About this topic
Summary This category contains books and articles related to the history of both aesthetics and the philosophy of art.  It includes works that deal directly with the history of the discipline, works that deal with aesthetic concepts as treated by different authors from a  historical perspective, and works that reflect upon the status of the disciple.
Key works While in other philosophical fields, as the general history of philosophy or the history of some other philosophical disciplines, there are a handful of works that could be cited as the key works in the discipline, in the history of aesthetics or of the philosophy of art, it is difficult to point them out. Nevertheless, it is usual to cite, Tatarkiewicz's History of Aesthetics as one of these, although his review of such history ends up in the 1700s. This means that his work ought to be completed with others that either focus in the later development of the discipline (missing, therefore, comprehensiveness) or that also try a full review of the historical development of the field. Among them, we find Beardsley's Aesthetics from Classical Greece to the Present: a short Introduction written from the perspective of analytical philosophy; Bosanquet's A History of Aesthetics originally published in 1892; Gilbert and Kuhn's A History of Esthetics published in 1939; and Aesthetics: The Key Thinkers edited by Alessandron Giovannelli, and very recent (2012).
Introductions Besides the works already mentioned above, any general encyclopedia on aesthetics serves as a good introduction to the problems addressed by the history of aesthetics and of the philosophy of art. In this sense, both Encyclopedia of Aesthetics and The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics can be considered as good starting points.
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2362 found
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1 — 50 / 2362
  1. added 2020-05-23
    Schiller on Freedom and Aesthetic Value: Part II.Samantha Matherne & Nick Riggle - forthcoming - British Journal of Aesthetics:ayaa005.
    In his Letters on the Aesthetic Education of Man, Friedrich Schiller draws a striking connection between aesthetic value and individual and political freedom, claiming that, ‘it is only through beauty that man makes his way to freedom’. However, contemporary ways of thinking about freedom and aesthetic value make it difficult to see what the connection could be. Through a careful reconstruction of the Letters, we argue that Schiller’s theory of aesthetic value serves as the key to understanding not only his (...)
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  2. added 2020-04-23
    Aesthetics, Scientism, and Ordinary Language: A Comparison Between Wittgenstein and Heidegger.Andreas Vrahimis - 2018 - Proceedings of the European Society for Aesthetics 10:659-684.
    Wittgenstein and Heidegger’s objections against the possibility of an aesthetic science were influential on different sides of the analytic/continental divide. Heidegger’s anti-scientism is tied up with a critique of the reduction of the work of art to an object of aesthetic experience. This leads him to an aletheic view of artworks which precedes and exceeds any possible aesthetic reduction. Wittgenstein too rejects the relevance of causal explanations, psychological or physiological, to aesthetic questions. His appeal to ordinary language provides the backdrop (...)
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  3. added 2020-02-12
    Everyday Aesthetics: Prosaics, the Play of Culture and Social Identities.Theodore Gracyk - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):422-424.
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  4. added 2020-02-12
    Sublimity: The Non-Rational and the Irrational in the History of Aesthetics.Emily Brady - 2007 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (2):242-244.
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  5. added 2020-02-11
    Can Literature Be Moral Philosophy? A Sceptical View on the Ethics of Literary Empathy.Ingrid Vendrell Ferran - 2011 - In Sebastian Hüsch (ed.), Philosophy and Literature and the Crisis of Metaphysics.
    One important aspect of Nussbaum´s thesis on the moral value of literature concerns the power of literature to enhance our ability to empathise with other minds. This aspect will be the focus of the current article. My aim is to reflect upon this question regarding the moral value of our empathy for fictional characters. The article is structured in two main parts. I will first examine the concept of “empathy” and distinguish between empathy for human beings and empathy for fictional (...)
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  6. added 2020-01-23
    Wittgenstein and Heidegger Against a Science of Aesthetics’.Andreas Vrahimis - 2020 - Estetika 57 (1):64-85.
