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  1. Concept and Time in Hegel.John Burbidge - 1973 - Dialogue 12 (3):403-422.
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  2. Hegel and the Normativity of the Concept.Victoria I. Burke - 2011 - Idealistic Studies 1 (3):161-166.
    A lexical unit of meaning, or the concept, involves not just two moments, the rule and the following of the rule, but two reciprocally dependent moments. I argue that this links meaning to value. As a reciprocal relation, truth as normative is constituted by what Hegel calls ethical substance, which exists only between more than one consciousness, or, as Hegel would say, moments of consciousness. I read these two moments as the two shapes of consciousness that Hegel calls the master (...)
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  3. Not Hegel’s Tales: Applied Concepts, Negotiated Truths and the Reciprocity of Un-Equals in Conceptual Pragmatism.de Laurentiis Allegra - 2007 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (1):83-98.
    The article expresses skepticism on the alleged affinity between Hegel’s theory of conceptuality and conceptual pragmatism. Despite the intriguing philosophical impetus underlying the latter, the author formulates doubts about its compatibility with logical and metaphysical principles of absolute idealism. The criticism is articulated in four theses: pragmatism’s concerns with concept-acquisition and concept-application are largely alien to Hegel’s logical-metaphysical theory of conceptuality; the interchangeability of ‘word’ and ‘concept’ in the pragmatist discussion is incompatible with Hegel’s notion of thinking; the distinction of (...)
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  4. The One and the Concept : On Hegel's Reading of Plato's Parmenides.Allegra de Laurentiis - 2005 - In David Carlson (ed.), Hegel's Theory of the Subject. Palgrave-Macmillan.
  5. On Hegel's Critique of Kant's Subjectivism in the Transcendental Deduction.Dennis Schulting - 2017 - In Kant's Radical Subjectivism. Perspectives on the Transcendental Deduction. London: Palgrave. pp. 341-370.
    In this article, I expound Hegel’s critique of Kant, which he first and most elaborately presented in his early essay "Faith and Knowledge" (1802), by focusing on the criticism that Hegel levelled against Kant’s (supposedly) arbitrary subjectivism about the categories. This relates to the restriction thesis of Kant’s transcendental idealism: categorially governed empirical knowledge only applies to appearances, not to things in themselves, and so does not reach objective reality, according to Hegel. Hegel claims that this restriction of knowledge to (...)
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  6. On An Older Dispute: Hegel, Pippin, and the Separability of Concept and Intuition in Kant.Dennis Schulting - 2016 - In Kantian Nonconceptualism. London: Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 227–255.
    In this chapter, I am interested in how, following Hegel’s critique of Kant, recent Hegelians have interpreted Kant’s claims in the Transcendental Deduction (TD), in particular. Hegelians such as Robert Pippin think that in TD Kant effectively compromises or wavers on the strict separability between concepts and intuitions he stipulates at A51/B75. For if the argument of TD, in particular in its B-version, is that the categories are not only the necessary conditions under which I think objects, by virtue of (...)
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  7. The Logic of the Border.Ioannis Trisokkas - 2014 - Russian Sociological Review 13 (4):18-41.
    In his Science of Logic Hegel purports to give an account of a dialectical logic that generates the totality of being’s fundamental structures. This totality does not exhaust the richness of being, but it exhausts the basis of this richness. Any phenomenon, whether cognitive, scientific, social or political, is based upon some or all of those structures. The paper presents and examines the logic of a structure which pervades each and every phenomenon: the border(die Grenze). It is analyzed as an (...)
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  8. Hegel on the Particular in the Science of Logic.Ioannis Trisokkas - 2011/12 - The Owl of Minerva 43 (1/2):1-40.
    Hegel begins the third main part of the Science of Logic, the “logic of the concept,” with the dialectic of universality. This dialectic, however, proves to be insufficient for the exposition of the fundamental structure of being-as-concept, because it is dominated by the perspective of self-identity. For this reason speculative logic develops a dialectic of particularity whose domain is dominated by the perspective of difference. While the dialectic of universality made explicit the meaning of the proposition-of-reason being-as-concept is universal, the (...)
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