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  1. added 2019-02-01
    Chemical Dissolution and Kant’s Critical Theory of Nature.Michael Bennett McNulty - 2018 - Kant-Studien 109 (4):537-556.
    Kant conceives of chemical dissolutions as involving the infinite division and subsequent blending of solvent and solute. In the resulting continuous solution, every subvolume contains a uniform proportion of each reactant. Erich Adickes argues that this account stands in tension with other aspects of Kant’s Critical philosophy and his views on infinity. I argue that although careful analysis of Kant’s conception of dissolution addresses Adickes’ objections, the infinite division inherent to the process is beyond our human cognition, for Kant. Nevertheless, (...)
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  2. added 2018-09-06
    What to Make of Mendeleev’s Predictions?K. Brad Wray - forthcoming - Foundations of Chemistry:1-5.
    I critically examine Stewart’s suggestion that we should weigh the various predictions Mendeleev made differently. I argue that in his effort to justify discounting the weight of some of Mendeleev’s failures, Stewart invokes a principle that will, in turn, reduce the weight of some of the successful predictions Mendeleev made. So Stewart’s strategy will not necessarily lead to a net gain in Mendeleev’s favor.
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  3. added 2018-08-19
    Kuhn, the History of Chemistry, and the Philosophy of Science.K. Brad Wray - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science:000-000.
    I draw attention to one of the most important sources of Kuhn’s ideas in Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Contrary to the popular trend of focusing on external factors in explaining Kuhn’s views, factors related to his social milieu or personal experiences, I focus on the influence of the books and articles he was reading and thinking about in the history of science, specifically, sources in the history of chemistry. I argue that there is good reason to think that the history (...)
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  4. added 2018-06-07
    A Defense of the Suppositionalist View of Hypothetical Entities.Jonathon Daniel Hricko - 2013 - Dissertation,
    When scientists put forward hypotheses, they sometimes involve new kinds of entities, which we can call 'hypothetical entities.' Hypothetical entities are pervasive in the sciences, and some examples include caloric and, up until very recently, the Higgs boson. Some hypothetical entities are discovered, as was the case with the Higgs boson, while scientists conclude that others, like caloric, do not exist. Hypothetical entities pose a number of important challenges for the philosophy of science, and my goal is to develop and (...)
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  5. added 2018-02-24
    Il neoplatonismo nell'ontologia chimica di Jan Baptista van Helmont.Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino - 2017 - In Il minimo, l’unità, e l’universo infinito nella cosmologia vitalistica di Giordano Bruno. Milano: Limina Mentis.
  6. added 2018-02-24
    Guest Editor: Foundations of Chemistry (Special Issue).Marina P. Banchetti - 2017 - Foundations of Chemistry 19 (3).
  7. added 2017-11-05
    Atoms, Molecules, and Linus Pauling.Judith Goodstein - 1984 - Social Research 51.
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  8. added 2017-10-09
    What is Chemistry, for Kant?Michael Bennett McNulty - 2017 - Kant Yearbook 9 (1):85-112.
    Kant’s preoccupation with architectonics is a characteristic and noteworthy aspect of his thought. Various features of Kant’s argumentation and philosophical system are founded on the precise definitions of the various subdomains of human knowledge and the derivative borders among them. One science conspicuously absent from Kant’s routine discussions of the organization of knowledge is chemistry. Whereas sciences such as physics, psychology, and anthropology are all explicitly located in the architectonic, chemistry finds no such place. In this paper, I examine neglected (...)
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  9. added 2017-09-22
    Amedeo Avogadro. [REVIEW]W. Brock - 1986 - British Journal for the History of Science 19 (2):205-206.
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  10. added 2017-09-20
    Primordial Alchemy & Modern Religion: Essays on Traditional Cosmology.R. Blackhirst - 2008 - Sophia Perennis.
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  11. added 2017-07-04
    A Letter From Berthollet to Blagden Relating to the Experiments for a Large-Scale Synthesis of Water Carried Out by Lavoisier and Meusnier in 1785.Denis I. Duveen & Herbert S. Klickstein - 1954 - Annals of Science 10 (1):58-62.