    Wittgenstein’s and Heidegger’s objections against the possibility of a science of aesthetics were influential on different sides of the analytic/continental divide. Heidegger’s anti-scientism leads him to an alētheic view of artworks which precedes and exceeds any possible aesthetic reduction. Wittgenstein also rejects the relevance of causal explanations, psychological or physiological, to aesthetic questions. The main aim of this paper is to compare Heidegger with Wittgenstein, showing that: (a) there are significant parallels to be drawn between Wittgenstein’s and Heidegger’s anti-scientism about (...)
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  7. added 2020-01-15
    Spur, Zeugnis und Imagination: Der Erkenntniswert von Dokumentarfilmen.Íngrid Vendrell-Ferran - 2020 - Zeitschrift für Ästhetik Und Allgemeine Kunstwissenschaft 65 (1).
    In diesem Aufsatz argumentiere ich für die These, dass alle Dokumentarfilme darauf abzielen, uns Erkenntnis über einen Aspekt der Realität zu vermitteln. Dieser These zufolge sind Dokumentarfilme – im Unterschied zu anderen Filmgattungen – der Wirklichkeit verpflichtet. Vor diesem Hintergrund sollen in diesem Aufsatz zwei Aspekte genauer untersucht werden: zum einen, wie der kognitive Wert von Dokumentarfilmen genauer zu verstehen ist, und zum anderen, inwiefern ausgehend von diesem epistemischen Aspekt Unterscheidungskriterien zwischen Dokumentarfilmen und anderen Filmgattungen entwickelt werden können. Der Aufsatz (...)
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  8. added 2020-01-07
    Jealousy and the Sense of Self: Unamuno and the Contemporary Philosophy of Emotion.Íngrid Vendrell-Ferran - forthcoming - Philosophy and Literature.
    This paper explores jealousy in Unamuno’s drama El otro. Drawing on contemporary philosophy of emotion, I will argue that for the Spanish author jealousy gives the subject a sense of self. The paper begins by embedding Unamuno’s philosophical anthropology in the context of contemporary emotion theory. It then presents the drama as an investigation into the affective dimension of self-identity. The third section offers an analysis of jealousy as an emotion of self-assessment. The final section discusses how this drama can (...)
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  9. added 2019-12-28
    Revolutionary Laughter: The Aesthetico-Political Meaning of Benjamin’s Chaplin.Ricardo Ibarlucía - 2019 - Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 12 (2):135-150.
    This paper discusses the aesthetic and political motivations of the great importance that Walter Benjamin gives to Charlie Chaplin in Das Kunstwerk im Zeitalter seiner technischen Reproduzierbarkeit. First, it proceeds to identify the main paragraphs that Benjamin devoted to Chaplin’s films in the different versions of his famous essay. Then it examines Chaplin’s reception in Weimar Germany both in the field of avant-garde art and that of press criticism, highlighting the philosophical, ethico-political and psychological arguments exchanged in a wide and (...)
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  10. added 2019-12-28
    «Unbewaffnetes Auge»: Benjamin’s Interpretation of Comedy in Shakespeare and Molière.Alice Barale - 2019 - Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 12 (2):127-133.
    This essay examines two texts that Walter Benjamin wrote in 1918, during his period in Bern, on Shakespeare’s comedy As you like it and on Le malade imaginaire by Molière When these texts are considered together, a question arises. What is the role of the comic inside Benjamin’s philosophy, in this period and also in the years to follow? Is the comic really only the other side of mourning, as Benjamin writes in The Origin of German Tragic Drama, or does (...)
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  11. added 2019-12-28
    Hamlet or Europe and the End of Modern Trauerspiel.Fabrizio Desideri - 2019 - Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 12 (2):117-126.
    Hamlet’s character sets, under different shapes and extents, the benchmark against which a large part of the European philosophy of the very long «short twentieth-century» behind us has had to measure. In the name of Hamlet as the most enigmatic among Shakespeare’s creatures, even Europe, its spirit and destiny, is identified, according to the well-known claim by Paul Valery.Common trait to a big part of these interpretations – from the juvenile works of Pavel Florenskij and Lev S. Vygotskij to Carl (...)
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  12. added 2019-12-19
    Reading David Hume’s » Of the Standard of Taste «.Babette Babich (ed.) - 2019 - Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter.
