and Whitehead: Open Systems in Dialogue.
    This paper takes stock of Leibnizian influences on Schleiermacher's thought through an examination and comparison of the views of Leibniz, Kant, and Schleiermacher on predication. I analyze each thinker's foundational ontological and epistemological commitments and their implications for their understanding of predication. More specifically, I explore whether Schleiermacher's adoption of Leibiniz' theory of the complete concept and the theory of prediction it entails conflicts with his adoption of Kant's two-source theory of knowledge. I conclude that it does, and that it (...)
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Leibniz: Metaphysics
  1. Possible Worlds in the Precipice: Why Leibniz Met Spinoza?Vassil Vidinsky - 2017 - Facta Universitatis 16 (3):213-223.
    The main objective of the paper is to give initial answers to three important questions. Why did Leibniz visit Spinoza? Why did his preparation for this meeting include a modification of the ontological proof of God? What is the philosophical result of the meeting and what do possible worlds have to do with it? In order to provide answers, three closely related manuscripts by Leibniz from November 1676 have been compared and the slow conceptual change of his philosophical apparatus has (...)
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  2. Leibniz's Monadological Positive Aesthetics.Pauline Phemister & Lloyd Strickland - 2018 - In Pauline Phemister & Jeremy William Dunham (eds.), Monadologies. London: Routledge.
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  3. Leibniz's Mirrors: Reflecting the Past.Pauline Phemister - 2017 - In Wenchao Li (ed.), Vortrage des X. Internationalen Leibniz-Kongress, vol. 6. Hannover: Olms. pp. 93-108.
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  4. Monadologies.Pauline Phemister & Jeremy William Dunham (eds.) - 2018 - London: Routledge.
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  5. Why Leibniz Was Not an Eclectic Philosopher?Ursula Goldenbaum - 2017 - In Wenchao Li (ed.), Für unser Glück oder das Glück anderer (=Keynotes of the Xth International Leibniz-Congress). Hildesheim-Zürich-New York: Olms. pp. 153-174.
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  6. Monads.Donald Rutherford - 2018 - In Maria Rosa Antognazza (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Leibniz. Oxford University Press. pp. 356-380.
    This article discusses the final development of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz’s metaphysics: the theory of monads. It examines Leibniz’s arguments for monads as mindlike “simple substances,” his description of the properties of monads, and the distinction he draws among different types of monads. The remainder of the article focuses on two problems that attend Leibniz’s claim that reality ultimately consists solely of monads and their internal states (perceptions and appetitions). The first problem is whether a relation among monads can account for (...)
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  7. The Actual World.Donald Rutherford - 2018 - In Maria Rosa Antognazza (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Leibniz. Oxford University Press. pp. 65-85.
    This chapter discusses Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz’s theory of the actual world as the best of all possible worlds. The chapter opens with Leibniz’s response to the two most basic questions of metaphysics: Why is there something rather than nothing? And, why do certain things exist while other equally possible things do not? It examines Leibniz’s critique of Baruch Spinoza’s metaphysics, with particular reference to the argument that God must make a choice among possible worlds because not all possibles are “compossible.” (...)
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  8. Natureza e artifício: Leibniz e os modernos sobre a concepção dos corpos orgânicos como máquinas.Celi Hirata - 2018 - Dois Pontos 15 (1):95-109.
    In modernity, the distinction between nature and artifice disappears, so that machines made by men become privileged models for the explanation of natural bodies, as can be observed in Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, among others. This new relationship between nature and artifice is correlated with the mechanization and refutation of finality in nature, insofar as the adoption of mechanics as a model of nature’s explanation is associated to the rejection of the use of final causes in physics and to the conception (...)
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  9. Leibniz’s Key Philosophical Writings: A Guide.Paul Lodge & Lloyd Strickland - forthcoming - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  10. The Correspondence with Arnauld.Julia Jorati - forthcoming - In Paul Lodge & Lloyd Strickland (eds.), Leibniz’s Key Philosophical Writings. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Leibniz’s correspondence with Antoine Arnauld is one of the clearest and most comprehensive expressions of Leibniz’s philosophy in the so-called middle period. This chapter will explore the philosophical content of this correspondence. It will concentrate on four of the most central topics: (a) complete concepts and contingency, (b) substance and body, (c) causation, and (d) the special status of rational souls in God’s plan.
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  11. Embodied Cognition Without Causal Interaction in Leibniz.Julia Jorati - forthcoming - In Dominik Perler & Sebastian Bender (eds.), Causation and Cognition: Perspectives on Early Modern Philosophy. New York, USA: Routledge.
