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  1. L'enseignement Et l'Application de la Nouvelle Chimie au Mexique au Temps de Lavoisier.Patricia Aceves - 1995 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 48 (1):123-132.
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  2. The Lavoisier Revolution: Some Philosophical Aspects.F. Michael Akeroyd - 2002 - Kem. Ind 51:393-396.
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  3. James Hutton and Phlogiston.Douglas Allchin - 1994 - Annals of Science 51 (6):615-635.
    James Hutton defended the doctrine of phlogiston in two lengthy dissertations 1792 and 1794. Empirical, biographical and disciplinary contexts jointly explain his position. Observationally, Hutton based his argument on facts about heat, light and the storage of energy, explicitly contrasting them to concerns about weight relationships. Hutton's intellectual development shows how he found these particular problems centrally relevant, and focusing on phlogiston indicates how his better known geology fits into more fundamental thinking about the natural economy. The resonance of Hutton's (...)
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  4. Cathy Cobb: Magick, Mayhem, and Mavericks: The Spirited History of Physical Chemistry. [REVIEW]Shawn B. Allin - 2003 - Foundations of Chemistry 5 (3):249-252.
  5. On Books and Chemical Elements.Santiago Alvarez, Joaquim Sales & Miquel Seco - 2008 - Foundations of Chemistry 10 (2):79-100.
    The history of the classification of chemical elements is reviewed from the point of view of a bibliophile. The influence that relevant books had on the development of the periodic table and, conversely, how it was incorporated into textbooks, treatises and literary works, with an emphasis on the Spanish bibliography are analyzed in this paper. The reader will also find unexpected connections of the periodic table with the Bible or the architect Buckminster Fuller.
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  6. The Early History of Chemistry Professor J. R. Partington, M.B.E., D.Sc.: Origins and Development of Applied Chemistry. Pp. Xii + 597. London, New York, Toronto: Longmans, 1935. Cloth, 45s. [REVIEW]K. C. Bailey - 1935 - The Classical Review 49 (06):239-.
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  7. Encapsulating Knowledge: The Direct Reading Spectrometer. [REVIEW]Davis Baird - 2000 - Foundations of Chemistry 2 (1):5-46.
    The direct reading emission spectrometer was developed during the1940s. By substituting photo-multiplier tubes and electronics forphotographic film spectrograms, the interpretation of special lineswith a densitometer was avoided. Instead, the instrument providedthe desired information concerning percentage concentration ofelements of interest directly on a dial. Such instruments `de-skill' the job of making such measurements. They do this by encapsulatingin the instrument the skills previously employed by the analyst,by `skilling' the instrument. This paper presents a history of thedevelopment of the Dow Chemical/Baird Associates (...)
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  8. Van Helmont’s Hybrid Ontology and its Influence on the Chemical Interpretation of Spirit and Ferment.Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino - 2016 - Foundations of Chemistry 18 (2):103-112.
    This essay proposes to discuss the manner in which Jan Baptista van Helmont helped to transform the Neoplatonic notions of vital spirit and of ferment by giving these notions an unambiguously chemical interpretation, thereby influencing the eventual naturalization of these ideas in the work of late seventeenth century chymists. This chemical interpretation of vital spirit and ferment forms part of Helmont’s hybrid ontology, which fuses a corpuscular conception of minima naturalia with a non-corporeal conception of semina rerum. For Helmont, chemical (...)
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  9. From Corpuscles to Elements: Chemical Ontologies From Van Helmont to Lavoisier.Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino - 2014 - In Lee McIntyre & Eric Scerri (eds.), Philosophy of Chemistry: Growth of a New Discipline. Springer. pp. 141-154.
  10. The Relevance of Boyle's Chemical Philosophy for Contemporary Philosophy of Chemistry.Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino - 2013 - In Jean-Pierre Llored (ed.), The Philosophy of Chemistry: Practices, Methodologies, and Concepts.
