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  1. Worthy of Gratitude: Why Veterans May Not Want to Be Thanked for Their "Service" in War. &Quot, Camillo Mac & Bica - 2015
    In this collection of essays, Camillo “Mac” Bica, Ph.D., a former Marine Corps Officer, Vietnam Veteran, and philosopher, provides a cogent analysis of why a veteran may not want to be thanked for his “service” in war. Mac’s experiential and theoretical perspective is both gut wrenching and concise. “The Philosopher speaks from the mind,” Mac writes, “the warrior from where it hurts.” With simplicity, poignancy, and power, this book, together with future installments of the War Legacy Series, works to dispel (...)
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  2. On the Relationship of Hope and Gratitude to Corporate Social Responsibility.Lynne M. Andersson, Robert A. Giacalone & Carole L. Jurkiewicz - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (4):401-409.
    A longitudinal study of 308 white -collar U.S. employees revealed that feelings of hope and gratitude increase concern for corporate social responsibility. In particular, employees with stronger hope and gratitude were found to have a greater sense of responsibility toward employee and societal issues; interestingly, employee hope and gratitude did not affect sense of responsibility toward economic and safety/quality issues. These findings offer an extension of research by Giacalone, Paul, and Jurkiewicz.
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  3. An Attitude for Gratitude: How Gratitude is Understood, Experienced and Valued by the British Public: Research Report.James Arthur, Kristján Kristjánsson, Liz Gulliford & Blaire Morgan - unknown
    The subject of gratitude has gained traction in recent years in academic and popular circles. However, limited attention has been devoted to understanding what laypeople understand by the concept of gratitude; the meaning of which tends to have been assumed in the literature. Furthermore, while intrapersonal and interpersonal benefits of gratitude have been extolled in this growing body of research, there has been little assessment of the value laypeople place on gratitude themselves, or whether and how they think it might (...)
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  4. Gratitude: Prompting Behaviours That Build Relationships.Monica Y. Bartlett, Paul Condon, Jourdan Cruz, Jolie Baumann & David Desteno - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (1):2-13.
  5. Gratitude.Fred R. Berger - 1975 - Ethics 85 (4):298-309.
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  6. Gratitude, Self-Interest, and Love.Y. Sandy Berkovski - 2014 - Philosophia 42 (3):645-664.
    Gratitude is usually conceived as a uniquely appropriate response to goodwill. A grateful person is bound to reward an act of goodwill in some appropriately proportionate way. I argue that goodwill, when interpreted as love, should require no reward. Consequently, the idea of gratitude as a proportionate response to love is not intelligible. However, goodwill can also be understood merely as a disinterested concern. Such forms of goodwill are involved in reciprocal relationships. But gratitude has no place in these relationships (...)
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  7. Duties of Gratitude.Samuel V. Bruton - 2003 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 10 (1):11-15.
    This paper is a response to a recent article by Christopher Wellman in which Wellman argues that gratitude is better understood as a virtue rather than a source of moral obligations. First, I offer several examples intended to dispute his claim that gratitude does not impose duties. Second, I provide my own reasons for thinking that deontic notions alone cannot capture the moral significance of gratitude. Wellman’s mistake is attributable to an overly narrow conception of duty that his argument presupposes. (...)
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  8. Chesterton's Spirituality of Gratitude and Praise.Stratford Caldecott - 2012 - The Chesterton Review 38 (1-2):83-96.
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  9. Gratitude and Obligation.Claudia Card - 1988 - American Philosophical Quarterly 25 (2):115 - 127.
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  10. Book Review:Gratitude. Terrance McConnell. [REVIEW]Norman S. Care - 1995 - Ethics 105 (3):657-.
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  11. Perspectives on Gratitude: An Interdisciplinary Approach.David Carr (ed.) - 2016 - Routledge.
    Psychologists, philosophers, theologians and educationalists have all lately explored various conceptual, moral, psychological and pedagogical dimensions of gratitude in a rapidly expanding academic and popular literature. However, while the distinguished contributors to this work hail from these distinct disciplines, they have been brought together in this volume precisely in recognition of the need for a more interdisciplinary perspective on the topic. While further developing such more familiar debates in the field as whether it is appropriate to feel grateful in circumstances (...)
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  12. From Gratitude to Lamentation: On the Moral and Psychological Economy of Gift, Gain and Loss.David Carr - 2016 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (1):41-59.
    The passing of Nelson Mandela and other figures of contemporary importance may prompt the interesting question of how we might or should understand the psychological, social and moral function of lamentation in human life. This paper aims to show that such responses are not just of emotional and interpersonal significance, but also of serious moral import. To this end, the paper proceeds via exploration of conceptually and morally suggestive correspondences or resonances between the logical grammar of lamentation—which, to be sure, (...)
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  13. Is Gratitude a Moral Virtue?David Carr - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (6):1475-1484.
    One matter upon which the already voluminous philosophical and psychological literature on the topic seems to be agreed is that gratitude is a psychologically and socially beneficial human quality of some moral significance. Further to this, gratitude seems to be widely regarded by positive psychologists and virtue ethicists as a moral virtue. This paper, however, sets out to show that such claims and assumptions about the moral character of gratitude are questionable and that its status as a moral virtue is (...)
