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  1. Sartre.Robert Hopkins - forthcoming - In Amy Kind (ed.), Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Imagination. Routledge. pp. 82-93.
    In The Imaginary Sartre offers a systematic, insightful and heterodox account of imagining in many forms. Beginning with four ‘characteristics’ he takes to capture the phenomenology of imagining, he draws on considerations both philosophical and psychological to describe the deeper nature of the state that has those features. The result is a view that remains the most potent challenge to the Humean orthodoxy that to this day dominates both philosophical and psychological thinking on the topic.
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  2. The Poetic Apriori: Philosophical Imagination in a Meaningful Universe.Raymond Barfield - 2020 - Stuttgart, Germany: ibidem/Columbia University Press.
    Theories about the nature and function of philosophical imagination depend on our understanding of what kind of universe we inhabit. Some theories are compelling if the universe is meaningful as a whole, but they make no sense if it is not. Raymond C. Barfield discusses conditions that would be necessary if the universe is meaningful as a whole, and then develops a theory of philosophical imagination in light of that starting place. The theory moves toward the conclusion that if the (...)
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  3. Imagination and the Distinction Between Image and Intuition in Kant.R. Brian Tracz - 2020 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 6:1087-1120.
    The role of intuition in Kant’s account of experience receives perennial philosophical attention. In this essay, I present the textual case that Kant also makes extensive reference to what he terms “images” that are generated by the imagination. Beyond this, as I argue, images are fundamentally distinct from empirical and pure intuitions. Images and empirical intuitions differ in how they relate to sensation, and all images (even “pure images”) actually depend on pure intuitions. Moreover, all images differ from intuitions in (...)
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  4. Aesthetics of History: The Example of Russia / Эстетика Истории: Пример России.Pavel Simashenkov - 2019 - Modern European Researches 3 (2019):47-55.
    The article highlights the problem of studying historical time in terms of aesthetics and social ethics. The essence of history, according to the author, is not so much in retrospection or reflection, but in the gap between feeling and awareness. Guided by the apophatic method, the author analyzes the historiosophical views of domestic and foreign scholars and comes to the conclusion that the Soviet paradigm is true, where the only vector of human development is the liberation of labor in the (...)
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  5. The Life of Imagination: Revealing and Making the World.Jennifer Anna Gosetti-Ferencei - 2018 - New York, NY, USA: Columbia University Press.
    Imagination allows us to step out of the ordinary but also to transform it through our sense of wonder and play, artistic inspiration and innovation, or the eureka moment of a scientific breakthrough. In this book, Jennifer Anna Gosetti-Ferencei offers a groundbreaking new understanding of its place in everyday experience as well as the heights of creative achievement. -/- The Life of Imagination delivers a new conception of imagination that places it at the heart of our engagement with the world—thinking, (...)
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  6. Historical progress and involution of ideals / Исторический прогресс и инволюция идеалов.Pavel Simashenkov - 2017
    My book is about the human creativity being a source of progress, and cycling of evolution caused by platitude and triviality of once high-reaching idealism. In essence the book presents an original perception of human history, based on Christian values as vital coordinates system. I hope this book will revive the interest to the Russian school of thoughts and to humanism in general.
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  7. Imagination in Mathematics.Andrew Arana - 2016 - In Amy Kind (ed.), Routledge Handbook on the Philosophy of Imagination. Routledge. pp. 463-477.
    This article will consider imagination in mathematics from a historical point of view, noting the key moments in its conception during the ancient, modern and contemporary eras.
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  8. Perception and Imagination.Uriah Kriegel - 2015 - In S. Miguens, G. Preyer & C. Bravo Morando (eds.), Prereflective Consciousness: Sartre and Contemporary Philosophy of Mind. Routledge. pp. 245-276.
    According to a traditional view, there is no categorical difference between the phenomenology of perception and the phenomenology of imagination; the only difference is in degree (of intensity, resolution, etc.) and/or in accompanying beliefs. There is no categorical difference between what it is like to perceive a dog and what it is like to imagine a dog; the former is simply more vivid and/or is accompanied by the belief that a dog is really there. A sustained argument against this traditional (...)
