Related categories

137 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 137
  1. A Note on the Definition of Gratitude.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    In this paper, I object to Michael Rush’s definitions of targeted and propositional gratitude.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. "Saying 'Thank You!' and Expressing Gratitude: A Response to Schwartz".Indrek Reiland - manuscript
    This is a short response piece to Jeremy Schwartz's "Saying 'Thank You' and Meaning It", published in Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 2020, 98, pp. 718-731. -/- Schwartz argues against the received view that 'Thank You! is for expressing gratitude, claiming instead that it is for expressing one's judgment that gratitude is appropriate or fitting. I argue against the judgment view while defending the received one. -/- I mainly consider the objection that the judgment view is implausible since it makes ‘Thank (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. What Gratitude Looks Like From Colombian Children’s Perspectives.Sonia Carrillo, Daniela Robles, Alicia Bernal, Gordon Ingram & Yvonne Gómez - forthcoming - Journal of Moral Education:1-19.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Gratitude to God for Our Own Moral Goodness.Robert J. Hartman - forthcoming - Faith and Philosophy.
    Someone owes gratitude to God for something only if God benefits her and is morally responsible for doing so. These requirements concerning benefit and moral responsibility generate reasons to doubt that human beings owe gratitude to God for their own moral goodness. First, moral character must be generated by its possessor’s own free choices, and so God cannot benefit moral character in human beings. Second, owed gratitude requires being morally responsible for providing a benefit, which rules out owed gratitude to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Optimism Without Theism? Nagasawa on Atheism, Evolution, and Evil.Guy Kahane - forthcoming - Religious Studies.
    Nagasawa has argued that the suffering associated with evolution presents a greater challenge to atheism than to theism because that evil is incompatible with ‘existential optimism’ about the world—with seeing the world as an overall good place, and being thankful that we exist. I argue that even if atheism was incompatible with existential optimism in this way, this presents no threat to atheism. Moreover, it’s unclear how the suffering associated with evolution could on its own undermine existential optimism. Links between (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Obligations of Gratitude and Correlative Rights.Tony Manela - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics 5.
    This article investigates a puzzle about gratitude—the proper response, in a beneficiary, to an act of benevolence from a benefactor. The puzzle arises from three platitudes about gratitude: 1) the beneficiary has certain obligations of gratitude; 2) these obligations are owed to the benefactor; and 3) the benefactor has no right to the fulfillment of these obligations. These platitudes suggest that gratitude is a counterexample to the “correlativity thesis” in the moral domain: the claim that strict moral obligations correlate to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  7. The Virtue of Gratitude and Its Associated Vices.Tony Manela - forthcoming - The Moral Psychology of Gratitude.
    Gratitude, the proper or fitting response to benevolence, has often been conceptualized as a virtue—a temporally stable disposition to perceive, think, feel, and act in certain characteristic ways in certain situations. Many accounts of gratitude as a virtue, however, have not analyzed this disposition accurately, and as a result, they have not revealed the rich variety of ways in which someone can fail to be a grateful person. In this paper, I articulate an account of the virtue of gratitude, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  8. Gratitude for Life-Force in African Philosophy.Thaddeus Metz - forthcoming - In Joshua Harris, Kirk Lougheed & Neal DeRoo (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Existential Gratitude: Analytic, Continental, and Religious Approaches. Bloomsbury Academic.
    In this chapter I critically discuss ideas from the under-explored indigenous African tradition of philosophy of religion. Salient in African thought are four major beliefs that on the face of it make good sense of the view that it is appropriate to be grateful and act gratefully to God for being alive. First, there is a theological belief in a personal God as the creator of all concrete objects in the universe, a globally under-recognized form of monotheism alongside the Abrahamic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. The Beneficial Effects of Cultivating Gratitude in the University.Blaire Morgan & L. Gulliford - forthcoming - In Cultivating Virtue in the University.
