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  1. Duns Scotus's Epistemic Argument Against Divine Illumination.Billy Dunaway - 2018 - In Matthew A. Benton, John Hawthorne & Dani Rabinowitz (eds.), Knowledge, Belief, and God: New Insights in Religious Epistemology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 29-53.
  2. Change and Contradiction in Henry of Ghent.Simo Knuuttila - 2017 - Vivarium 55 (1-3):22-35.
    Hugh of Novocastro, Landolfo Caracciolo, John Baconthorpe, and some other medieval authors argued that there are real contradictions in nature. The background of this early fourteenth-century theory was the Aristotelian question of how to determine the instant of change between p and ~p. The argument was that these are simultaneously true at the temporal instant of change if it is an instant of changing. The author’s aim is to discuss the background of this view in Henry of Ghent’s theory of (...)
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  3. John Duns Scotus.Scott M. Williams - 2017 - In William Abraham & Fred Aquino (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of the Epistemology of Theology. Oxford University Press. pp. 421-433.
  4. Divine Production in Late Medieval Trinitarian Theology: Henry of Ghent, Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham by JT Paasch. Oxford Theological Monographs, Oxford University Press, 2012.Mark Henninger - 2016 - Heythrop Journal 57 (2):432-433.
  5. La totalité peut-elle être un attribut divin? Les questions De totalitate Dei d’Henri de Gand.Pasquale Porro - 2016 - Quaestio 16:209-223.
    Rather unusually, Henry of Ghent includes ‘totality’ in the list of divine attributes discussed in his Summa quaestionum ordinariarum. Availing himself of the different philosophical definitions of totality given by Boethius and Avicenna, Henry concludes that God cannot be considered a totum universale, a totum numerale and a totum virtuale or potestativum, but concedes that He may be considered a totality insofar as His being comprehends the exemplary perfections of all created beings.
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  6. Henry of Ghent’s Argument for Divine Illumination Reconsidered.Patrick J. Connolly - 2015 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 89 (1):47-68.
    In this paper I offer a new approach to Henry of Ghent's argument for divine illumination. Normally, Henry is criticized for adhering to a theory of divine illumination and failing to accept rediscovered Aristotelian approaches to cognition and epistemology. I argue that these critiques are mistaken. On my view, Henry was a proponent of Aristotelianism. But Henry discovered a tension between Aristotle's views on teleology and the nature of knowledge, on the one hand, and various components of the Christian worldview, (...)
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  7. Wege eines Textes. Die Summa quaestionum ordinariarum des Heinrich von Gent von Paris nach Rom.Silvia Negri - 2015 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 57:117-169.
    This article investigates three major contexts in which Henry of Ghent’s Summa quaestionum ordinariarum was received from the thirteenth to the fifteenth century. The study takes into account the material features of a group of relevant manuscripts of the Summa: Paris, where the Summa was copied and annotated by Godfrey of Fontaines and his socii; the Dominican convent in Bologna at the beginning of the fourteenth century, to which Aimericus de Placentia gave a copy of the Summa corrected against the (...)
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  8. Henry of Ghent , Summa of Ordinary Questions: Articles Six to Ten on Theology , Trans. Roland J. Teske, SJ. Reviewed By.Stephen Boulter - 2013 - Philosophy in Review 33 (3):199–202.
  9. De Magistro - Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and John Duns Scotus on Natural Conceptions.Wouter Goris - 2013 - Review of Metaphysics 66 (3):435-468.
  10. Divine Production in Late Medieval Trinitarian Theology: Henry of Ghent, Duns Scotus, and William Ockham.J. T. Paasch - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    This book examines the central ideas that defined the debate about divine production in the Trinity in the late 13th and early 14th centuries, namely those of Henry of Ghent, John Duns Scotus, and William Ockham. Their discussions are significant for the history of trinitarian theology and the history of philosophy.
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  11. Two-Staged Doctrines of God as First Known and the Transformation of the Concept of Reality in Bonaventure and Henry of Ghent.Wouter Goris - 2011 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (1):77-97.
    The medieval doctrine of God as first known presents a privileged moment in a tradition of classical metaphysics that runs from Plato to Levinas. The presentcontribution analyzes two versions of this doctrine formulated by Bonaventure († 1274) and Henry of Ghent († 1293). In reaction to the preceding discussion inParis, they advance a doctrine of God as first known that distinguishes the relative priority of God within the first known transcendental concepts from the absolutepriority of God over these. Although their (...)
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  12. Intelligible Species in the Mature Thought of Henry of Ghent.Michael E. Rombeiro - 2011 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (2):181-220.
    There has been a renewed interest of late in the thought of Henry of Ghent.1 Scholars have recognized that Henry was an influential figure at the University of Paris in the late-thirteenth century and that his influence extended well past his own generation. It is also widely acknowledged that Henry's thought developed significantly over the span of his career.2 The critical edition of Henry's works has proven to be crucial in assessing this development.3 Nonetheless there is little consensus on the (...)