    This collection dedicated to and including David Hume's "Of the Standard of Taste," offers a much needed resource for students and scholars of philosophical aesthetics, political reflection, value and judgments, economics, and art. The authors include experts in the philosophy of art, aesthetics, history of philosophy as well as the history of science. Contributors include Babette Babich, Howard Caygill, Timothy M.Costelloe, Andrej Démuth / Slávka Démuthová, Bernard Freydberg, Peter Kivy, Carolyn Korsmeyer, Christopher MacLachlan, Emilio Mazza, Roger Schiner, Roger Scruton, and (...)
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  13. added 2019-12-18
    Signatures and Taste: Hume’s Mortal Leavings and Lucian.Babette Babich - 2019 - In Reading David Hume’s » Of the Standard of Taste «. Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter. pp. 3-22.
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  14. added 2019-12-11
    Hedda Gabler and the Uses of Beauty.Tom Stern - 2018 - In Kristin Gjesdal (ed.), Ibsen's Hedda Gabler: Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 71-91.
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  15. added 2019-11-28
    Die Kunst der Zweiten Natur Und Die Andere Natur der Kunst.Thomas Khurana - 2018 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 66 (3):339-361.
    This contribution traces an aesthetic shift in the concept of second nature that occurs around 1800 and raises the question as to what role art might play in a culture that already conceives of itself in generally aesthetic terms. The paper recalls Kant’s rejection of habit as a proper realization of ethical life and shows that in his third critique, Kant proposes a second nature of a different kind. To realize ethical life as a “second nature”, we cannot confine ourselves (...)
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  16. added 2019-11-25
    Schwerpunkt: Die Ästhetik der Zweiten Natur.Thomas Khurana - 2018 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 66 (3):321-324.
    Die praktische Philosophie der Gegenwart hat in vielfacher Weise Gebrauch von dem Gedanken gemacht, dass unsere sittliche Konstitution uns zur „zweiten Natur“ wird. Diesem Gedanken kann eine therapeutische, eine affirmative und eine kritische Wendung gegeben werden: In der therapeutischen Verwendung soll uns die Erinnerung, dass praktische Vernunft uns zur zweiten Natur werden kann, helfen, einen Dualismus von Geist und Natur zu überwinden, ohne uns auf einen reduktiven Naturalismus festzulegen. In der affirmativen Wendung soll der Begriff der zweiten Natur die Exzellenzform (...)
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  17. added 2019-11-08
    On the Advantages and Disadvantages of Comedy for Life.Russell Ford - 2004 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 35 (1):89-105.
    Freud had read Bergson’s 1900 book Laughter when he composed his own book on jokes, and, even prior to his development of the concept of the super-ego, Freud had criticized Bergson for not following up his insights into the linkage between comedy and childhood experiences. Freud thus chides Bergson for failing to pursue a line of inquiry that would confirm the ultimately tragic underpinnings of comedy. Wise to this clever and even mischievous little suggestion, Bergson’s book can be read as (...)
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  18. added 2019-11-06
    Life's Joke: Bergson, Comedy, and the Meaning of Laughter.Russell Ford - 2018 - In Lydia L. Moland (ed.), All Too Human: Laughter, Humor, and Comedy in Nineteenth-Century Philosophy. Cham, Switzerland: pp. 175-193.
    The present essay argues that Bergson’s account of the comic can only be fully appreciated when read in conjunction with his later metaphysical exposition of the élan vital in Creative Evolution and then by the account of fabulation that Bergson only elaborates fully three decades later in The Two Sources of Morality and Religion. The more substantive account of the élan vital ultimately shows that, in Laughter, Bergson misses his own point: laughter does not simply serve as a means for (...)
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  19. added 2019-11-01
    Beauty, Ugliness and the Free Play of Imagination.Anthony Savile - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics 60 (1):106-110.
    Beauty, Ugliness and the Free Play of Imagination Mojca Küplen Springer. 2015. pp. 152. £74.99.
