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  1. M. A. Sanchez-Gonzalez, B. Herreros, V. R. Ramnath, M. D. Martin, E. Pintor & L. Bishop (2014). Clinical Ethics Protocols in the Clinical Ethics Committees of Madrid. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):205-208.
    Introduction Currently, The nature and scope of Clinical Ethics Protocols in Madrid are not well understood.Objectives The main objective is to describe the features of ‘guideline/recommendation’ type CEPs that have been or are being developed by existing Clinical Ethics Committees in Madrid. Secondary objectives include characterisation of those CECs that have been the most prolific in reference to CEP creation and implementation and identification of any trends in future CEP development.Methods We collected CEPs produced and in process by CECs accredited (...)
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  2. D. A. (1998). The Limits of Individuality: Ritual and Sacrifice in the Lives and Medical Treatment of Conjoined Twins. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 29 (1):1-29.
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  3. Eliana Aaron (2013). Ethical Challenges in Refugee Health: A Global Public Health Concern. Hastings Center Report 43 (3):inside back cover-inside back co.
  4. Derrick E. Aarons (1999). Medicine and Its Alternatives: Health Care Priorities in the Caribbean. Hastings Center Report 29 (4):23-27.
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  5. M. Aase, J. E. Nordrehaug & K. Malterud (2008). "If You Cannot Tolerate That Risk, You Should Never Become a Physician": A Qualitative Study About Existential Experiences Among Physicians. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (11):767-771.
    Background and objectives: Physicians are exposed to matters of existential character at work, but little is known about the personal impact of such issues. Methods: To explore how physicians experience and cope with existential aspects of their clinical work and how such experiences affect their professional identities, a qualitative study using individual semistructured interviews has analysed accounts of their experiences related to coping with such challenges. Analysis was by systematic text condensation. The purposeful sample comprised 10 physicians (including three women), (...)
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  6. M. Aase, J. E. Nordrehaug & K. Malterud (2008). “If You Cannot Tolerate That Risk, You Should Never Become a Physician”: A Qualitative Study About Existential Experiences Among Physicians. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (11):767-771.
    Background and objectives: Physicians are exposed to matters of existential character at work, but little is known about the personal impact of such issues.Methods: To explore how physicians experience and cope with existential aspects of their clinical work and how such experiences affect their professional identities, a qualitative study using individual semistructured interviews has analysed accounts of their experiences related to coping with such challenges. Analysis was by systematic text condensation. The purposeful sample comprised 10 physicians , aged 33–66 years, (...)
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  7. Elmer D. Abbo & Angelo E. Volandes (2006). Teaching Residents to Consider Costs in Medical Decision Making. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):33 – 34.
  8. R. Abdool, M. Szego, D. Buchman, L. Justason, S. Bean, A. Heesters, H. Kaufman, B. Parke, F. Wagner & J. Gibson (forthcoming). Difficult Healthcare Transitions: Ethical Analysis and Policy Recommendations for Unrepresented Patients. Nursing Ethics.
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  9. H. E. Abdulhameed, M. M. Hammami & E. A. Hameed Mohamed (2011). Disclosure of Terminal Illness to Patients and Families: Diversity of Governing Codes in 14 Islamic Countries. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (8):472-475.
    Background The consistency of codes governing disclosure of terminal illness to patients and families in Islamic countries has not been studied until now. Objectives To review available codes on disclosure of terminal illness in Islamic countries. Data source and extraction Data were extracted through searches on Google and PubMed. Codes related to disclosure of terminal illness to patients or families were abstracted, and then classified independently by the three authors. Data synthesis Codes for 14 Islamic countries were located. Five codes (...)
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  10. Hunida E. Abdulhameed, Muhammad M. Hammami & Elbushra A. Hameed Mohamed (2011). Disclosure of Terminal Illness to Patients and Families: Diversity of Governing Codes in 14 Islamic Countries. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (8):472-475.
  11. Brendan S. Abel (2014). Hormone Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Gender Dysphoria:An Ethical Analysis. Hastings Center Report 44 (s4):S23-S27.
