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  1. Hegel’s Idealistic Approach to Philosophy of History.Mudasir A. Tantray - 2018 - International Journal of Creative Research Thoughts 6 (1):103-106.
    Philosophy of history is the conceptual and technical study of the relation which exists between philosophy and history. This paper tries to analyze and examine the nature of philosophy of history, its methodology and ideal development. In this I have tried to set the limits of knowledge to know the special account of Hegel’s idealistic view about philosophy of history. In this paper I have also used the philosophical methodology and philosophy inquiry, quest and hypothesis to discuss the Hegel’s idealistic (...)
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  2. Hegel and Naturphilosophie.Frederick Beiser - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (1):135-147.
    Against current non-metaphysical interpretations, I argue that Naturphilosophie is central to Hegel’s philosophy. This is so for three reasons. First, it was crucial to Hegel’s program to create a holistic culture. Second, Naturphilosophie is pivotal to absolute idealism, Hegel’s characteristic philosophical doctrine. Third, the idea of organic development, so central to Naturphilosophie, is pervasive throughout Hegel’s system. This idea is essential to Hegel’s concepts of spirit, dialectic, and identity-in-difference. Finally, I take issue with the neo-Kantian critique of Hegel’s Naturphilosophie on (...)
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  3. Hegel’s Philosophy of Nature. Relations Between Empirical and Speculative Knowledge of Nature. [REVIEW]Johannes Balthasar - 1988 - Philosophy and History 21 (1):13-14.
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  4. Hegel’s Unresolved Contradiction: Experience, Philosophy, and the Irrationality of Nature.Ardis B. Collins - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (4):771-796.
    RÉSUMÉ: Cet article étudie la façon dont Hegel élabore sa conception des rapports entre la pensée et la nature dans la Phénoménologie de l’esprit. L’examen montre que 1) Hegel étend le concept de raison pour y inclure l’indépendance de la nature à l’endroit de la pensée rationnelle, 2) cette indépendance se révèle dans le donné contingent de l’empiricité, 3) le concept étendu de raison détermine et justifie les présuppositions de la logique hégélienne, et 4) ce même concept limite le rôle (...)
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  5. Die Form der Materie Zur Metaphysik der Natur Bei Kant Und Hegel.Brigitte Falkenburg - 1987
  6. The Philosophy of Nature of Kant, Schelling and Hegel.Dieter Wandschneider - 2010 - In Dean Moyar (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Nineteenth Century Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 64.
    My presentation begins with Kant's philosophical project, which played a key role in understanding German Idealism, and then considers in detail the philosophical approaches developed by Schelling and Hegel.
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  7. What's Wrong with Rex? Hegel on Animal Defect and Individuality.Sebastian Rand - 2015 - European Journal of Philosophy 23 (1):68-86.
    In his Logic, Hegel argues that evaluative judgments are comparisons between the reality of an individual object and the standard for that reality found in the object's own concept. Understood in this way, an object is bad insofar as it fails to be what it is according to its concept. In his recent Life and Action, Michael Thompson has suggested that we can understand various kinds of natural defect in a similar way, and that if we do, we can helpfully (...)
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  8. Hegel’s Naturalism: Mind, Nature and the Final Ends of Life.Jean-Philippe Deranty - 2012 - Critical Horizons 13 (2):275 - 287.
  9. Hegel and Deleuze on Life, Sense, and Limit.Emilia Angelova - 2013 - In Karen Houle, Jim Vernon & Jean-Clet Martin (eds.), Hegel and Deleuze: Together Again for the First Time. Northwestern University Press.
  10. "Hegel's Philosophy of Nature," 3 Vols., Trans, with Introd. By Michael John Petry.James Collins - 1972 - Modern Schoolman 49 (2):162-165.
  11. Hegel and Ecologically Oriented System Theory.Darrell Arnold - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 7 (16):53-64.
    Building on the views of Kant and early nineteenth century life scientists, Hegel develops a view of systems that is a clear precursor to the developments in Ludwig von Bertalanffy’s general system theory, as well as the thinking of the ecologically minded system thinkers that built upon the foundation Bertalanffy laid. Hegel describes systems as organic wholes in which the parts respectively serve as means and ends. Further, in the Encyclopedia version of the logic Hegel notes that such systems are (...)
