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  1. Governing the World of Wakefulness: The Exploration of Alertness, Performance, and Brain Activity with the Help of “Stay‐Awake‐Men” (1884–1964). [REVIEW]Hannah Ahlheim - 2013 - Anthropology of Consciousness 24 (2):117-136.
    In January 1959, famous radio DJ Peter Tripp stayed awake for 200 hours in a glass booth on Times Square, exposing his weakening body and distracted sleepless mind to the public. Tripp's playing with the borderlines of consciousness was a media attraction, but the DJ also served as a guinea pig for scientific research. From the late 19th century on, several experts had tried to explore the world of wakefulness by observing stay-awake-men. With their help, researchers tested methods of measuring (...)
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  2. Computation in Cognitive Science: It is Not All About Turing-Equivalent Computation.Kenneth Aizawa - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (3):227-236.
    One account of the history of computation might begin in the 1930's with some of the work of Alonzo Church, Alan Turing, and Emil Post. One might say that this is where something like the core concept of computation was first formally articulated. Here were the first attempts to formalize an informal notion of an algorithm or effective procedure by which a mathematician might decide one or another logico-mathematical question. As each of these formalisms was shown to compute the same (...)
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  3. Freud Did Not Anticipate Modern Reconstructive Memory Processes.Allen Esterson & Stephen J. Ceci - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):517-518.
    In this commentary, we challenge the claim that Freud's thinking anticipated Bartlettian reconstructive theories of remembering. Erdelyi has ignored important divergences that demonstrate it is not the case that “The constructions and reconstructions of Freud and Bartlett are the same but for motive” (target article, sect. 5).
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  4. Work and Play: Collected Papers on the Philosophy of Psychology, 1939/1962.Rudolf Allers - 2008 - Marquette University Press.
    Notes on Rudolf Allers and his thought -- Introduction -- Cause in psychology -- Irresistible impulses -- Vis cogitativa and evaluation -- The cognitive aspect of emotion -- The limitations of medical psychology -- Intuition and abstraction -- Philosophia-philanthropia -- Ethics and anthropology -- The dialectics of freedom -- Psychiatry and the role of personal belief -- Reflections on co-operation and communication -- Ontoanalysis : a new trend in psychiatry -- Work and play -- The Freud legend.
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  5. Nineteenth Century Pioneers in the Study of Dissociation: William James and Psychical Research.Carlos S. Alvarado & Stanley Krippner - 2010 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (11-12):11-12.
    Following recent trends in the historiography of psychology and psychiatry we argue that psychical research was an important influence in the development of concepts about dissociation. To illustrate this point, we discuss American psychologist and philosopher William James's writings about mediumship, secondary personalities, and hypnosis. Some of James's work on the topic took place in the context of research conducted by the American Society for Psychical Research, such as his early work with the medium Leonora E. Piper . James Following (...)
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  6. Contested Psychiatric Ontology and Feminist Critique 'Female Sexual Dysfunction'and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual.Katherine Angel - 2012 - History of the Human Sciences 25 (4):3-24.
    In this article I discuss the emergence of Female Sexual Dysfunction (FSD) within American psychiatry and beyond in the postwar period, setting out what I believe to be important and suggestive questions neglected in existing scholarship. Tracing the nomenclature within successive editions of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), I consider the reification of the term ‘FSD’, and the activism and scholarship that the rise of the category has occasioned. I suggest that analysis of FSD benefits from (...)
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  7. Die Experimentelle Analyse des Bewußtseins Bei Vittorio Benussi.Mauro Antonelli (ed.) - 1994 - Rodopi.
    Der Triestiner Vittorio Benussi , Mitglied der Grazer gegenstandstheoretischen und psychologischen Schule um Alexius Meinong, war einer der bedeutendsten Experimentalpsychologen seiner Zeit. Seine Pionierleistungen auf dem Gebiet der experimentellen Gestaltpsychologie gerieten jedoch bald durch die fortschreitende Durchsetzung der Berliner Schule der Gestalttheorie in Vergessenheit, so daß sein Werk bis heute weitgehend unbekannt geblieben ist.Benussis wissenschaftliche Tätigkeit, die sich durch eine streng experimentelle Vorgangsweise auszeichnet, erweist sich rückblickend als fruchtbarer Anknüpfungspunkt für die zeitgenössische Kognitionswissenschaft. Dies ermöglicht eine Neubewertung seiner wissenschaftlichen Arbeit (...)
