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  1. The Politics of Perception and the Aesthetics of Social Change.Jason Miller - 2021 - New York, NY, USA: Columbia University Press.
    In both politics and art in recent decades, there has been a dramatic shift in emphasis on representation of identity. Liberal ideals of universality and individuality have given way to a concern with the visibility and recognition of underrepresented groups. Modernist and postmodernist celebrations of disruption and subversion have been challenged by the view that representation is integral to social change. Despite this convergence, neither political nor aesthetic theory has given much attention to the increasingly central role of art in (...)
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  2. Hegel, Romantic Art, and the Unfinished Task of the Poetic Word.Theodore George - 2019 - In Charles Bambach & Theodore George (eds.), Philosophers and their Poets: Reflections on the Poetic Turn in Philosophy Since Kant. Albany, NY, USA: pp. 65-83.
    This chapter focuses on Hegel's important but underappreciated conception of romantic art. The author argues that for Hegel, art is a work of language. Whereas Hegel believes classical art is a work of language that serves as a foundation of society, however, romantic art provides what the author refers to as a supplement.
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  3. The Stubbornness of Nature in Art: A Reading of §§556, 558 and 560 of Hegel's Encyclopedia.Ioannis Trisokkas - forthcoming - In Joshua Wretzel & Sebastian Stein (eds.), Hegel’s Encyclopedia of the Philosophical Sciences: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
    Speight has recently raised the question, which he himself leaves unanswered, how naturalism relates to spirit in Hegel’s philosophy of art. ‘Naturalism’ denotes an explanation that invokes aspects of nature that are (allegedly) irreducible or resistant to thought. I call nature ‘stubborn’ insofar as it evinces resistance to its being formed by thought and hence to its being united with it. This paper argues that §§556, 558 and 560 of Hegel’s Encyclopedia answer Speight’s question by specifying three elements of nature (...)
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  4. The Anachronism of Myth in Hegel and Bolsonarist Brazil.Adriano Kurle - 2020 - Problemata 11 (4):176-192.
    In this paper, I present some concepts of Hegel’s philosophy of art, aiming to interpret a cultural-political situation, namely, Bolsonarism in contemporary Brazil. I present the ideas in the following order: (a) the modes of comprehension, mainly through the distinction between the poetic and the prosaicmodes; (b) the conception of “Action [Handlung]” as a category of art, by means of its three levels: State of the World [Weltzustand], Situation [Situation], and Action itself [Handlung als solche]; (c) an evaluation of the (...)
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  5. Figural Space: Semiotics and the Aesthetic Imaginary.William D. Melaney - 2021 - London and New York: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This book is concerned with the continuing viability of both Freud and Hegel to the reading of modern literature. The book begins with Julia Kristeva’s attempts to relate Hegelian thought to a psychoanalytically informed conception of semiotics that was first explored in her influential study, The Revolution of Poetic Language, and then modified in later books that develop semiotics in new directions. Kristeva’s agreements and disagreement with Hegel are important to the book’s argument, which ultimately defends Hegel against familiar, poststructuralist (...)
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  6. Das Geistige und das Sinnliche in der Kunst – Hegel, Heidegger, Adorno.Dieter Wandschneider - 2005 - In Das Geistige und das Sinnliche in der Kunst. Ästhetische Reflexion in der Perspektive des Deutschen Idealismus. Würzburg, Germany: Königshausen & Neumann. pp. 123–137.
    Dass Kunst Sinnliches zu vergeistigen und Geistiges zu versinnlichen vermag, macht ihren Wesenskern und zugleich Rätselcharakter aus. Dass dieses Rätsel immer erneut als unaufgelöst erscheint, bedeutet auch, dass eine fortdauernde Irritation von Kunst ausgeht. Das Bestürzende der Kunst ist dies, dass sie den scheinbar unversöhnlichen Gegensatz des Geistigen und Sinnlichen zugleich als versöhnt erscheinen lässt: als Ver-Sinnlichung von Ideellem. Hegels These, dass die Kunst, eben durch diese Bindung an Sinnliches, 'ihrer eigentlichen Bestimmung nach für uns ein Vergangenes' sei, erscheint so (...)