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  12. On Hegel’s Early Critique of Kant’s Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science.Kenneth R. Westphal - 1998 - In S. Houlgate (ed.), Hegel and the Philosophy of Nature. SUNY.
    In 1801 Hegel charged that, on Kant’s analysis, forces are ‘either purely ideal, in which case they are not forces, or else they are transcendent’. I argue that this objection, which Hegel did not spell out, reveals an important and fundamental line of internal criticism of Kant’s Critical philosophy. I show that Kant’s basic forces of attraction and repulsion, which constitute matter, are merely ideal because Kant’s arguments for them are circular and beg the question, and they have no determinate (...)
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  13. Hegel and the Sciences. [REVIEW]Sergio Cremaschi - 1989 - The Owl of Minerva 20 (2):224-228.
    I discuss this collection of essays on Hegel and the sciences while stressing the interest of Hegel's philosophy of nature in the light of later non-mainstream developments in the life-sciences and medicine. I compare then the chapters dedicated to Hegel's logic with recent literature on para-consistent logic and re-interpretations of Hegel's own logic.
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  14. Hegel's Concept of Science.Nina Cunningham - 1978 - The Owl of Minerva 10 (1):9-9.
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  15. Hegel and Marx on Nature and Ecology.Daniel Berthold-Bond - 1997 - Journal of Philosophical Research 22:145-179.
    While neither Hegel nor Marx can be called “ecologists” in any strict sense of the term, they both present views of the human-nature relationship which offer important insights for contemporary debates in philosophical ecology. Further, while Marx and Engels began a tradition of sharply distinguishing their own views of nature from those of Hegel, careful examination reveals a substantial commonality of sentiment. The essay compares Hegel and Marx (and Engels) in terms of their basic conceptions of nature, their critiques of (...)
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  16. Organism, Normativity, Plasticity: Canguilhem, Kant, Malabou.Sebastian Rand - 2011 - Continental Philosophy Review 44 (4):341-357.
    Some of Catherine Malabou’s recent work has developed her conception of plasticity (originally deployed in a reading of Hegelian Aufhebung ) in relation to neuroscience. This development clarifies and advances her attempt to bring contemporary theory into dialogue with the natural sciences, while indirectly indicating her engagement with the French tradition in philosophy of science and philosophy of medicine, especially the work of Georges Canguilhem. I argue that we can see her development of plasticity as an answer to some specific (...)
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  17. New Directions in Hegel's Philosophy of Nature.John Burbidge - 2006 - In Katerina Deligiorgi (ed.), Hegel: New Directions.
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  18. Hegel and the Natural Sciences.Johannes Balthasar - 1989 - Philosophy and History 22 (2):157-158.
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  19. Concept and Time in Hegel.John Burbidge - 1973 - Dialogue 12 (3):403-422.
  20. Mathematical Method in Kant, Schelling, and Hegel.Frederick Beiser - 2010 - In Michael Friedman, Mary Domski & Michael Dickson (eds.), Discourse on a New Method: Reinvigorating the Marriage of History and Philosophy of Science. Open Court.
  21. A Hegelian View of Complementarity. [REVIEW]J. Agassi - 1958 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 9 (33):57-63.
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  22. Erratum: "Hegel's Conception of Nature".S. Alexander - 1887 - Mind 12 (45):160.
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  23. Hegel's Conception of Nature.S. Alexander - 1886 - Mind 11 (44):495-523.
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  24. Hegel and the Seven Planets.Bertrand Beaumont - 1954 - Mind 63 (250):246-248.
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  25. Hegel's Philosophy of Nature. [REVIEW]Gerd Buchdahl - 1972 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 23 (3):257-266.
  26. Hegel's Philosophy of Nature.Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel - 1970 - Oxford, Clarendon Press.
    This is a much-needed reissue of the standard English translation of Hegel's Philosophy of Nature, originally published in 1970. The Philosophy of Nature is the second part of Hegel's Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences, all of which is now available in English from OUP (Part I being his Logic, Part III being his Philosophy of Mind). Hegel's aim in this work is to interpret the varied phenomena of Nature from the standpoint of a dialectical logic. Those who still think of (...)