    My aim in this chapter is to explain how and why all human cognition depends on the body for Leibniz. I will show that there are three types of dependence: (a) the body is needed in order to supply materials, or content, for thinking; (b) the body is needed in order to give us the opportunity for the discovery of innate ideas; and (c) the body is needed in order to provide sensory notions as vehicles of thought. The third type (...)
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  12. Why Monads Need Appetites.Julia Jorati - 2016 - In Wenchao Li (ed.), ‘Für unser Glück oder das Glück anderer’: Vorträge des X. Internationalen Leibniz-Kongresses Hannover, 18.–23. Juli 2016, Vol. 5. Hildesheim, Germany: Olms. pp. 121–129.
    The mature Leibniz often describes monads as having two types of modifications: perceptions and appetites. But why would monads need appetites? When reading secondary literature about Leibniz, it can easily look as if appetites are superfluous: some scholars describe the inner workings of monads without saying much, if anything, about appetites. Instead, they focus on perceptions and explain the transition to new perceptions by reference to prior perceptions together with the underlying primitive force or law of the series. These interpretations (...)
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  13. Leibniz's Ontology of Force.Julia Jorati - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 8:189–224.
    Leibniz portrays the most fundamental entities in his mature ontology in at least three different ways. In some places, he describes them as mind-like, immaterial substances that perceive and strive. Elsewhere, he presents them as hylomorphic compounds. In yet other passages, he characterizes them in terms of primitive and derivative forces. Interpreters often assume that the first description is the most accurate. In contrast, I will argue that the third characterization is more accurate than the other two. If that is (...)
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  14. Stephen Voss (Ed.), The Leibniz-Arnauld Correspondence: With Selections From the Correspondence with Ernst, Landgrave of Hessen-Rheinfels by G. W. Leibniz. [REVIEW]Julia Jorati - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):757-758.
    In February 1686, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz sent a letter to Antoine Arnauld, via their mutual friend Ernst, the Landgrave of Hessen-Rheinfels. This letter contained a short summary of Leibniz's most recent philosophical work, the Discourse on Metaphysics, and asked Arnauld for his reaction to it. Arnauld's response was extremely harsh: he called Leibniz's views shocking and useless and advised him to stop engaging in metaphysical speculations. Yet, Leibniz did not let this discourage him. In the exchange that followed, Leibniz was (...)
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  15. Leibniz et l'invention des phénomènes.Daniel Schulthess - 2009 - Paris: PUF.
    LES APPARENCES: ANALYSES PREALABLES L'ontologie des apparences I : questions terminologiques L'ontologie des apparences II : les entia apparentia La sémantique des apparences DES APPARENCES AUX FONDEMENTS Aspects catégoriels : la substance La simplicité comme condition de la substance L'activité comme condition de la substance DES FONDEMENTS AUX APPARENCES La production des apparences I : l'étendue La production des apparences II : la diffusion La production des qualités sensibles I BILAN Dire ce qu'il en est du corps Les propositions réduplicatives.
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  16. Leibniz and The Best of All One-Monad Universes.Richard Mather - 2018
    The purpose of this essay is to make the case for a heterodox reading of Leibniz’s The Monadology (published 1720) through the lens of Professor John Wheeler’s hypothesis of the one-electron universe (proposed in 1940). My conjecture is this: That there exists in the knowable universe only one monad; that this monad traverses time in both directions, eventually criss-crossing the entire past and future history of the universe; and that this singular monad interacts with itself countless times, thereby filling the (...)
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  17. Eternal Punishment, Universal Salvation and Pragmatic Theology in Leibniz.Paul Lodge - 2017 - In Lloyd Strickland, Erik Vynckier & Julia Weckend (eds.), Tercentenary Essays on the Philosophy & Science of G.W. Leibniz. London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 301-24.
    This paper explores the issue of Leibniz's commitment to the doctrines of eternal punishment and universal salvation. I argue against the dominant view that Leibniz was committed to eternal punishment, but rather than defending the minority position that Leibniz believed in universal salvation, I suggest that the evidence for his adherence to each is indicative of the way in which he regards religious doctrine as instrumentally valuable. My hypothesis is that Leibniz thought that the appropriateness of advocating eternal damnation, universal (...)
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  18. Het spatium: Leibniz en Deleuze over ruimte en uitgebreidheid.Florian Vermeiren - forthcoming - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie.