    Taking gratitude as an example, this chapter considers how character and virtue can be cultivated in universities while simultaneously recognizing the diverse ways in which virtues might be understood and valued. With reference to multicomponent perspectives on virtue, the chapter outlines the conceptual issues surrounding gratitude and how they have informed the conceptualization and measurement of gratitude as a multifaceted construct comprising cognitive, affective, attitudinal, and behavioral elements. The chapter then considers how the virtue of gratitude might be cultivated in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Beyond Benefits: Gratitude as a Response to Moral Regard.Stefan Riedener - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    What are the fittingness conditions of gratitude? One assumption seems unquestioned in the literature: that whenever it’s fitting for you to be grateful to me, that’s because I’ve benefitted or tried to benefit you. In this paper, I argue that that’s false. You may sometimes fittingly be grateful precisely because I refrained from benefitting you. Or you may be grateful because I omitted to instrumentalise you, or treated you justly – where this isn’t reducible to benefits. Morality isn’t all about (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11. Benevolent Situations and Gratitude.Daniel Telech - forthcoming - Australasian Philosophical Review.
    [Commentary on Kwong-loi Shun, “Anger, Compassion, and the Distinction between First and Third Person” Australasian Philosophical Review 6.1 (Issue theme: Moral psychology— Insights from Chinese Philosophy), forthcoming.] -/- In maintaining that gratitude fails to reflect a perspectival distinction based on whether the grateful agent is the direct beneficiary of the benefactor’s good will, Kwong-loi Shun suggests that gratitude might be felt to benefactors for benefits bestowed to strangers. With an eye toward understanding the form that gratitude might take on this (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Does Gratitude Ensure Workplace Happiness Among University Teachers? Examining the Role of Social and Psychological Capital and Spiritual Climate.Naval Garg, Manju Mahipalan, Shobitha Poulose & John Burgess - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    The study examines the necessity and sufficiency of gratitude for supporting workplace happiness among Indian university teachers. It also explores the mediating effect of psychological capital and social capital in the relationship between gratitude and workplace happiness. The moderating effect of spiritual climate is investigated. A survey of 726 university staff in India was undertaken to examine the relationship between gratitude and workplace happiness. A series of statistical tests involving correlation, multiple regression, and necessary condition analysis was undertaken from the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Expressing Gratitude as What’s Morally Expected: A Phenomenological Approach.Terry Horgan & Mark Timmons - 2022 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 25 (1):139-155.
    This paper addresses an alleged paradox regarding gratitude—that a duty of gratitude is odd or puzzling if not paradoxical. The gist of our position is that in prototypical cases, gratitude expression falls under a distinctive deontic category we call morally expected—which has a corresponding contrary deontic category we call morally offensive. These categories, we maintain, need recognition in normative ethics to make proper sense of the moral status of gratitude expression and other morally charged restrictions on action, and likewise to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Gratitude Is Only Fittingly Targeted Towards Agents.Marcus William Hunt - 2022 - Sophia 61 (2):345-363.
    The paper argues that ‘All varieties of gratitude are only overall fitting when targeted towards agents,’ for instance that any variety of gratitude for the beautiful sunset is only overall fitting if a supernatural agent such as God exists. The first premise is that ‘Prepositional gratitude is overall fitting only when targeted towards agents.’ For this premise, intuitive judgments are offered. The second premise is that ‘Prepositional gratitude is the paradigmatic variety of gratitude.’ For this premise, an aspect of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. The Effect of Family Atmosphere on Chinese College Students’ Pro-Social Behavior: The Chained Mediation Role of Gratitude and Self-Efficacy.Na Li & Qiangqiang Li - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    The current study aimed to explore how family atmosphere influenced pro-social behavior among Chinese college students and to explore the mediation roles of gratitude and self-efficacy. We recruited 800 Chinese college students, and the participation rate was 89%. Participants completed the family atmosphere scale, the pro-social tendencies measure, the gratitude questionnaire, and the general self-efficacy scale. Results indicated that Family atmosphere, gratitude, self-efficacy, and pro-social behavior were positively correlated after controlling for the grade, gender, and age. The family atmosphere affected (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Moral Decline in the Workplace: Unethical Pro-Organizational Behavior, Psychological Entitlement, and Leader Gratitude Expression.Feng Qin, Yannan Zhang, Silu Chen, Yanghao Zhu & Wenxing Liu - 2022 - Ethics and Behavior 32 (2):110-123.
    ABSTRACT Although unethical pro-organizational behavior in the workplace has been widely researched, studies have focused on its antecedents rather than its outcomes. To fill this gap in the literature, we integrated moral licensing theory and the literature on leader gratitude expression to explore the ethical consequences of UPB. Using a sample of multi-source time-lagged surveys of 206 leader–employee dyads, we found that the pro-organizational nature of UPB fostered employees’ psychological entitlement and thereby increased their likelihood of engaging in subsequent unethical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. A Puzzle Concerning Gratitude and Accountability.Robert H. Wallace - 2022 - The Journal of Ethics (Online First):1-26.