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  20. added 2019-10-14
    Introduction: The Place of Beauty in Contemporary Aesthetics.Ingrid Vendrell Ferran & Wolfgang Huemer - 2019 - In Wolfgang Huemer & Íngrid Vendrell Ferran (eds.), Beauty. New Essays in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. München, Deutschland:
    The notion of beauty has endured a troublesome history over the last few decades. While for centuries beauty has been considered one of the central values of art, there have also been times when it seemed old-fashioned to even mention the term. The present volume aims to explore the nature of beauty and to shed light its place in contemporary philosphy and art practice.
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  21. added 2019-09-25
    Beyond the Imagery: The Encounters of Kierkegaard and Dostoevsky with an Image of the Dead Christ.Wojciech Kaftanski - 2014 - Dostoevsky Journal. An Independent Review 14 (1): 110–129.
    Through an analysis of Kierkegaard’s and Dostoevsky’s approaches to the theme of the death of Christ – one of the major leitmotifs in the debate of their contemporaries conveyed through theological and philosophical considerations, but also expressed in novels and in art – I show how the thinkers comprehended and articulated in their works the religious challenges awaiting the modern man.
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  22. added 2019-08-16
    Kiesewetter, Kant, and the Problem of Poetic Beauty.C. E. Emmer - 2018 - In Violetta L. Waibel, Margit Ruffing & David Wagner (eds.), Natur und Freiheit: Akten des XII. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. Berlin, Germany: pp. 2979–2986.
    My observations here are meant to address a current lacuna in discussions of Kant's aesthetics, namely the beauty of poetry. There are, I admit, numerous treatments of poetry considered in the light of Kant's aesthetic theory, but what may not be noticed is that in discussions of poetry and Kant's aesthetics, the topic of poetic beauty only rarely comes up. This virtual silence on the beauty of poetry is surprising, given that the beautiful is obviously one of the two foundational (...)
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  23. added 2019-08-16
    Journal of Scottish Thought. Volume 7. Francis Hutcheson and the Origins of the Aesthetic.Botond Csuka - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (2):218-221.
    Journal of Scottish Thought. Volume 7. Francis Hutcheson and the Origins of the AestheticSZÉCSÉNYIENDREthe university of aberdeen press. 2016. pp. 212. £10.00.
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  24. added 2019-08-14
    Kierkegaard on the Value of Art: An Indirect Method of Communication.Antony Aumann - 2019 - In Patrick Stokes, Eleanor Helms & Adam Buben (eds.), The Kierkegaardian Mind. New York: pp. 166-176.
    Like many 19th c. thinkers, Kierkegaard embraces a cognitivist view of art. He thinks works of art matter because they can teach us in important ways. This chapter defends two striking features of Kierkegaard’s version of this theory. First, works of art do not teach “directly” by telling us truths and offering us evidence. Instead, they educate us “indirect-ly” by helping us make our own discoveries. Second, the fact that art does not teach in a straightforward manner is no defect. (...)
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  25. added 2019-08-09
    Schiller Revisited: Aesthetic Play as the Solution to Halbbildung and Instrumental Reason.Lisbet Rosenfeldt Svanøe - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 53 (3):34.
    In the fifth and sixth letter of Friedrich Schiller's On the Aesthetic Education of Man [Über die ästhetische Erziehung des Menschen], which is based on letters written from 1793 to 1795 to his patron, the Duke of Augustenburg, Schiller critiques his contemporary society and culture. He describes how the organization of a state based on rationality alone does not develop but rather alienates man in a society in which "the dead letter succeeds the living intellect and a trained memory leads (...)
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  26. added 2019-08-02
    The Problem With Sentimental Art.Nada Gatalo - 2008 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 5 (2):20-31.
    If we feel confident in criticizing art for being sentimental, we ought to be able to precisely state how and why sentimentality is an aesthetic fault. This entails demonstrating that sentimental art fails to perform some function that is essential to art. In this paper I will argue that any critique of sentimental art that does not satisfy such a condition is not a legitimate aesthetic critique. Additionally I will put forth a genuinely aesthetic critique of sentimental art, establishing why (...)