    This paper aims to show that Deleuze’s ideas on space and extension are heavily in debt to Leibniz. The focus is on chapter five, ‘the Asymmetrical Synthesis of the Sensible’, of Difference and Repetition. Concepts such as ‘intensive magnitude’, ‘distance’, ‘order’ and most importantly ‘spatium’ are shown to have their origin in Leibniz’s philosophy. In order to do so, the article starts with Leibniz’s critique on Cartesian mechanics and how this leads Leibniz to a conception of space that goes beyond (...)
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  19. Une difficulté dans la théorie leibnizienne du temps.Daniel Schulthess - 1988 - In I. Marchlewitz (ed.), Leibniz: Tradition und Aktualität - Vorträge des V. Int. Leibniz-Kongresses (Hannover, 14-19 November 1988). Hannover: G.-W.-Leibniz-Gesellschaft. pp. p.878-882..
    The article deals with the problem of how works indexical reference to temporal moments (especially to the present) in the philosophy of Leibniz. Leibniz refutes Newton's and Clarke’s theory of absolute time: since there is no sufficient reason to consider the universe as having being created at one absolute moment rather than at another, temporal moments can be individuated only through their reciprocal relation. What then distinguishes reference to the present from reference to the past and to the future? There (...)
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  20. La réhabilitation des apparences sensibles - Eléments d'un programme leibnizien.Daniel Schulthess - 2002 - In Hans Poser (ed.), Nihil sine ratione: VII. Internationaler Leibniz-Kongress, Berlin, 10.-14. September 2001, Nachtragsband,. Hannover: G.-W. Leibniz-Gesellschaft. pp. p.358-368..
    The article reconstructs Leibniz’s theory of the relation between perceptions and reality. Leibniz’s position is different both from that of Descartes, according to whom the perceptions of the senses, unlike those of the mind, are never perceptions of reality, and from that of Locke, according to whom only the perceptions of primary qualities have a resemblance to reality, whereas secondary qualities do not correspond to anything real. The author shows that, according to Leibniz, the expressive link between perception and reality (...)
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  21. Leibniz - A Freedom Libertarian.Ori Beck - 2015 - Studia Leibnitiana 47:67-85.
    Leibniz's views about human freedom are much debated today. While traditionalists hold that Leibniz was a compatibilist about freedom, some commentators are now suggesting that Leibniz can be read as an incompatibilist. This exciting new reading is often based on Leibniz's "Necessary and Contingent Truths" (AVI, 4 B, 1514-1524; henceforth: NCT). This paper shall argue that NCT supports not only an understanding of Leibniz as a freedom incompatibilist, but more radically, as embracing a particularly intriguing kind of libertarianism. On this (...)
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  22. Leibniz Reinterpreted.Lloyd Strickland - 2006 - London, UK: Continuum.
    Leibniz Reinterpreted tackles head on the central idea in Leibniz's philosophy, namely that we live in the best of all possible worlds. Strickland argues that Leibniz's theory has been consistently misunderstood by previous commentators. In the process Strickland provides both an elucidation and reinterpretation of a number of concepts central to Leibniz's work, such as 'richness', 'simplicity', 'harmony' and 'incompossibility', and shows where previous attempts to explain these concepts have failed. This clear and concise study is tightly focussed and assumes (...)
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  23. Reply to Donald Rutherford.Julia Jorati - 2017 - The Leibniz Review 27:199-208.
  24. Leibniz on Causation and Agency, by Julia Jorati. [REVIEW]Donald Rutherford - 2017 - The Leibniz Review 27:183-197.
  25. Self-Moving Machines and the Soul: Leibniz Contra Spinoza on the Spiritual Automaton.Christopher P. Noble - 2017 - The Leibniz Review 27:65-89.
    The young Spinoza and the mature Leibniz both characterize the soul as a self-moving spiritual automaton. Though it is unclear if Leibniz’s use of the term was suggested to him from his reading of Spinoza, Leibniz was aware of its presence in Spinoza’s Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect. Considering Leibniz’s staunch opposition to Spinozism, the question arises as to why he was willing to adopt this term. I propose an answer to this question by comparing the spiritual automaton (...)
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  26. Review of Vis Vim Vi: Declinations of Force in Leibniz’s Dynamics, by Tzuchien Tho. [REVIEW]Edward Slowik - 2017 - The Leibniz Review 27:169-172.
  27. Leibniz and the Problem of Temporary Truths.Giovanni Merlo - 2017 - The Leibniz Review 27:31-63.
    Not unlike many contemporary philosophers, Leibniz admitted the existence of temporary truths, true propositions that have not always been or will not always be true. In contrast with contemporary philosophers, though, Leibniz conceived of truth in terms of analytic containment: on his view, the truth of a predicative sentence consists in the analytic containment of the concept expressed by the predicate in the concept expressed by the subject. Given that analytic relations among concepts are eternal and unchanging, the problem arises (...)