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  9. The Kantian Roots of Merleau-Ponty's Account of Pathology.Samantha Matherne - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (1):124-149.
    One of the more striking aspects of Maurice Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception (1945) is his use of psychological case studies in pathology. For Merleau-Ponty, a philosophical interpretation of phenomena like aphasia and psychic blindness promises to shed light not just on the nature of pathology, but on the nature of human existence more generally. In this paper, I show that although Merleau-Ponty is surely a pioneer in this use of pathology, his work is deeply indebted to an earlier philosophical study (...)
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  10. Phantasie and Phenomenological Inquiry - Thinking with Edmund Husserl.Andreea Smaranda Aldea - 2012 - Dissertation,
    This dissertation explores and argues for the import of the imagination (Phantasie) in Edmund Husserl's phenomenological method of inquiry. It contends that Husserl's extensive analyses of the imagination influenced how he came to conceive the phenomenological method throughout the main stages of his philosophical career. The work clarifies Husserl's complex method of investigation by considering the role of the imagination in his main methodological apparatuses: the phenomenological, eidetic, and transcendental reductions, and eidetic variation - all of which remained ambiguous despite (...)
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  11. The Unity of Imagining.Fabian Dorsch - 2012 - De Gruyter.
    Please send me an email (fabian.dorsch@unifr.ch) if you wish to receive a copy of the book. — 'In this highly ambitious, wide ranging, immensely impressive and ground-breaking work Fabian Dorsch surveys just about every account of the imagination that has ever been proposed. He identifies five central types of imagining that any unifying theory must accommodate and sets himself the task of determining whether any theory of what imagining consists in covers these five paradigms. Focussing on what he takes to (...)
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  12. Imagination and Judgment in John Dewey's Philosophy: Intelligent Transactions in a Democratic Context.Thomas Aastrup Rømer - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (2):133-150.
    In this essay, I attempt to interpret the educational philosophy of John Dewey in a way that accomplishes two goals. The first of these is to avoid any reference to Dewey as a propagator of a particular scientific method or to any of the individualist and cognitivist ideas that is sometimes associated with him. Secondly, I want to overcome the tendency to interpret Dewey as a naturalist by looking at his concept of intelligence. It is argued that ‘intelligent experience’ is (...)
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  13. The Medieval Origins of Conceivability Arguments.Stephen Boulter - 2011 - Metaphilosophy 42 (5):617-641.
    The central recommendation of this article is that philosophers trained in the analytic tradition ought to add the sensibilities and skills of the historian to their methodological toolkit. The value of an historical approach to strictly philosophical matters is illustrated by a case study focussing on the medieval origin of conceivability arguments and contemporary views of modality. It is shown that common metaphilosophical views about the nature of the philosophical enterprise as well as certain inference patterns found in thinkers from (...)
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  14. The Critique of Pure Reason and Continental Philosophy: Heidegger's Interpretation of Transcendental Imagination.Daniel Dahlstrom - 2010 - In Paul Guyer (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Cambridge University Press.
  15. Kant on the Imagination and Geometrical Certainty.Mary Domski - 2010 - Perspectives on Science 18 (4):409-431.
    My goal in this paper is to develop our understanding of the role the imagination plays in Kant’s Critical account of geometry, and I do so by attending to how the imagination factors into the method of reasoning Kant assigns the geometer in the First Critique. Such an approach is not unto itself novel. Recent commentators, such as Friedman (1992) and Young (1992), have taken a careful look at the constructions of the productive imagination in pure intuition and highlighted the (...)
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  16. Narrative as the Means to Freedom: Spinoza on the Uses of Imagination.Susan James - 2010 - In Yitzhak Y. Melamed & Michael A. Rosenthal (eds.), Spinoza's 'Theological-Political Treatise': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press. pp. 250.