    P.F. Strawson’s account of moral responsibility in “Freedom and Resentment” has been widely influential. In both that paper and in the contemporary literature, much attention has been paid to Strawson’s account of blame in terms of reactive attitudes like resentment and indignation. The Strawsonian view of praise in terms of gratitude has received comparatively little attention. Some, however, have noticed something puzzling about gratitude and accountability. We typically understand accountability in terms of moral demands and expectations. Yet gratitude does not (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Correcting Acedia Through Gratitude and Wonder.Brandon Dahm - 2021 - Religions 458 (12):1-15.
    In the capital vices tradition, acedia was fought through perseverance and manual labor. In this paper, I argue that we can also fight acedia through practicing wonder and gratitude. I show this through an account of moral formation developed out of the insight of the virtues and vices traditions that character traits affect how we see things. In the first section, I use Robert Roberts’s account of emotions to explain a mechanism by which virtues and vices affect vision and thus (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Indignation, Appreciation, and the Unity of Moral Experience.Uriah Kriegel - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 25 (1):5-19.
    Moral experience comes in many flavors. Some philosophers have argued that there is nothing common to the many forms moral experience can take. In this paper, I argue that close attention to the phenomenology of certain key emotions, combined with a clear distinction between essentially and accidentally moral experiences, suggests that there is a group of (essentially) moral emotions which in fact exhibit significant unity.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Paternalistic Gratitude: The Theory and Politics of Confucian Political Obligation.Shu-Shan Lee - 2021 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (4):635-659.
    While researchers have offered remonstration-oriented, reciprocal, voluntary, and gratitude-based accounts of political obligation in classical Confucianism, I argue that these interpretations are either in conflict with the textual evidence or merely scratch the surface of Confucius’ theory of political obligation without fully elaborating its essence. Instead, I demonstrate that the theory of political obligation in Confucianism is a specific argument from paternalistic gratitude in which the people’s political obligation is analogically compared to children’s grateful duty to their parents. Moreover, I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Intrinsically Bad Gratitude.Jörg Löschke - 2021 - Zeitschrift Für Ethik Und Moralphilosophie 4 (1):73-89.
    This paper discusses under which circumstances grateful responses can become intrinsically bad. It is argued that gratitude should be understood as an appropriate response to value and that it is subject to the so-called recursive account of intrinsic value, according to which appropriate responses to value are intrinsically good, and inappropriate responses to value are intrinsically bad. As a result, gratitude can become intrinsically bad in two cases: i) when gratitude has the wrong object, i.e., is a pro-response to an (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. Group Agents and Moral Status: What Can We Owe to Organizations?Adam Lovett & Stefan Riedener - 2021 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 51 (3):221–238.
    Organizations have neither a right to the vote nor a weighty right to life. We need not enfranchise Goldman Sachs. We should feel few scruples in dissolving Standard Oil. But they are not without rights altogether. We can owe it to them to keep our promises. We can owe them debts of gratitude. Thus, we can owe some things to organizations. But we cannot owe them everything we can owe to people. They seem to have a peculiar, fragmented moral status. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. Thanks for Being, Loving, and Believing.Tony Manela - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 179 (5):1649-1672.
    Gratitude to others is typically understood as a response to good things people give to us or do for us. Occasionally, though, we thank people for things other than gifts or actions. We sometimes thank people for being there for us, for instance, or for loving us, or for being good parents or teachers, or for believing in us. In this article, I develop a set of considerations to help determine whether gratitude to others for being, loving, or believing can (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Protectors of Wellbeing During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Key Roles for Gratitude and Tragic Optimism in a UK-Based Cohort.Jessica P. Mead, Zoe Fisher, Jeremy J. Tree, Paul T. P. Wong & Andrew H. Kemp - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has presented a global threat to physical and mental health worldwide. Research has highlighted adverse impacts of COVID-19 on wellbeing but has yet to offer insights as to how wellbeing may be protected. Inspired by developments in wellbeing science and guided by our own theoretical framework, we examined the role of various potentially protective factors in a sample of 138 participants from the United Kingdom. Protective factors included physical activity, tragic optimism, gratitude, social support, and nature connectedness. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  25. The Concept of Gratitude in Philosophy and Psychology: An Update.Blaire Morgan & Liz Gulliford - 2021 - Zeitschrift Für Ethik Und Moralphilosophie 4 (1):201-212.
