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  1. Methodological Challenges to Prospective Study of an Innovation: Interregional Nursing Care Management of Cardiovascular Patients.Sharon Price Aadalen - 1998 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 4 (3):197-223.
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  2. Why Do the Well-Fed Appear to Die Young?Margo I. Adler & Russell Bonduriansky - 2014 - Bioessays 36 (5):439-450.
  3. Health as a Clinic-Epidemiological Concept.Marco Antonio Azevedo - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (3):365-373.
    I propose a clinic-epidemiological concept of health as the best description of what physicians actually think about health within medical practice. Its aim is to be an alternative to the best approach in the philosophy of medicine about health, Christopher Boorse’s biostatistical theory. Contrary to Boorse’s ‘theoretical’ approach, I propose to take health as a practical clinical concept. In the first two parts of the paper, I will present my complaints against Boorse’s view that health is a theoretical concept, a (...)
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  4. Concepts of Health and Disease.Christopher Boorse - 2011 - In Fred Gifford (ed.), Philosophy of Medicine. Elsevier. pp. 16--13.
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  5. Microsatellite Repeat Instability and Neurological Disease.Judith R. Brouwer, Rob Willemsen & Ben A. Oostra - 2009 - Bioessays 31 (1):71-83.
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  6. Gender and the Hygiene Hypothesis.Sharyn Clough - 2011 - Social Science and Medicine 72:486-493.
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  7. Answering Bacchi: A Conversation About the Work and Impact of Carol Bacchi in Teaching, Research and Practice in Public Health.John Coveney & Christine Putland - 2012 - In Angelique Bletsas & Chris Beasley (eds.), Engaging with Carol Bacchi: Strategic Interventions and Exchanges. University of Adelaide Press.
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  8. Textes Clés de Philosophie de la Médecine: Vol. Ii : Santé, Maladie, Pathologie.Élodie Giroux & Maël Lemoine - 2012 - Vrin.
    Depuis le célèbre essai de Georges Canguilhem sur le normal et le pathologique publié initialement en 1943 et dont l’un des objectifs était la clarification des concepts de santé et de maladie, une littérature philosophique abondante, principalement anglo-saxonne, s’est attachée à définir ces concepts et à analyser leur statut. Le principal débat de ce domaine émergent de la philosophie de la médecine porte sur la question : peut-on décrire la santé et la maladie comme des phénomènes naturels ou s’agit-il d’états (...)
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  9. Encarnación: Illness and Body Politics in Chicana Feminist Literature. By Suzanne Bost. New York: Fordham University Press, 2010; and Unassimilable Feminisms: Reappraising Feminist, Womanist, and Mestiza Identity Politics. By Laura Gillman. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. [REVIEW]Christina Holmes - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (2):383-387.
  10. Illness a Possibility of the Living Being (Bilingual: hungarian-english edition) - A betegseg az elo letlehetosege.Kiraly V. Istvan - 2011 - Kalligram.
    One bi-lingual - hungarian-ENGLISH - meditation and research about the Illness and the Living Being. Concentrated, of course, to the specific HUMAN reporting to them. The book investigates philosophically the issue of human illness and its organic pertinence to the meaning of human life starting from the recognition that the dangerous encounter with the experience of illness is an unavoidable – and as such crucial – experience of the life of any living being. As for us humans, there is probably (...)
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  11. Dimensions of Pain.Lisa Folkmarson Käll (ed.) - 2013 - Routledge.
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  12. Vagueness in Psychiatry.Geert Keil, Lara Keuck & Rico Hauswald (eds.) - 2017 - Oxford University Press UK.
    In psychiatry there is no sharp boundary between the normal and the pathological. Although clear cases abound, it is often indeterminate whether a particular condition does or does not qualify as a mental disorder. For example, definitions of ‘subthreshold disorders’ and of the ‘prodromal stages’ of diseases are notoriously contentious. -/- Philosophers and linguists call concepts that lack sharp boundaries, and thus admit of borderline cases, ‘vague’. Although blurred boundaries between the normal and the pathological are a recurrent theme in (...)
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  13. Exemplars, Ethics, and Illness Narratives.Ian James Kidd - 2017 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 38 (4):323-334.
    Many people report that reading first-person narratives of the experience of illness can be morally instructive or educative. But although they are ubiquitous and typically sincere, the precise nature of such educative experiences is puzzling—for those narratives typically lack the features that modern philosophers regard as constitutive of moral reason. I argue that such puzzlement should disappear, and the morally educative power of illness narratives explained, if one distinguishes two different styles of moral reason: an inferentialist style that generates the (...)
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  14. Epistemic Injustice in Healthcare: A Philosophical Analysis.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (4):529-540.
  15. Situation-Specific Disease and Dispositional Function: Table 1.E. Kingma - 2016 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 67 (2):391-404.
    In, I argued that Boorse's biostatistical theory of health is unable to accommodate diseases that are the normal result of harmful environments. Hausman disagrees: if the BST compares normal dispositional function against the whole population or reference class, rather than against organisms in similar circumstances as I proposed, then my challenge can be avoided. In this paper, I argue that Hausman's response fails: his proposal cannot accommodate a series of common physiological processes, such as sleep and those involved in reproduction. (...)
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  16. Der biomedizinische Fortschritt: Chancen, Grenzen und Verantwortung.Paul Gottlob Layer - 2003 - Darmstädter Interdisziplinäre Beiträge 8:63-76.