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  12. added 2017-02-15
    Andre-Marie Ampere's Mathematical Theory of Chemical Combination.Myriam Scheidecker-Chevallier & Robert Locqueneux - 1994 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 47 (3):309-352.
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  13. added 2017-02-15
    Document, Text and Myth: Lavoisier's Crucial Year Revisited.C. E. Perrin - 1989 - British Journal for the History of Science 22 (1):3-25.
    Published texts, unpublished documents and, to a lesser extent, artefacts are the stuff from which historians of science fashion their interpretations of the past. From these residues we attempt to reconstruct the lost fabric of personalities, activities and institutions that constituted the practice of science, and to comprehend the flow of thought that was its substance. Like the sensory data of the empirical sciences, these raw materials are not pure chunks of reality. They must be interpreted in the light of (...)
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  14. added 2017-02-15
    Radioactivity and Atomic Theory. Presenting Facsimile Reproduction of the Annual Reports on Radioactivity 1904–1920 to the Chemical Society. [REVIEW]S. B. Sinclair - 1977 - British Journal for the History of Science 10 (2):182-182.
  15. added 2017-02-15
    Affinity and Matter. Elements of Chemical Philosophy 1800–1865. [REVIEW]John Brooke - 1973 - British Journal for the History of Science 6 (3):329-330.
  16. added 2017-02-15
    An Essay on Phlogiston and the Constitution of Acids. [REVIEW]Maurice Crosland - 1969 - British Journal for the History of Science 4 (3):293-293.
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  17. added 2017-02-15
    John Dalton and the Atom. [REVIEW]Arnold Thackray - 1967 - British Journal for the History of Science 3 (3):300-301.
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  18. added 2017-02-15
    John Dalton. 1766–1844. A Bibliography of Works by and About Him. [REVIEW]Arnold Thackray - 1966 - British Journal for the History of Science 3 (2):194-194.
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  19. added 2017-02-14
    The Importance of History and Philosophy of Science in Correcting Distorted Views of 'Amount of Substance'and 'Mole'concepts in Chemistry Teaching.Kira Padilla & Carles Furio-Mas - 2008 - Science & Education 17 (4):403-424.
  20. added 2017-02-14
    L'enseignement Et l'Application de la Nouvelle Chimie au Mexique au Temps de Lavoisier.Patricia Aceves - 1995 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 48 (1):123-132.
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  21. added 2017-02-14
    Water and Measuring: Views on the Intellectual Itinerary of the Young Lavoisier.Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent - 1995 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 48 (1):49-70.
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  22. added 2017-02-14
    Chemical Contributions, Especially From the Nineteenth Century, to Knowledge of the Brain and its Functioning.H. McIlwain - 1958 - In F. N. L. Poynter (ed.), The History and Philosophy of Knowledge of the Brain and its Functions. Blackwell.
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  23. added 2017-02-13
    In Search of El Dorado: John Dalton and the Origins of the Atomic Theory.Alan J. Rocke - 2005 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 72 (1):1-34.
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  24. added 2017-02-13
    The Marginalization of Berthollet's Chemical Affinities in the French Textbook Tradition at the Beginning of the Nineteenth Century.Pere Grapí - 2001 - Annals of Science 58 (2):111-135.
    After Lavoisier's execution, the leading French chemists were Antoine-François Fourcroy , Louis-Bernard Guyton de Morveau and Claude-Louis Berthollet . At the beginning of the nineteenth century, Berthollet introduced a new conception of chemical change that challenged the theory of elective affinities which had dominated chemistry for nearly a hundred years. Berthollet's new affinities raised controversy among chemists and had to coexist with the firmly established theory of elective affinities. Apart from the public debate in research articles, Berthollet's affinities also had (...)
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  25. added 2017-02-13
    Changes in Chemical Concepts and Language in the Seventeenth Century.Maurice Crosland - 1996 - Science in Context 9 (3).
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  26. added 2017-02-13
    Alexander W. Williamson on the Atomic Theory: A Study of Nineteenth-Century British Atomism.E. Robert Paul - 1978 - Annals of Science 35 (1):17-31.
