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  1. Prawa metafizyczne we wczesnej filozofii Immanuela Kanta (1724- 1804).Janusz Sytnik -Czetwertyński - 2010 - Zagadnienia Naukoznawstwa 46 (183):101-110.
    Autor przedstawia krytykę praw metafizyki przedstawionych przez Immanuela Kanta w tzw. przedkrytycznym okresie jego twórczości. Zdaniem Kanta, prawa te składają się na tzw. Boży układ świata.
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  2. Un “mistero incomprensibile”: il problema mente-corpo nella filosofia dello spirito di Hegel.Stefania Achella - 2012 - Etica E Politica 14 (2):8-27.
    The essay aims to analyze the relationship between mind and body in the Hegel’s philosophy of subjective spirit. Through a rapid reconstruction of the influences of emerging empirical sciences, such as biology with his vitalist positions, physiognomy and phrenology, the essay aims to highlight not only the role that in the structure of Hegel’s view assumes the teleological vision derived from Aristotle, mediated by third Kantian critique, but also the epistemological significance of the Hegelian methodological attitude. Hegel rejects the attempts (...)
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  3. Insanity, Crime and the Structure of Freedom in Hegel.Timo Airaksinen - 1989 - Social Theory and Practice 15 (2):155-178.
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  4. Ethics and History in Hegel's Practical Philosophy.Mark Alznauer - 2012 - Review of Metaphysics 65 (3):581-611.
    Hegel’s contextualization of ethics in history has often been understood as implying the possibility of “world-historical” justifications for unethical actions. Critics have seen this as a category mistake that violates the authority of the ethical sphere; defenders have argued that it represents one of Hegel’s most revolutionary insights, the idea that customary morality should not stand in the way of human liberation. In this essay, I argue that both of these reactions are based on failure to properly distinguish between rational (...)
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  5. Hegel on Legal and Moral Responsibility.Mark Alznauer - 2008 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 51 (4):365 – 389.
    When Hegel first addresses moral responsibility in the Philosophy of Right, he presupposes that agents are only responsible for what they intended to do, but appears to offer little, if any, justification for this assumption. In this essay, I claim that the first part of the Philosophy of Right, “Abstract Right”, contains an implicit argument that legal or external responsibility (blame for what we have done) is conceptually dependent on moral responsibility proper (blame for what we have intended). This overlooked (...)
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  6. Kant and Hegel on Freedom: Two New Interpretations.Karl Ameriks - 1992 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 35 (2):219 – 232.
    Can Kant's theory of freedom be defended in contemporary "incompatibilist" terms, as Henry Allison believes, or is it vulnerable to Hegelian criticisms of the "compatibilist" sort that Allen Wood presents? I argue that the answer to both of these questions is negative, and that there is a third option, namely that Kant's real theory of freedom is not as well off as Allison contends, nor as weak as Wood claims. Allison tries to save Kant's theory of freedom from both what (...)
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  7. Conscience, Recognition, and the Irreducibility of Difference In Hegel’s Conception of Spirit.Nathan Andersen - 2005 - Idealistic Studies 35 (2-3):119-136.
    Hegel’s conception of Spirit does not subordinate difference to sameness, in a way that would make it unusable for a genuinely intersubjective idealism directed to a comprehensive account of the contemporary world. A close analysis of the logic of recognition and the dialectic of conscience in the Phenomenology of Spirit demonstrates that the unity of Spirit emerges in and through conflict, and is forged in the process whereby particular encounters between differently situated individuals reveal and establish the emerging character and (...)
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  8. A Hegelian Theory of Punishment.Jami L. Anderson - 1999 - Legal Theory 5 (4):363-388.
    Despite the bad press that retributivism often receives, the basic assumptions on which this theory of punishment rests are generally regarded as being attractive and compelling. First of these is the assumption that persons are morally responsible agents and that social practices, such as criminal punishment, must acknowledge that fact. Additionally, retributivism is committed to the claim that punishment must be proportionate to the crime, and not determined by such utilitarian concerns as the welfare of society, or the hope of (...)