  11. The Ontological Function of First-Order and Second-Order Corpuscles in the Chemical Philosophy of Robert Boyle: The Redintegration of Potassium Nitrate.Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino - 2012 - Foundations of Chemistry 14 (3):221-234.
    Although Boyle has been regarded as a champion of the seventeenth century Cartesian mechanical philosophy, I defend the position that Boyle’s views conciliate between a strictly mechanistic conception of fundamental matter and a non-reductionist conception of chemical qualities. In particular, I argue that this conciliation is evident in Boyle’s ontological distinction between fundamental corpuscles endowed with mechanistic properties and higher-level corpuscular concretions endowed with chemical properties. Some of these points have already been acknowledged by contemporary scholars, and I actively engage (...)
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  12. Ontological Tensions in Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century Chemistry: Between Mechanism and Vitalism.Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino - 2011 - Foundations of Chemistry 13 (3):173-186.
    The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries marks a period of transition between the vitalistic ontology that had dominated Renaissance natural philosophy and the Early Modern mechanistic paradigm endorsed by, among others, the Cartesians and Newtonians. This paper will focus on how the tensions between vitalism and mechanism played themselves out in the context of sixteenth and seventeenth century chemistry and chemical philosophy, particularly in the works of Paracelsus, Jan Baptista Van Helmont, Robert Fludd, and Robert Boyle. Rather than argue that these (...)
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  13. Ontological Tensions in 16th and 17th Century Chemistry: Between Mechanism and Vitalism.Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino - unknown
    The 16th and 17th centuries marked a period of transition from the vitalistic ontology that had dominated Renaissance natural philosophy to the Early Modern mechanistic paradigm endorsed by, among others, the Cartesians and Newtonians. This paper focuses on how the tensions between vitalism and mechanism played themselves out in the context of 16th and 17th century chemistry and chemical philosophy. The paper argues that, within the fields of chemistry and chemical philosophy, the significant transition that culminated in the 18th century (...)
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  14. Scientific Explanation in the History of Chemistry: The Priestley-Lavoisier Debate.Prajit Kumar Basu - 1992 - Dissertation, The University of Iowa
    In this dissertation, I attempt to understand Joseph Priestley's scientific beliefs. I describe his scientific practices, for the purpose of showing how they shed light on two key issues in philosophy of science: scientific explanation and hypothesis confirmation. I discuss these matters in the historical context of the eighteenth-century Chemical Revolution. ;In the first chapter, I discuss Priestley's view of causation and reconstruct his account of explanation as a species of what is now called 'contrastive' explanation. A contrastive explanation attempts (...)
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  15. Discussions. The Origin of the Atomic Theory.A. W. Benn - 1911 - Mind 20 (79):394-398.
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  16. Eaux Et Mesures. Éclairages Sur l'Itinéraire Intellectuel du Jeune Lavoisier/Water and Measuring: Views on the Intellectual Itinerary of the Young Lavoisier.Bernadette Bensaude Vincent - 1995 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 48 (1):49-70.
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  17. Lavoisier: Memoires d'Une Revolution.B. Bensaude-Vincent & M. Crosland - 1995 - Annals of Science 52 (1):86-86.
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  18. Chemistry, an Ontology-Free Science?Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent - unknown
    It is often assumed that chemistry was a typical positivistic science as long as chemists used atomic and molecular models as mere fictions and denied any concern with their real existence. Even when they use notions such as molecular orbitals chemists do not reify them and often claim that they are mere models or instrumental artefacts. However a glimpse on the history of chemistry in the longue durée suggests that such denials of the ontological status of chemical entities do not (...)
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  19. Book Review: Marco Beretta (Ed.): "Lavoisier in Perspective", München 2005. [REVIEW]Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent - 2005 - Hyle 11 (2):167 - 168.
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  20. Water and Measuring: Views on the Intellectual Itinerary of the Young Lavoisier.Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent - 1995 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 48 (1):49-70.
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  21. A View Of The Chemical Revolution Through Contemporary Textbooks: Lavoisier, Fourcroy and Chaptal.Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent - 1990 - British Journal for the History of Science 23 (4):435-460.
