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  1. The “Passion” of Finitude. The Young Hegel as Post-Kantian.Francesca Brencio - forthcoming - In Hegel-Jahrbuch.
  2. On the Death of God.David Wyatt Aiken - 2019 - Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 71 (3):285-311.
  3. Kenotic Chorology as A/Theology in Nishida and Beyond.John W. M. Krummel - 2019 - Sophia 58 (2):255-282.
    In this paper, I explore a possible a/theological response to what Nietzsche called the ‘death of God’—or Hölderlin’s and Heidegger’s ‘flight of the gods’—through a juxtaposition of the Christian-Pauline concept of kenōsis and the ancient Greek-Platonic notion of chōra, and by taking Nishida Kitarō’s appropriations of these concepts as a clue and starting point. Nishida refers to chōra in 1926 to initiate his philosophy of place and then makes reference to kenōsis in 1945 in his final work that culminates—without necessarily (...)
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  4. Postmodernism.Christopher Watkin - 2019 - In Graham Oppy (ed.), A Companion to Atheism and Philosophy. Oxford: Blackwell. pp. 138-151.
    I trace the genealogy and tensions of postmodern atheism through a series of encounters: Heidegger's reading of Nietzsche's “God is dead,” Foucault's critique of Sartre's humanism, Jean‐Luc Nancy's rejection of Alain Badiou's atheism, and the questions Derrida raises about Nancy's own position. I argue that there are plural postmodern atheisms, each of which defends its own claim to be following through on the consequences of the death of God more radically than the alternatives.
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  5. Hegel and Bataille on Sacrifice.W. Ezekiel Goggin - 2018 - Hegel Bulletin 39 (2):236-259.
    In Georges Bataille’s view, the Hegelian interpretation of kenotic sacrifice as passage from Spirit to the Speculative Idea effaces the necessarily representational character of sacrifice and the irreducible non-presence of death. But Hegel identifies these aspects of death in the fragments of the 1800 System. In sacrificial acts, subjectivity represents its disappearance via the sacrificed other, and hence is negated and conserved. Sacrifice thus provides the representational model of sublation pursued in the Phenomenology as a propaedeutic to Science. Bataille’s critique (...)
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  6. Tragedy, Recognition and the Death of God. [REVIEW]Paul Redding - 2013 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 201307.
  7. “God Himself Is Dead!” Luther, Hegel, and the Death of God.Frederiek Depoortere - 2007 - Philosophy and Theology 19 (1/2):171-195.
    This paper traces the origins of the phrase “God is dead!” back to Hegel and Luther. It proceeds in the following four steps: Section I investigates the appearance of the theme of God’s death in Lutheran theology. Section II elaborates on Hegel’s adaptation of this theme in the context of his early work Faith & Knowledge. In section III, the paper continues on how the theme of the death of God developed from Luther to Nietzsche via Hegel, before concluding, in (...)
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  8. Мъртвият Бог? Хегел, Ницше, Хайдегер.Vasil Penchev - 2007 - Sofia: "М. Михайлож".
    The relation of "God" and "human being" as two fundamental concepts in philosophy is considered in the trdition of Western philosophy: Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger ...
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