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  1. A Note on the Definition of Gratitude.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    In this paper, I object to Michael Rush’s definitions of targeted and propositional gratitude.
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  2. Indignation, Appreciation, and the Unity of Moral Experience.Uriah Kriegel - forthcoming - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
    Moral experience comes in many flavors. Some philosophers have argued that there is nothing common to the many forms moral experience can take. In this paper, I argue that close attention to the phenomenology of certain key emotions, combined with a clear distinction between essentially and accidentally moral experiences, suggests that there is a group of (essentially) moral emotions which in fact exhibit significant unity.
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  3. Group Agents and Moral Status: What Can We Owe to Organizations?Adam Lovett & Stefan Riedener - forthcoming - Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    Organizations have neither a right to the vote nor a weighty right to life. We need not enfranchise Goldman Sachs. We should feel few scruples in dissolving Standard Oil. But they are not without rights altogether. We can owe it to them to keep our promises. We can owe them debts of gratitude. Thus, we can owe some things to organizations. But we cannot owe them everything we can owe to people. They seem to have a peculiar, fragmented moral status. (...)
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  4. Obligations of Gratitude and Correlative Rights.Tony Manela - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics 5.
    This article investigates a puzzle about gratitude—the proper response, in a beneficiary, to an act of benevolence from a benefactor. The puzzle arises from three platitudes about gratitude: 1) the beneficiary has certain obligations of gratitude; 2) these obligations are owed to the benefactor; and 3) the benefactor has no right to the fulfillment of these obligations. These platitudes suggest that gratitude is a counterexample to the “correlativity thesis” in the moral domain: the claim that strict moral obligations correlate to (...)
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  5. The Virtue of Gratitude and Its Associated Vices.Tony Manela - forthcoming - The Moral Psychology of Gratitude.
    Gratitude, the proper or fitting response to benevolence, has often been conceptualized as a virtue—a temporally stable disposition to perceive, think, feel, and act in certain characteristic ways in certain situations. Many accounts of gratitude as a virtue, however, have not analyzed this disposition accurately, and as a result, they have not revealed the rich variety of ways in which someone can fail to be a grateful person. In this paper, I articulate an account of the virtue of gratitude, and (...)
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  6. Beyond Benefits: Gratitude as a Response to Moral Regard.Stefan Riedener - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    What are the fittingness conditions of gratitude? One assumption seems unquestioned in the literature: that whenever it’s fitting for you to be grateful to me, that’s because I’ve benefitted or tried to benefit you. In this paper, I argue that that’s false. You may sometimes fittingly be grateful precisely because I refrained from benefitting you. Or you may be grateful because I omitted to instrumentalise you, or treated you justly – where this isn’t reducible to benefits. Morality isn’t all about (...)
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  7. Gratitude Is Only Fittingly Targeted Towards Agents.Marcus William Hunt - 2021 - Sophia:1-19.
    The paper argues that ‘All varieties of gratitude are only overall fitting when targeted towards agents,’ for instance that any variety of gratitude for the beautiful sunset is only overall fitting if a supernatural agent such as God exists. The first premise is that ‘Prepositional gratitude is overall fitting only when targeted towards agents.’ For this premise, intuitive judgments are offered. The second premise is that ‘Prepositional gratitude is the paradigmatic variety of gratitude.’ For this premise, an aspect of the (...)
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  8. The Solace: Finding Value in Death Through Gratitude for Life.Joshua Glasgow - 2020 - Oup Usa.
    Mourning the loss of loved ones can be one of the hardest things we go through. But what if we changed the way we thought about it, and learned to find positive value in death as part of life? This book examines how we can take solace in the fact that we and our loved ones will die, surprising or impossible as that may seem. Along the way, it investigates the nature of gratitude, how good and bad relate, and enduring (...)
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  9. Does gratitude to R for ϕ-ing imply gratitude that R ϕ-ed?Tony Manela - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 177 (11):3245-3262.
    Many find it plausible that for a given beneficiary, Y, benefactor, R, and action, ϕ, Y’s being grateful to R for ϕ-ing implies Y’s being grateful that R ϕ-ed. According to some philosophers who hold this view, all instances of gratitude to, or “prepositional gratitude,” are also instances of gratitude that, or “propositional gratitude.” These philosophers believe there is a single unified concept of gratitude, a phenomenon that is essentially gratitude that, and whose manifestations sometimes have additional features that make (...)
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  10. Demanding More of Strawsonian Accountability Theory.Daniel Telech - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (4):926-941.