    Scientific textbooks are often said to deliver a stereotyped kind of knowledge, which conceals rather than reveals the real making of science. They may, however, alternatively be regarded as of peculiar interest for historians of science. An over-mechanical application of the Kuhnian concepts of ‘scientific revolution’ and ‘normal science’ can lead to the neglect of the internal dynamics of ‘normal science’. Scientific textbooks may provide a better understanding of the process of normalization in science.
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  22. Between Economics and Chemistry: Lavoisier's and Le Chatelier's Notions of Equilibrium.Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent & Valeria Mosini - unknown
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  23. Antoine Lavoisier.Oeuvres de Lavoisier: Correspondance. Volume 7:1792–1794. Edited by, Patrice Bret. Foreword by, Henri Kagan. Xv + 587 Pp., Illus., Tables, Apps., Index. Paris: Académie des Sciences, 2012. €70. [REVIEW]Marco Beretta - 2015 - Isis 106 (3):724-726.
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  24. Book Review: Lavoisier in Italia. [REVIEW]Bertomeu Sánchez José Ramón - 2004 - Foundations of Chemistry 6 (2):191-195.
  25. Lavoisier’s “Reflections on Phlogiston” II: On the Nature of Heat.Nicholas W. Best - 2016 - Foundations of Chemistry 18 (1):3-13.
    Having refuted the phlogiston theory, Lavoisier uses this second portion of his essay to expound his new theory of combustion, based on the oxygen principle. He gives a mechanistic account of thermodynamic phenomena in terms of a subtle fluid and its ability to penetrate porous bodies. He uses this hypothetical fluid to explain volume changes, heat capacity and latent heat. Beyond the three types of combustion that he distinguishes and defines, Lavoisier also explains other chemical sources of heat, such as (...)
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  26. What Was Revolutionary About the Chemical Revolution?Nicholas W. Best - 2016 - In Eric Scerri & Grant Fisher (eds.), Essays in the Philosophy of Chemistry. Oxford University Press. pp. 37-59.
    Lavoisier and his allies should be regarded as philosophers of chemistry, for they took it upon themselves to carry out a scientific revolution. Inspired by enlightenment philosophy, they introduced new assumptions, apparatus and methods of experimentation. They provided a linguistic framework that would ensure These reforms, as much as any theoretical changes, are what make this period revolutionary. Moreover, by reading these scientists as philosophers of chemistry, we see that the Chemical Revolution was in many ways more revolutionary than Thomas (...)
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  27. Lavoisier’s "Reflections on Phlogiston" I: Against Phlogiston Theory.Nicholas W. Best - 2015 - Foundations of Chemistry 17 (2):137-151.
    This seminal paper, which marks a turning point of the chemical revolution, is presented for the first time in a complete English translation. In this first half Lavoisier undermines phlogiston chemistry by arguing that his French contemporaries had replaced Stahl’s original theory with radically different systems that conceptualised the phlogiston principle in completely incompatible ways. He refutes their claims by showing that these later models were riddled with inconsistencies as to phlogiston’s weight, its ability to penetrate glass and its role (...)
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  28. Discussion of Professor F. A. Paneth's Second Article.G. W. Scott Blair - 1963 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 14 (53):40-40.
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  29. Ronald J. Gillespie and Paul L. A. Popelier: Chemical Bonding and Molecular Geometry: From Lewis to Electron Densities. [REVIEW]John E. Bloor - 2002 - Foundations of Chemistry 4 (3):241-247.
  30. Kuhn and the Chemical Revolution: A Re-Assessment. [REVIEW]Geoffrey Blumenthal - 2013 - Foundations of Chemistry 15 (1):93-101.
    A recent paper by Hoyningen-Huene argues that the Chemical Revolution is an excellent example of the success of Kuhn’s theory. This paper gives a succinct account of some counter-arguments and briefly refers to some further existing counter-arguments. While Kuhn’s theory does have a small number of more or less successful elements, it has been widely recognised that in general Kuhn’s theory is a “preformed and relatively inflexible framework” (1962, p. 24) which does not fit particular historical examples well; this paper (...)
