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Summary Henry Sidgwick (1838-1900) is widely regarded as the most enduringly significant figure in late 19th century Anglo-American moral philosophy. He is both the last of the three classical utilitarians (Bentham, Mill, and Sidgwick) and the first in a tradition of British intuitionists stretching into the mid 20th century and including Moore and Ross. His works include books on political philosophy, political history, and economics, and articles on issues in epistemology and general philosophy. But by far his most discussed work in his masterpiece, The Methods of Ethics (first edition 1874, 7th (posthumous) edition 1907).
Key works For the student of ethics, Sidgwick's own most important works are The Methods of Ethics (Sidgwick 1907); Lectures on the Ethics of T.H. Green, Mr. Herbert Spencer, and J. Martineau (Sidgwick 1902) and Essays on Ethics and Method (Sidgwick 2000). Important secondary sources include C.D. Broad, Five Types of Ethical Theory (Broad 1959); Jerome Schneewind, Sidgwick's Ethics and Victorian Moral Philosophy (Schneewind 1977); Robert Shaver, Rational Egoism (Shaver 1998);  Bart Schultz, Henry Sidgwick: Eye of the Universe (Schultz 2004); Terence Irwin, The Development of Ethics, Vol. III (Irwin 2009); and David Phillips, Sidgwickian Ethics (Phillips 2011).
Introductions The best introductions to Sidgwick's work are probably his own in the "short intellectual autobiography" included by his literary executor, E.E. Constance Jones, in the Preface to the 6th edition of the Methods (Sidgwick 1907, xvii-xxiii) and Bart Schultz's Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy article "Henry Sidgwick".
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  1. SIDGWICK, HENRY.-National and International Right and Wrong. [REVIEW]A. E. T. A. E. T. - 1920 - Mind 29:108.
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  2. Mr. H. Sidgwick on the Critical Philosophy.R. Adamson - 1883 - Mind 8 (30):251-255.
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  3. Kant's View of Mathematical Premisses and Reasonings.Robert Adamson - 1883 - Mind 8 (31):421 - 425.
  4. A Recent Criticism of Sidgwick's Methods of Ethics: Rejoinder.Ernest Albee - 1902 - Philosophical Review 11 (6):614-616.
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  5. An Examination of Professor Sidgwick's Proof of Utilitarianism.Ernest Albee - 1901 - Philosophical Review 10 (3):251-260.
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  6. Henry Sidgwick (1838-1900).Skelton Anthony - 2002 - In J. Mander & A. P. F. Sell (eds.), The Dictionary of Nineteenth-Century British Philosophers. Thoemmes Press.
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  7. The Invention of Altruism: Making Moral Meanings in Victorian Britain.Leslie Armour - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (2):351 – 354.
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  8. Move Over Mill and Bentham: The Complete Works and Selected Correspondence of Henry Sidgwick (CD-ROM), Ed. Bart Schultz, Prices on Request.Julian Baggini - 2011 - The Philosophers' Magazine 3:52.
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  9. Sidgwick, A. -The Process of Argument.A. Bain - 1878 - Mind 3:137.
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  10. Mr. Sidgwick's Methods of Ethics.A. Bain - 1876 - Mind 1 (2):179-197.
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  11. Decadence. Henry Sidgwick Memorial Lecture.Arthur James Balfour - 1908
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  12. Naturalism and Ethics.Arthur James Balfour - 1894 - International Journal of Ethics 4 (4):415-429.
  13. The Philosophy of Ethics.Arthur James Balfour - 1878 - Mind 3 (9):67-86.
  14. Green and Sidgwick on the Community of the Good.G. F. Barbour - 1908 - Philosophical Review 17 (2):149-166.
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  15. A Recent Criticism of Sidgwick's Methods of Ethics.Henry Barker - 1902 - Philosophical Review 11 (6):607-613.
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  16. The `Suppression' of Egoism.Alfred Barratt - 1877 - Mind 2 (6):167-186.
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  17. Henry Sidgwick and the Disagreement Between Egotism and Utilitarianism.Giuseppe Barreca - 2007 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 62 (1):41-56.
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  18. Sidgwick's Septem C. Thebas and Persae of Aischylos Aeschylus, Septem Contra Thebas and Persae (Separate Vols.). With Introduction and Notes by A. Sidgwick. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1903. [REVIEW]M. A. Bayfield - 1904 - The Classical Review 18 (03):159-163.