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  27. added 2019-08-02
    Schopenhauer On The Epistemological Value Of Art.Vid Simoniti - 2008 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 5 (3):19-28.
    Art, as discussed in the third book of Arthur Schopenhauer’s The World as Will and Representation, plays a double role in his philosophical system. On one hand, beholding an object of aesthetic worth provides the spectator with a temporary cessation of the otherwise incessant suffering that Schopenhauer takes life to be; on the other, art creates an epistemological bridge between ourselves and the world as it really is: unlike science which only studies relations between things, contemplation of art leads to (...)
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  28. added 2019-07-30
    Collingwood On Art, Craft And All That Jazz.Adam Wills - 2010 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 7 (2):38-49.
    R. G. Collingwood is best known within the philosophy of art for his development of the so-called expressionist theory. Briefly stated, this theory regards expression as a necessary condition for the production of any artwork, where expression is conceived as a process whereby the artist transforms inchoate thoughts and feelings into some clarified form within a given artistic medium. My intention is not to examine the conception of expression itself, but instead, turn to Collingwood’s earlier distinction between art and craft. (...)
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  29. added 2019-07-28
    A Critical Assessment Of The Role Of The Imagination In Kant’s Exposition Of The Mathematical Sublime.Richard Stopford - 2007 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 4 (3):24-31.
    Kant argues in the Critique of Judgment (CJ) that there are two distinct modes of the sublime. This essay will concentrate on the mathematical mode. It is helpful to begin an examination of the mathematical sublime by elucidating the difference between logical estimation and aesthetic estimation; it is aesthetic estimation under strain, so Kant argues, that instigates the moment of the sublime. Logical estimation forms the cognitive basis of scientific calculations. He argues that scientific enquiry only requires an understanding of (...)
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  30. added 2019-07-28
    What Is Wrong With The Rhapsode? The Role Of Inspiration In Plato’s The Ion.Tilmann Koeppe - 2007 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 4 (3):13-22.
    In Plato’s Ion we find Socrates engaged in a conversation with the rhapsode Ion. During the course of the dialogue, Socrates gives a critical account of the nature of the rhapsode’s profession. But what exactly is it that Socrates criticises? And is his account entirely critical or does he, in the end, attach some positive value to the rhapsode’s profession in virtue of its being a ‘divinely inspired’ activity?1 In this essay I shall argue that Socrates does in fact give (...)
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  31. added 2019-07-28
    The Reinvention Of Genius Wagner's Transformation Of Schopenhauer's Aesthetics In “Beethoven”.Menno Boogaard - 2007 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 2 (2).
    Wagner's treatise Beethoven (1870), written to celebrate the centenary of Beethoven's birth, is one of his most influential theoretical works. Its influence on Nietzsche's Birth of Tragedy is well known, and Gustav Mahler regarded it as one of the most profound writings on music he knew, on a par with Schopenhauer's theory on the subject. Wagner's main concern in this text is to bring his theory of opera into line with his recent 'conversion' to Schopenhauer's philosophy. It contains an account (...)
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  32. added 2019-07-28
    Dickie’s Institutional Theory And The “Openness” Of The Concept Of Art.Alexandre Erler - 2006 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 3 (3):110-117.
    In this paper, I will look at the relationship between Weitz’s claim that art is an “open” concept and Dickie’s institutional theory of art, in its most recent form. Dickie’s theory has been extensively discussed, and often criticized, in the literature on aesthetics, yet it has rarely been observed – to my knowledge at least – that the fact that his theory actually incorporates, at least to some extent, Weitz’s claim about the “openness” of the concept of art, precisely accounts (...)
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  33. added 2019-07-26
    The End Of Art Revisited: A Response To Kalle Puolakka.Hans Maes - 2005 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 2 (3).
    In ‘The End of Art: A Real Problem or Not Really a Problem?’ I raised some questions about Arthur Danto’s famous ‘end of art’ thesis. A largely polemical paper, it was intended as an invitation to further discussion, and Kalle Puolakka has now taken up this invitation in ‘Playing The Game After The End of Art’. I thank him for his many insightful remarks. Critical comments are typically more interesting and helpful than simple praise, and Puolakka’s comments are no exception. (...)