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Hegel: Mathematics
  1. Hegel on Calculus.Christopher Yeomans & Ralph Kaufmann - 2017 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 34 (4):371-390.
    It is fair to say that Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel's philosophy of mathematics and his interpretation of the calculus in particular have not been popular topics of conversation since the early part of the twentieth century. Changes in mathematics in the late nineteenth century, the new set-theoretical approach to understanding its foundations, and the rise of a sympathetic philosophical logic have all conspired to give prior philosophies of mathematics (including Hegel's) the untimely appearance of naïveté. The common view was expressed (...)
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  2. Math by Pure Thinking: R First and the Divergence of Measures in Hegel's Philosophy of Mathematics.Ralph M. Kaufmann & Christopher Yeomans - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):985-1020.
    We attribute three major insights to Hegel: first, an understanding of the real numbers as the paradigmatic kind of number ; second, a recognition that a quantitative relation has three elements, which is embedded in his conception of measure; and third, a recognition of the phenomenon of divergence of measures such as in second-order or continuous phase transitions in which correlation length diverges. For ease of exposition, we will refer to these three insights as the R First Theory, Tripartite Relations, (...)
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  3. Hegel’s Misunderstood Treatment of Gauss in the Science of Logic: Its Implications for His Philosophy of Mathematics.Edward Beach - 2006 - Idealistic Studies 36 (3):191-218.
    This essay explores Hegel’s treatment of Carl Friedrich Gauss’s mathematical discoveries as examples of “Analytic Cognition.” Unfortunately, Hegel’s main point has been virtually lost due to an editorial blunder tracing back almost a century, an error that has been perpetuated in many subsequent editions and translations.The paper accordingly has three sections. In the first, I expose the mistake and trace its pervasive influence in multiple languages and editions of the Wissenschaft der Logik. In the second section, I undertake to explain (...)
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  4. Towards a Hegelian Philosophy of Mathematics.Alan L. T. Paterson - 1997 - Idealistic Studies 27 (1/2):1-10.
    There is at present no intelligible account of what the statements of pure mathematics are about. The philosophy of mathematics is in a mess! Marvin J. Greenberg.
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  5. The Successor Function and Induction Principle in a Hegelian Philosophy of Mathematics.Alan L. T. Paterson - 2000 - Idealistic Studies 30 (1):25-60.
  6. Does Hegel Have Anything to Say to Modern Mathematical Philosophy?Alan L. T. Paterson - 2002 - Idealistic Studies 32 (2):143-158.
    This paper argues that Hegel has much to say to modern mathematical philosophy, although the Hegelian perspective needs to be substantially developed to incorporate within it the extensive advances in post-Hegelian mathematics and its logic. Key to that perspective is the self-referential character of the fundamental concepts of philosophy. The Hegelian approach provides a framework for answering the philosophical problems, discussed by Kurt Gödel in his paper on Bertrand Russell, which arise out of the existence in mathematics of self-referential, non-constructive (...)
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  7. The Mathematical Infinite in Hegel.Alain Lacroix - 2000 - Philosophical Forum 31 (3&4):298-327.
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Hegel: Physics
  1. Hegel and Newtonianism: Trinity College, Cambridge University, August 30 to September 4, 1989.John Burbidge - 1990 - The Owl of Minerva 21 (2):238-239.
    On Thursday evening, August 30, 1989, in the Combination Room of Trinity College, Cambridge University, Michael Petry of Erasmus University, Rotterdam, opened the conference he had organized on “Hegel and Newtonianism.” Under the sponsorship of the Istituo per gli Studi Filosofici of Naples, Petry invited more than 40 scholars from Italy, Germany, Switzerland, Holland, Belgium, Denmark, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Canada to discuss the relation between eighteenth century Newtonian science and Hegel’s philosophy of nature.
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  2. Cracking Open the Inverted World: Teleology Without End.Curtis Reed Naser - 1993 - Dissertation, State University of New York at Stony Brook
    The "inverted world" and "dialectic of life" sections of G. W. F. Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit are analyzed in terms of Immanuel Kant's theory of teleological judgment as set forth in his Critique of Judgment. ;It is argued that the "inverted world" is an appropriation of Kant's speculations in the third Critique concerning the teleological unification of the laws of nature. The resultant concept of "infinity" is then analyzed as it develops in the "dialectic of life" as an appropriation of (...)