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  19. The Basis of the Conflict Between Self-Interest and Duty in Henry Sidgwick's 'Methods of Ethics.'.Paula J. Erdwinn Benson - 1971 - Dissertation, University of Colorado at Boulder
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  20. Between Science and Religion: The Reaction to Scientific Naturalism in Late Victorian England.Christopher J. Berry - 1981 - History of European Ideas 2 (2):173-174.
  21. Sidgwick the Man.Brand Blanshard - 1974 - The Monist 58 (3):349-370.
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  22. Henry Sidgwick's Practical Ethics.Sissela Bok - 2000 - Utilitas 12 (3):361.
    How practical can ethics be? To what extent is it possible to put ethics, in the words of Samuel Johnson? In Practical Ethics, Henry Sidgwick offers the distillation of a lifetime of reflection on how to relate moral theory and practice. This book provides both a model and a cautionary example. Its lucid, urbane, and broad-gauged approach to practical moral issues is exemplary; but its very lucidity also exposes the moral risks in Sidgwick's attempt to isolate deliberation about these issues (...)
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  23. Book Review:Practical Ethics. A Collection of Addresses and Essays. Henry Sidgwick. [REVIEW]B. Bosanquet - 1898 - Ethics 8 (3):390-.
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  24. Mr. Sidgwick on Ethical Studies.F. H. Bradley - 1877 - Mind 2:122.
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  25. Mr. Sidgwick's Hedonism: An Examination of the Main Argument of 'the Methods of Ethics'.Francis Herbert Bradley & Henry Sidgwick - 1877
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  26. Sidgwick and the Rationale for Rational Egoism.David Brink - 1992 - In Bart Schultz (ed.), Essays on Henry Sidgwick. Cambridge University Press.
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  27. Objectivity and Dialectical Methods in Ethics.David O. Brink - 1999 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 42 (2):195 – 212.
    A cognitivist interpretation of moral inquiry treats it, like other kinds of inquiry, as aiming at true belief. A dialectical conception of moral inquiry represents the justification for a given moral belief as consisting in its intellectual fit with other beliefs, both moral and nonmoral. The essay appeals to semantic considerations to defend cognitivism as a default metaethical view; it defends a dialectical conception of moral inquiry by examining Sidgwick's ambivalence about the probative value of appeal to common moral beliefs (...)
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  28. Sidgwick's Dualism of Practical Reason.David O. Brink - 1988 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 66 (3):291 – 307.
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  29. Sidgwick's Ethics and Victorian Moral Philosophy By J. B. Schneewind Clarendon Press: Oxford University Press, 1977, Xvi + 405 Pp., £17.50. [REVIEW]Karl Britton - 1978 - Philosophy 53 (203):132-.
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  30. SCHNEEWIND, J. B. "Sidgwick's Ethics and Victorian Moral Philosophy". [REVIEW]Karl Britton - 1978 - Philosophy 53:132.
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  31. James, D. G.-"Henry Sidgwick: "Science and Faith in Victorian England". [REVIEW]Karl Britton - 1974 - Philosophy 49:217.
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  32. Henry Sidgwick: Science and Faith in Victorian England By D. G. James. With a Memoir of the Author by Gwyn Jones. Oxford University Press, 1970, Xvi + 64 Pp., 80p. [REVIEW]Karl Britton - 1974 - Philosophy 49 (188):217-.
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  33. Five Types of Ethical Theory.C. D. Broad - 1959 - Paterson, N.J., Littlefield, Adams.
    Secondly, all five authors are thinkers of the highest rank, so it is reasonable to suppose that the types of ethical theory which they favoured will be ...
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  34. Henry Sidgwick.C. D. Broad - 1938 - Hibbert Journal 37:25.
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  35. Proceedings of the Second World Congress on Henry Sidgwick: Ethics, Psychics, Politics.Placido Bucolo, Roger Crisp & Bart Schultz (eds.) - forthcoming - Universita degli Studi di Catania.
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  36. Mr. Sidgwick on Intuitionalism.H. Calderwood - 1876 - Mind 1 (2):197-206.
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  37. Analogical Reasoning in Victorian Historical Epistemology.Michael Carignan - 2003 - Journal of the History of Ideas 64 (3):445-464.