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  34. added 2019-07-09
    Kierkegaard's Aesthetics and the Aesthetic of Imitation.Wojciech Kaftański - 2014 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 19 (1):111-134.
    This paper challenges the general approach to Kierkegaard ’ s engagement with imitation, which privileges a strictly religious reading. Heretofore imitation has been apprehended as a coherent concept shaped within the context of imitatio Christi in the devotio moderna. I locate Kierkegaard ’ s writings in the broader context of mimesis. Analysing particular mimetic structures woven into the text, I show that a plurality of imitative models that are different fromChrist occurs therein. Addressing the distinction between the religious and the (...)
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  35. added 2019-06-26
    Formalism Around 1800: A Grudging Concession to Aesthetic Sensibility.Paul Guyer - 2019 - Filozofija I Društvo 30 (2):241-256.
    This paper compares the outwardly similar structural formalisms of Marc- Antoine Laugier and Arthur Schopenhauer. Laugier purports to base his aesthetics on an historical argument from the “primitive hut”; but his preferences are really based on aversion to structurally and programmatically non-functional elements. His preferences show disregard for purely aesthetic considerations, such as pleasing proportions. Schopenhauer’s formalism is based on his cognitivist approach to aesthetics, according to which architecture is above all supposed to demonstrate relations between load and support, but (...)
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  36. added 2019-06-24
    “There is No Progress, Change is All We Know.” Notes on Duchamp’s Concept of Plastic Duration.Sarah Kolb - 2019 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 28 (57-58):87-108.
    Henri Bergson is generally recognized as one of the most influential philosophers in the history of historical avant-gardism. Nevertheless, it has been widely neglected that Bergson’s philosophy also played a crucial role for the radically new concept of art that Marcel Duchamp developed based on his critical attitude towards the avant-gardes. First and foremost, this is apparent in view of Duchamp’s paintings The Passage from Virgin to Bride and Bride of 1912, as they both feature an idea of transition laying (...)
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  37. added 2019-06-19
    The Passions and Disinterest: From Kantian Free Play to Creative Determination by Power, Via Schiller and Nietzsche.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2019 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 6:249-279.
    I argue that Nietzsche’s criticism of the Kantian theory of disinterested pleasure in beauty reflects his own commitment to claims that closely resemble certain Kantian aesthetic principles, specifically as reinterpreted by Schiller. I show that Schiller takes the experience of beauty to be disinterested both (1) insofar as it involves impassioned ‘play’ rather than desire-driven ‘work’, and (2) insofar as it involves rational-sensuous (‘aesthetic’) play rather than mere physical play. In figures like Nietzsche, Schiller’s generic notion of play—which is itself (...)
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  38. added 2019-06-13
    Blackwell Companion to Aesthetics.Stephen Davies, Kathleen Marie Higgins, Robert Hopkins, Robert Stecker & David Cooper (eds.) - 2009 - Wiley.
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  39. added 2019-06-07
    Rancière's Proust: A Rebirth of Aesthetics.William Melaney - 2018 - Res Cogitans 13 (1).
    Philosopher and literary theorist, Jacques Rancière, has argued that Marcel Proust’s work as a novelist enables us to understand how modern literature articulates and largely resolves a specifically aesthetic crisis. From Rancière’s standpoint, Proust shows us how the dominant conflict in nineteenth-century French literature was carried beyond a mere opposition and given a new aesthetic significance in the modern novel. In this paper, I will discuss Jacques Rancière’s attempt to assess Proust’s contribution to literature in the wake of the aesthetic (...)
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  40. added 2019-06-06
    Introduction: The Aesthetic Tradition of Hispanic Thought.S. Hugo Moreno & Elizabeth Millán - 2014 - Symposium 18 (1):1-21.
    An introduction is presented in which the authors discuss various articles within the issue on topics including Baroque history in Europe and Latin America, aesthetic tradition of Latin America, and Spanish philosopher José Ortega y Gasset's aesthetic work.