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  7. Lectures on the Philosophy of Art: The Hotho Transcript of the 1823 Berlin Lectures G.W.F. HEGEL, ROBERT F. BROWN, Trans. Oxford University Press, 2014; 508 Pp.; £80.00. [REVIEW]Joseph Carew - 2018 - Dialogue 57 (1):196-199.
  8. Stephen Bungay, "Beauty and Truth: A Study of Hegel's Aesthetics". [REVIEW]William Desmond - 1987 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 25 (2):307.
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  9. David Punter, "Blake, Hegel and Dialectic". [REVIEW]Daniel O. Dahlstrom - 1985 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 23 (2):267.
  10. Hegel’s Philosophy of Art—An Analysis of its Foundations and Topicality. [REVIEW]Alexius J. Bucher - 1976 - Philosophy and History 9 (1):53-56.
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  11. Tragedy, Comedy, and Ethical Action in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit.Marcos Bisticas-Cocoves - 2005 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (1):95-115.
    For most readers of the Phenomenology of Spirit, Hegel’s example of “Ethical Action” is taken from Sophocles’ Antigone. In fact, however, Hegel provides us with a trilogy of tragic examples. The first is Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannos; the second, Aeschylus’s Seven against Thebes; Antigone is but the third. Further, just as a dramatic trilogy was followed by a satyr play among the ancients, ethical action’s final moment is taken from Aristophanes’ Ekklesiazousai. These four examples do not form a simple series where (...)
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  12. Art and Logic in Hegel’s Philosophy. [REVIEW]William Desmond - 1981 - The Owl of Minerva 12 (4):7-9.
    A fate similar to Kant’s sometimes befalls Hegel: the importance of their meditation on art is not always given its full due. In Kant’s case the Critique of Judgement becomes an elaborate afterthought, filling some of the gaps left by the Critique of Pure Reason and the Critique of Practical Reason. Particularly with English-speaking commentators, Kant is read from the First Critique forwards, never also from the Third Critique backwards. Hegel, we add, did not lend himself to such a unilinear (...)
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  13. 7. Music and Monosyllables: The Language of Pleasure and Necessity.Jeffrey Reid - 2007 - In Real Words: Language and System in Hegel. University of Toronto Press. pp. 85-95.
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  14. Kathleen Dow Magnus's Hegel And The Symbolic Mediation Of Spirit. [REVIEW]Victoria I. Burke - 2002 - Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 45:138-142.
    Kathleen Dow Magnus' Hegel and the Symbolic Mediation of Spirit is a welcome exposition of the role of the symbol in Hegel's philosophy, and it is an important contribution to scholarship on Hegel's philosophy of language, aesthetics, and theology. Magnus is concerned to provide an alternative to the view that Hegel fails to recognize the value of the symbol in the course of privileging the sign. As Jacques Derrida writes, "The sign, as the unity of the signifying body and the (...)
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  15. From Desire to Fascination: Hegel and Blanchot on Negativity.Victoria I. Burke - 1999 - MLN 114 (4).
    Using Blanchot’s Heideggerian conception of “negativity,” this paper argues that the Hegelian conception of desire is defined by its pursuit of comprehension of the concept, but, because of the operation of negativity, the comprehension of the concept perpetually reproduces the desire for further comprehension. Desiring self-consciousness thus perpetually recreates its own opacity to itself, and the pursuit of the object of desire destroys its own fulfilment. The Greek mythical figure of Orpheus, whose gaze destroys the beloved for whom he longs, (...)
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  16. Historia y Eticidad en la Antígona de Hegel.Alejandro Bárcenas - 2006 - Apuntes Filosóficos 15 (29).
    This essay explains the role of history and ethical life (Sittlichkeit) in the first section of the chapter entitled “Spirit” in the Phenomenology of Spirit, in which Hegel interprets the meaning of Sophocles’' Antigone as the best expression of the ancient Greeks’ ethical life in its preliminary and most immediate state. It is argued, first, that Hegel’s understanding of the ethical life was developed as an alternative, based on history, to Kant’s notion of morals (Sitten) and, second, that Hegel considered (...)
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  17. Institutional Design and Public Space: Hegel, Architecture, and Democracy.J. C. Berendzen - 2008 - Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (2):291-307.