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  14. The Paradox of Gratitude.David Carr - 2015 - British Journal of Educational Studies 63 (4):429-446.
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  15. Varieties of Gratitude.David Carr - 2013 - Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (1-2):17-28.
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  16. Gratitude Toward Veterans: Why Americans Should Not Be Very Grateful to Veterans.Spencer Jay Case - 2015 - Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):197-199.
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  17. The Philosophy of Gratitude.G. K. Chesterton - 1988 - The Chesterton Review 14 (2):177-179.
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  18. A Time for Gratitude.Ellen Wright Clayton - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (4):329-329.
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  19. A Time for Gratitude.Ellen Wright Clayton - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 28 (4):329-329.
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  20. Anger, Gratitude, and the Enlightenment Writer.Patrick Coleman - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    On the one hand, anger and gratitude are crucial in appreciating what one owes to oneself or others; on the other, they disturb one's internal balance and reinforce one's dependence upon others. This book explores the tension between these two attitudes in the work of French Enlightenment writers such as Rousseau, Diderot, Marivaux, and Challe.
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  21. Accidental Devotion and Gratitude : Kierkegaard in My Life-Story.John Davenport - 2010 - In Robert L. Perkins, Marc Alan Jolley & Edmon L. Rowell (eds.), Why Kierkegaard Matters: A Festschrift in Honor of Robert L. Perkins. Mercer University Press.
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  22. Expressing Gratitude and Feeling Grateful.K. Dowling - 1996 - South African Journal of Philosophy 15 (1):23-28.
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  23. Grateful Personality.Robert A. Emmons - 2009 - In Darcia Narvaez & Daniel Lapsley (eds.), Personality, Identity, and Character. Cambridge University Press. pp. 256.
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  24. Gratitude as the Basis for Asceticism in Chesterton.David W. Fagerberg - 1999 - The Chesterton Review 25 (4):451-477.
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  25. Gratitude and Justice.Patrick Fitzgerald - 1998 - Ethics 109 (1):119-153.
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  26. Neural Correlates of Gratitude.Glenn R. Fox, Jonas Kaplan, Hanna Damasio & Antonio Damasio - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  27. Gratitude and the Duties of Grown Children Towards Their Aging Parents.Rona M. Gerber - 1990 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 5 (1):29-34.
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  28. Recent Work on the Concept of Gratitude in Philosophy and Psychology.Liz Gulliford, Blaire Morgan & Kristján Kristjánsson - 2013 - Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (3):285-317.
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  29. Gratitude, Obligation, and Individualism.Jean Harvey - 2004 - In Peggy DesAutels & Margaret Urban Walker (eds.), Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 33.
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  30. Being Helped and Being Grateful.Barbara Herman - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy 109 (5):391-411.
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  31. Why Should I Be Grateful? The Morality of Gratitude in Contexts Marked by Injustice.Liz Jackson - 2016 - Journal of Moral Education 45 (3):276-290.
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  32. Gratitude, Ressentiment, and Citizenship Education.Mark E. Jonas - 2012 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (1):29-46.
    Patricia White (Stud Philos Educ 18:43–52, 1999) argues that the virtue gratitude is essential to a flourishing democracy because it helps foster universal and reciprocal amity between citizens. Citizens who participate in this reciprocal relationship ought to be encouraged to recognize that “much that people do does in fact help to make communal civic life less brutish, pleasanter and more flourishing.” This is the case even when the majority of citizens do not intentionally seek to make civic life better for (...)
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  33. Gratitude Toward Veterans: Why Americans Should Not Be Very Grateful to Veterans.Stephen Kershnar - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    Veterans are celebrated with speeches, statues, memorials, holidays, and affirmative action. They are lavishly praised in public gatherings and private conversations. Contradicting this widespread attitude, Stephen Kershnar’s Gratitude toward Veterans: A Philosophical Explanation of Why American Should Not Be Very Grateful to Veterans argues that U.S. citizens should not be very grateful to veterans.
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  34. Four Arguments Against Political Obligations From Gratitude.George Klosko - 1991 - Public Affairs Quarterly 5 (1):33-48.
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  35. Political Obligation and Gratitude.George Klosko - 1989 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 18 (4):352-358.
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  36. Gratitude and Good Government.Dudley Knowles - 2002 - Res Publica 8 (1):1-20.
    I attempt to show that it is notphilosophically incompetent to ground politicalobligation in feelings of gratitude. But theargument needs to be stated carefully.Gratitude must be distinguished fromreciprocity. It applies only to good governmentwhich provides benefits to citizens for whichthey ought to feel grateful. It applies only tocitizens who accept that their feelings ofgratitude are properly demonstrated by anacceptance on their part of the duties ofcitizenship. It does not apply to citizenswhose benefits are purchased at the expense ofthe unjust treatment of (...)
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  37. An Aristotelian Virtue of Gratitude.Kristján Kristjánsson - 2015 - Topoi 34 (2):499-511.