    A neglected and non-trivial problem exists for a central cluster of Strawsonian accountability theories of moral responsibility, namely those that, following Gary Watson, understand the reactive attitudes to be implicit forms of moral address, particularly moral demand. The problem consists in the joint acceptance of two claims: (a) Accountability is a matter of agents holding one another to moral demands, and (b) accountability is a view of blame and praise. I label joint acceptance of these claims the Strawsonian’s demand dogma. (...)
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  11. Gratitude for Being.Sungwoo Um - 2020 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 98 (2):222-233.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper, I argue that what I call ‘gratitude for being’ can capture the distinctive sort of gratitude that we typically owe to our intimates, such as parents and close friends. Instead of specific actions or beneficial objects, the benefactor herself and her relationship to the beneficiary are considered as the grounds of gratitude. I argue that people who have consistent and particularized care for us deserve our gratitude for being, rather than gratitude for doing.
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  12. Gratitude Increases Third-Party Punishment.Jonathan Vayness, Fred Duong & David DeSteno - 2020 - Cognition and Emotion 34 (5):1020-1027.
    ABSTRACTThird-party punishment occurs when a perpetrator of a transgression is punished by another person who was not directly affected by the transgression. Given gratitude’s...
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  13. Surprise Me! On the Impact of Unexpected Benefits on Other-Praising Gratitude Expressions.Alexa Weiss, Pascal Burgmer & Jens Lange - 2020 - Tandf: Cognition and Emotion 34 (8):1608-1620.
    Volume 34, Issue 8, December 2020, Page 1608-1620.
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  14. Gratitude and Alterity in Environmental Virtue Ethics.Nathan Wood - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (4):481-498.
    Rachel Carson begins her revolutionary book Silent Spring with a quote from E.B. White that reads 'we would stand a better chance of survival if we accommodated ourselves to this planet and viewed it appreciatively'. While White's advice can account for an instrumental relationship towards nature, I believe that the more important relationship offered in his recommendation is one of appreciation or gratitude. But how are we to understand gratitude as appreciating Nature non-instrumentally when it has traditionally always been understood (...)
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  15. Gratitude: Generic Vs. Deep.Hichem Naar - 2019 - In Robert Roberts & Daniel Telech (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Gratitude. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 15-34.
    In this paper, I argue that gratitude is not necessarily affective or motivating. Against a common trend in recent philosophical treatments of the notion, indeed, I argue for the introduction of an important but neglected kind of gratitude that is simply a matter of believing that one has been benefitted by a benevolent benefactor. I will call this non-affective, non-motivating kind of gratitude “generic,” and the kind – taking center stage in the literature – that is affective and motivating “deep.” (...)
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  16. The Ethical Significance of Gratitude in Epicureanism.Benjamin A. Rider - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (6):1092-1112.
    ABSTRACTMany texts in the Epicurean tradition mention gratitude but do not explicitly explain its function in Epicurean ethics. I review passages that mention or discuss gratitude and ingratitude a...
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  17. The Emotion-Virtue-Debt Triad of Gratitude: An Introduction to The Moral Psychology of Gratitude.Robert C. Roberts & Daniel Telech - 2019 - In Robert Roberts & Daniel Telech (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Gratitude.
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  18. The Moral Psychology of Gratitude.Robert Roberts & Daniel Telech (eds.) - 2019 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    Expressions of gratitude abound. Hardly a book is published that does not include in its preface or acknowledgments some variation on, “I am grateful to…for…” Indeed, most achievements come to be only through the help of others. We value the benevolence of others, and when we—or our loved ones—are the recipients of benevolence, our emotional response is often one of gratitude. -/- But, are we bound to the requirement of ‘repaying’ our benefactors in some way? If we are, and there (...)
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  19. Perspectives On Gratitude: An Interdisciplinary Approach.Michael Rush - 2018 - Philosophical Quarterly 68 (272):648-650.
    Perspectives On Gratitude: An Interdisciplinary Approach. Edited By Carr David.
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  20. Evidence for a Relationship Between Trait Gratitude and Prosocial Behaviour.Rachel Yost-Dubrow & Yarrow Dunham - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (2):397-403.
  21. Functions of Positive Emotions: Gratitude as a Motivator of Self-Improvement and Positive Change.Christina N. Armenta, Megan M. Fritz & Sonja Lyubomirsky - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (3):183-190.
    Positive emotions are highly valued and frequently sought. Beyond just being pleasant, however, positive emotions may also lead to long-term benefits in important domains, including work, physical health, and interpersonal relationships. Research thus far has focused on the broader functions of positive emotions. According to the broaden-and-build theory, positive emotions expand people’s thought–action repertoires and allow them to build psychological, intellectual, and social resources. New evidence suggests that positive emotions—particularly gratitude—may also play a role in motivating individuals to engage in (...)