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  8. Organizing the Brain's Diversities.Michael A. Arbib & Peter Érdi - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):551-565.
    We clarify the arguments in Neural organization: Structure, function, and dynamics, acknowledge important contributions cited by our critics, and respond to their criticisms by charting directions for further development of our integrated approach to theoretical and empirical studies of neural organization. We first discuss functional organization in general (behavior versus cognitive functioning, the need to study body and brain together, function in ontogeny and phylogeny) and then focus on schema theory (noting that schema theory is not just a top-down theory (...)
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  9. Individual Differences in Time Perspective Predict Autonoetic Experience.Kathleen M. Arnold, Kathleen B. McDermott & Karl K. Szpunar - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):712-719.
    Tulving posited that the capacity to remember is one facet of a more general capacity—autonoetic consciousness. Autonoetic consciousness was proposed to underlie the ability for “mental time travel” both into the past and into the future to envision potential future episodes . The current study examines whether individual differences can predict autonoetic experience. Specifically, the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory was administered to 133 undergraduate students, who also rated phenomenological experiences accompanying autobiographical remembering and episodic future thinking. Scores on two of (...)
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  10. Review of Blackmore. [REVIEW]Erik C. Banks - 2012 - Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 48 (4):395-397.
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  11. Ernst Mach and the Episode of the Monocular Depth Sensations.Erik C. Banks - 2001 - Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 37 (4):327-348.
    A look at Mach's work on monocular stereoscopy with relation to Mach Bands and the sensation of space.
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  12. Book Review: Portrait of the Psychiatrist as a Young Man: The Early Writing and Work of RD Laing, 1927–60. [REVIEW]Peter Barham - 2012 - History of the Human Sciences 25 (4):125-130.
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  13. The Philospohical Background and Scientific Legacy of E. B. Titchener's Psychology: Understanding Introspectionism.Christian Beenfeldt - 2013 - Springer.
    ​This volume offers a new understanding of Titchener’s influential system of psychology popularly known as introspectionism, structuralism and as classical introspective psychology. Adopting a new perspective on introspectionism and seeking to assess the reasons behind its famous implosion, this book reopens and rewrites the chapter in the history of early scientific psychology pertaining to the nature of E. B. Titchener’s psychological system. -/- Arguing against the view that Titchener’s system was undone by an overreliance on introspection, the author explains how (...)
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  14. The First Modern Battle for Consciousness: J.B. Watson's Rejection of Mental Images.David Berman & W. Lyons - 2007 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (11):4-26.
    This essay investigates the influences that led J.B. Watson to change from being a student in an introspectionist laboratory at Chicago to being the founder of systematic (or radical) behaviourism. Our focus is the crucial period, 1913-1914, when Watson struggled to give a convincing behaviourist account of mental imaging, which he considered to be the greatest obstacle to his behaviourist programme. We discuss in detail the evidence for and against the view that, at least eventually, Watson rejected outright the very (...)
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  15. The Rise and Decline of Character: Humoral Psychology in Ancient and Early Modern Medical Theory.J. Bos - 2009 - History of the Human Sciences 22 (3):29-50.
    Humoralism, the view that the human body is composed of a limited number of elementary fluids, is one of the most characteristic aspects of ancient medicine. The psychological dimension of humoral theory in the ancient world has thus far received a relatively small amount of scholarly attention. Medical psychology in the ancient world can only be correctly understood by relating it to psychological thought in other fields, such as ethics and rhetoric. The concept that ties these various domains together is (...)
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  16. Sentient Nature and Human Economy: The 'Human'science of Early Nationalökonomie.Richard Bowler - 2005 - History of the Human Sciences 18 (1):23-54.