  12. Tineke Abma, Anne Bruijn, Tinie Kardol, Jos Schols & Guy Widdershoven (2012). Responsibilities in Elderly Care: Mr Powell's Narrative of Duty and Relations. Bioethics 26 (1):22-31.
    In Western countries a considerable number of older people move to a residential home when their health declines. Institutionalization often results in increased dependence, inactivity and loss of identity or self-worth (dignity). This raises the moral question as to how older, institutionalized people can remain autonomous as far as continuing to live in line with their own values is concerned. Following Walker's meta-ethical framework on the assignment of responsibilities, we suggest that instead of directing all older people towards more autonomy (...)
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  13. Marcia Abramson (1982). Social Work and the Safety Net. Hastings Center Report 12 (4):19-23.
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  14. Vincanne Adams (2004). Equity of the Ineffable: Cultural and Political Constraints on Ethnomedicine as a Health Problem in Contemporary Tibet. In Sudhir Anand, Fabienne Peter & Amartya Sen (eds.), Public Health, Ethics, and Equity. Oxford University Press.
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  15. David G. Addiss (forthcoming). Spiritual Themes and Challenges in Global Health. Journal of Medical Humanities.
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  16. M. Adib-Hajbaghery, S. Zehtabchi & I. A. Fini (forthcoming). Iranian Nurses' Professional Competence in Spiritual Care in 2014. Nursing Ethics.
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  17. Paola Adinolfi (2012). Philosophy, Medicine and Healthcare: Insights From the Italian Experience. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis (3):1-22.
    To contribute to our understanding of the relationship between philosophical ideas and medical and healthcare models. A diachronic analysis is put in place in order to evaluate, from an innovative perspective, the influence over the centuries on medical and healthcare models of two philosophical concepts, particularly relevant for health: how Man perceives his identity and how he relates to Nature. Five epochs are identified—the Archaic Age, Classical Antiquity, the Middle Ages, the Modern Age, the ‘Postmodern’ Era—which can be seen, à (...)
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  18. Paola Adinolfi (2012). Barriers to Reforming Healthcare: The Italian Case. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis (1):1-23.
    Using the conceptual lenses offered by the ideational and cultural path taken in the health care arena, this article attempts to explain the trajectory of recent major health care reforms in Italy and the reasons for their failure, as well as providing some directions for successful intervention. A diachronic analysis of the relatively under-investigated phenomenon of health care reforms in Italy is carried out, drawing on a systematic review of the Italian and international literature combined with the research work carried (...)
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  19. Roger Adkins (1999). Where “Sex” Is Born(E): Intersexed Births and the Social Urgency of Heterosexuality. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 20 (2):117-133.
    Our beloved “genders” of the present moment are neither universal nor trans-historical presences in the world. The specific gender order which we employ today is the legacy of a particular cultural and political history, and there is still a great deal at stake in preserving it. As a graduate student I stumbled upon the topic of intersexuality a few years ago and found myself enthralled with its implications. Continuing to present itself inspite of all our scientific knowledge about the supposed (...)
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  20. Liza Dawson Adnan A. Hyder (2005). Defining Standard of Care in the Developing World: The Intersection of International Research Ethics and Health Systems Analysis. Developing World Bioethics 5 (2):142-152.
    ABSTRACTIn recent years there has been intense debate regarding the level of medical care provided to ‘standard care’ control groups in clinical trials in developing countries, particularly when the research sponsors come from wealthier countries. The debate revolves around the issue of how to define a standard of medical care in a country in which many people are not receiving the best methods of medical care available in other settings. In this paper, we argue that additional dimensions of the standard (...)
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  21. G. Adshead (1999). Informed Consent in Psychiatry: European Perspectives of Ethics, Law and Clinical Practice. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (5):428-429.
  22. Gwen Adshead (2009). Ethical Issues in Secure Care. In Annie Bartlett & Gillian McGauley (eds.), Forensic Mental Health: Concepts, Systems, and Practice. Oxford University Press.
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  23. Gwen Adshead (2000). Psychiatric Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (3):220-221.
  24. Gwen Adshead (2000). Psychiatric Ethics S Bloch, P Chodoff, S Agreen, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1999, 531 Pages,£ 65 (Hb)£ 34.50 (Pb). [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (3):220-221.