    Although not universally accepted at the time, the atomic hypothesis during the 19th century provided a definite ordering scheme for certain relatively sophisticated chemical phenomena. As such, it was conceptually responsible for the formulation and precise articulation of important seminal ideas in chemical studies. In this paper we will explore this claim with regard to the views of the British chemist Alexander W. Williamson.
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  27. added 2017-02-13
    The Platinum Pyrometers of Louis Bernard Guyton de Morveau, F.R.S.J. A. Chaldecott - 1972 - Annals of Science 28 (4):347-368.
    As we have seen, it was clearly Guyton's intention, in 1808, to supply details of his improved platinum pyrometer, and he did submit a drawing of the instrument at the meeting of the Class in December 1810. It would seem that on that occasion he did not supply those details which are to be found in the fourth, unpublished, part of the ‘Essay’. The existence of a text fit to be sent to the printer, and the execution of a drawing (...)
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  28. added 2017-02-13
    Private Enterprise and Chemical Training in Nineteenth Century Liverpool.Gordon W. Roderick & Michael D. Stephens - 1971 - Annals of Science 27 (1):85-93.
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  29. added 2017-02-13
    Thomson Before Dalton.Seymour H. Mauskopf - 1969 - Annals of Science 25 (3):229-242.
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  30. added 2017-02-13
    Lavoisier's Technical Reports: 1768–1794 Part I.F. C. Storrs - 1966 - Annals of Science 22 (4):251-275.
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  31. added 2017-02-13
    The Origins of Gay-Lussac's Law of Combining Volumes of Gases.M. P. Crosland - 1961 - Annals of Science 17 (1):1-26.
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  32. added 2017-02-13
    Saltpetre, Tin and Gunpowder: Addenda to the Correspondence of Lavoisier and Franklin.Claude A. Lopez - 1960 - Annals of Science 16 (2):83-94.
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  33. added 2017-02-13
    L'avant-Coureur. The Journal in Which Some of Lavoisier's Earliest Research Was Reported.W. A. Smeaton - 1957 - Annals of Science 13 (4):219-234.
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  34. added 2017-02-13
    The Contributions of P.-J. Macquer, T. O. Bergman and L. B. Guyton de Morveau to the Reform of Chemical Nomenclature.W. A. Smeaton - 1954 - Annals of Science 10 (2):87-106.
  35. added 2017-02-13
    Lavoisier's Memoir on the Composition of Nitric Acid.J. R. Partington - 1953 - Annals of Science 9 (1):96-98.
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  36. added 2017-02-13
    Historical Studies on the Phlogiston Theory.—IV. Last Phases of the Theory.J. R. Partington & Douglas McKie - 1939 - Annals of Science 4 (2):113-149.
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  37. added 2017-02-12
    Spheres of Influence: Illustration, Notation, and John Dalton's Conceptual Toolbox, 1803–1835.Gillian Gass - 2007 - Annals of Science 64 (3):349-382.
    In the early years of the nineteenth century, the English chemist John Dalton developed his atomic theory, a set of theoretical commitments describing the nature of atoms and the rules guiding their interactions and combinations. In this paper, I examine a set of conceptual and illustrative tools used by Dalton in developing his theory as well as in presenting it to the public in printed form as well as in his many public lectures. These tools—the concept of ‘atmosphere’, the pile (...)
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  38. added 2017-02-12
    Lavoisier's Technical Reports: 1768–1794.F. C. Storrs M. Sc F. R. I. C. DipBact - 2006 - Annals of Science 24 (3):179-197.
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  39. added 2017-02-12
    James Hutton and Phlogiston.Douglas Allchin - 1994 - Annals of Science 51 (6):615-635.
    James Hutton defended the doctrine of phlogiston in two lengthy dissertations 1792 and 1794. Empirical, biographical and disciplinary contexts jointly explain his position. Observationally, Hutton based his argument on facts about heat, light and the storage of energy, explicitly contrasting them to concerns about weight relationships. Hutton's intellectual development shows how he found these particular problems centrally relevant, and focusing on phlogiston indicates how his better known geology fits into more fundamental thinking about the natural economy. The resonance of Hutton's (...)