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  9. Understanding Punishment as Annulment.Jami L. Anderson - 1998 - Social Philosophy Today 13:215-226.
    Hegel claims that punishment is justified because it annuls crimes thereby revealing the criminal act for what it is, a will “null and void.” In this paper I analyze the complex notion of annulment, arguing that Hegel is claiming that punishment does not change the past, but alters the status of the criminal will so as to reveal that will for what it is, a violation of a victim’s rights. In short, punishment invalidates the criminal's will and validates the victim's (...)
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  10. Hegel's Theory of Recognition: From Oppression to Ethical Liberal Modernity.Sybol Cook Anderson - 2009 - Continuum.
    Introduction: Redeeming recognition -- Oppression reconsidered -- Foundations of a liberal conception -- Toward a liberal conception of oppression -- Conclusion : A liberal conception of oppression -- Misrecognition as oppression -- Exploitation and disempowerment -- Cultural imperialism -- Marginalization -- Violence -- Conclusion: Misrecognition as oppression -- Overcoming oppression : the limits of toleration -- Contemporary differences : matters of toleration -- John Rawls : political liberalism -- Will Kymlicka : multicultural citizenship -- Conclusion: Accommodating differences : the limits (...)
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  11. Ethics: The Key Thinkers.Tom P. S. Angier (ed.) - 2012 - Continuum.
    Plato Tom Angier -- Aristotle Timothy Chappell -- Stoics Jacob Klein -- Aquinas Vivian Boland O.P -- Hume Peter Millican -- Kant Ralph Walker -- Hegel Kenneth Westphal -- Marx Sean Sayers -- Mill Krister Bykvist -- Nietzsche Ken Gemes and Christoph Schuringa -- Macintyre David Solomon.
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  12. The Instrumentality of Passion in the World of Reason: Hegel and Marx.Schlomo Avineri - 1973 - Political Theory 1 (4):388-398.
  13. Aspects of Freedom of Writing and Expression In Hegel and Marx.Shlomo Avineri - 1977 - Social Theory and Practice 4 (3):273-286.
  14. Hegel's Philosophy of Law.Johannes Balthasar - 1990 - Philosophy and History 23 (1):22-23.
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  15. The Doctrine of the Awareness of Wrong in Hegel's Legal Philosophy.Johannes Balthasar - 1980 - Philosophy and History 13 (1):3-4.
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  16. Hugh A. Reyburn, The Ethical Theory of Hegel: A Study of the Philosophy of Right. [REVIEW]H. Barker - 1923 - Ethics 33 (2):216-.
  17. Being-with as Being-Against: Heidegger Meets Hegel in the Second Sex. [REVIEW]Nancy Bauer - 2001 - Continental Philosophy Review 34 (2):129-149.
    In this paper I attempt to further the case, made in recent years by Eva Gothlin, that readers interested in a philosophical return to Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex have good reason to heed Beauvoir's appropriation of central concepts from Heidegger's Being and Time. I speculate about why readers have been hesitant to acknowledge Heidegger's influence on Beauvoir and show that her infrequent though, I argue, important use of the Heideggarian neologism Mitsein in The Second Sex makes inadequate sense (...)
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  18. Social Conceptions of Moral Agency in Hegel and Sellars.David Baumeister - 2017 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 25 (2):249-265.
    This essay contributes to our understanding of the relation between the philosophies of Hegel and Sellars. While most treatments of this relation have focused on metaphysics or epistemology, I focus on ethics, and in particular on the formulation of moral agency. I argue that Hegel and Sellars arrive at a similar metaphilosophical rejection of individual moral agency in favor of conceptions of moral agency as the outcome of social mediation. To demonstrate this, I trace how Hegel and Sellars offer parallel (...)
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  19. SETTINGS OF PRESS FREEDOM AND PUBLIC OPINION IN HEGEL.Agemir Bavaresco & Paulo Roberto Konzen - 2009 - Kriterion: Revista de Filosofia 50 (119):63-92.