    Habermas's conception of deliberative democracy could be fruitfully supplemented with a discussion of the "institutional design" of civil society; for example the architecture of public spaces should be considered. This paper argues that Hegel's discussion of architecture in his 'Aesthetics' can speak to this issue. For Hegel, architecture culminates in the gothic cathedral, because of how it fosters reflection on the part of the worshiper. This discussion suggests the possibility that architecture could foster a similar kind of intersubjective reflection. To (...)
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  18. Masking the Abject: A Genealogy of Play.Mechthild Nagel - 2002 - Latham, MD, USA: Lexington Books.
    Masking the Abject traces the beginnings of the malediction of play in Western metaphysics to Aristotle. Mechthild Nagel's innovative study demonstrates how play has served as a 'castaway' in western philosophical thinking: It is considered to be repulsive and loathsome, yet also fascinating and desirable. The book illustrates how play 'succeeds' and proliferates after Hegel—despite its denunciation by classical philosophers—entering Marxist, phenomenological, postmodern, and feminist discourses. This work provides the reader with a superb analyisis of how the distinction between the (...)
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  19. An Unrelieved Heart: Hegel, Tragedy, and Schiller's Wallenstein.Lydia L. Moland - 2011 - New German Critique 113 (38):1-23.
    In his early and unpublished essay on Schiller’s trilogy Wallenstein, Hegel criticizes the plays’ denouement as “horrific” and “appalling” and for depicting the triumph of death over life. Why was the young Hegel’s response to Wallenstein so negative? To answer this question, I first offer an analysis of Wallenstein in terms of Hegel’s mature theory of modern tragedy. I argue that Schiller’s portrayal of Wallenstein’s character and death indeed render the play a particularly dark and unredemptive example of modern tragedy (...)
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  20. Benjamin Rutter , Hegel on the Modern Arts . Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Kienhow Goh - 2012 - Philosophy in Review 32 (1):51-54.
    This book review offers the reader some perspectives on Benjamin Rutter's book Hegel on the Modern Arts as well as a concise summary of its contents.
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  21. Hegel Más Allá de Hegel: La Transgresión Cómica de Los Límites de Hegel En Žižek Y Kierkegaard.Alejandro Cavallazzi - 2013 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 7 (1).
  22. Negative Darstellung. Das Erhabene Bei Kant Und Hegel.Alessandro Bertinetto - 2006 - Internationales Jahrbuch des Deutschen Idealismus / International Yearbook of German Idealism 4:124-151.
  23. Art and the Absolute: A Study of Hegel's Aesthetics.Martin Donougho - 1987 - Review of Metaphysics 40 (3):567-569.
    As the author of this agreeably written book points out, the Lectures on Aesthetics is a neglected work in English-language Hegel scholarship. Desmond responds to this lack by aiming not at a full commentary but rather at a selective discussion of some central issues. He believes that the result should be of interest not merely to Hegel scholars or philosophers but also to a wider audience, with concerns in art and in modern culture generally.
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  24. Hegel’s Antigone: A Response to the Feminist Critique.Nadine Changfoot - 2002 - The Owl of Minerva 33 (2):179-204.
    Recent feminist criticism suggests that Hegel’s account of Antigone in the Phenomenology of Spirit is antithetical to feminism on two key counts: first, Hegel does not develop an authentic political representation of women’s agency and participation in the community, and second, he does not provide a model for a genuinely ethical order especially where relations between men and women are concerned. Patricia Jagentowicz Mills and Luce Irigaray are two feminist thinkers who have expressed these positions. They both take issue with (...)
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  25. The “Death of the Author” in Hegel and Kierkegaard: On Berthold’s The Ethics of Authorship.Antony Aumann - 2011 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 32 (2):435-447.
    In The Ethics of Authorship, Daniel Berthold depicts G. W. F. Hegel and Søren Kierkegaard as endorsing two postmodern principles. The first is an ethical ideal. Authors should abdicate their traditional privileged position as arbiters of their texts’ meaning. They should allow readers to determine this meaning for themselves. Only by doing so will they help readers attain genuine selfhood. The second principle is a claim about language. To wit, language cannot express an author’s thoughts. I argue that if the (...)
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  26. Hegel and the Modern Arts. [REVIEW]Matthew C. Altman - 2011 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (3):381-382.
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  27. Tragedy, Dialectics, and Différance: On Hegel and Derrida.Karin Boer - 2001 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (3):331-357.
