About this topic
Summary This category includes works on the philosophical schools of the Hellenistic period (the Stoics, Skeptics and Epicureans). It also includes the philosophy of late antiquity. While the works of Plato and Aristotle were largely eclipsed in the Hellenistic period, the practice of commenting upon these authors dominates the philosophy of late antiquity (200-600 CE). Neoplatonists wrote commentaries on both, since they regarded Aristotle himself as a somewhat heterodox Platonist. They read Aristotle as an introduction to Plato. Other authors of commentaries, such as Alexander of Aphrodisias, identified as Aristotelians without this admixture of Platonism.
Key works Long & Sedley 1987 provides the most widely used English translation of our evidence on the Hellenistic philosophers. The following collections of articles were seminal in establishing Hellenistic philosophy as an important sub-field in ancient philosophy: Schofield et al 1979,  Barnes 1982Schofield & Striker 1986, and Brunschwig & Nussbaum 1993. The standard reference work is Algra 2005. Boys-Stones 2001 provides one (admittedly controversial) account of the transition from the Hellenistic schools to a post-Hellenistic period dominated by Platonism. Sorabji 2005 provides key extracts from voluminous writings of the Aristotelian and Neoplatonist commentators of late antiquity.
Introductions Long 1974 is a classic introduction to Hellenistic philosophy. Brennan 2005 is a lively introduction to Stoic ethics. Dillon 1977 provides a short overview of the Platonists up to Plotinus. O'Meara 1993 is a gentle introduction to Plotinus. For a wider look at the Neoplatonists, Wallis 1972 is the early classic. Tuominen 2012 provides a survey of the commentary tradition, with more emphasis on Aristotelians.
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  1. Peri ton areskonton philosophois physikon dogmaton.Gregor Damschen - 1999 - In Franco Volpi (ed.), Großes Werklexikon der Philosophie. Stuttgart: Kröner. pp. 1640-1641.
    Contribution on Peri ton areskonton philosophois physikon dogmaton (Placita philosophorum), 2nd c. CE, based on a work by Aetius, falsely attributed to Plutarch.
  2. Theatre of the Book, 1480–1880: Print, Text, and Performance in Europe Julie Stone Peters; Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2000, Price £60.00, ISBN 0-19-818714-9. [REVIEW]Julia Prest - 2001 - History of European Ideas 27 (4):426-428.
  3. Basel in the Age of Burckhardt: Lionel Gossman; Chicago University Press, Chicago, 2000, Pp. Xiii+ 608,£ 55. [REVIEW]Peter Ghosh - 2002 - History of European Ideas 28 (4):295-315.
  4. Neoplatonic Demons and Angels.Luc Brisson, Seamus O'Neill & Andrei Timotin - 2018 - Leiden, Netherlands: Brill.
    Neoplatonic Demons and Angels is a collection of studies which examine the place reserved for angels and demons not only by the main Neoplatonic philosophers, but also in Gnosticism, the Chaldaean Oracles and Christian Neoplatonism.
  5. La antropología del De opificio hominis de Gregorio de Nisa en la obra de Nicolás de Cusa.Francisco Bastitta-Harriet - 2015 - In Claudia D'Amico & Jorge Machetta (eds.), La cuestión del hombre en Nicolás de Cusa: fuentes, originalidad y diálogo con la modernidad. Buenos Aires: Biblos. pp. 43-55.
    Gregory of Nyssa’s treatise 'De opificio hominis' was one of the only Greek anthropological texts translated into latin during the early Middle Ages, by Dionysius Exiguus between the late 5th and early 6th centuries and by John Scotus Eriugena in the 9th century. Nicholas of Cusa certainly became acquainted with this work indirectly through the extensive citations in Eriugena’s 'Periphyseon' and through their partial reproduction in the 'Clavis physicae' of Honorius Augustodunensis. Our paper will analyse these and other possible ways (...)
  6. Human Communion and Difference in Gregory of Nyssa: From Trinitarian Theology to the Philosophy of Human Person and Free Decision.Francisco Bastitta-Harriet - 2011 - In Volker H. Drecoll & Margitta Berghaus (eds.), Gregory of Nyssa: The Minor Treatises on Trinitarian Theology and Apollinarism (Vigiliae Christianae Supplements, 106). Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 337-349.
    In the Philosophical Anthropology of Gregory of Nyssa, inspired by his Trinitarian Theology, the new concept of hypostasis as a unique self implies for the first time the irreducibility of human person to the universal. Moreover, Gregory manages to account for both a deep communion of life and nature among all men and a clear distinction between persons, in a truly harmonious dynamism of the physical and the hypostatic. This union and distinction will also inspire his original conception of proaíresis, (...)