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  13. Henry of Ghent on Teaching Theology.Joke Spruyt - 2011 - Vivarium 49 (1-3):165-183.
    This paper aims to explain Henry of Ghent's views on what kind of language is appropriate in theology, and why. It concentrates on a number of questions of the Summa quaestionum ordinariarum , which are devoted to his take on how theologians should explain their discipline to students, and to the meaningfulness in general of theological language. The paper delves into the technical terms sensus and insinuare , and compares Henry's account with H.P. Grice's views on (speaker-)meaning and his notion (...)
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  14. Juan Carlos Flores, Henry of Ghent: Metaphysics and the Trinity. With a Critical Edition of Question Six of Article Fifty-Five of the Summa Quaestionum Ordinariarum. Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2006. Pp. Viii, 239. $50.50. Distributed by Cornell University Press.Henricus de Gandavo, Quodlibet XV., Ed., Girard Etzkorn and G. A. Wilson. Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2007. Pp. Lx, 200 Plus Separate Errata Sheet; 1 Black-and-White Figure and Tables. $81.50. Distributed by Cornell University Press. [REVIEW]Steven P. Marrone - 2010 - Speculum 85 (3):671-673.
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  15. After Life.Eugene Thacker - 2010 - University of Chicago Press.
    Life and the living (on Aristotelian biohorror) -- Supernatural horror as the paradigm for life -- Aristotle's De anima and the problem of life -- The ontology of life -- The entelechy of the weird -- Superlative life -- Life with or without limits -- Life as time in Plotinus -- On the superlative -- Superlative life I: Pseudo-Dionysius -- Negative vs. affirmative theology -- Superlative negation -- Negation and preexistent life -- Excess, evil, and non-being -- Superlative life II: (...)
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  16. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and John Duns Scotus: On the Theology of the Father's Intellectual Generation of the Word.Scott M. Williams - 2010 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 77 (1):35-81.
    There are two general routes that Augustine suggests in De Trinitate, XV, 14-16, 23-25, for a psychological account of the Father's intellectual generation of the Word. Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent, in their own ways, follow the first route; John Duns Scotus follows the second. Aquinas, Henry, and Scotus's psychological accounts entail different theological opinions. For example, Aquinas (but neither Henry nor Scotus) thinks that the Father needs the Word to know the divine essence. If we compare the theological (...)
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  17. A Companion to Henry of Ghent.Gordon Anthony Wilson (ed.) - 2010 - Brill.
    The volume addresses the historical context of Henry, e.g. his writings and his participation in the events of 1277; examines Henry’s theology, metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics; and studies Henry’s influence on John Duns Scotus and Pico della Mirandola.
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  18. The Historical Development of the Second Parisian University Exemplar of Henry of Ghent’s Quodlibet IV.J. M. Gray & G. A. Wilson - 2008 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 50:151-173.
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  19. Henry of Ghent's Summa of Ordinary Questions: Article One: On the Possibility of Knowing. Henricus, Henry & Henry of Ghent - 2008 - St. Augustine's Press.
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  20. The Theologian and the Contracts - Henry of Ghent and the Emptio-Venditio Reddituum.Marialucrezia Leone - 2008 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 75 (1):137-160.
    Between 1276 and 1288, Henry of Ghent composes four quodlibetal questions concerning the ‘economic’ practice commonly known as ‘rent contracts’ or emptio-venditio reddituum. In contrast to other authors of his day, Henry holds that these rent contracts are not legitimate, arguing that the practice is just a form of usury. In particular the Flemish doctor, following Aristotle, denounces the emptio-venditio reddituum as a kind of usurious loan being contra naturam. In this article I want to show that behind his condemnation (...)
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  21. Au-Delà de la Scientia Transcendens? Le Cas Henri de Gand.R. Guerizoli - 2007 - In Roberto Hofmeister Pich (ed.), New Essays on Metaphysics as "Scientia Transcendens": Proceedings of the Second International Conference of Medieval Philosophy, Held at the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande Do Sul (Pucrs), Porto Alegre/Brazil, 15-18 August 2006. Fédération Internationale des Instituts d'Études Médiévales.
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  22. Heinrich von Gent Über Metaphysik Als Erste Wissenschaft: Studien Zu Einem Metaphysikentwurf Aus Dem Letzten Viertel des 13. Jahrhunderts.Martin Pickavé - 2007 - Leiden: Brill.
    This volume offers a new and comprehensive study of a central aspect of Henry of Ghent's (+ 1293) philosophical thought: his understanding of metaphysics.