    New settings for communication are being built, having, at one side, great corporations of television, radio, press and on line media, and at the other side the role of the independent / alternative press, understood as not bound to a private, public or state enterprise or to some economic group. It takes gradually shape the constitution of the opposition between the traditional media and the independent / alternative press, having as a material base the new technologies of information. How can (...)
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  20. Freedom and Tradition in Hegel: Reconsidering Anthropology, Ethics, and Religion (Review).Thora Ilin Bayer - 2006 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (2):322-323.
    Thora Ilin Bayer - Freedom and Tradition in Hegel: Reconsidering Anthropology, Ethics, and Religion - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.2 322-323 Thomas A. Lewis. Freedom and Tradition in Hegel: Reconsidering Anthropology, Ethics, and Religion. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 2005. Pp. xiii + 258. Cloth, $32.50. Central to the purpose of this book is an examination of Hegel's conception of ethics. This examination is most welcome because between Hugh (...)
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  21. Freedom and Recognition in Hegel and Habermas.Kenneth Baynes - 2002 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (1):1-17.
    Contrary to some popular interpretations, I argue that Hegel and Habermas share many basic assumptions in their respective accounts of freedom. In particular, both respond to weaknesses in Kant's idea of freedom as acting from (certain kinds of) reasons by explicating this idea with reference to specific social practices or 'forms of recognition' that in turn express suppositions and expectations that actors adopt with respect to one another. I illustrate this common strategy in each and suggest that it may offer (...)
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  22. The Moral Foundations of Hegel's Thought.Werner Beierwaltes - 1969 - Philosophy and History 2 (2):140-141.
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  23. “Morality” in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit.Frederick C. Beiser - 2009 - In Kenneth R. Westphal (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit.
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  24. In The Shadow Of Aristotle And Hegel: Communicative Ethics And Current Controversies In Practical Philosophy.Seyla Benhabib - 1989 - Philosophical Forum 21 (1):1-31.
  25. What If the Other Were an Animal? Hegel on Jews, Animals and Disease.Andrew Benjamin - 2007 - Critical Horizons 8 (1):61-77.
    The question of the other appears to be a uniquely human concern. Engagement with the nature of alterity and the quality of the other are philosophical projects that commence with an assumed anthropocentrism. This anthropocentrism will be pursued by way of Hegel's discussion of "disease" in his Philosophy of Nature. Disease is implicitly bound up with race, racial identity and animality, and provides an opening to the question: what if the other were an animal? Any answer to this question should (...)
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  26. Rawls, Hegel, and Personhood.Peter Benson - 1994 - Political Theory 22 (3):491-500.
  27. Hegel on Others and the Self.Frances Berenson - 1982 - Philosophy 57 (219):77 - 90.
    Hegel, in offering his account of Other Minds, claims that his way of conducting the enquiry is the only philosophically significant way. I shall attempt to bring out certain profound insights in this area on Hegel's part, but I shall also argue that his view of Man leaves out of consideration some of the most important aspects of what is essentially human.
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  28. Freedom and its Betrayal: Six Enemies of Human Liberty.Isaiah Berlin - 2002 - Princeton University Press.
    Isaiah Berlin's celebrated radio lectures on six formative anti-liberal thinkers were broadcast by the BBC in 1952. They are published here for the first time, fifty years later. They comprise one of Berlin's earliest and most convincing expositions of his views on human freedom and on the history of ideas--views that later found expression in such famous works as "Two Concepts of Liberty," and were at the heart of his lifelong work on the Enlightenment and its critics. Working with BBC (...)
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  29. Hegel's Ladder: The Ethical Presuppositions of Absolute Knowing.J. M. Bernstein - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (4):803.
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  30. The Ethics of Authorship: Communication, Seduction, and Death in Hegel and Kierkegaard.Daniel Berthold-Bond - 2011 - Fordham University Press.