  17. Review of Stephen Mulhall, Wittgenstein's Private Language: Grammar, Nonsense, and Imagination in PI 243-515. [REVIEW]Oskari Kuusela - 2010 - Philosophical Quarterly 60 (241):867-869.
  18. Feeling Fantastic? - Emotions and Appearances in Aristotle.Jamie Dow - 2009 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 37:143-175.
  19. Kant and the Power of Imagination (Review).Daniel Guevara - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (4):pp. 629-630.
    Kant and the Power of the Imagination discusses some neglected literature from the early German Romantic period—one major text that Kneller discusses was not published until the manuscript, lost for decades, resurfaced at an auction in New York in the 1960s. Kneller argues that this unduly neglected literature makes a productive and illuminating contribution to Kant’s program in the three Critiques. More particularly, she argues that it contributes to our understanding of the true philosophical potential of the role of the (...)
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  20. Collingwood on Historical Authority and Historical Imagination.Dale Jacquette - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (1):55-78.
    R. G. Collingwood's philosophy of history is explained and critically evaluated. Collingwood advances an objective idealist historiography, according to which it is necessary for the historian to enter vicariously into the thoughts of historically interesting decision makers, literally re-thinking them in order to understand their reasoning in historical context. A detailed exposition of Collingwood's theory is presented, identifying its central features as they developed from the early to later periods of his philosophy. Collingwood's remarkable inversion of the positivist unity of (...)
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  21. Literature (R.) Mitchell-Boyask Plague and the Athenian Imagination: Drama, History and the Cult of Asclepius. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008. Pp. Xiv + 209. £50. 9780521873451. [REVIEW]Jennifer Clarke Kosak - 2009 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:148-.
  22. Mind's World: Imagination and Subjectivity From Descartes to Romanticism.Alexander M. Schlutz - 2009 - University of Washington Press.
    Introduction -- Epistemology, metaphysics, and rhetoric : contexts of imagination -- Aristotle, Phantasia, and the problem of epistemology -- Plato, the neoplatonists, and the vagaries of the sublunar world -- Phantasia and ecstatic knowledge -- A more skillful artist than imitation -- Dreams, doubts, and evil demons : Descartes and imagination -- Mediatio prima : certainty, the cogito, and imagination -- Imagination in the rules -- Meditatio secunda : the world of the cogito -- Descartes, Montaigne, and Pascal -- Analogies (...)
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  23. Memory and the Unity of the Imagination in Spinoza’s Ethics.Peter Weigel - 2009 - International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (2):229-246.
    Spinoza assigns to the imagination a wide-ranging and often disparate looking set of operations. Commentators have long recognized that these operations share a certain proximity to the body and a common tendency to lead people into error. Yet others remark on the apparent thinness of an overarching theme. This article examines the prominent and often underappreciated role of memory in unifying Spinoza’s account of imaginative cognition. The discussion revisits various aspects of imagination in light of their integrated characterization as forms (...)
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  24. Kant and the Power of Imagination by Jane Kneller.David W. Wood - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):464-468.
  25. Ibn Sînâ (Avicenna) and René Descartes on the Faculty of Imagination.Hulya Yaldir - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):247-278.
  26. Imagination and Judgment in Kant's Practical Philosophy.Alfredo Ferrarin - 2008 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (1-2):101-121.
    My aim in this article is to understand the role of imagination and practical judgment in Kant's moral philosophy. After a comparison of Kant with Rousseau, I explore Kant's moral philosophy itself — unlike Hannah Arendt, who finds in the enlarged mentality of the third Critique the ground for the activity of imagination in a shared world. Instead, I place the concept of moral legislation in its background, the reflection on particulars relevant to deliberation, and discuss the mutual relation of (...)
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  27. Imagination and Mathematics in Proclus.Dmitri Nikulin - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (1):153-172.
  28. Structures of Imagination in Fichte's Wissenschaftslehre 1794-95 and 1804.Violetta L. Waibel - 2008 - In Daniel Breazeale & Tom Rockmore (eds.), After Jena: New Essays on Fichte's Later Philosophy. Northwestern University Press.