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  41. added 2019-06-06
    James Kennaway, Bad Vibrations: The History of the Idea of Music as a Cause of Disease. Farnham: Ashgate, 2012. Pp. Xii+213. ISBN 978-1-4094-2642-4. £65.00. [REVIEW]Penelope Gouk - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Science 46 (3):525-526.
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  42. added 2019-06-06
    Bridging the Abyss: Victor Basch's Political and Aesthetic Mindset*: Rajesh Heynickx.Rajesh Heynickx - 2013 - Modern Intellectual History 10 (1):87-107.
    This essay cross-examines both the correlation and the disjunction between art philosophy and political reason in the thinking of the French Jewish art philosopher, Kant specialist and socialist politician Victor Basch. Two interwoven lines of questioning will be in play. One considers the extent to which Basch's theory of beauty, which was primarily grounded in a psychological theory of Einfühlung, was a corollary to his political ideas and practices. The other line of inquiry raises questions about how Basch's political position, (...)
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  43. added 2019-06-06
    The Literate Eye: Victorian Art Writing and Modernist Aesthetics: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Rebecca Beasley - 2011 - British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (1):111-113.
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  44. added 2019-06-06
    Good Sense, Art, and Morality in Hume's ‘Of the Standard of Taste’.Reed Winegar - 2011 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (1):17-35.
    In his essay ‘Of the Standard of Taste,’ Hume argues that artworks with morally flawed outlooks are, to some extent, aesthetically flawed. While Hume's remarks regarding the relationship between art and morality have influenced contemporary aestheticians, Hume's own position has struck many people as incoherent. For Hume appears to entangle himself in two separate contradictions. First, Hume seems to claim both that true judges should not enter into vicious sentiments and that true judges should adopt the standpoint of an artwork's (...)
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  45. added 2019-06-06
    An Aesthetics of the Given in Rei Terada’s Looking Away. [REVIEW]John Hicks - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 6 (14):66-67.
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  46. added 2019-06-06
    Clytemnestra at the Mall: A Plea for More Improvisational Pedagogy in the Arts.Ellen Handler Spitz - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 44 (4):33.
    A work of art no matter how old and classic is actually, not just potentially, a work of art only when it lives in some individualized experience. . . . It cannot be asserted too strongly that what is not immediate is not aesthetic. Let’s imagine a young professor who receives a poor review of her teaching because she fails, when observed, to complete what she had initially set out to accomplish in the specific class meeting under critique. Assessment, after (...)
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  47. added 2019-06-06
    Inspiration and Technique: Ancient to Modern Views on Beauty and Art: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Penelope Murray - 2010 - British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (3):321-323.
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  48. added 2019-06-06
    François Jullien: Review of The Impossible Nude: Chinese Art and Western Aesthetics, University of Chicago Press 2007. [REVIEW]Christian Helmut Wenzel - 2009 - Philosophy East and West 59 (2):240-243.
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  49. added 2019-06-06
    By Grace of Broken Skin: An Aesthetics of Inscriptive Development.Scott Zeman - 2009 - Radical Philosophy Review 12 (1-2):289-313.
    I address the question of the origins and historical meaning of art. Analyzing suggestions from Marx, Derrida, Winnicott, and Todorov, I claim that art doesn’t simply represent conscious, historical events but is also the continuing presentation of the prehistorical break-up of our “original” human family. Indeed,perpetuating yet distancing this archaic scene of community and violence in tension, art performs this mediation not just in history but also as history, as a secretive historiography of splitting and meaning-making. To this end, I (...)
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  50. added 2019-06-06
    Integrating Music Into Intellectual History: Nineteenth-Century Art Music as a Discourse of Agency and Identity: John E. Toews.John E. Toews - 2008 - Modern Intellectual History 5 (2):309-331.
    Few intellectual historians of nineteenth-century Europe would deny that the tradition of art music that evolved between the revolutionary watershed at the end of the eighteenth century and the international wars and domestic convulsions of the first half of the twentieth century—a body of musical works from Haydn and Mozart to Mahler and Strauss that has been passed down to us in canonized form as the “imaginary museum” of “classical music” —was an enormously significant dimension of European cultural and intellectual (...)
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