  25. Muhammed Afolabi (2015). Situating the Trovan Trial With the Use of Experimental Ebola Therapies Is Like Comparing an Apple With an Orange. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (1):19-20.
    I read with great bewilderment the unconvincing arguments of Peter F. Omonzejele in his article “Ethical Challenges Posed by the Ebola Virus Epidemic in West Africa” published in the 11 issue of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry. While the author glaringly mixed up anthropological issues concerning the hygiene of hand-washing and safe burials in an article with a title clearly focused on ethical challenges, he failed to establish how the current Ebola epidemic ravaging some West Africa countries made these human (...)
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  26. Surgeries In Africa (forthcoming). Seven Things to Know About Female Genital Surgeries in Africa. Hastings Center Report.
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  27. A. Agard, R. Lofmark, N. Edvardsson & I. Ekman (2007). Views of Patients with Heart Failure About Their Role in the Decision to Start Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Treatment: Prescription Rather Than Participation. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (9):514-518.
    Background: There is a shortage of reports on what potential recipients of implantable cardioverter–defibrillators need to be informed about and what role they can and want to play in the decision-making process when it comes to whether or not to implant an ICD.Aims: To explore how patients with heart failure and previous episodes of malignant arrhythmia experience and view their role in the decision to initiate ICD treatment.Patients and methods: A qualitative content analysis of semistructured interviews was used. The study (...)
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  28. C. Agathangelou (2005). Book Review: The New Politics of Medicine. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 12 (4):422-423.
  29. C. Agathangelou (2004). Book Review: Nurses and Politics; the Impact of Power and Practice. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 11 (5):531-532.
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  30. George J. Agich (2009). The Issue of Expertise in Clinical Ethics. Diametros 22:3-20.
    The proliferation of ethics committees and ethics consultation services has engendered a discussion of the issue of the expertise of those who provide clinical ethics consultation services. In this paper, I discuss two aspects of this issue: the cognitive dimension or content knowledge that the clinical ethics consultant should possess and the practical dimension or set of dispositions, skills, and traits that are necessary for effective ethics consultation. I argue that the failure to differentiate and fully explicate these dimensions contributes (...)
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  31. George J. Agich & Stella Reiter-Theil (2009). Guest Editorial: Encouraging the Dialogue. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (4):333.
    Ethics consultation is the most engaged aspect of clinical ethics, a field focused on ethical issues, questions, and conflicts arising in the course of patient care and delivery of healthcare services. Despite the skepticism of some academic bioethicists and criticism expressed by social commentators, clinical ethics, which began in North America, has expanded to Europe and many other parts of the world with the proliferation of healthcare institution ethics and ethics consultation support services. Along with the development and implementation of (...)
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  32. Judith C. Ahronheim, Jonathan Moreno, Connie Zuckerman & Laurence B. McCullough (1995). Ethics in Clinical Practice. HEC Forum 7 (6):377-378.
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  33. Nancy Aldrich & Cheryl Macleod Darling (1995). Hospital Ethics Committees as Community Educators: A Model for Institutions. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 7 (4):252-263.
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  34. Rogelio Altisent, Begoña Buil & Maria Teresa Delgado-Marroquín (2012). Are Ethics Committees in Tune With the “Epidemiology of Ethical Issues”? American Journal of Bioethics 12 (11):27-29.
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  35. Judith Andre (2001). The Medical Humanities as an Elephant Seen by Blind Men. Medical Humanities Review.
    Because the medical humanities are multidisciplinary, participants tend to see one another's work through their own disciplinary lens. This can lead to misinterpretations.
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  36. Judith Andre (1998). Ethics and Medical Decision-Making. Society for Medical Decision-Making Newsletter (53):6-8.
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  37. George J. Annas (1991). Ethics Committees: From Ethical Comfort to Ethical Cover. Hastings Center Report 21 (3):18-21.
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  38. Jonny Anomaly (2012). Is Obesity a Public Health Problem? Public Health Ethics 5 (3):216-221.