    Introduction : Rorschach tests -- A question of style -- Live or tell -- Kierkegaard's seductions -- Hegel's seductions -- Talking cures -- A penchant for disguise : the death (and rebirth) of the author in Kierkegaard and Nietzsche -- Passing over : the death of the author in Hegel -- Conclusion : the melancholy of having finished -- Aftersong : from low down.
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  31. Duquette, Hegel, and Political Freedom.Joseph Bien - 1990 - Southwest Philosophy Review 6 (2):111-113.
  32. Hegel's Grounding of Intersubjectivity in the Master-Slave Dialectic.S. Bird-Pollan - 2012 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (3):237-256.
    In this article I seek to explain Hegel’s significance to contemporary meta-ethics, in particular to Kantian constructivism. I argue that in the master–slave dialectic in the Phenomenology of Spirit , Hegel shows that self-consciousness and intersubjectivity arise at the same time. This point, I argue, shows that there is no problem with taking other people’s reasons to motivate us since reflection on our aims is necessarily also reflection on the needs of those around us. I further explore Hegel’s contribution to (...)
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  33. Review: Geiger, The Founding Act of Modern Ethical Life: Hegel's Critique of Kant's Moral and Political Philosophy.Stefan Bird-Pollan - 2009 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 6 (4):535-537.
  34. Tragedy, Comedy, and Ethical Action in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit.Marcos Bisticas-Cocoves - 2005 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (1):95-115.
    For most readers of the Phenomenology of Spirit, Hegel’s example of “Ethical Action” is taken from Sophocles’ Antigone. In fact, however, Hegel provides us with a trilogy of tragic examples. The first is Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannos; the second, Aeschylus’s Seven against Thebes; Antigone is but the third. Further, just as a dramatic trilogy was followed by a satyr play among the ancients, ethical action’s final moment is taken from Aristophanes’ Ekklesiazousai. These four examples do not form a simple series where (...)
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  35. Hegel on War.Edward Black - 1973 - The Monist 57 (4):570-583.
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  36. The Symbolic Dimension and the Politics of Left Hegelianism.Warren Breckman - 2006 - In Douglas Moggach (ed.), The New Hegelians: Politics and Philosophy in the Hegelian School. Cambridge University Press.
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  37. Thinking Outside the Circle: The Place of Kierkegaard in Stern'sUnderstanding Moral Obligation.William Bristow - 2012 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 55 (6):606-621.
    Abstract In Understanding Moral Obligation, Robert Stern presents an interesting account of the history of ethics from Kant through Hegel and Kierkegaard. I argue that Stern in this account misinterprets Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling and Works of Love by reading them as presenting a Divine Command Theory of moral obligation, as a philosophical account meant to compete with those of Kant and Hegel. It mistakes, indeed subverts, Kierkegaard's purposes to read him as engaging in a philosophical dialectic in these texts. (...)
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  38. Hegel's Philosophy of Right: Essays on Ethics, Politics, and Law.Thom Brooks (ed.) - 2012 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    The most comprehensive collection on Hegel's Philosophy of Right available Features new essays by leading international Hegel interpreters divided in sections ...
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  39. Hegel: Philosophy of Politics.Thom Brooks - 2010 - Oxford Bibliographies Online.
    G. W. F. Hegel is widely considered to be one of the most important philosophers in the history of philosophy. This entry focuses on his contributions to political philosophy, with particular attention paid to his seminal work: the Philosophy of Right. A particular focus will be placed on Hegel’s theories of freedom, contract and property, punishment, morality, family, civil society, law, and the state.
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  40. Between Natural Law and Legal Positivism: Dworkin and Hegel on Legal Theory.Thom Brooks - 2007 - Georgia State University Law Review 23 (3):513-60.
    In this article, I argue that - despite the absence of any clear influence of one theory on the other - the legal theories of Dworkin and Hegel share several similar and, at times, unique positions that join them together within a distinctive school of legal theory, sharing a middle position between natural law and legal positivism. In addition, each theory can help the other in addressing certain internal difficulties. By recognizing both Hegel and Dworkin as proponents of a position (...)