  7. Types of Freedom and Submission in Tacitus' Agricola.Jula Wildberger - 2016 - In Aldo Setaioli (ed.), Apis Matina: Studi in onore di Carlo Santini. Trieste: EUT Edizioni Università di Trieste. pp. 715-726.
    Discusses conceptions of freedom displayed in Tacitus' Agricola. Tacitus seems to have had a clear-cut conceptual grid in which the German defectors, the Usipi, mirror the futile demonstrations of freedom by senators seeking a "ambitious death." The British provincials, including Calgacus and his followers, correspond to the ordinary Roman people and their leadership. It is in the army that a form of non-debasing hierarchy for the common benefit can be conceived, as long as the army and their leader is in (...)
  8. Lukian. Symposion, Griechisch Und Deutsch.Jula Wildberger - 2005 - Stuttgart, Deutschland: Reclam.
    Bilingual edition with ancient Greek text and German translation, rather lavish notes explaining all the philosophy jokes and introduction that also outlines the nature of Lukian's engagement with his famous subtext, Plato's Symposium.
  9. ‘Porphyry, An Anti-Christian Plotinian Platonist’.Yip-Mei Loh - 2017 - The International Academic Forum (IAFOR).
    Porphyry, the Phoenician polymath, having studied with Plotinus when he was thirty years old, was a well-known Hellenic philosopher, an opponent of Christianity, and was born in Tyre, in the Roman Empire. We know of his anti-Christian ideology and of his defence of traditional Roman religions, by means of a fragment of his Adversus Christianos. This work incurred controversy among early Christians. His Adversus Christianos has been served as a critique of Christianity and a defence of the worship of the (...)
  10. An Apophatic Response to the Evidential Argument From Evil.Brown Joshua Matthan - 2017 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 78 (4-5):485-497.
    I argue that Christian apophaticism provides the most powerful and economical response to the evidential argument from evil for the non-existence of God. I also reply to the objection that Christian apophaticism is incoherent, because it appears to entail the truth of the following contradiction: it is both possible and impossible to know God’s essential properties. To meet this objection, I outline a coherent account of the divine attributes inspired by the theology of the Greek Father’s and St. Gregory Palamas.
  11. Magnitudo Animi and Cosmic Politics in Cicero's De Re Publica.Sean McConnell - 2017 - Classical Journal 113:45-70.
  12. Gregorio di Nissa Sull'anima e la resurrezione.Ilaria L. E. Ramelli - 2007 - Milan: Bompiani, in collaboration with the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Milan. Series: Il Pensiero Occidentale. Pp. 1352..
    Four critical essays (on De Anima, on In Illud: Tunc et Ipse Filius, on Patristic Platonism, and on the doctrine of apokatastasis in Gregory of Nyssa and Origen), new Greek edition of De anima also based on the Coptic version predating every Greek manuscript, translations of, and commentaries on, both De Anima and In Illud: Tunc et Ipse Filius, appendixes (on the Syriac and Coptic translations of De Anima and on its reception among the Cambridge Platonists, with the first Italian (...)
  13. El conocimiento natural de Dios según san Pablo.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2016 - In Mercedes López Salvá, Ignacio Sanz Extremeño & Pablo de Paz Amérigo (eds.), Los orígenes del cristianismo en la filosofía, la literatura y el arte I. Madrid: Dykinson. pp. 157-200.
    This article studies the issue of natural knowledge of God in the Bible verses which speak most explicitly about it: Romans 1,18-32. 'Natural knowledge' means here knowledge accessible to all men by virtue of their innate forces, possible even for those who have not partaken in the biblical revelalion. St. Paul's passage is compared with Wisdom 13-15, which shares many doctrinal points with it. The Pauline discourse, though inserted into a theological reasoning within the perspective of faith, represents a truly (...)
  14. GALEN, DE INDOLENTIA. C.K. Rothschild, T.W. Thompson Galen's De Indolentia. Essays on a Newly Discovered Letter. Pp. Xii + 336, Ills. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2014. Paper, €94. ISBN: 978-3-16-153215-3. [REVIEW]Caroline Petit - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):83-85.
  15. How the West Was Won. D. Hoyos Mastering the West. Rome and Carthage at War. Pp. XXII + 337, Ills, Maps. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. Cased, £18.99, Us$29.95. Isbn: 978-0-19-986010-4. [REVIEW]Michael J. Taylor - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):203-204.