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  29. Hume's Phenomenology of the Imagination.Timothy M. Costelloe - 2007 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 5 (1):31-45.
    This paper examines the role of the imagination in Hume's epistemology. Three specific powers of the imagination are identified – the imagistic, conceptual and productive – as well as three corresponding kinds of fictions based on the degree of belief contained in each class of ideas the imagination creates. These are generic fictions, real and mere fictions, and necessary fictions, respectively. Through these manifestations, it is emphasized, Hume presents the imagination both as the positive force behind human creativity and a (...)
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  30. Review: Kneller, Kant and the Power of Imagination. [REVIEW]Gabriel A. Gottlieb - 2007 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 28 (2):189-194.
  31. Imagination in Kant's Critique of Practical Reason.Jeanine Grenberg - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):335-336.
    Jeanine Grenberg - Imagination in Kant's Critique of Practical Reason - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 45.2 335-336 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Jeanine M. Grenberg St. Olaf College Bernard Freydberg. Imagination in Kant's Critique of Practical Reason. Bloomington-Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2005. Pp. xiii + 180. Paper, $19.95. At the heart of the task of the historian of philosophy is the effort to interpret well what has been said (...)
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  32. Hegel’s Theory of Imagination. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Reid - 2006 - Dialogue 45 (3):591.
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  33. Kant's Transcendental Imagination.Gary Banham - 2005 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    The role and place of transcendental psychology in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason has been a source of some contention. This work presents a detailed argument for restoring transcendental psychology to a central place in the interpretation of Kant's Analytic, in the process providing a detailed response to more "austere" analytic readings.
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  34. Hegel's Theory of Imagination (Review). [REVIEW]Kathleen Eamon - 2005 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 19 (4):257-259.
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  35. Imagination in Kant's Critique of Practical Reason.Bernard Freydberg - 2005 - Indiana University Press.
    With particular focus on imagination, Bernard Freydberg presents a close reading of Kant’s second critique, The Critique of Practical Reason. In an interpretation that is daring as well as rigorous, Freydberg reveals imagination as both its central force and the bridge that links Kant’s three critiques. Freydberg’s reading offers a powerful challenge to the widespread view that Kant’s ethics calls for rigid, self-denying obedience. Here, to the contrary, the search for self-fulfillment becomes an enormously creative endeavor once imagination is understood (...)
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  36. On the Development of Husserl’s Transcendental Phenomenology of Imagination and its Use for Interdisciplinary Research.Julia3 Jansen - 2005 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):121-132.
    In this paper I trace Husserl’s transformation of his notion of phantasy from its strong leanings towards empiricism into a transcendental phenomenology of imagination. Rejecting the view that this account is only more incompatible with contemporary neuroscientific research, I instead claim that the transcendental suspension of naturalistic (or scientific) pretensions precisely enables cooperation between the two distinct realms of phenomenology and science. In particular, a transcendental account of phantasy can disclose the specific accomplishments of imagination without prematurely deciding upon a (...)
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  37. Hegel’s Theory of Imagination.John Russon - 2005 - Review of Metaphysics 59 (2):404-406.
    The Introduction outlines how the topic of imagination developed in Kant and German Idealism. Bates focuses on Fichte’s establishing of imagination as the primary dynamic structure of consciousness itself, and on Schelling’s transformation of this epistemological conception into a metaphysical one, interpreting imagination as the very self-sundering of the Absolute. Chapter 1, “The Sundering Imagination of the Absolute,” then looks at Hegel’s early, Schellingian interpretation of imagination. In Hegel’s Differenzschrift and in Faith and Knowledge, philosophy is construed as a self-conscious (...)
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  38. Imagination as a Category of History: An Essay Concerning Koselleck's Concepts Of.Anders Schinkel - 2005 - History and Theory 44 (1):42-54.