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  41. Hegel's Ambiguous Contribution to Legal Theory.Thom Brooks - 2005 - Res Publica 11 (1):85-94.
    Hegel's legacy is particularly controversial, not least in legal theory. He has been classified as a proponent of either natural law, legal positivism, the historical school, pre-Marxism, postmodern critical theory, and even transcendental legal theory. To what degree has Hegel actually influenced contemporary legal theorists? This review article looks at Michael Salter's collection Hegel and Law. I look at articles on civil disobedience, contract law, feminism, and punishment. I conclude noting similarities between Hegel's legal theory and that of Ronald Dworkin. (...)
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  42. Hegel's Philosophy of Freedom.Thom Brooks - 2003 - The Owl of Minerva 35 (1-2):70-73.
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  43. Corlett on Kant, Hegel, and Retribution.Thom Brooks - 2001 - Philosophy 76 (4):561-580.
    The purpose of this essay is to critically appraise J. Angelo Corlett's recent interpretation of Kant's theory of punishment as well as his rejection of Hegel's penology. In taking Kant to be a retributivist at a primary level and a proponent of deterrence at a secondary level, I believe Corlett has inappropriately wed together Kant's distinction between moral and positive law. Moreover, his support of Kant on these grounds is misguided as it is instead Hegel who holds such a distinction. (...)
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  44. Hegel and International Ethics.Chris Brown - 1991 - Ethics and International Affairs 5 (1):73–86.
    Brown attempts to clarify Hegelian ideas of absolute knowledge and self-knowledge that lead to the model of the modern state as "the vehicle for the self-expression of spirit...governed only by the requirements of reason" upon which Hegel grounds international ethics.
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  45. Hegel's Moral Concept of Evil.Timothy Brownlee - 2013 - Dialogue 52 (1):81-108.
    The central aim of this article is to set out the essential elements of Hegel’s conception of evil. I demonstrate that Hegel understands evil primarily as a moral phenomenon. In particular, he identifies evil as a pernicious subjectivism and hypocrisy that undermines the social and institutional conditions for ethical action. An appropriate understanding of his conception of evil points to the centrality of trust to ethicality (die Sittlichkeit).
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  46. Hegel's Concept of Virtue.Andrew Buchwalter - 1992 - Political Theory 20 (4):548-583.
  47. Hegel and the Normativity of the Concept.Victoria I. Burke - 2011 - Idealistic Studies 41 (3):161-166.
    A lexical unit of meaning, or the concept, involves not just two moments, the rule and the following of the rule, but two reciprocally dependent moments. I argue that this links meaning to value. As a reciprocal relation, truth as normative is constituted by what Hegel calls ethical substance, which exists only between more than one consciousness, or, as Hegel would say, moments of consciousness. I read these two moments as the two shapes of consciousness that Hegel calls the master (...)
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  48. On Development: World, Limit, Translation.Victoria I. Burke - 2002 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 31 (2).
    Martha Nussbaum and Seyla Benhabib have raised the question of how the Western subject might engage with the non-Western other in a non-imperialistic fashion. However, both of these feminist thinkers propose a universalist framework, consistent with Donald Davidson’s conclusions regarding the translatability of ”conceptual schemes”. Drawing upon the thought of G.W.F. Hegel and Walter Benjamin, I argue that the historically constituted subject that emerges in the wake of the Enlightenment affords an account of subjectivity that recasts the meaning of rationality (...)
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  49. A Vueltas Con la Dialéctica Entre El Señor Y El Siervo Apuntes Sobre El Problema de la Moral Desde Hegel Y Nietzsche.Germán Cano - 2013 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 7 (1).
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  50. Comment on Terry Pinkard's 'Virtues, Morality and Sittlichkeit'.Ardis B. Collins - 1999 - European Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):239–246.
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