    This paper surveys interdisciplinary research on gratitude that has been conducted since the review paper translated into German in this issue ‘Recent work on the concept of gratitude in philosophy and psychology’, was published in the Journal of Value Inquiry in 2013. We share progress on our subsequent research, and report on key developments in the field. We revisit familiar themes regarding conditions placed on gratitude, the structure and moral value of gratitude, and the pedagogical implications of research on gratitude, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Gratitude, Anger and the Horror of Asymmetry.Thomas Nisters - 2021 - Zeitschrift Für Ethik Und Moralphilosophie 4 (1):143-147.
    This paper puts two propositions to the test: First, gratitude and active ingratitude are in one sense opposed, yet in another sense they bear a striking resemblance. Second, mature morality sometimes expects us to transcend the quid pro quo structure implied by common gratitude.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27. Gratitude, Justice, and the Emotions: Comments on Thomas Nisters.Martin Pickavé - 2021 - Zeitschrift Für Ethik Und Moralphilosophie 4 (1):161-167.
    In this comment on Thomas Nisters’ “Gratitude, Anger and the Horror of Asymmetry” I propose a different reading of Schnitzler’s short story that serves as a basis for Nisters’ reflections. On my interpretation, the behaviour of Franz is best understood on the background of a traditional understanding of gratitude, one that we can find, for instance, in Thomas Aquinas.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28. Gratitude to God: Jonathan Edwards and the Opening of the Self.Kyle Strobel - 2021 - Scientia et Fides 9 (2):115-131.
    : The study of gratitude has become an increasingly important topic among psychologists to address the nature of human flourishing. Of more recent interest is how gratitude to God specifically functions within an account of human flourishing, with theologians seeking to provide a distinctively Christian account of the nature of gratitude. This article enters into the ongoing conversation by attending to Jonathan Edwards’s theological anthropology and development of natural and supernatural gratitude. In particular, Edwards’s anthropology includes within it an account (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Gratitude Communication in Academic Written Acknowledgement : Gender Variation.Chihsia Tang - 2021 - Pragmatics and Society 12 (4):515-536.
    In the existing literature, no attempt has been made to inspect how men and women rhetorically manage their gratitude communications in the academic written discourse. To bridge this knowledge gap, the present article examined how students of different gender construct their thanking acts in the acknowledgements of their M.A. theses. Discrepancies between male and female postgraduates’ employment of linguistic patterns and gratitude themes were compared. The results showed that student writers’ gratitude communications to a certain extent are conditioned by the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Gratitude and That Which We Cannot Return: Critical Reflections on Gratitude.Mees van Hulzen - 2021 - Zeitschrift Für Ethik Und Moralphilosophie 4 (1):109-119.
    Gratitude is often perceived from the perspective of economic reciprocity, i.e., from the simple logic of quid pro quo. It is for this reason that Marcel Mauss ignores the topic of gratitude in his famous work on gift-giving, and that Seneca believes that gratitude is something which is given in return: ‘for the benefit that is accomplished by an act has been repaid by our gratitude if we give it friendly welcome’. In this paper I will demonstrate that gratitude is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. The Solace: Finding Value in Death Through Gratitude for Life.Joshua Glasgow - 2020 - Oup Usa.
    Mourning the loss of loved ones can be one of the hardest things we go through. But what if we changed the way we thought about it, and learned to find positive value in death as part of life? This book examines how we can take solace in the fact that we and our loved ones will die, surprising or impossible as that may seem. Along the way, it investigates the nature of gratitude, how good and bad relate, and enduring (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Does gratitude to R for ϕ-ing imply gratitude that R ϕ-ed?Tony Manela - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 177 (11):3245-3262.