    Over the course of the 18th century, scholarly examinations of animal nature and behavior rejected ‘mechanical’, overly deterministic hypotheses, suggesting instead that animal action proceeded from a psycho-physiological sentient capacity. Though the ultimate causes of this capacity appeared to elude explanation, they expressed themselves in behaviors that scholars described and analyzed. Interpretations of sentient, animal nature also bore on the contemporary understanding of human nature: like animals, human beings were also considered to possess a psycho-physiological nature that motivated them to (...)
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  17. Freud's Dual Process Theory and the Place of the a-Rational.Linda A. W. Brakel & Howard Shevrin - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):527-528.
    In this commentary on Stanovich & West (S&W) we call attention to two points: (1) Freud's original dual process theory, which antedates others by some seventy-five years, deserves inclusion in any consideration of dual process theories. His concepts of primary and secondary processes (Systems 1 and 2, respectively) anticipate significant aspects of current dual process theories and provide an explanation for many of their characteristics. (2) System 1 is neither rational nor irrational, but instead a-rational. Nevertheless, both the a-rational System (...)
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  18. Functional Clothes for the Emperor.Gary L. Brase - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):328-329.
    A more complete and balanced theoretical framework for social psychology, as recommended in the target article, must include functional explanations of processes – moving beyond enumerations of processes and their properties. These functional explanations are at a different, but complementary, level from process descriptions. The further advancement of social psychology relies on the incorporation of such multilevel explanations.
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  19. Readings in the History and Systems of Psychology.James F. Brennan - 1994
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  20. History and Systems of Psychology.James F. Brennan - 1982
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  21. History of Psychology. Edited and Abridged by R.S. Peters.George Sidney Brett - 1967 - M.I.T. Press.
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  22. Brett's History of Psychology.George Sidney Brett - 1953 - Cambridge: Mass., M.I.T. Press.
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  23. History of Psychology.George Sidney Brett - 1953 - New York: Macmillan.
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  24. A History of Psychology.George Sidney Brett - 1912 - Thoemmes Press.
    'the whole work is remarkably fresh, vivid and attractively written psychologists will be grateful that a work of this kind has been done ... by one who has the scholarship, science, and philosophical training that are requisite for the task' - Mind This renowned three-volume collection records chronologically the steps by which psychology developed from the time of the early Greek thinkers and the first writings on the nature of the mind, through to the 1920s and such modern preoccupations as (...)
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  25. Psychoanalytic Facts as Unintended Institutional Facts.F. Buekens & M. Boudry - 2012 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (2):239-269.
    We present an inference to the best explanation of the immense cultural success of Freudian psychoanalysis as a hermeneutic method. We argue that an account of psychoanalytic facts as products of unintended declarative speech acts explains this phenomenon. Our argument connects diverse, seemingly independent characteristics of psychoanalysis that have been independently confirmed, and applies key features of John Searle’s and Eerik Lagerspetz’s theory of institutional facts to the psychoanalytic edifice. We conclude with a brief defence of the institutional approach against (...)
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  26. Slow and Fast Thinking, Historical-Cultural Psychology and Major Trends of Modern Epistemology: Unveiling a Fundamental Convergence.Nathalie Bulle - 2014 - Mind and Society 13 (1):149-166.
    There exists a fundamental convergence between some major trends of modern epistemology—as outlined, for instance, by Filmer Northrop and Henry Margenau—and the theories actually developed within sciences of the human mind where two types of thought—one implicit and, the other, explicit—tend to refer to two different lines of development. Moreover, these theories can find in the psychology of Lev Vygotsky some seminal hypotheses of a major importance. In order to highlight this convergence, we parallel the role played by structured conceptual (...)
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  27. A Neural-Network Interpretation of Selection in Learning and Behavior.José E. Burgos - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):531-533.
    In their account of learning and behavior, the authors define an interactor as emitted behavior that operates on the environment, which excludes Pavlovian learning. A unified neural-network account of the operant-Pavlovian dichotomy favors interpreting neurons as interactors and synaptic efficacies as replicators. The latter interpretation implies that single-synapse change is inherently Lamarckian.