  28. Beauty and Truth: A Study of Hegel's Aesthetics.J. M. Bernstein - 1986 - Philosophical Books 27 (2):90-91.
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  29. Hegel, Literature and the Problem of Agency by Allen Speight. [REVIEW]Michael Baur - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):134-135.
  30. The Ethics of Authorship: Communication, Seduction, and Death in Hegel and Kierkegaard.Daniel Berthold-Bond - 2011 - Fordham University Press.
    Introduction : Rorschach tests -- A question of style -- Live or tell -- Kierkegaard's seductions -- Hegel's seductions -- Talking cures -- A penchant for disguise : the death (and rebirth) of the author in Kierkegaard and Nietzsche -- Passing over : the death of the author in Hegel -- Conclusion : the melancholy of having finished -- Aftersong : from low down.
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  31. Hegel and Shakespeare on Moral Imagination.Jennifer Ann Bates - 2010 - State University of New York Press.
    A Hegelian reading of good and bad luck -- In Shakespearean drama (phen. of spirit, King Lear, Othello, Hamlet, a Midsummer night's dream) -- Tearing the fabric: Hegel's Antigone, Shakespeare's Coriolanus, and kinship-state conflict (phen. of spirit c. 6, Judith Butler's Antigone, Coriolanus) -- Aufhebung and anti-aufhebung: geist and ghosts in Hamlet (phen. of spirit, Hamlet) -- The problem of genius in King Lear: Hegel on the feeling soul and the tragedy of wonder (anthropology and psychology in the encyclopaedia, Philosophy (...)
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  32. Review of Bruce Baugh, French Hegel: From Surrealism to Postmodernism[REVIEW]Robert Bernasconi - 2004 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (4).
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  33. Sublime Understanding: Aesthetic Reflection in Kant and Hegel.Ruben Berrios - 2003 - British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):422-424.
  34. Hegel on Aesthetic Internalization.Gene Blocker - 1971 - British Journal of Aesthetics 11 (4):341-353.
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  35. Resurrecting Hegel to Bury Art.Lee B. Brown - 1989 - British Journal of Aesthetics 29 (4):303-315.
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  36. Art and the Absolute: A Study of Hegel's Aesthetics.Curtis L. Carter - 1989 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (1):163-165.
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  37. The Greek Profile: Hegel's Aesthetics and the Implications of a Pseudo-Science.Steven Decaroli - 2006 - Philosophical Forum 37 (2):113–151.
  38. Review of Sara MacDonald, Finding Freedom: Hegel's Philosophy and the Emancipation of Women[REVIEW]Lydia Moland - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (12).
Hegel: End of Art Thesis
  1. Hegel's Aesthetics: The Art of Idealism.Lydia L. Moland - 2019 - Oup Usa.
    Hegel's Aesthetics is the first comprehensive interpretation of Hegel's philosophy of art in English in thirty years. It gives a new analysis of his notorious "end of art" thesis, shows the indispensability of his aesthetics to his philosophy generally, and argues for his theory's relevance today.
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  2. Hegel's Philosophy of Art.Lydia L. Moland - 2017 - In Dean Moyar (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Hegel. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 559-580.
    Despite Hegel’s effusive praise for art as one of the ways humans express truth, art by his description is both essentially limited and at perpetual risk of ending. This hybrid assessment is apparent first in Hegel’s account of art’s development, which shows art culminating in classical sculpture’s perfect unity but then, unable to depict Christianity’s interiority, evolving into religion, surrendering to division, or dissipating into prose. It is also evident in his ranking of artistic genres from architecture to poetry according (...)
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  3. "And Why Not?" Hegel, Comedy, and the End of Art.Lydia L. Moland - 2016 - Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane (1-2):73-104.
    Towards the very end of his wide-ranging lectures on the philosophy of art, Hegel unexpectedly expresses a preference for comedy over tragedy. More surprisingly, given his systematic claims for his aesthetic theory, he suggests that this preference is arbitrary. This essay suggests that this arbitrariness is itself systematic, given Hegel’s broader claims about unity and necessity in art generally and his analysis of ancient as opposed to modern drama in particular. With the emergence of modern subjectivity, tragic plots lose their (...)