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  22. Should Gratitude Be a Requirement for Access to Live Organ Donation?Monica Escher, Monique Lamuela-Naulin, Catherine Bollondi, Paola Flores Menendez & Samia A. Hurst - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (11):762-765.
    Gratitude is both expected and problematic in live organ donation. Are there grounds to require it, and to forbid access to live donor transplantation to a recipient who fails to signal that he feels any form of gratitude? Recipient gratitude is not currently required for organ donation, but it is expected and may be a moral requirement. Despite this, we argue that making it a condition for live organ transplantation would be unjustified. It would constitute a problematic and disproportionate punishment (...)
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  23. Gratitude, Rights, and Moral Standouts.Terrance McConnell - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (2):279-293.
    Many maintain that if a beneficiary has a right to a benefit provided by his benefactor, then the former cannot owe the latter gratitude for that benefit. In this paper I argue against that view. I provide examples in which benefactors provide others with benefits to which they have a right even though most others are denying them that right. These benefactors are moral standouts; they do what is right when most similarly situated agents fail to do so. I then (...)
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  24. No Thanks! Autonomous Interpersonal Style is Associated with Less Experience and Valuing of Gratitude.Suzanne C. Parker, Haseeb Majid, Kate L. Stewart & Anthony H. Ahrens - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (8):1627-1637.
    Gratitude has been promoted as a beneficial emotional experience. However, gratitude is not universally experienced as positive. The current work examines whether an autonomous interpersonal style is associated with differential experience of gratitude. Study 1 found an inverse relationship between trait autonomy and both trait gratitude and positivity of response to receiving a hypothetical benefit from a friend. Study 2 replicated the finding that those higher in autonomy report less trait gratitude, and also demonstrated an inverse relationship between autonomy and (...)
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  25. Reconsidering the Roles of Gratitude and Indebtedness in Social Exchange.Cong Peng, Rob M. A. Nelissen & Marcel Zeelenberg - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (4):760-772.
    ABSTRACTReceiving favors is often a mixed blessing and commonly triggers two emotions: the positive emotion gratitude and negative emotion indebtedness. In three studies, we examined the hypothesis that gratitude and indebtedness have distinct functions in social exchange. Contrary to current views, we believe that the function of gratitude does not primarily reside in facilitating social exchange. Instead, we propose that indebtedness motivates people to repay favours received, and thus accounts for most of the prosocial effects commonly attributed to gratitude. On (...)
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  26. From Gratitude to Lamentation: On the Moral and Psychological Economy of Gift, Gain and Loss.David Carr - 2016 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (1):41-59.
    The passing of Nelson Mandela and other figures of contemporary importance may prompt the interesting question of how we might or should understand the psychological, social and moral function of lamentation in human life. This paper aims to show that such responses are not just of emotional and interpersonal significance, but also of serious moral import. To this end, the paper proceeds via exploration of conceptually and morally suggestive correspondences or resonances between the logical grammar of lamentation—which, to be sure, (...)
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  27. Perspectives on Gratitude: An Interdisciplinary Approach.David Carr (ed.) - 2016 - Routledge.
    Psychologists, philosophers, theologians and educationalists have all lately explored various conceptual, moral, psychological and pedagogical dimensions of gratitude in a rapidly expanding academic and popular literature. However, while the distinguished contributors to this work hail from these distinct disciplines, they have been brought together in this volume precisely in recognition of the need for a more interdisciplinary perspective on the topic. While further developing such more familiar debates in the field as whether it is appropriate to feel grateful in circumstances (...)
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  28. Why Should I Be Grateful? The Morality of Gratitude in Contexts Marked by Injustice.Liz Jackson - 2016 - Journal of Moral Education 45 (3):276-290.
    In philosophical and psychological literature, gratitude has normally been promoted as beneficial to oneself and others and as morally good. Being grateful for what you have is conceived as virtuous, while acts expressing gratefulness to those who have benefited you is often regarded as morally praiseworthy, if not morally expected. However, critical interrogations of the moral status of gratitude should also frame the possible cultivation of gratitude in moral education. This article focuses on whether gratitude should be regarded as morally (...)
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  29. Can Non-Theists Appropriately Feel Existential Gratitude?Michael Lacewing - 2016 - Religious Studies 52 (2):145-165.
    Does it make sense for non-theists to feel gratitude for their existence? The question arises because gratitude is typically thought to be directed towards a person to whom one is grateful. Hence the theist may be grateful to God for their existence, experienced as a gift. But can the non-believer feel something similar without being irrational? Can there be gratitude for existence but not to anyone? After analysing gratitude and how we can best understand the idea of non-directed gratitude, I (...)