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  40. added 2017-02-12
    Joseph Black and the Absolute Levity of Phlogiston.Carleton E. Perrin - 1983 - Annals of Science 40 (2):109-137.
    For some fifteen years in his chemistry lectures in Edinburgh, Joseph Black taught that phlogiston possesses absolute levity. It was not an aberration on Black's part: he justified the notion on experimental grounds. Moreover, the existence of a nongravitating substance capable of entering the composition of bodies raised intriguing possibilities for uniting physical and chemical phenomena. The doctrine became something of a tradition in Edinburgh, but was subject to growing criticism, particulary with the growth of pneumatic chemistry. By the early (...)
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  41. added 2017-02-12
    Richard Kirwan, J. H. De Magellan, and the Early History of Specific Heat.E. L. Scott - 1981 - Annals of Science 38 (2):141-153.
    In the spring of 1780 there appeared a short work by J. H. de Magellan, published in London but written in French, which contained the first table of specific heats to appear in print. Magellan attributed the table to Richard Kirwan, but in none of his published works does Kirwan refer to it, so that the circumstances of its compilation are obscure. Kirwan's correspondence, however, provides evidence both of his association with Magellan and of his long concern with theories of (...)
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  42. added 2017-02-12
    Berthelot's Anti-Atomism: A 'Matter of Taste'?Mary Jo Nye - 1981 - Annals of Science 38 (5):585-590.
    The influential French chemist Marcelin Berthelot spoke against the use of Dalton's atomic theory and Avogadro's hypothesis in the second half of the nineteenth century. This paper argues that Berthelot conceded that atomism might be acceptable as a system of conventions, but he feared the power of such conventions in constructing a realistic picture of atoms which was not warranted empirically. Equally, Berthelot's anti-atomism was a last-ditch effort to assert the place of chemistry within the tradition of natural history and (...)
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  43. added 2017-02-12
    August Kekulé and the Benzene Problem.Oswald J. Walker B. Sc PhD - 1939 - Annals of Science 4 (1):34-46.
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  44. added 2017-02-11
    Mi Gyung Kim, Affinity, That Elusive Dream: A Genealogy of the Chemical Revolution.Bernard Joly - 2006 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 59 (2):358-360.
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  45. added 2017-02-11
    Positivism, Whiggism, and the Chemical Revolution: A Study in the Historiography of Chemistry.John G. McEvoy - 1997 - History of Science 35 (107):1-33.
  46. added 2017-02-11
    The Hypothesis of Avogadro (1811) and Ampere (1814): The Atom/Molecule Distinction and the Theory of Chemical Combination. [REVIEW]Myriam Scheidecker-Chevallier - 1997 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 50 (1).
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  47. added 2017-02-08
    The Nineteenth-Century Atomic Debates and the Dilemma of an 'Indifferent Hypothesis'.Mary Jo Nye - 1976 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 7 (3):245-268.
  48. added 2017-02-07
    Causal Concepts in Chemical Vernaculars.Rom Harré - 2010 - Foundations of Chemistry 12 (2):101-115.
    Though causality seems to have a natural place in chemical thought, the analysis of the underlying causal concepts requires attention to two different research styles. In Part One I attempt a classification and critical analysis of several philosophical accounts of causal concepts which appear to be very diverse. I summarize this diversity which ranges from causality as displayed in regular concomitances of types of events to causality as the activity of agents. Part Two is concerned with the analysis of contrasting (...)
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  49. added 2017-02-07
    Discussions. The Origin of the Atomic Theory.A. W. Benn - 1911 - Mind 20 (79):394-398.
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  50. added 2017-02-01
    Joan Baptista Van Helmont and the Question of Experimental Modernism.Steffen Ducheyne - unknown
    In this paper, I take up the question to what extent and in which sense we can conceive of Johannes Baptista Van Helmont’s (1579-1644) style of experimenting as “modern”. Connected to this question, I shall reflect upon what Van Helmont’s precise contribution to experimental practice was. I will argue - after analysing some of Van Helmont's experiments such as his tree-experiment, ice-experiment, and thermoscope experiment - that Van Helmont had a strong preference to locate experimental designs in places wherein variables (...)
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