    The aim of this paper is to offer a reconstruction of gratitude as an Aristotelian virtue. The account I propose is meant to be essentially Aristotelian although it is clearly not Aristotle’s own account. I start in section “Current Discourses on Gratitude” with an overview of recent discourses on gratitude in philosophy and psychology. I then proceed, in section “Putting the Aristotelian Pieces Together”, to spell out a formal characterisation of gratitude as an Aristotelian emotional virtue. Section “Reappraising Aristotle on (...)
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  38. Can Non-Theists Appropriately Feel Existential Gratitude?Michael Lacewing - 2016 - Religious Studies 52 (2):145-165.
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  39. Gratitude and Depressive Symptoms: The Role of Positive Reframing and Positive Emotion.Nathaniel M. Lambert, Frank D. Fincham & Tyler F. Stillman - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (4):615-633.
  40. Filial Gratitude and God's Right to Command.Joseph L. Lombardi - 1991 - Journal of Religious Ethics 19 (1):93 - 118.
    Defenders of theistic morality sometimes insist that God's will can impose moral obligation only if God has a right to command. The right is compared to that which parents have over their children and which is thought to derive from a filial debt of gratitude. This essay examines arguments for divine authority based on gratitude which employ the parental analogy. It is argued that neither parental nor divine authority is based on gratitude. An alternative derivation of parental authority is suggested (...)
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  41. Institutions and Debts of Gratitude.Scott C. Lowe - 1992 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (2):57-62.
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  42. The Odd Debt of Gratitude.Daniel Lyons - 1969 - Analysis 29 (3):92 - 97.
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  43. The Ethics of Cultivated Gratitude.Robert Macauley - 2014 - HEC Forum 26 (4):343-348.
    Given narrow operating margins, health care organizations are increasingly relying on philanthropy to fund operations. Since individuals provide the majority of philanthropic support, many organizations have expanded their “grateful patient fundraising” programs to include current inpatients, both established donors as well as persons of wealth. While this is legally permissible under HIPAA, it raises substantial ethical concerns for potential coercion of vulnerable patients, as well as unequal care stemming from preferential treatment and provided “amenities.” While some have drawn the analogy (...)
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  44. “Screw You!” & “Thank You”.Coleen Macnamara - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 165 (3):893-914.
    If I do you a good turn, you may respond with gratitude and express that gratitude by saying “Thank you.” Similarly, if I insult you, you may react with resentment which you express by shouting, “Screw you!” or something of the sort. Broadly put, when confronted with another’s morally significant conduct, we are inclined to respond with a reactive attitude and to express that reactive attitude in speech. A number of familiar speech acts have a call-and-response structure. Questions, demands and (...)
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  45. Gratitude and Appreciation.Tony Manela - forthcoming - American Philosophical Quarterly.
    This article argues that "gratitude to" and "gratitude that" are fundamentally different concepts. The former (prepositional gratitude) is properly a response to benevolent attitudes, and entails special concern on the part of the beneficiary for a benefactor, while the latter (propositional gratitude) is a response to beneficial states of affairs, and entails no special concern for anyone. Propositional gratitude, it is argued, ultimately amounts to a species of appreciation. The tendency to see prepositional gratitude and propositional “gratitude” as two species (...)
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  46. Obligations of Gratitude and Correlative Rights.Tony Manela - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics 5.
    This article investigates a puzzle about gratitude—the proper response, in a beneficiary, to an act of benevolence from a benefactor. The puzzle arises from three platitudes about gratitude: 1) the beneficiary has certain obligations of gratitude; 2) these obligations are owed to the benefactor; and 3) the benefactor has no right to the fulfillment of these obligations. These platitudes suggest that gratitude is a counterexample to the “correlativity thesis” in the moral domain: the claim that strict moral obligations correlate to (...)
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  47. Negative Feelings of Gratitude.Tony Manela - 2016 - Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (1):129-140.
    Philosophers generally agree that gratitude, the called-for response to benevolence, includes positive feelings. In this paper, I argue against this view. The grateful beneficiary will have certain feelings, but in some contexts, those feelings will be profoundly negative. Philosophers overlook this fact because they tend to consider only cases of gratitude in which the benefactor’s sacrifice is minimal, and in which the benefactor fares well after performing an act of benevolence. When we consider cases in which a benefactor suffers severely, (...)
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  48. Gratitude.Tony Manela - 2015 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 2015 (Spring).
    Gratitude is the proper or called-for response in a beneficiary to benefits or beneficence from a benefactor. It is a topic of interest in normative ethics, moral psychology, and political philosophy, and may have implications for metaethics as well. Despite its commonness in everyday life, there is substantive disagreement among philosophers over the nature of gratitude and its connection to other philosophical concepts. The sections of this article address five areas of debate about what gratitude is, when it is called (...)
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  49. 5. Normative Hope.Adrienne Martin - 2013 - In How We Hope: A Moral Psychology. Princeton University Press. pp. 118-140.
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  50. Good Fortune Obligates: Gratitude, Philanthropy, and Colonialism.Mike W. Martin - 1999 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (1):57-75.
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