    Many find it plausible that for a given beneficiary, Y, benefactor, R, and action, ϕ, Y’s being grateful to R for ϕ-ing implies Y’s being grateful that R ϕ-ed. According to some philosophers who hold this view, all instances of gratitude to, or “prepositional gratitude,” are also instances of gratitude that, or “propositional gratitude.” These philosophers believe there is a single unified concept of gratitude, a phenomenon that is essentially gratitude that, and whose manifestations sometimes have additional features that make (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33. Inapt Gratitude: Against Expansionist Views.Terrance McConnell - 2020 - Zeitschrift Für Ethik Und Moralphilosophie 4 (1):91-108.
    Psychologists and philosophers have written much about gratitude recently. Many of these contributions have endorsed expansionist views of gratitude, counseling agents to feel and express gratitude in many circumstances. I argue that the essential features of the moral norm of gratitude are that a beneficiary acknowledges and appreciates benefits provided by another who is acting from beneficence, and is disposed to provide a comparable benefit to the benefactor if a suitable occasion arises. The best-known philosophical version of expansionist views claims (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. Demanding More of Strawsonian Accountability Theory.Daniel Telech - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (4):926-941.
    A neglected and non-trivial problem exists for a central cluster of Strawsonian accountability theories of moral responsibility, namely those that, following Gary Watson, understand the reactive attitudes to be implicit forms of moral address, particularly moral demand. The problem consists in the joint acceptance of two claims: (a) Accountability is a matter of agents holding one another to moral demands, and (b) accountability is a view of blame and praise. I label joint acceptance of these claims the Strawsonian’s demand dogma. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  35. Gratitude for Being.Sungwoo Um - 2020 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 98 (2):222-233.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper, I argue that what I call ‘gratitude for being’ can capture the distinctive sort of gratitude that we typically owe to our intimates, such as parents and close friends. Instead of specific actions or beneficial objects, the benefactor herself and her relationship to the beneficiary are considered as the grounds of gratitude. I argue that people who have consistent and particularized care for us deserve our gratitude for being, rather than gratitude for doing.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  36. Gratitude Increases Third-Party Punishment.Jonathan Vayness, Fred Duong & David DeSteno - 2020 - Cognition and Emotion 34 (5):1020-1027.
    ABSTRACTThird-party punishment occurs when a perpetrator of a transgression is punished by another person who was not directly affected by the transgression. Given gratitude’s...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Surprise Me! On the Impact of Unexpected Benefits on Other-Praising Gratitude Expressions.Alexa Weiss, Pascal Burgmer & Jens Lange - 2020 - Tandf: Cognition and Emotion 34 (8):1608-1620.
    Volume 34, Issue 8, December 2020, Page 1608-1620.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Gratitude and Alterity in Environmental Virtue Ethics.Nathan Wood - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (4):481-498.
    Rachel Carson begins her revolutionary book Silent Spring with a quote from E.B. White that reads 'we would stand a better chance of survival if we accommodated ourselves to this planet and viewed it appreciatively'. While White's advice can account for an instrumental relationship towards nature, I believe that the more important relationship offered in his recommendation is one of appreciation or gratitude. But how are we to understand gratitude as appreciating Nature non-instrumentally when it has traditionally always been understood (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39. Resoluteness and Gratitude for the Good.Irene McMullin - 2019 - In Matt Burch, Jack Marsh & Irene McMullin (eds.), Normativity, Meaning, and the Promise of Phenomenology. New York, NY, USA: pp. 137-154.
    The aim of this volume is to critically assess the philosophical importance of phenomenology as a method for studying the normativity of meaning and its transcendental conditions. Using the pioneering work of Steven Crowell as a springboard, phenomenologists from all over the world examine the promise of phenomenology for illuminating long-standing problems in epistemology, the philosophy of mind, action theory, the philosophy of religion, and moral psychology. The essays are unique in that they engage with the phenomenological tradition not as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Gratitude: Generic Vs. Deep.Hichem Naar - 2019 - In Robert Roberts & Daniel Telech (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Gratitude. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 15-34.
    In this paper, I argue that gratitude is not necessarily affective or motivating. Against a common trend in recent philosophical treatments of the notion, indeed, I argue for the introduction of an important but neglected kind of gratitude that is simply a matter of believing that one has been benefitted by a benevolent benefactor. I will call this non-affective, non-motivating kind of gratitude “generic,” and the kind – taking center stage in the literature – that is affective and motivating “deep.” (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41. The Ethical Significance of Gratitude in Epicureanism.Benjamin A. Rider - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (6):1092-1112.