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Hegel: Biology
  1. Hegel’s “Idea of Life” and Internal Purposiveness.Daniel Lindquist - 2018 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 8 (2):376-408.
    The first part of the final section of Hegel's Science of Logic, the section on "The Idea", is titled "Life". Logic being the science of thought for Hegel, this section presents Hegel's account of the form of thought peculiar to thinking about living beings as living. Hegel's full account of this form of thought holds that a living being is (1) a functionally organized totality of members (2) that maintains itself in and through its environment (3) in the manner of (...)
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  2. Life, Logic, and the Pursuit of Purity.Alexander T. Englert - 2017 - Hegel-Studien 50:63-95.
    In the *Science of Logic*, Hegel states unequivocally that the category of “life” is a strictly logical, or pure, form of thinking. His treatment of actual life – i.e., that which empirically constitutes nature – arises first in his *Philosophy of Nature* when the logic is applied under the conditions of space and time. Nevertheless, many commentators find Hegel’s development of this category as a purely logical one especially difficult to accept. Indeed, they find this development only comprehensible as long (...)
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  3. La genèse naturelle de la conscience et la reconnaissance.Italo Testa - 2015 - In Buée Jean-Michel & Renault Emmanuel (eds.), Hegel à Iéna. Ens éditions. pp. 143-156.
    Je vais reconstruire quelques aspects de la genèse naturelle de la conscience dans les écrits hégéliens d’Iéna, avec le but de montrer que cette reconstruction est essentielle pour comprendre la genèse des capacités fondamentales qui sont présupposées par l’interaction de la reconnaissance. En particulier, je vais défendre la thèse suivante: Hegel a jeté une base pour une Naturphilosophie de la reconnaissance, en esquissant une sorte d'histoire naturelle de l’évolution de la relation consciente à soi-même, relation qui commence par le soi (...)
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  4. The Freedom of Life: Hegelian Perspectives.Thomas Khurana (ed.) - 2013 - Berlin, Germany: August Verlag.
    For post-Kantian philosophy, “life” is a transitory concept that relates the realm of nature to the realm of freedom. From this vantage point, the living seems to have the double character of being both already and not yet free: Compared with the external necessity of dead nature, the living already seems to exhibit a basic type of spontaneity and normativity that on the other hand still has to be superseded on the path to the freedom and normativity of spirit. The (...)
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  5. Kant and Hegel on Teleology and Life From the Perspective of Debates About Free Will.James Kreines - 2013 - In Thomas Khurana (ed.), THE FREEDOM OF LIFE. Hegelian Perspectives. Walther König. pp. 111-153.
    Kant’s treatment of teleology and life in the Critique of the Power of Judgment is complicated and difficult to interpret; Hegel’s response adds considerable complexity. I propose a new way of understanding the underlying philosophical issues in this debate, allowing a better understanding of the underlying structure of the arguments in Kant and Hegel. My new way is unusual: I use for an interpretive lens some structural features of familiar debates about freedom of the will. These debates, I argue, allow (...)
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Hegel: Philosophy of Nature, Misc
  1. Hegel's Confrontation with the Sciences in ‘Observing Reason’: Notes for a Discussion.Cinzia Ferrini - 2007 - Hegel Bulletin 28 (1-2):1-22.
    In an attempt to reconcile first-hand historical research on scientific material and philosophical concerns, this paper aims to show how Hegel took active part in the scientific debate of the time, by publicly siding with some strands of contemporaneous natural science against others, as well as how Hegel supports a considered scientific position, by providing it with philosophical justification and foundation, taking issue at the same time with formulations of British Empiricism and German Idealism.
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  2. Hegel intérprete de Aristóteles: a questão teleológica na Filosofia da História hegeliana.Lincoln Menezes de França - 2017 - Dissertation, UFSCAR, Brazil
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  3. Digestion, Habit, and Being at Home: Hegel and the Gut as Ambiguous Other.Jane Dryden - 2016 - PhaenEx 11 (2):1-22.