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  30. Gratitude and Appreciation.Tony Manela - 2016 - American Philosophical Quarterly 53 (3):281-294.
    This article argues that "gratitude to" and "gratitude that" are fundamentally different concepts. The former (prepositional gratitude) is properly a response to benevolent attitudes, and entails special concern on the part of the beneficiary for a benefactor, while the latter (propositional gratitude) is a response to beneficial states of affairs, and entails no special concern for anyone. Propositional gratitude, it is argued, ultimately amounts to a species of appreciation. The tendency to see prepositional gratitude and propositional “gratitude” as two species (...)
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  31. Negative Feelings of Gratitude.Tony Manela - 2016 - Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (1):129-140.
    Philosophers generally agree that gratitude, the called-for response to benevolence, includes positive feelings. In this paper, I argue against this view. The grateful beneficiary will have certain feelings, but in some contexts, those feelings will be profoundly negative. Philosophers overlook this fact because they tend to consider only cases of gratitude in which the benefactor’s sacrifice is minimal, and in which the benefactor fares well after performing an act of benevolence. When we consider cases in which a benefactor suffers severely, (...)
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  32. Misplaced Gratitude and the Ethics of Oppression.Robin May Schott - 2016 - Metaphilosophy 47 (4-5):524-538.
    This essay examines Claudia Card's notion of misplaced gratitude, which she explores in one of her last papers, “Gratitude to the Decent Rescuer.” Whereas typically philosophers have been interested in the problems of the failures to honor obligations of gratitude, Card is more interested in the opposite fault of misplaced gratitude. Her interest reflects her social indignation and her fundamental commitment to opposing oppression, exploitation, and injustice in all its forms. The phenomenon of misplaced gratitude becomes visible from this perspective, (...)
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  33. Much Obliged: Kantian Gratitude Reconsidered.Kate Moran - 2016 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 98 (3):330-363.
    In his published texts and lectures on moral philosophy, Kant repeatedly singles out gratitude for discussion. Nevertheless, puzzles about the derivation, content, and nature of this duty remain. This paper seeks to solve some of these puzzles. Centrally, I argue that it is essential to attend to a distinction that Kant makes between well-wishing benevolence (Wohlwollen) and active beneficence (Wohlthun) on the part of a benefactor. On the Kantian account, I argue, a different type of gratitude is owed in response (...)
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  34. Dependent Children, Gratitude, and Respect.Amy Mullin - 2016 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 13 (6):720-738.
    _ Source: _Volume 13, Issue 6, pp 720 - 738 I argue that under the right conditions young dependent children owe their parents gratitude for the care they receive from them and further that parents have an obligation to motivate their children to be grateful in appropriate circumstances. Gratitude is appropriate even though parents have a duty to care for their children but it is only warranted when parents act both benevolently and with respect for their children’s partial autonomy. Moreover, (...)
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  35. Stephen Kershnar, Gratitude Toward Veterans: Why Americans Should Not Be Very Grateful to Veterans: Plymouth, England: Lexington Books, 2014, 158 Pp, ISBN 978-0-7391-8578-0 £49.95.Uwe Steinhoff - 2016 - Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (2):479-481.
    Stephen Kershnar’s main argument in Gratitude toward Veterans is that Americans should not be very grateful towards veterans. More precisely, he not only argues that veterans do not deserve the gratitude that many Americans offer them, but also that it is morally objectionable to be grateful towards them. His argument is applicable to war veterans generally, not only to those in the USA. Yet, it does have specific relevance to the United States given that, as Kershnar demonstrates, public gratitude towards (...)
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  36. Spiritual Development and Gratitude Among Indian Emerging Adults.Jobi Thomas Thurackal, Jozef Corveleyn & Jessie Dezutter - 2016 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 38 (1):72-88.
    Gratitude, a significant Christian value, is regarded as a duty among Indians. The present study examines the role played by spiritual development in gratitude among the Indian population. The participants were emerging Indian male adults, aged between 18 and 30 years. The first sample is from 495 Catholic Indian seminarians with intensive spiritual training, and the second is from 504 Catholic Indian nonseminarians. We use the Gratitude Questionnaire-6 and the Spiritual Assessment Inventory in the study. The results show that the (...)
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  37. Is Gratitude a Moral Virtue?David Carr - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (6):1475-1484.