    ABSTRACTMany texts in the Epicurean tradition mention gratitude but do not explicitly explain its function in Epicurean ethics. I review passages that mention or discuss gratitude and ingratitude a...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. The Emotion-Virtue-Debt Triad of Gratitude: An Introduction to The Moral Psychology of Gratitude.Robert C. Roberts & Daniel Telech - 2019 - In Robert Roberts & Daniel Telech (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Gratitude.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. The Moral Psychology of Gratitude.Robert Roberts & Daniel Telech (eds.) - 2019 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    Expressions of gratitude abound. Hardly a book is published that does not include in its preface or acknowledgments some variation on, “I am grateful to…for…” Indeed, most achievements come to be only through the help of others. We value the benevolence of others, and when we—or our loved ones—are the recipients of benevolence, our emotional response is often one of gratitude. -/- But, are we bound to the requirement of ‘repaying’ our benefactors in some way? If we are, and there (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Perspectives On Gratitude: An Interdisciplinary Approach.Michael Rush - 2018 - Philosophical Quarterly 68 (272):648-650.
    Perspectives On Gratitude: An Interdisciplinary Approach. Edited By Carr David.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Evidence for a Relationship Between Trait Gratitude and Prosocial Behaviour.Rachel Yost-Dubrow & Yarrow Dunham - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (2):397-403.
  46. Functions of Positive Emotions: Gratitude as a Motivator of Self-Improvement and Positive Change.Christina N. Armenta, Megan M. Fritz & Sonja Lyubomirsky - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (3):183-190.
    Positive emotions are highly valued and frequently sought. Beyond just being pleasant, however, positive emotions may also lead to long-term benefits in important domains, including work, physical health, and interpersonal relationships. Research thus far has focused on the broader functions of positive emotions. According to the broaden-and-build theory, positive emotions expand people’s thought–action repertoires and allow them to build psychological, intellectual, and social resources. New evidence suggests that positive emotions—particularly gratitude—may also play a role in motivating individuals to engage in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  47. Should Gratitude Be a Requirement for Access to Live Organ Donation?Monica Escher, Monique Lamuela-Naulin, Catherine Bollondi, Paola Flores Menendez & Samia A. Hurst - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (11):762-765.
    Gratitude is both expected and problematic in live organ donation. Are there grounds to require it, and to forbid access to live donor transplantation to a recipient who fails to signal that he feels any form of gratitude? Recipient gratitude is not currently required for organ donation, but it is expected and may be a moral requirement. Despite this, we argue that making it a condition for live organ transplantation would be unjustified. It would constitute a problematic and disproportionate punishment (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Gratitude, Rights, and Moral Standouts.Terrance McConnell - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (2):279-293.
    Many maintain that if a beneficiary has a right to a benefit provided by his benefactor, then the former cannot owe the latter gratitude for that benefit. In this paper I argue against that view. I provide examples in which benefactors provide others with benefits to which they have a right even though most others are denying them that right. These benefactors are moral standouts; they do what is right when most similarly situated agents fail to do so. I then (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49. No Thanks! Autonomous Interpersonal Style is Associated with Less Experience and Valuing of Gratitude.Suzanne C. Parker, Haseeb Majid, Kate L. Stewart & Anthony H. Ahrens - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (8):1627-1637.
    Gratitude has been promoted as a beneficial emotional experience. However, gratitude is not universally experienced as positive. The current work examines whether an autonomous interpersonal style is associated with differential experience of gratitude. Study 1 found an inverse relationship between trait autonomy and both trait gratitude and positivity of response to receiving a hypothetical benefit from a friend. Study 2 replicated the finding that those higher in autonomy report less trait gratitude, and also demonstrated an inverse relationship between autonomy and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Reconsidering the Roles of Gratitude and Indebtedness in Social Exchange.Cong Peng, Rob M. A. Nelissen & Marcel Zeelenberg - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (4):760-772.
    ABSTRACTReceiving favors is often a mixed blessing and commonly triggers two emotions: the positive emotion gratitude and negative emotion indebtedness. In three studies, we examined the hypothesis that gratitude and indebtedness have distinct functions in social exchange. Contrary to current views, we believe that the function of gratitude does not primarily reside in facilitating social exchange. Instead, we propose that indebtedness motivates people to repay favours received, and thus accounts for most of the prosocial effects commonly attributed to gratitude. On (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
1 — 50 / 137