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  31. The Phlogistic Role of Heat in the Chemical Revolution and the Origins of Kirwan's 'Ingenious Modifications… Into the Theory of Phlogiston'.Victor Boantza - 2008 - Annals of Science 65 (3):309-338.
    Summary Contrary to common belief, Lavoisier's greatest phlogistic rival was not Joseph Priestley but Richard Kirwan, a fact that was firmly recognized by both the Lavoisians as well as Priestley himself. During the 1780s, which saw the unprecedented rise of the chemistry of air(s), Kirwan's ?ingenious modifications?into the theory of phlogiston?, in Mme. Lavoisier's words, became the most dominant alternative to the revisionist pneumatic interpretations of the French. A genealogical contextualization of Kirwan's phlogistic contributions, the circumstances of their emergence and (...)
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  32. The ‘Absolute Existence’ of Phlogiston: The Losing Party's Point of View.Victor Boantza & Ofer Gal - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Science 44 (3):317-342.
    Long after its alleged demise, phlogiston was still presented, discussed and defended by leading chemists. Even some of the leading proponents of the new chemistry admitted its ‘absolute existence’. We demonstrate that what was defended under the title ‘phlogiston’ was no longer a particular hypothesis about combustion and respiration. Rather, it was a set of ontological and epistemological assumptions and the empirical practices associated with them. Lavoisier's gravimetric reduction, in the eyes of the phlogistians, annihilated the autonomy of chemistry together (...)
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  33. Three Interviews.Miro Brada - manuscript
    To support my Phd theses and results of my grant research in 1999, I asked 1) prominent chemist Antonín Holý, author of substances to treat hepatitis and HIV, about the indivisibility of the art and science (published in Slovak Narodna Obroda and Czech blisty,cz), 2) the distinguished economist William Baumol about the alternative activities (published in Slovak Nove Slovo, Czech Respekt and blisty.cz), 3) Nobel Laureate Clive Granger about the significance of the economics (published in 2004 in Czech weekly Tyden). (...)
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  34. Discussion of Professor F. A. Paneth's Second Article.John Bradley - 1963 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 14 (53):39-40.
  35. Discussion of Professor Paneth's Article.John Bradley - 1962 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (52):316-317.
  36. Débats Et Chantiers Actuels Autour de Lavoisier Et de la Révolution Chimique. Introduction./Lavoisier and the Chemical Revolution: Current Points of Debate and Work in Progress. Introduction. [REVIEW]Patrice Bret - 1995 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 48 (1):3-8.
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  37. Chemical Atomism in the Nineteenth Century: From Dalton to Cannizzaro. [REVIEW]W. H. Brock - 1985 - British Journal for the History of Science 18 (3):345-347.
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  38. Affinity and Matter. Elements of Chemical Philosophy 1800–1865. [REVIEW]John Brooke - 1973 - British Journal for the History of Science 6 (3):329-330.
  39. Chemical Atomism: A Case Study in Confirmation and Ontology.Joshua D. K. Brown - 2015 - Synthese 192 (2):453-485.
    Quine, taking the molecular constitution of matter as a paradigmatic example, offers an account of the relation between theory confirmation and ontology. Elsewhere, he deploys a similar ontological methodology to argue for the existence of mathematical objects. Penelope Maddy considers the atomic/molecular theory in more historical detail. She argues that the actual ontological practices of science display a positivistic demand for “direct observation,” and that fulfillment of this demand allows us to distinguish molecules and other physical objects from mathematical abstracta. (...)
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  40. The Caloric Theory of Gases From Lavoisier to Regnault. [REVIEW]Stephen Brush - 1972 - British Journal for the History of Science 6 (2):218-220.
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  41. The Platinum Pyrometers of Louis Bernard Guyton de Morveau, F.R.S.J. A. Chaldecott - 1972 - Annals of Science 28 (4):347-368.