    It is often claimed that there is an obesity epidemic in affluent countries, and that obesity is one of the most serious public health threats in the developed world. I will argue that obesity is not an 'epidemic' in any useful sense of the word, and that classifying it as a public health problem requires us to make fairly controversial moral and empirical assumptions. While evidence suggests that the prevalence of obesity is on the rise, and that obesity can lead (...)
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  39. Richard E. Ashcroft (ed.) (2007). Principles of Health Care Ethics. Wiley.
    Edited by four leading members of the new generation of medical and healthcare ethicists working in the UK, respected worldwide for their work in medical ethics, Principles of Health Care Ethics, Second Edition_is a standard resource for students, professionals, and academics wishing to understand current and future issues in healthcare ethics. With a distinguished international panel of contributors working at the leading edge of academia, this volume presents a comprehensive guide to the field, with state of the art introductions to (...)
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  40. Benedict M. Ashley (1994). Ethics of Health Care: An Introductory Textbook. Georgetown University Press.
    Contending that concern over the ethical dimensions of these and other like issues are no longer just in the domain of those involved in medical practice, the ...
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  41. Mark P. Aulisio, Jessica Moore, May Blanchard, Marcia Bailey & Dawn Smith (2009). Clinical Ethics Consultation and Ethics Integration in an Urban Public Hospital. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (4):371.
    Clinical ethics committees, with their typical threefold function of education, policy formation, and consultation, are present in nearly all U.S. hospitals today, and they are increasingly common in other healthcare settings such as long-term care and even home care. Ethics committees are at least as prevalent in Canadian hospitals as they are in U.S. hospitals, and their presence is growing in Europe, much of Asia, and Central and South America. Although ethics committees serve a variety of needs, their ultimate goal (...)
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  42. Bertram Bandman (2003). The Moral Development of Health Care Professionals: Rational Decisionmaking in Health Care Ethics. Praeger.
    A central challenge motivates this work: How, if at all, can philosophical ethics help in the moral development of health professionals?
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  43. Remmon E. Barbaza (2012). Ethics Beyond Ethics Committees: A Commentary on Lukas Kaelin,“Don't Trust the Ethicist!”. Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 16 (2):112-115.
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  44. S. G. Barber (2000). Ethical Ethics Committees? Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (2):142-a-142.
    sirAt a recent health authority meeting Professor Stacey, the NHSE Head of Research Ethics, was quoted as stating that for multicentre trials rapid responses were required ….
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  45. Kathleen Berchelmann & Barbara Blechner (2002). Searching for Effectiveness: The Functioning of Connecticut Clinical Ethics Committees. Journal of Clinical Ethics 13 (2):131.
  46. Bela Blasszauer (1991). Medical Ethics Committees in Hungary Dr. Bela Blasszauer. HEC Forum 3 (5):277-283.
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  47. M. Bloor, R. W. Dingwall, G. Horobin, J. McIntosh & M. L. Samphier (1975). Correspondence: Composition and Function of Ethical Committees. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (3):152-153.
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  48. Robyn Bluhm (2007). Clinical Trials as Nomological Machines: Implications for Evidence-Based Medicine. In Harold Kincaid Jennifer McKitrick (ed.), Establishing Medical Reality: Essays In The Metaphysics And Epistemology Of Biomedical Science. Springer.
  49. Allen Buchanan, Dan W. Brock, Norman Daniels & Daniel Wikler (2000). From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice. Cambridge University Press.
    This book, written by four internationally renowned bioethicists and first published in 2000, was the first systematic treatment of the fundamental ethical issues underlying the application of genetic technologies to human beings. Probing the implications of the remarkable advances in genetics, the authors ask how should these affect our understanding of distributive justice, equality of opportunity, the rights and obligations as parents, the meaning of disability, and the role of the concept of human nature in ethical theory and practice. The (...)
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  50. Stephen M. Campbell, Connie Ulrich & Christine Grady (2016). A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):2-9.
    On the traditional view, moral distress arises only in cases where an individual believes she knows the morally right thing to do but fails to perform that action due to various constraints. We seek to motivate a broader understanding of moral distress. We begin by presenting six types of distress that fall outside the bounds of the traditional definition and explaining why they should be recognized as forms of moral distress. We then propose and defend a new and more expansive (...)
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