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  28. Thomas Aquinas and Cognitive Therapy: An Exploration of the Promise of the Thomistic Psychology.Giuseppe Butera - 2010 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (4):347-366.
    In his classic introduction to the subject, Cognitive Therapy and the Emotional Disorders, Aaron Beck observes that “the philosophical underpinnings” of cognitive therapy’s (CT) approach to the emotional disorders “go back thousands of years, certainly to the time of the Stoics, who considered man’s conceptions (or misconceptions) of events rather than the events themselves as the key to his emotional upsets” (Beck 1976, 3). But beyond acknowledging that the stoics anticipated the central insight of CT, Beck has very little to (...)
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  29. Common Ground on Which to Approach the Origins of Higher Cognition.Richard W. Byrne & Anne E. Russon - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):709-717.
    Imitation research has been hindered by (1) overly molecular analyses of behaviour that ignore hierarchical structure, and (2) attempts to disqualify observational evidence. Program-level imitation is one of a range of cognitive skills for scheduling efficient novel behaviour, in particular, enabling an individual to purloin the organization of another's behaviour for its own. To do so, the individual must perceive the underlying hierarchical schedule of the fluid action it observes and must understand the local functions of subroutines within the overall (...)
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  30. Ralph Cudworth and the Theological Origins of Consciousness.Benjamin Carter - 2010 - History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):29-47.
    The English Neoplatonic philosopher Ralph Cudworth introduced the term ‘consciousness’ into the English philosophical lexicon. Cudworth uses the term to define the form and structure of cognitive acts, including acts of freewill. In this article I highlight the important role of theological disputes over the place and extent of human freewill within an overarching system of providence. Cudworth’s intellectual development can be understood in the main as an increasingly detailed and nuanced reaction to the strict voluntarist Calvinism that is typified (...)
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  31. Trundle-Bed Philosophy; Being a Critique Upon the Modern Cafeteria Method of Education and Pseudo-Scientific Behaviorism.Charles Henry Chase - 1927 - East Lansing, Mich., The Author.
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  32. Democratizing Mental Health Motherhood, Therapeutic Community and the Emergence of the Psychiatric Family at the Cassel Hospital in Post-Second World War Britain.Teri Chettiar - 2012 - History of the Human Sciences 25 (5):107-122.
    Shortly following the Second World War, and under the medical direction of ex-army psychiatrist T. F. Main, the Cassel Hospital for Functional Nervous Disorders emerged as a pioneering democratic ‘therapeutic community’ in the treatment of mental illness. This definitive movement away from conventional ‘custodial’ assumptions about the function of the psychiatric hospital initially grew out of a commitment to sharing therapeutic responsibility between patients and staff and to preserving patients’ pre-admission responsibilities and social identities. However, by the mid-1950s, hospital practices (...)
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  33. The Unconscious.Charles Manning Child (ed.) - 1928 - Freeport, N.Y., Books for Libraries Press.
    The beginnings of unity and order in living things, by C. M. Child.--On the structure of the unconscious, by K. Koffka.--The genesis of social reactions in the young child, by J. E. Anderson.--The unconscious of the behaviorist, by J. B. Watson.--The unconscious patterning of behavior in society by E. Sapir.--The configurations of personality, by W. I. Thomas.--The prenatal and early postnatal phenomena of consciousness, by M. E. Kenworthy.--Values in social psychology, by F. L. Wells.--Higher levels of mental integration, by W. (...)
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  34. The Reflexivity of Cognitive Science: The Scientist as Model of Human Nature.Cohen-Cole Jamie - 2005 - History of the Human Sciences 18 (4):107-139.
    This article examines how experimental psychology experienced a revolution as cognitive science replaced behaviorism in the mid-20th century. This transition in the scientific account of human nature involved making normal what had once been normative: borrowing ideas of democratic thinking from political culture and conceptions of good thinking from philosophy of science to describe humans as active, creatively thinking beings, rather than as organisms that simply respond to environmental conditions. Reflexive social and intellectual practices were central to this process as (...)