  16. West African Classics. B. Goff ‘Your Secret Langauge’. Classics in the British Colonies of West Africa. Pp. VI + 239, Ills, Map. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2013. Cased, £65. Isbn: 978-1-78093-205-7. [REVIEW]Steve Nyamilandu - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):276-278.
  17. The Bellum Civile. L. Grillo the Art of Caesar's Bellum Civile. Literature, Ideology, and Community. Pp. XII + 221. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Cased, £59.99, Us$104.99 . Isbn: 978-1-107-00949-3. [REVIEW]Debra Nousek - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):113-115.
  18. EPICS IN FILM. J. Paul Film and the Classical Epic Tradition. Pp. Xii + 334, Ills. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Cased, £70, US$150. ISBN: 978-0-19-954292-5. [REVIEW]Jon Solomon - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):284-286.
  19. The Laudatio Turiae. J. Osgood Turia. A Roman Woman's Civil War. Pp. XVI + 215, Ills, Map. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. Paper, £18.99, Us$27.95 . Isbn: 978-0-19-983235-4. [REVIEW]C. H. Lange - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):212-214.
  20. The Augustus. D. Wardle Suetonius: Life of Augustus. Pp. X + 603. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. Paper, £35, Us$49.50 . Isbn: 978-0-19-968646-9. [REVIEW]Charles L. Murison - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):142-144.
  21. An Egyptian Tax Register. R.S. Bagnall, J.G. Keenan, L.S.B. MacCoull a Sixth-Century Tax Register From the Hermopolite Nome. Pp. 226, Pls. Durham, Nc: The American Society of Papyrologists, 2011. Cased, £40. Isbn: 978-0-9799758-4-4. [REVIEW]D. W. Rathbone - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):189-191.
  22. Latin Vowels. R. Sen Syllable and Segment in Latin. Pp. XVI + 272, Figs. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. Cased, £65, Us$115. Isbn: 978-0-19-966018-6. [REVIEW]John J. Lowe - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):106-108.
  23. HERE BE DRAGONS. D. Ogden Drakōn. Dragon Myth and Serpent Cult in the Greek and Roman Worlds. Pp. Xviii + 472, Ills. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Cased, £105, US$185. ISBN: 978-0-19-955732-5. [REVIEW]Alan Griffiths - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):20-22.
  24. The New Frhist. T.J. Cornell the Fragments of the Roman Historians. Volume I: Introduction. Pp. L + 662. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Cased, £295, Us$375 . Isbn: 978-0-19-927703-2 . T.J. Cornell the Fragments of the Roman Historians. Volume II: Texts and Translations. Pp. VIII + 1159. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Cased, £295, Us$375 . Isbn: 978-0-19-927704-9 . T.J. Cornell the Fragments of the Roman Historians. Volume III: Commentary. Pp. VIII + 829. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Cased, £295, Us$375 . Isbn: 978-0-19-967906-5. [REVIEW]Ayelet Haimson Lushkov - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):191-196.
  25. Achilles as Romantic Hero. M. Fantuzzi Achilles in Love. Intertextual Studies. Pp. XII + 317, Pls. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. Cased, £78, Us$150. Isbn: 978-0-19-960362-6. [REVIEW]Peter Heslin - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):12-13.
  26. Legal Inscriptions From Crete. Gagarin, Perlman the Laws of Ancient Crete C. 650–400bce. Pp. XXIV + 566, Ills, Maps. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Cased, £120, Us$199. Isbn: 978-0-19-920482-3. [REVIEW]David M. Lewis - 2017 - The Classical Review 67 (1):133-134.
  27. A New Approach to Teaching Roman Art History.Marice Rose - 2016 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 110 (1):119-136.
  28. Introduction: The Empire’s Second Language?Patrick P. Hogan & Adam M. Kemezis - 2016 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 110 (1):31-42.
  29. Understanding Grief in Greece and Rome.David Konstan - 2016 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 110 (1):3-30.
  30. Editors’ Note: Classical World at 110.Lee T. Pearcy & Robin Mitchell-Boyask - 2016 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 110 (1):1-1.
  31. Body and Soul in Galen.R. A. H. King - 2006 - In Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity. Walter de Gruyter.
  32. Galen and the Stoics: What Each Could Learn From the Other About Embodied Psychology.Burkhard Reis & Dorothea Frede - 2009 - In Burkhard Reis & Dorothea Frede (eds.), Body and Soul in Ancient Philosophy. Walter de Gruyter.