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  23. Some Aspects of Henry of Ghent’s Debt to Avicenna’s Metaphysics.Roland J. Teske - 2007 - Modern Schoolman 85 (1):51-70.
    The paper explores three areas in which Avicenna had an important influence on the metaphysics of Henry of Ghent: first, in developing an argument for the existence of God in metaphysics rather than in physics; secondly, in his intentional distinction between essence and existence; and thirdly, in his arguments not merely that there is only one God, but that it is impossible for there to be many gods, his arguments which Henry clearly took from books one and eight of Avicenna’s (...)
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  24. Henry of Ghent's Summa: The Questions on God's Existence and Essence, (Articles 21-24).Henry (of Ghent) - 2005 - Peeters.
    This volume offers a translation with introduction and notes of Henry of Ghent's questions on the being and essence of God from his Summa of Ordinary Questions (Summa quaestionum ordinarium). These questions form the heart of Henry's philosophy of God, especially his "new way" of proving the existence of God and his claim that God is the first object known by the human intellect.
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  25. Love of God and Love of Self in Thirteenth-Century Ethics.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2005 - Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press.
    This book treats the thirteenth-century debate concerning the natural love of God over self with an eye to how the thinkers of this period saw the connection between one's own good and the aims of virtuous action. It shows that the main difference in this debate reflects a fundamental contrast between Thomas Aquinas and John Duns Scotus over the importance of natural inclination in Ethics and the priority of the common good. It indicates how medieval thinkers attempted to reconcile eudaimonism (...)
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  26. A Re-Examination of Henry of Ghent’s Criticisms in Light of His Predecessors.T. M. Rudavsky - 2005 - Modern Schoolman 82 (2):101-109.
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  27. Henry of Ghent’s Criticism of the Aristotelian Arguments for God’s Existence.Roland J. Teske - 2005 - Modern Schoolman 82 (2):83-99.
  28. Henry of Ghent’s Metaphysical Argument for the Existence of God.Roland J. Teske - 2005 - Modern Schoolman 83 (1):19-38.
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  29. Die Opposition des Johannes de Polliaco Gegen Die Schule der Gandavistae. [REVIEW]Ludwig Hödl - 2004 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 9 (1):115-147.
    In spite of the fact that Henry of Gent had a major and lasting influence on the developments at the University of Paris after the condemnation of the errores philosophorum in 1277, the Gandavistae – pupils of Henry of Gent – are hardly known by their proper names in the history of philosophy. As a member of the theological and philosophical faculty, Henry broke with the predominant Averroistic approach to Aristotle’s conception of science and concentrated, instead, on the Aristotelian tradition. (...)
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  30. Die Opposition des Johannes de Polliaco gegen die Schule der Gandavistae.Ludwig Hödl - 2004 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 9:115-147.
    In spite of the fact that Henry of Gent had a major and lasting influence on the developments at the University of Paris after the condemnation of the errores philosophorum in 1277, the Gandavistae - pupils of Henry of Gent - are hardly known by their proper names in the history of philosophy. As a member of the theological and philosophical faculty, Henry broke with the predominant Averroistic approach to Aristotle's conception of science and concentrated, instead, on the Aristotelian tradition. (...)
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  31. Aids-to-Study Accompanying the Quodlibeta of Henry of Ghent in Cod. Cusanus 92.Stephen F. Brown - 2003 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 45:205-216.
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  32. Wahrheit und Wahrheitserkenntnis bei Heinrich von Gent.Christoph Kann - 2003 - In Guy Guldentops & Carlos Steel (eds.), Henry of Ghent and the Transformation of Scholastic Thought. Studies in Memory of Jos Decorte. Leuven University Press. pp. 157--175.
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  33. Les degrés de forme selon Henri de Gand (Quodl. IV, q.15).Jean-Luc Solere - 2003 - In Guy Guldentops & Carlos Steel (eds.), Henry of Ghent and the Transformation of Scholastic Thought. Leuven, Belgium: pp. 127-155.
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  34. International Colloquium. Between Aquinas and Scotus: Henry of Ghent's Contribution to the Transformation of Scholastic Thought.Juan Flores - 2002 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 7:233-236.
  35. The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts: Volume 3, Mind and Knowledge.Robert Pasnau (ed.) - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    The third volume of The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts will allow scholars and students access in English, to major texts that form the debate over mind and knowledge at the center of medieval philosophy. Beginning with thirteenth-century attempts to classify the soul's powers and to explain the mind's place within the soul, the volume proceeds systematically to consider the scope of human knowledge and the role of divine illumination, intentionality and mental representation, and attempts to identify the object (...)
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  36. Skepsis, Wahrheit, Illumination. Bemerkungen zur Erkenntnistheorie Heinrichs von Gent.Christoph Kann - 2001 - In Jan Aertsen, Emery A., Speer Kent & Andreas (eds.), Nach der Verurteilung von 1277. Philosophie Und Theologie an der Universität von Paris Im Letzten Viertel des 13. Jahrhunderts. Miscellanea Mediaevalia 28. De Gruyter. pp. 38--58.