    As we have seen, it was clearly Guyton's intention, in 1808, to supply details of his improved platinum pyrometer, and he did submit a drawing of the instrument at the meeting of the Class in December 1810. It would seem that on that occasion he did not supply those details which are to be found in the fourth, unpublished, part of the ‘Essay’. The existence of a text fit to be sent to the printer, and the execution of a drawing (...)
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  42. Klein on the Origin of the Concept of Chemical Compound.Alan Chalmers - 2012 - Foundations of Chemistry 14 (1):37-53.
    Ursula Klein has argued that Geoffroy’s table of chemical affinities, published in 1718, marked the emergence of the concepts of chemical compound and chemical combination central to chemistry. In this paper her position is summarised and then modified to render it immune to criticism that has been levelled against it. The essentials of Geoffroy’s chemistry are clarified and adapted to Klein’s picture by way of a detailed comparison of it with Boyle’s corpuscular chemistry that proceeded Geoffroy’s by over half a (...)
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  43. Historical Teaching of Atomic and Molecular Structure.José Antonio Chamizo & Andoni Garritz - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 343-374.
    Besides the presentation and conclusions, the chapter is divided into two equally important sections. The first one describes the modern development of atomic and molecular structure, emphasising some of the philosophical problems that have been taken, and those that have to be faced in its understanding. The second discusses the alternative conceptions and difficulties of students of different educational levels and also the different approaches to its historical or philosophical teaching. Finally, we recognise the necessity for science teachers to assume (...)
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  44. The Hidden History of Phlogiston: How Philosophical Failure Can Generate Historiographical Refinement.Hasok Chang - 2010 - Hyle 16 (2):47 - 79.
    Historians often feel that standard philosophical doctrines about the nature and development of science are not adequate for representing the real history of science. However, when philosophers of science fail to make sense of certain historical events, it is also possible that there is something wrong with the standard historical descriptions of those events, precluding any sensible explanation. If so, philosophical failure can be useful as a guide for improving historiography, and this constitutes a significant mode of productive interaction between (...)
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  45. Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Quantum Chemistry.Hasok Chang, Jeremiah James, Paul Needham, Kostas Gavroglu & Ana Simões - 2013 - Metascience 22 (3):523-544.
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  46. Kant’s Reception of Lavoisier’s ‘New Chemistry’. [REVIEW]Marco Ciardi - 2000 - Hyle 6:193-194.
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  47. On the Origin of Tetrahedral Carbon: A Case for Philosophy of Chemistry? [REVIEW]Pedro Cintas - 2002 - Foundations of Chemistry 4 (2):149-161.
    This essay analyzes the historical and philosophical context that led to the basic concepts of stereochemistry proposed by Van’t Hoff and Le Bel. Although it is now well established that the key idea of tetrahedral carbon, and in general a geometric view of matter, was pioneered by other chemists, Van’t Hoff and Le Bel used this idea to solve the puzzle of optical activity, thereby establishing a direct linkage between structure and physical properties. It is also interesting to note that (...)
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  48. Epistemology of a Believing Historian: Making Sense of Duhem's Anti-Atomism.Klodian Coko - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 50:71-82.
    Pierre Duhem’s (1861-1916) lifelong opposition to 19th century atomic theories of matter traditionally has been attributed to his conventionalist and/or positivist philosophy of science. Relatively recently, this traditional view has been challenged by the claim that Duhem’s opposition to atomism was due to the precarious state of atomic theories during the beginning of the 20th century. In this paper I present some of the difficulties with both the traditional and the new interpretation of Duhem’s opposition to atomism and provide a (...)
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  49. Lavoisier and the Chemistry of Life. An Exploration of Scientific Creativity. [REVIEW]N. Coley - 1987 - British Journal for the History of Science 20 (1):85-86.
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  50. The Enlightement of Matter-the Definition of Chemistry From Agricola to Lavoisier-Beretta, M.M. P. Crosland - 1995 - Annals of Science 52 (1):94-95.
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