  33. Philosophical Norms and Political Attachments: Cicero and Seneca.Burkhard Reis & Dorothea Frede - 2009 - In Burkhard Reis & Dorothea Frede (eds.), Body and Soul in Ancient Philosophy. Walter de Gruyter.
  34. Transgressions Are Equal, and Right Actions Are Equal: Some Philosophical Reflections on Paradox III in Cicero’s Paradoxa Stoicorum.Daniel Rönnedal - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (1):317-334.
    In Paradoxa Stoicorum, the Roman philosopher Cicero defends six important Stoic theses. Since these theses seem counterintuitive, and it is not likely that the average person would agree with them, they were generally called “paradoxes”. According to the third paradox,, transgressions are equal and right actions are equal. According to one interpretation of this principle, which I will call, it means that if it is forbidden that A and it is forbidden that B, then not-A is as good as not-B; (...)
  35. The Greek Sceptics.Richard Robinson & Mary Mills Patrick - 1930 - Philosophical Review 39 (5):519.
  36. The Platonism of Philo Judaeus.W. A. Heidel & Thomas H. Billings - 1920 - Philosophical Review 29 (3):293.
  37. A Medieval Critique of Anthropomorphism: Ibn Al-Jawzi's Kitab Akhbar as-Sifat: A Critical Edition of the Arabic Text.Devin J. Stewart & Merlin Swartz - 2004 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 124 (3):616.
  38. A Greek and Arabic Lexicon : Materials for a Dictionary of the Medieval Translations From Greek Into Arabic, Fascicles 2 and 3.Kees Versteegh, Gerhard Endress & Dimitri Gutas - 1998 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 118 (1):108.
  39. The Thousand and One Nights From the Earliest Known Sources: Arabic Text Edited with Introduction and Notes, Pt. 3: Introduction and Indexes.András Hámori, Muhsin Mahdi & Andras Hamori - 1997 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 117 (4):748.
  40. The Wellsprings of Wisdom: A Study of Abū Yaʿqūb Al-Sijistānī's Kitāb Al-Yanābīʿ Including a Complete English Translation with Commentary and Notes on the Arabic TextThe Wellsprings of Wisdom: A Study of Abu Yaqub Al-Sijistani's Kitab Al-Yanabi Including a Complete English Translation with Commentary and Notes on the Arabic Text.Sarah Stroumsa & Paul E. Walker - 1997 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 117 (1):186.
  41. A Greek and Arabic Lexicon: Materials for a Dictionary of the Mediaeval Translations From Greek Into Arabic, Fascicle 1: Introduction, Sources, ʾ to ʾ-Kh-rA Greek and Arabic Lexicon: Materials for a Dictionary of the Mediaeval Translations From Greek Into Arabic, Fascicle 1: Introduction, Sources, to -Kh-R. [REVIEW]Remke Kruk, Gerhard Endress & Dimitri Gutas - 1994 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 114 (2):285.
  42. II Samuel: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary.David Marcus & P. Kyle McCarter - 1989 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 109 (4):681.
  43. Structures of Avarice: The Bukhalāʾ in Medieval Arabic LiteratureStructures of Avarice: The Bukhala in Medieval Arabic Literature.Kevin Lacey & Fedwa Malti-Douglas - 1988 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 108 (3):493.
  44. The Phoenician History of Philo of Byblos: A Commentary.Robert A. Oden & A. I. Baumgarten - 1984 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 104 (3):581.
  45. The Aramaic Portions of the Pesiqta de Rab Kahana with English Translation, Commentary and Introduction.J. C. Greenfield & Gerhard Svedlund - 1978 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 98 (4):511.
  46. Arabic Literature. An Introduction.Nicholas Heer & H. A. R. Gibb - 1965 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 85 (4):574.
  47. Arabic Literature, An Introduction.G. C. M. & H. A. R. Gibb - 1963 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 83 (3):414.
  48. The Book of Idols. Being a Translation From the Arabic of the Kitāb Al-AṣnāmThe Book of Idols. Being a Translation From the Arabic of the Kitab Al-Asnam.G. E. von Grunebaum, Hishām Ibnal-Kalbi, N. A. Faris & Hisham Ibnal-Kalbi - 1953 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 73 (1):44.
  49. From Arabic Books and Manuscripts IV: New Fragments of as-SaraḫsîFrom Arabic Books and Manuscripts IV: New Fragments of as-Sarahsi.Franz Rosenthal - 1951 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 71 (2):135.
  50. Two Fragments of Galen in Arabic Translation.G. Levi Della Vida - 1950 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 70 (3):182.
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