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  4. THE END OF ART AND PATOČKA's PHILOSOPHY OF ART.Josl Jan - 2016 - HORIZON. Studies in Phenomenology 1 (1):232-246.
    In this essay I consider the end-of-art thesis in its metaphysical and empirical versions. I show that both use the correspondence theory of truth as the basis for their conception of the history of art. As a counterpart to these theories I have chosen Patočka’s conception of the history of art. His theory is based also on the relationship between art and truth, but he conceives truth in the phenomenological sense of manifestation. In the rest of the essay I seek (...)
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  5. Hegel and Semiotics: Beyond the End of Art.William D. Melaney - 2016 - In K. Bankov (ed.), New Semiotics: Between Tradition and Innovation Proceedings of the Twelfth World Congress of Semiotics. New Bulgarian University. pp. 10 pages.
    This paper argues that Hegel attempts to appropriate the irreversible aspects of Romantic aesthetics in four ways: (i) Hegel radicalizes Kantian aesthetics on the basis of a basically textual approach to sublime experience that opens up the question of community as a philosophical one; (ii) without demoting classical conceptions of art, Hegel privileges Romantic conceptions that demonstrate the ascendancy of sign over symbol in a spiraling chain; (iii) Hegel laments the fate of art in the triumph of Romantic subjectivism but (...)
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  6. Why is the Amphibian Status of the Human Unavoidable? Some Remarks on Robert Pippin's "After the Beautiful".Italo Testa - 2015 - Lebenswelt: Aesthetics and Philosophy of Experience 7:21-27.
  7. Embodied Meaning and Art as Sense-Making: A Critique of Beiser’s Interpretation of the ‘End of Art Thesis'.Paul Giladi - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Culture 8:http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/jac.v8.
    The aim of this paper is to challenge Fred Beiser’s interpretation of Hegel’s meta-aesthetical position on the future of art. According to Beiser, Hegel’s comments about the ‘pastness’ of art commit Hegel to viewing postromantic art as merely a form of individual self-expression. I both defend and extend to other territory Robert Pippin’s interpretation of Hegel as a proto-modernist, where such modernism involves (i) his rejection of both classicism and Kantian aesthetics, and (ii) his espousal of what one may call (...)
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  8. Hegels Auffassung von der Poesie als Endform der Kunst.Héctor Ferreiro - 2015 - In Peter Remmers & Christoph Asmuth (eds.), Ästhetisches Wissen. Berlin/Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 133-144.
  9. What is the Future of the Past? Gadamer and Hegel on the Work of Art in the Age of its Liberation.Theodore George - 2009 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 40 (1):4-20.
    Some more recent scholarship that challenges received wisdom about Gadamer not withstanding, it remains common to associate his hermeneutical approach to art and literature, along with his hermeneutics generally, with political and cultural conservatism. In this essay, however, the author argues that some of Gadamer’s significant, but underappreciated, later essays on Hegel’s aesthetics further support and nuance the rising recognition of Gadamer’s sensitivity to the discontinuities, dislocations, and fractures that pervade any experience of the past. Specifically, Gadamer’s critical response in (...)
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  10. The Moral Consequences of the End of Art.David Rondel - 2014 - In Vladimir Marchenkov (ed.), Between Histories: Art's Dilemmas and Trajectories. Hampton Press. pp. 13-24.
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Hegel: Aesthetic Feeling
  1. The Historicity of Music in Hegel in Face of Schoenberg’s Twelve-Tone Music.Adriano Bueno Kurle - 2019 - Veritas – Revista de Filosofia da Pucrs 64 (2):33169.
    In this paper, I consider how it would be possible to think about the historicity of music through Hegel’s thought. I will compare Hegel’s idea with a historical event that is considered relevant in the history of music: Schoenberg’s twelve-tone music, taken here also as a model of immanent negation and Aufhebung of tonal system in music. Furthermore, I will take Schoenberg’s twelve-tone music as an instance and wonder about the role of music and its history in the sociocultural formation (...)
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  2. Hegel's Aesthetics: The Art of Idealism.Lydia L. Moland - 2019 - Oup Usa.
    Hegel's Aesthetics is the first comprehensive interpretation of Hegel's philosophy of art in English in thirty years. It gives a new analysis of his notorious "end of art" thesis, shows the indispensability of his aesthetics to his philosophy generally, and argues for his theory's relevance today.
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