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  28. Leibniz on Innate Ideas and Kant on the Origin of the Categories.Alberto Vanzo - 2018 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 100 (1):19-45.
    In his essay against Eberhard, Kant denies that there are innate concepts. Several scholars take Kant’s statement at face value. They claim that Kant did not endorse concept innatism, that the categories are not innate concepts, and that Kant’s views on innateness are significantly different from Leibniz’s. This paper takes issue with those claims. It argues that Kant’s views on the origin of the intellectual concepts are remarkably similar to Leibniz’s. Given two widespread notions of innateness, the dispositional notion and (...)
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  29. Necessitarianism in Leibniz's Confessio Philosophi.Joseph Anderson - 2012 - Society and Politics 6 (2):114-123.
    Leibniz’s Confessio philosophi (1672–1673) appears to provide an anti-necessitarian solution to the problem of the author of sin. I will give here a brief reading of what appear to be two solutions to the problem of the author of sin in the Confessio. The first solution appears to commit Leibniz’s spokesman (the Philosopher) to necessitarianism. The Theologian (Leibniz’s interlocutor) objects to this necessitarianism, prompting the Philosopher to offer a modified version that appears to exorcise this doctrine. As it turns out, (...)
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  30. Tentamen Anagogicum: An Anagogical Essay in the Investigation of Causes.Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - 1696 - In Leroy E. Loemker (ed.), Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Philosophical Papers. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 477-85.
  31. A Brief Demonstration of a Notable Error of Descartes and Others Concerning a Natural Law (Brevis Demonstratio).Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - 1686 - In Leroy E. Loemker (ed.), Leibniz Philosophical Papers. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 296-302.
  32. On Nature Itself (De Ipsa Natura).Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - 1698 - In Roger Ariew & Daniel Garber (eds.), G. W. Leibniz Philosophical Essays. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company. pp. 155-167.
  33. Against Barbaric Physics (Antibarbarus Physicus).Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - 1989 - In Roger Ariew & Daniel Garber (eds.), G. W. Leibniz Philosophical Essays. Indianapolis: Hackett. pp. 312-320.
  34. A Specimen of Dynamics (Specimen Dynamicum).Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - 1989 - In Roger Ariew & Daniel Garber (eds.), G. W. Leibniz Philosophical Essays. Indianapolis: Hackett. pp. 117-138.
  35. Leibniz on Determinateness and Possible Worlds.Adam Harmer - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (1).
    Leibniz argues that God doesn't create everything possible because not all possible things are compossible, that is, compatible with each other. Much recent debate has focused on Leibniz's conception of compossibility. One important aspect of this debate, which has not been examined directly, is the distinction between possible worlds and possible creations: the notion of possible world is more robust than simply whatever God can create. Many commentators have relied on this distinction without a clear formulation of it. I develop (...)
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  36. Leibniz et la Méthode de la Science.François Duchesneau - 1993 - Paris: Presses Universitaire de France.
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  37. The Contingency of Leibniz's Principle of the Identity of Indiscernibles.Julia Jorati - 2017 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 4:899–929.
    Leibniz’s famous Principle of the Identity of Indiscernibles (PII) states that no two things are exactly alike. The PII is commonly thought to be metaphysically necessary for Leibniz: the coexistence of two indiscernibles is metaphysically impossible. This paper argues, against the standard interpretation, that Leibniz’s PII is metaphysically contingent. In other words, while the coexistence of indiscernibles would not imply a contradiction, the PII is true in the actual world because the Principle of Sufficient Reason rules out violations of the (...)
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  38. Realidade do ideal e substancialidade do mundo em Leibniz: percorrendo e sobrevoando o labirinto do contínuo.William de Siqueira Piauí - 2009 - Dissertation, USP, Brazil
  39. Review of "Leibniz's Mill" by Charles Landesman. [REVIEW]Lloyd Strickland - 2017 - Heythrop Journal 58 (3):545-546.
  40. Leibniz on Human Finitude, Progress, and Eternal Recurrence: The Argument of the ‘Apokatastasis’ Essay Drafts and Related Texts.David Forman - 2018 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 8:225-270.
    The ancient doctrine of the eternal return of the same embodies a thoroughgoing rejection of the hope that the future world will be better than the present. For this reason, it might seem surprising that Leibniz constructs an argument for a version of the doctrine. He concludes in one text that in the far distant future he himself ‘would be living in a city called Hannover located on the Leine river, occupied with the history of Brunswick, and writing letters to (...)