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  35. Some Limitations of Behaviorist and Computational Models of Mind.John Collier - unknown
    The purpose of this paper is to describe some limitations on scientific behaviorist and computational models of the mind. These limitations stem from the inability of either model to account for the integration of experience and behavior. Behaviorism fails to give an adequate account of felt experience, whereas the computational model cannot account for the integration of our behavior with the world. Both approaches attempt to deal with their limitations by denying that the domain outside their limits is a part (...)
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  36. Cognitive Control: Componential or Emergent?Richard P. Cooper - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):598-613.
    The past 25 years have witnessed an increasing awareness of the importance of cognitive control in the regulation of complex behavior. It now sits alongside attention, memory, language, and thinking as a distinct domain within cognitive psychology. At the same time it permeates each of these sibling domains. This introduction reviews recent work on cognitive control in an attempt to provide a context for the fundamental question addressed within this topic: Is cognitive control to be understood as resulting from the (...)
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  37. Explaining Norms and Norms Explained.David Danks & Frederick Eberhardt - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):86-87.
    Oaksford & Chater (O&C) aim to provide teleological explanations of behavior by giving an appropriate normative standard: Bayesian inference. We argue that there is no uncontroversial independent justification for the normativity of Bayesian inference, and that O&C fail to satisfy a necessary condition for teleological explanations: demonstration that the normative prescription played a causal role in the behavior's existence.
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  38. Interpreting the Internal Structure of a Connectionist Model of the Balance Scale Task.Michael R. W. Dawson & Corinne Zimmerman - 2003 - Brain and Mind 4 (2):129-149.
    One new tradition that has emerged from early research on autonomous robots is embodied cognitive science. This paper describes the relationship between embodied cognitive science and a related tradition, synthetic psychology. It is argued that while both are synthetic, embodied cognitive science is antirepresentational while synthetic psychology still appeals to representations. It is further argued that modern connectionism offers a medium for conducting synthetic psychology, provided that researchers analyze the internal representations that their networks develop. The paper then provides a (...)
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  39. Theory in Psychology: A Review Essay of Andre Kukla's Methods of Theoretical Psychology. [REVIEW]Huib Looren de Jong, Sacha Bem & Maurice Schouten - 2004 - Philosophical Psychology 17 (2):275 – 295.
    This review essay critically discusses Andre Kukla's Methods of theoretical psychology. It is argued that Kukla mistakenly tries to build his case for theorizing in psychology as a separate discipline on a dubious distinction between theory and observation. He then argues that the demise of empiricism implies a return of some form of rationalism, which entails an autonomous role for theorizing in psychology. Having shown how this theory-observation dichotomy goes back to traditional and largely abandoned ideas in epistemology, an alternative (...)
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  40. From Milgram to Zimbardo: The Double Birth of Postwar Psychology/Psychologization.Jan De Vos - 2010 - History of the Human Sciences 23 (5):156-175.
    Milgram’s series of obedience experiments and Zimbardo’s Stanford Prison Experiment are probably the two best-known psychological studies. As such, they can be understood as central to the broad process of psychologization in the postwar era. This article will consider the extent to which this process of psychologization can be understood as a simple overflow from the discipline of psychology to wider society or whether, in fact, this process is actually inextricably connected to the science of psychology as such. In so (...)
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  41. The Anatomy and Physiology of Mind: Hume's Vitalistic Account.Tamás Demeter - 2012 - In H. F. J. Horstmanshoff, H. King & C. Zittel (eds.), Blood, Sweat and Tears: The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe. Brill.
    In this paper I challenge the widely held view which associates Hume’s philosophy with mechanical philosophies of nature and particularly with Newton. This view presents Hume’s account of the human mind as passive receiver of impressions which bring into motion, from the outside, a mental machinery whose functioning is described in terms of mechanical causal principles. Instead, I propose an interpretation which suggests that for Hume the human mind is composed of faculties that can be characterized by their active contribution (...)