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  37. Heinrich von Gent über das Subjekt der Metaphysik als Ersterkanntes.Martin Pickavé - 2001 - Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 12:493-522.
    L'A. esamina in primo luogo l'origine del problema metafisico in Enrico. Il tema del subiectum metaphysice è inquadrato nel contesto della problematica del soggetto scientifico e ciò che interessa l'A. è soprattutto il procedimento argomentativo di Enrico ed il significato delle conseguenze di tale procedere. Lo studio si chiude con uno sguardo sul commentario alla Metafisica di Pietro di Auvergne, evidenziando la relazione fra soggetto della metafisica e dottrina del primum cognitum nell'intelletto umano. Riferimenti alle posizioni di Avicenna, Averroè e (...)
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  38. Henry of Ghent on Divine Illumination.Markus L. Führer - 1998 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 3 (1):69-85.
    This essay examines Henry of Ghent's reaction to the Thomistic criticism of the Au-gustinian theory of divine illumination. By grounding epistemology in the psychology of Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas made divine illumination appear to be an unwieldy theory incorrect in its basic assumptions. Even though Henry reworked the Augustinian theory, he did not completely reject the Aristotelian-Thomistic epistemology. Unlike so many of his predecessors, Henry did not attempt to avoid difficult questions raised by the fallibility of sense experience in developing his (...)
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  39. The Possible First Exemplar of the Articles 73-75 of Henry of Ghent's Summa.Raymond Macken - 1998 - Medioevo 22:480-490.
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  40. Good Fortune and the Eternity of the World - Henry of Ghent and John Duns Scotus.G. A. Wilson - 1998 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 65 (1):40-51.
  41. Studies on Henry of Ghent - The Relevance of Henry's Concept of Relation.Jos Decorte - 1997 - Recherches de Philosophie 64 (1):230-238.
    This modest contribution has been occasioned by the publication of the Proceedings of an international colloquium held at the De Wulf-Mansion Centre of the Institute of Philosophy in commemoration of the seven-hundredth anniversary of the death of Henry of Ghent. This colloquium had a twofold purpose: «first to establish a status quaestionis of the different fields of research concerning Henry’s doctrines and the critical edition of his work and, second, to provide a forum for specialists to exchange ideas and insights (...)
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  42. The Proofs of the Existence of God: Henry of Ghent and Duns Scotus as Precursors of Leibniz.Michael Latzer - 1997 - Modern Schoolman 74 (2):143-160.
  43. Henry of Ghent and the Twilight of Divine Illumination.Robert Pasnau - 1995 - Review of Metaphysics 49 (1):49 - 75.
    The first doctrine Peckham mentions as being under attack is of undoubtedly the TDI, according to which human beings are illuminated by "the unchangeable light" so as to attain the "eternal rules." This language of light and illumination is of course most closely associated with Augustine, but it permeates the entire Christian medieval tradition. Until Aquinas's time the TDI had played a prominent role in all the most influential medieval theories of knowledge, including those of Anselm, Albert the Great, Roger (...)
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  44. Henry of Ghent's Quodlibet VII as a Source for Richard of Mediavilla's Quaestio Privilegii Papae Martini.Gordon Wilson - 1993 - Franciscan Studies 53 (1):97-120.
  45. Natural Rights in the Thirteenth Century: A Quaestio of Henry of Ghent.Brian Tierney - 1992 - Speculum 67 (1):58-68.
    According to one recent account, in the “preliberal epoch” before the seventeenth century people did not think of individuals “as possessing inalienable rights to anything — much less life, liberty, property, or even the pursuit of happiness.” The statement is not true, but it is excusable. Compared with the flood of writing on the classical rights theories of the early modern period, there has been only a thin trickle of work on medieval ideas concerning individual natural rights, or human rights (...)
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  46. Steven P. Marrone, "Truth and Scientific Knowledge in the Thought of Henry of Ghent". [REVIEW]Paul J. W. Miller - 1989 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (1):149.
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  47. A Note Concerning The Authorship Of The Lectura Ordinaria Attributed To Henry Of Ghent.G. Wilson - 1989 - Recherches de Philosophie 56:227-231.
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  48. Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent on the Succession of Substantial Forms and the Origin of Human Life.Gordon A. Wilson - 1989 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 63:117.
  49. Marronne, St.P., Truth and Scientific Knowledge in the Thought of Henry of Ghent. [REVIEW]Liesbeth Lippens - 1987 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 49:678.
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  50. Truth and Scientific Knowledge in the Thought of Henry of Ghent.Steven P. Marrone - 1987 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 49 (4):678-678.
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