  38. Parfit, Sidgwick, and Divided Reason.George R. Carlson - 1988 - Philosophia 18 (2-3):247-252.
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  39. A. Sidgwick, The Use of Words in Reasoning.J. M. Cattell - 1886 - Mind 11:377.
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  40. Henry Parkes [Book Review].Maggie Catterall - 2013 - Agora (History Teachers' Association of Victoria) 48 (1):56.
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  41. “Nothing To Invite Or To Reward A Separate Examination”: Sidgwick And Whewell.Sergio Cremaschi - 2008 - Etica E Politica 10 (2):137-184.
    In this paper I discuss Sidgwick’s reaction to Whewell’s moral philosophy. I show how, to Sidgwick’s eyes, Whewell’s philosophy looked as an emblem of the set of beliefs, primarily religious, into which he had been socialised, and that his reaction was over-determined by both his own ambivalent feelings to his own Anglican upbringing and his subtle rhetorical strategy practised by presenting new shocking ideas hidden between an amount of platitudes and playing the neutral observer or the ‘philosopher of morality’ instead (...)
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  42. Sidgwick E Il Progetto di Un’Etica Scientifica.Sergio Cremaschi - 2006 - Etica E Politica 8 (1):1-36.
    In this paper I discuss the role played by the ideas of ‘common sense’ and ‘common sense morality’ in Sidgwick’s system of ideas. I argue that, far from aiming at overcoming common sense morality, Sidgwick aimed purposely at grounding a consist code of morality by methods allegedly taken from the example provided by the natural sciences, in order to reach also in the moral field some body of ‘mature’ knowledge similar to that provided by the natural sciences. His whole polemics (...)
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  43. Sidgwick i granice intuicjonizmu.R. Crisp - 2008 - Etyka 41.
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  44. The Cosmos of Duty: Henry Sidgwick's Methods of Ethics.Roger Crisp - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Roger Crisp presents a comprehensive study of Henry Sidgwick's The Methods of Ethics, a landmark work first published in 1874. Crisp argues that Sidgwick is largely right about many central issues in moral philosophy: the metaphysics and epistemology of ethics, consequentialism, hedonism about well-being, and the weight to be given to self-interest. He holds that Sidgwick's long discussion of 'common-sense' morality is probably the best discussion of deontology we have. And yet The Methods of Ethics can be hard to understand, (...)
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  45. Metaphysics, Epistemology, Utilitarianism, Intuitionism, and Egoism: A Response to Phillips on Sidgwick.Roger Crisp - 2013 - Revue D’Études Benthamiennes 12.
    The shape of contemporary ethics owes a great deal to Henry Sidgwick, through his influence on Rawls, Parfit, and others. No one who reads David Phillips’s outstanding book can be left in the slightest doubt about Sidgwick’s continuing significance for both metaethics and normative ethics. Phillips’s scholarship and his substantive arguments are powerful and insightful, and I find them largely persuasive. So in these remarks I intend merely to raise a few questions about each of his four main..
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  46. Reasons and the Good.Roger Crisp - 2006 - Clarendon Press.
    In Reasons and the Good Roger Crisp answers some of the oldest questions in moral philosophy. Fundamental to ethics, he claims, is the idea of ultimate reasons for action; and he argues controversially that these reasons do not depend on moral concepts. He investigates the nature of reasons themselves, and how we come to know them. He defends a hedonistic theory of well-being and an account of practical reason according to which we can give some, though not overriding, priority to (...)
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  47. Sidgwick and Intuitionism.Roger Crisp - 2002 - In Philip Stratton-Lake (ed.), Ethical Intuitionism: Re-Evaluations. Clarendon Press.
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  48. Sidgwick and the Boundaries of Intuitionism.Roger Crisp - 2002 - In Philip Stratton-Lake (ed.), Ethical Intuitionism. Oxford Clarendon Press. pp. 56--75.
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  49. The Dualism of Practical Reason.Roger Crisp - 1996 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 96 (1):53 - 73.
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  50. Sidgwick and Self-Interest.Roger Crisp - 1990 - Utilitas 2 (2):267.
    The notion of self-interest has not received from philosophers of this century the attention it deserves. In this paper, I shall first elucidate the views on self-interest of a philosopher who nourished in the last century. It could be argued that Henry Sidgwick's views on this topic are the most considered in the history of philosophy. I shall then point to a number of misconceptions in his position, and suggest a more satisfactory account. I shall attempt also to solve a (...)
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