    Reinhart Koselleck is an important thinker in part for his attempt to interpret the cultural changes resulting in our modern cultural outlook in terms of the historical categories of experience and expectation. In so doing he tried to pay equal attention to the static and the changing in history. This article argues that Koselleck’s use of “experience” and “expectation” confuses their metahistorical and historical meaning, with the result that his account fails to do justice to the static, to continuity in (...)
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  39. Defining Imagination: Sartre Between Husserl and Janet.Beata Stawarska - 2005 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):133-153.
    The essay traces the double, phenomenological and psychological, background of Sartre’s theory of the imagination. Insofar as these two phenomenological and psychological currents are equally influential for Sartre’s theory of the imagination, his intellectual project is situated in an inter-disciplinary research area which combines the descriptive analyses of Edmund Husserl with the clinical reports and psychological theories of Pierre Janet. While Husserl provides the foundation for the prevailing theory of imagination as pictorial representation, Janet’s findings on obsessive behavior enrich an (...)
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  40. Hiding From History: Habermas's Elision of Public Imagination.Meili Steele - 2005 - Constellations 12 (3):409-436.
  41. Hegel’s Theory of Imagination.Jennifer Ann Bates - 2004 - State University of New York Press.
    _A comprehensive account of the role of the imagination in Hegel's philosophy._.
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  42. Phenomenology and Imagination in Husserl and Heidegger.Brian Elliott - 2004 - Routledge.
    Phenomenology is one of the most pervasive and influential schools of thought in twentieth-century European philosophy. This book provides a systematic and comprehensive analysis of the idea of the imagination in Husserl and Heidegger. The author also locates phenomenology within the broader context of a philosophical world dominated by Kantian thought, arguing that the location of Husserl within the Kantian landscape is essential to an adequate understanding of phenomenology both as an historical event and as a legacy for present and (...)
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  43. The Imaginary: A Phenomenological Psychology of the Imagination.Jean-Paul Sartre - 2004 - Routledge.
    Webber's perceptive new introduction helps to decipher this challenging, seminal work, placing it in the context of the author's work and the history of ...
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  44. Spinoza on the Imagination.Piet Steenbakkers - 2004 - In Lodi Nauta & Detlev Pätzold (eds.), Imagination in the Later Middle Ages and Early Modern Times. Peeters.
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  45. Imagination and Hobbes: Distance, Possibility, and Desire.Alfredo Ferrarin - 2003 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 24 (2):5-27.
    Whether or not we think that Marshall McLuhan’s prophecy regarding the end of the Gutenberg galaxy and the advent of the civilization of the image has come true in the era of sophisticated computer-enhanced imagery, it seems indisputable that images play a central role in our existence. We are constantly bombarded and inescapably surrounded by images. Publicly accessible and reproducible images are a singularly effective way to find and exemplify a visual representative for what they picture, or to convey a (...)
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  46. The Use of Imagination, Emotion, and the Will in a Medieval Classic.Lawrence F. Hundersmarck - 2003 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 6 (2):46-62.
  47. Reply to Recker’s “Imagination and Images in Descartes’ Science”.Don Sievert - 2003 - Southwest Philosophy Review 19 (2):61-64.
  48. Enigmatic Sayings. Review of the Hypocritical Imagination: Between Kant and Levinas by John Llewelyn.John Wilhelm Wurzer - 2002 - Research in Phenomenology 32 (1):233-237.
  49. Those Powerful Materialized Dreams: Peirce on Icons and the Human Imagination.Fernando Andacht - 2001 - American Journal of Semiotics 17 (3):91-116.
  50. Optics, Imagination, and the Construction of Scientific Observation in Kepler’s New Science.Raz D. Chen-Morris - 2001 - The Monist 84 (4):453-486.
    A major intellectual shift between Copernicus and the mid-17th century was the rejection of Aristotelian assertions concerning the relationship of mathematics to physical nature. Aristotle asserted that “The minute accuracy of mathematics is not to be demanded in all cases, but only in the case of things which have no matter. Therefore its method is not that of natural science; for presumably all nature has matter.” Thus, he pulled out the rug from under the feet of the aspiration to a (...)
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