    One matter upon which the already voluminous philosophical and psychological literature on the topic seems to be agreed is that gratitude is a psychologically and socially beneficial human quality of some moral significance. Further to this, gratitude seems to be widely regarded by positive psychologists and virtue ethicists as a moral virtue. This paper, however, sets out to show that such claims and assumptions about the moral character of gratitude are questionable and that its status as a moral virtue is (...)
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  38. The Paradox of Gratitude.David Carr - 2015 - British Journal of Educational Studies 63 (4):429-446.
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  39. Gratitude Toward Veterans: Why Americans Should Not Be Very Grateful to Veterans.Spencer Jay Case - 2015 - Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):197-199.
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  40. Do Positive Relations with Patients Play a Protective Role for Healthcare Employees? Effects of Patients' Gratitude and Support on Nurses' Burnout.Daniela Converso, Barbara Loera, Sara Viotti & Mara Martini - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  41. Neural Correlates of Gratitude.Glenn R. Fox, Jonas Kaplan, Hanna Damasio & Antonio Damasio - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  42. Appreciating Gratitude: Is Gratitude an Amplifier of Well-Being?Eufrozyna Gruszecka - 2015 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 46 (2):186-196.
    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between gratitude and certain components of well-being which are conducive to affirming life. Additionally, we also compared how experiencing joy impacts those components of well-being. A randomly chosen 1/3 of the participants was asked to recall an event from their past when they felt grateful. Another 1/3 was asked to recall an event from their past when they felt joy. The final 1/3 of the participants was the control group. Next, (...)
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  43. An Aristotelian Virtue of Gratitude.Kristján Kristjánsson - 2015 - Topoi 34 (2):499-511.
    The aim of this paper is to offer a reconstruction of gratitude as an Aristotelian virtue. The account I propose is meant to be essentially Aristotelian although it is clearly not Aristotle’s own account. I start in section “Current Discourses on Gratitude” with an overview of recent discourses on gratitude in philosophy and psychology. I then proceed, in section “Putting the Aristotelian Pieces Together”, to spell out a formal characterisation of gratitude as an Aristotelian emotional virtue. Section “Reappraising Aristotle on (...)
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  44. Gratitude.Tony Manela - 2015 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 2015 (Spring).
    Gratitude is the proper or called-for response in a beneficiary to benefits or beneficence from a benefactor. It is a topic of interest in normative ethics, moral psychology, and political philosophy, and may have implications for metaethics as well. Despite its commonness in everyday life, there is substantive disagreement among philosophers over the nature of gratitude and its connection to other philosophical concepts. The sections of this article address five areas of debate about what gratitude is, when it is called (...)
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  45. Educating Gratitude: Some Conceptual and Moral Misgivings.Blaire Morgan, Liz Gulliford & David Carr - 2015 - Journal of Moral Education 44 (1):97-111.
    In a rapidly expanding academic literature on gratitude, psychologists, philosophers and educational theorists have argued that gratitude is not just of great psycho-social importance but also of moral significance. It would therefore seem to follow that the promotion of gratitude is also of moral educational significance. In this regard, recent attempts by psychologists to develop practical interventions designed to make people more grateful should be of some interest. However, while appreciating some benefits of such work, this article argues that much (...)
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  46. The Normative and the Empirical in the Study of Gratitude.Robert C. Roberts - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (4):883-914.
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  47. Infection Control Measures and Debts of Gratitude.Diego S. Silva & A. M. Viens - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (4):55-57.
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  48. Directions of Cultivating Grateful Disposition in Moral Education. 추병완 - 2015 - Journal of Ethics: The Korean Association of Ethics 1 (103):31-57.
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  49. Gratitude, Self-Interest, and Love.Y. Sandy Berkovski - 2014 - Philosophia 42 (3):645-664.
    Gratitude is usually conceived as a uniquely appropriate response to goodwill. A grateful person is bound to reward an act of goodwill in some appropriately proportionate way. I argue that goodwill, when interpreted as love, should require no reward. Consequently, the idea of gratitude as a proportionate response to love is not intelligible. However, goodwill can also be understood merely as a disinterested concern. Such forms of goodwill are involved in reciprocal relationships. But gratitude has no place in these relationships (...)
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  50. Displacement and Gratitude: Accounting for the Political Obligation of Refugees.Jason D'Cruz - 2014 - Ethics and Global Politics 7 (1):1-17.
    On what basis, and to what extent, are refugees obligated to obey the laws of their host countries? Consideration of the specific case of asylum-seekers generates, I think, two competing intuitions: the refugee has a prima facie obligation to obey the laws of her host country and none of the popularly canvassed substrates of political obligation—consent, tacit consent, fairness, or social role—is at all apt to explain the presence of this obligation. I contend that the unfashionable gratitude account of political (...)
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