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  42. The Changing Reality of Modern Man: Essays in Honour of Jan Hendrik Van Den Berg. den Berg, H. J. & Dreyer Kruger (eds.) - 1985 - Humanities Press.
  43. Look Out for the Dirty Baby.Daniel C. Dennett - unknown
    Back and forth swings the pendulum. It is remarkable that Baars can claim that “many scientists now feel that radical behaviorists tossed out the baby with the bathwater” while not being able to see that his own efforts threaten to be an instance of the complementary overshooting–what we might call covering a nice clean baby with dualistic dirt . Yes indeed, radical behaviorism of Skinner’s variety fell from grace some years ago, with the so-called cognitive revolution, to be replaced by (...)
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  44. Thomistic Thought as a Metapsychological Meeting Ground.Eugene M. DeRobertis - 2010 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (4):367-372.
    Cognitive therapies are among the most popular forms of psychotherapy in the United States (e.g., Robins, Gosling & Craik 1999). It goes without saying that those seeking psychotherapeutic treatment are best served by a profession whose representatives thoughtfully examine their methods of choice. Giuseppe Butera’s article on cognitive therapy and Thomistic psychology is truly thoughtful, as he gives careful philosophical consideration to the basic premises of Aaron Beck’s cognitive approach to therapy. Accordingly, Butera’s work is a valuable contribution to the (...)
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  45. The Graphic Strategy: The Uses and Functions of Illustrations in Wundt's Grundzüge.Douwe Draaisma & Sarah De Rijcke - 2001 - History of the Human Sciences 14 (1):1-24.
    Illustrations played an important role in the articulation of Wundt’s experimental program. Focusing on the woodcuts of apparatus and experimental designs in the six editions of his Grundzüge der physiologischen Psychologie (published between 1873 and 1911), we investigate the uses and functions of illustrations in the experimental culture of the physiological and psychological sciences. We will first present some statistics on the increasing number of illustrations Wundt included in each new edition of his handbook. Next we will show how Wundt (...)
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  46. Where is Psychology Going? Structural Fault Lines Revealed by Psychologists' Use of Kuhn.Erin Driver-Linn - 2003 - American Psychologist 58:269-78.
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  47. Questioning Identities: Philosophy in Psychoanalytic Practice.Mary Lynne Ellis - 2010 - Karnac.
    In this new book, Mary Lynne Ellis and Noreen O'Connor move to the heart of 21st century intertwining of psychoanalytical and philosophical critical reflections ...
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  48. Slips of the Tongue.Kathleen Emmett - 1989 - Philosophical Psychology 2 (2):203-222.
    Abstract Freud's theory of slips of the tongue has been extensively criticized by Adolf Grunbaum and Edward Erwin. They argue that in an effort to make the theory plausible Freud relied on examples of speech errors that do not conform to his theoretical characterization of slips of the tongue. These examples have contributed to the impression that Freud's theory relies on a broader evidential base than it in fact does. Furthermore they argue that Freud has not established the existence of (...)
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  49. Introduction.Michel Ferrari - 2010 - History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):1-14.
    The history of the science of consciousness is difficult to trace because it involves an ongoing debate over the aims involved in the study of consciousness that historically engaged people working in a variety of different, often overlapping, philosophical projects. At least three main aims of these different projects can be identified: (1) providing an ultimate foundation for natural science; (2) providing an empirical study of experience; and (3) promoting human well-being by relieving suffering and encouraging human flourishing. Each of (...)
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  50. Wundt, Vygotsky and Bandura: A Cultural-Historical Science of Consciousness in Three Acts.Michel Ferrari, David K. Robinson & Anton Yasnitsky - 2010 - History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):95-118.
    This article looks at three historical efforts to coordinate the scientific study of biological and cultural aspects of human consciousness into a single comprehensive theory of human development that includes the evolution of the human body, cultural evolution and personal development: specifically, the research programs of Wilhelm Wundt, Lev Vygotsky and Albert Bandura. The lack of historical relations between these similar efforts is striking, and suggests that the effort to promote cultural and personal sources of consciousness arises as a natural (...)
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