    Berge von brennenden Tieren, Bilder vom „Keulen“, Bilder vom geklonten Menschen. Aber auch Euphorisches: nach der Aufklärung des menschlichen Genoms schöpfen Krebs- und AIDS-Kranke, Querschnittsgelähmte und Alzheimer-Patienten neue Hoffnung. Bilder auch von Börsenkursen: vom neuen Markt der Informations- und Biotechnologien hängt unsere ökonomische Zukunft ab. Hinter allem stecken die „Life Sciences“, und oft wird man mit schrägem Blick gefragt, was das für Leute sind, diese Bio- bzw. Lebenswissenschaftler? Die Frage nach den Möglichkeiten und dem wahren Wert des biomedizinischen Fortschritts, nach (...)
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  17. The Naturalization of the Concept of Disease.Maël Lemoine - 2014 - In Philippe Huneman, Gérard Lambert & Marc Silberstein (eds.), History, Philosophy and Theory of the Life Sciences. Springer. pp. 19-41.
    Science starts by using terms such as ‘temperature’ or ‘fish’ or ‘gene’ to preliminarily delimitate the extension of a phenomenon, and concludes by giving most of them a technical meaning based on an explanatory model. This transforma- tion of the meaning of the term is an essential part of its naturalization. Debating on the definition of ‘disease’, what most philosophers of medicine have examined is the pre-naturalized meaning of the term: for that reason they have focused on the task of (...)
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  18. Disgust, Contamination, and Vaccine Refusal.Mark Navin - manuscript
    Vaccine refusers often seem motivated by disgust, and they invoke ideas of purity, contamination and sanctity. Unfortunately, the emotion of disgust and its companion ideas are not directly responsive to the probabilistic and statistical evidence of research science. It follows that increased efforts to promulgate the results of vaccine science are not likely to contribute to increased rates of vaccination among persons who refuse vaccines because of the ‘ethics of sanctity’. Furthermore, the fact that disgust-based vaccine refusal is not monolithic (...)
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  19. Nonlinearity in the Epidemiology of Complex Health and Disease Processes.P. Philippe & O. Mansi - 1998 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (6):591-607.
    The challenges posed by chronic illness have pointed out to epidemiologists the multifactorial complex nature of disease causality. This notion has been referred to as a web of causality. This web extends theoretically beyond risk markers. It includes determinants of emergence/non-emergence of disease. This web of determinants is a form of complex system. Due to its complexity, the determinants within such system are not linked to each others in a linear, predictable manner only. Predictability is possible only on a short-term (...)
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  20. Functions Must Be Performed at Appropriate Rates in Appropriate Situations.G. Piccinini & Justin Garson - 2014 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 65 (1):1-20.
    We sketch a novel and improved version of Boorse’s biostatistical theory of functions. Roughly, our theory maintains that (i) functions are non-negligible contributions to survival or inclusive fitness (when a trait contributes to survival or inclusive fitness); (ii) situations appropriate for the performance of a function are typical situations in which a trait contributes to survival or inclusive fitness; (iii) appropriate rates of functioning are rates that make adequate contributions to survival or inclusive fitness (in situations appropriate for the performance (...)
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  21. Global Food, Global Justice: Essays on Eating Under Globalization.Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.) - 2015 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    As Brillant-Savarin remarked in 1825 in his classic text Physiologie du Goût, “Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are.” Philosophers and political theorists have only recently begun to pay attention to food as a critical domain of human activity and social justice. Too often these discussions treat food as a commodity and eating as a matter of individual choice. Policies that address the global obesity crisis by focusing on individual responsibility and medical interventions ignore (...)
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  22. Immune System, Immune Self. Introduction.Bartlomiej Swiatczak - 2012 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 (1):12-18.
    The idea that the immune system distinguishes between self and non-self was one of the central assumptions of immunology in the second half of 20th century. This idea influenced experimental design and data interpretation. However, in the face of new evidence there is a need for a new conceptual framework in immunology.
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  23. Gut Feelings of Safety: Tolerance to the Microbiota Mediated by Innate Immune Receptors.Bartlomiej Swiatczak & Irun R. Cohen - 2015 - Microbiology and Immunology 59:573-585.
    To enable microbial colonisation of the gut mucosa, the intestinal immune system must not only react to danger signals but also recognize cues that indicate safety. Safety recognition, paradoxically, is mediated by the same environmental sensors that are involved in signalling danger. Indeed, in addition to their well established role in inducing inflammation in response to stress signals, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and a variety of metabolic sensors also promote gut-microbiota symbiosis by responding to "microbial symbiosis factors", "resolution-associated molecular patterns", (...)
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  24. Depression and Suicide Are Natural Kinds: Implications for Physician-Assisted Suicide.Jonathan Y. Tsou - 2013 - International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 36 (5-6):461-470.
    In this article, I argue that depression and suicide are natural kinds insofar as they are classes of abnormal behavior underwritten by sets of stable biological mechanisms. In particular, depression and suicide are neurobiological kinds characterized by disturbances in serotonin functioning that affect various brain areas (i.e., the amygdala, anterior cingulate, prefrontal cortex, and hippocampus). The significance of this argument is that the natural (biological) basis of depression and suicide allows for reliable projectable inferences (i.e., predictions) to be made about (...)
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  25. Childhood Obesity: Ethical and Policy Issues.Kristin Voigt, Stuart G. Nicholls & Garrath Williams - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Childhood obesity has become a central concern in many countries and a range of policies have been implemented or proposed to address it. This co-authored book is the first to focus on the ethical and policy questions raised by childhood obesity and its prevention. -/- Throughout the book, the authors emphasize that childhood obesity is a multi-faceted phenomenon, and just one of many issues that parents, schools and societies face. They argue that it is important to acknowledge the resulting complexities (...)
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