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  41. Relation Between Whole and Part in Leibnitz Philosophy.Zahra Nouri Sangdehi Katrimi & Hourieh Bakoui - 2014 - Journal of Philosophical Investigations at University of Tabriz 8 (15):45-58.
    Here, on the one hand, regarding to the fundamental idea of Leibniz’s philosophy, namely, «Substance”, we will try to study the different kinds of whole and part and their relationship. On the other hand, considering some principles of Leibniz’s philosophy such as; the principal of contradiction, the principle of sufficient reason, and the principle of harmony, we will consider the whole and part relationship with substance. The whole and part has either philosophical – ontological meaning or logical- epistemological one. The (...)
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  42. Newton and Leibniz on Non-Substantival Space.Alejandro Cassini - 2005 - Theoria : An International Journal for Theory, History and Fundations of Science 20 (1):25-43.
    According to their own concepts of substance, both Newton’s and Leibniz’ spaces are not substantival. The reason of that consists in the fact that space is not capable of action. However, space is relational because their parts are individuated only by means of their mutual relations.
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  43. Leibniz’s Monads and Mulla Sadra’s Hierarchy of Being: A Comparative Study.طاهری علی فتح - 2012 - Journal of Philosophical Investigations at University of Tabriz 6 (11):95-108.
    Mulla Sadra and Leibniz, the two philosophers from the East and the West, belong to two different worlds. Though they were unaware of the ideas of each other, their philosophical systems share certain common points that are comparable. Monads constitute the basis of Leibniz's thought and he refers to their features in his various works. On the other side, Mulla Sadra's philosophy is also based on being and he tries to deal with its reality in his philosophy. Though Leibniz's monads (...)
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  44. Leibniz on Plurality, Dependence, and Unity.Adam Harmer - 2017 - Res Philosophica 95 (1):69-94.
    Leibniz argues that Cartesian extension lacks the unity required to be a substance. A key premise of Leibniz’s argument is that matter is a collection or aggregation. I consider an objection to this premise raised by Leibniz’s correspondent Burchard de Volder and consider a variety of ways that Leibniz might be able to respond to De Volder’s objection. I argue that it is not easy for Leibniz to provide a dialectically relevant response and, further, that the difficulty arises from Leibniz’s (...)
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  45. Leibniz, o Individual e Suas Fissuras Reflexões sobre o Discurso de metafísica e a filosofia pré-monádica.Dante Carvalho Targa - 2009 - Dissertation, UFSC, Brazil
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  46. The Ontological Status of Bodies in Leibniz (Part II).Shane Duarte - 2016 - Studia Leibnitiana 48 (1):68-88.
    In the second part of this essay, I aim to show that Leibniz, in asserting that bodies are aggregates of substances, wants to affirm something about bodies insofar as they exist a parte rei or in reality: in reality a body is not a being, but a multitude of beings or substances. And this, on my view, is precisely what leads Leibniz to assert that bodies are phenomena: since a body is not in reality a being, but many beings, it (...)
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  47. Some Antecedents of Leibniz’s Principles.Martinho Antônio Bittencourt de Castro - 2008 - Dissertation, University of New South Wales, Australia
    An objective of thisthesis is to investigate whether philosophical tradition can justify or support some of the arguments that are at the basis of Leibniz’s system (for example, monads have no window to the exterior world, a phrase that summarises the structure of Monadology). I shall demonstrate how Leibniz reflects the concerns and the positions of his key predecessors. Thus, the aim of the thesis is to explore key antecedents to Leibniz’s central doctrines. The thesis argues that Leibniz carried out (...)
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  48. Theories of mixture in the early modern period. JEMS 4.1 (Spring).Lucian Petrescu (ed.) - 2015 - Zeta Books.
    Special issue of the Journal for Early Modern Studies (4.1., Spring 2005) Guest Editor: Lucian Petrescu. -/- .
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  49. Leibniz, the Young Kant, and Boscovich on the Relationality of Space.Idan Shimony - 2016 - In Wenchao Li (ed.), Für Unser Glück Oder Das Glück Anderer, X. Internationaler Leibniz-Kongress. Hildesheim: Georg Olms. pp. Vol. 2, pp. 73-85.
    Leibniz’s main thesis regarding the nature of space is that space is relational. This means that space is not an independent object or existent in itself, but rather a set of relations between objects existing at the same time. The reality of space, therefore, is derived from objects and their relations. For Leibniz and his successors, this view of space was intimately connected with the understanding of the composite nature of material objects. The nature of the relation between space and (...)
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