    Recent work in the philosophy of biology argues that we must rethink the biological individual beyond the boundary of the species, given that a key part of our essential functioning is carried out by the bacteria in our intestines in a way that challenges any strictly genetic account of what is involved for the biological human. The gut is a kind of ambiguous other within our understanding of ourselves, particularly when we also consider the status of gastro-intestinal disorders. Hegel offers (...)
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  4. To Suspend Finitude Itself: Hegel’s Reaction to Kant’s First Antinomy.Reed Winegar - 2016 - Hegel Bulletin 37 (1):81-103.
    Hegel famously criticizes Kant’s resolution of the antinomies. According to Sedgwick, Hegel primarily chastises Kant’s resolution for presupposing that concepts are ‘one-sided’, rather than identical to their opposites. If Kant had accepted the dialectical nature of concepts, then (according to Sedgwick) Kant would not have needed to resolve the antinomies. However, as Ameriks has noted, any such interpretation faces a serious challenge. Namely, Kant’s first antinomy concerns the universe’s physical dimensions. Even if we grant that the concept of the finite (...)
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  5. La genèse naturelle de la conscience et la reconnaissance.Italo Testa - 2015 - In Buée Jean-Michel & Renault Emmanuel (eds.), Hegel à Iéna. Ens éditions. pp. 143-156.
    Je vais reconstruire quelques aspects de la genèse naturelle de la conscience dans les écrits hégéliens d’Iéna, avec le but de montrer que cette reconstruction est essentielle pour comprendre la genèse des capacités fondamentales qui sont présupposées par l’interaction de la reconnaissance. En particulier, je vais défendre la thèse suivante: Hegel a jeté une base pour une Naturphilosophie de la reconnaissance, en esquissant une sorte d'histoire naturelle de l’évolution de la relation consciente à soi-même, relation qui commence par le soi (...)
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  6. Anachronism, Antiquarianism, and Konstellationsforschung: A Critique of Beiser.Ioannis Trisokkas - 2015 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 44 (1):87-113.
    In his Introduction to The Cambridge Companion to Hegel and Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (2008), entitled ‘The Puzzling Hegel Renaissance’, Frederick Beiser, the editor of the volume, claims that Anglophone Hegel research has been in the main deeply problematic and proceeds to offer a program of research for its rejuvenation. The paper argues that the reasons based on which he exercises his critique (antiquarianism and anachronism) fail on internal grounds and that, therefore, Hegelforschung should not be reduced to his proposed research program (...)
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  7. Selbstbewußtsein und zweite Natur.Italo Testa - 2008 - In Klaus Vieweg & Wolfgang Welsh (eds.), Hegels Phänomenologie des Geistes - Ein kooperativer Kommentar zu einem Schlüsselwerk der Moderne, Suhrkamp, Frankfurt am Main, 2008. Suhrkamp. pp. 286-307.
    My aim in this paper is to bring into focus the concept of self-consciousness showing the reciprocal connection between the notions of recognition and second nature. The very evolution of Hegel's thought from the writings of his youth to those of his maturity reveals a strict connection between these notions. This reading will be justified through an articulate interpretation of the "Self-consciousness" section of the Phenomenology and then through an interpretation of the systematic connection between this text and the section (...)
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  8. Cracking Open the Inverted World: Teleology Without End.Curtis Reed Naser - 1993 - Dissertation, State University of New York at Stony Brook
    The "inverted world" and "dialectic of life" sections of G. W. F. Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit are analyzed in terms of Immanuel Kant's theory of teleological judgment as set forth in his Critique of Judgment. ;It is argued that the "inverted world" is an appropriation of Kant's speculations in the third Critique concerning the teleological unification of the laws of nature. The resultant concept of "infinity" is then analyzed as it develops in the "dialectic of life" as an appropriation of (...)
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  9. A Criticism of a False Idealism and Onward to Hegel: Objections to the Gaia Hypothesis.Daniel E. Shannon - 1995 - The Owl of Minerva 27 (1):19-36.
    Many of you may be familiar with what is today called the “Gaia hypothesis.” It consists in the thesis that the earth is a super-organism that exhibits specific properties of life: It regulates its own temperature, “excretes” waste, combats poisonous “infections,” and the like. In a word, it maintains homoeostasis. The hypothesis has supposedly been established by using a scientific method: the proposal of a hypothesis putatively based on observation and the reasonable explanation of the data. It was offered ostensibly (...)
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