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  1. Eugenics and IQ Testing.Aida Roige - 2014 - Eugenics Archives.
    Intelligence, genius and mental ability were a cluster of traits that received much attention in eugenics discourse. Intelligence was regarded as one of the good qualities superior men possessed, in turn beneficial for society as a whole. On the other hand, the socially problematic or unproductive were identified as being of inferior mental quality: “feeble-minded”. By and large, eugenicists thought that (1) intelligence was a unitary psychological trait that could be measured, being quantified as an intelligence quotient (IQ); (2) intelligence (...)
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  2. Introspecting in the 20th Century.Maja Spener - 2018 - In Amy Kind (ed.), Philosophy of Mind in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries. London: Rutledge. pp. 148-174.
  3. Deleuze e la psicologia. Per una scienza dell'ecceità. [REVIEW]Fabio Vergine - 2018 - Doppiozero 1.
    Discussione a partire dal libro di M. NICHTERLEIN e J. R. MORSS, Deleuze e la psicologia, a cura di Pietro Barbetta ed Enrico Valtellina, Raffaello Cortina, Milano 2017.
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  4. A Psicologia entre o longo passado e a curta história.Marcio Luiz - 2018 - Dissertatio 47:95-134.
    O presente trabalho pretende inserir a História da Psicologia dentro de um debate mais alargado, em torno das Histórias da Filosofia e das Ciências. Para isso, o objeto de análise é a célebre frase de Ebbinghaus, 'A Psicologia tem um longo passado, mas uma curta história', e toda a tradição de livros e textbooks decorrente dela, muito popular nos séculos XX e XXI. O trabalho analisará o texto de Ebbinghaus e seus compromissos decorrentes. Então realizará uma crítica a essa tradição, (...)
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  5. Michel Meulders, Helmholtz, des Lumières aux Neurosciences, Paris: Editions Odile Jacob, 2001. [REVIEW]Gabriel Finkelstein - 2002 - Journal of the History of the Neurosciences 11 (3):317-319.
  6. Daniel P. Todes, Pavlov’s Physiology Factory: Experiment, Interpretation, Laboratory Enterprise, Baltimore: John Hopkins, 2002. [REVIEW]Gabriel Finkelstein - 2005 - Journal of the History of the Neurosciences 14 (1):70-71.
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  7. The Behaviorisms of Skinner and Quine: Genesis, Development, and Mutual Influence.Sander Verhaegh - forthcoming - Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    B. F. Skinner and W. V. Quine, arguably the two most influential proponents of behaviorism in mid-twentieth century psychology and philosophy, are often considered to be brothers in arms. They were close friends, they had remarkably parallel careers, and they both identified as behaviorists. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the relation between the two. The question as to how the two influenced each other often comes up, but is standardly dealt with by rehearsing the few remarks on the issue (...)
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  8. Histórias das ciências e os “fundamentos históricos” da Psicologia.Marcio Luiz - 2018 - Temporalidades 10 (1):129-158.
    RESUMO: O presente texto põe algumas questões referentes à “história” dos fundamentos da Psicologia entre os séculos XIX e XX, mostrando como ocorrem ainda, em História da Psicologia, certos fatores controversos, muitos deles tributários de postulados filosóficos do século XIX, especialmente em torno do positivismo. O artigo concentra-se em mostrar, preliminarmente, de que forma a ruptura da Filosofia Natural e a ascensão da figura do “cientista” no século XIX ensejaram novos motivos de análise, dentre eles certo cientificismo que se impôs (...)
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  9. Helmholtz on Perceptual Properties.R. Brian Tracz - 2018 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 6 (3).
    Hermann von Helmholtz’s work on perceptual science had a fundamental impact on Neo-Kantian movements in the late nineteenth century, and his influence continues to be felt in psychology and analytic philosophy of perception. As is widely acknowledged, Helmholtz denied that we can perceive mind-independent properties of external objects, a view I label Ignorance. Given his commitment to Ignorance, Helmholtz might seem to be committed to a subjectivism according to which we only perceive properties of our own representations. Against this, I (...)
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  10. Tad Schmaltz, Early Modern Cartesianisms: Dutch and French Constructions.Spink Aaron - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
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  11. Structural Model.Kelso Cratsley - 2017 - In V. Zeigler-Hill & T. Shackelford (eds.), Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences. Springer. pp. 1-5.
    The mind is not unitary. Despite enduring Cartesian influences, the idea that mental activity is the work of an assortment of processes remains one of the more plausible guiding assumptions of psychological research. Freud endorsed a distinctive variant of this broader explanatory commitment. Beginning with his earlier metapsychological works, he slowly developed a view of the mind as a collection of closely related systems. Famously, these ultimately became known as the id, ego, and super-ego. Like much of Freud’ s work, (...)
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  12. “The ‘Physiology of the Understanding’ and the ‘Mechanics of the Soul’: Reflections on Some Phantom Philosophical Projects”.Charles T. Wolfe - 2016 - Quaestio 16:3-25.
    In reflecting on the relation between early empiricist conceptions of the mind and more experimentally motivated materialist philosophies of mind in the mid-eighteenth century, I suggest that we take seriously the existence of what I shall call ‘phantom philosophical projects’. A canonical empiricist like Locke goes out of his way to state that their project to investigate and articulate the ‘logic of ideas’ is not a scientific project: “I shall not at present meddle with the Physical consideration of the Mind” (...)
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  13. The Philospohical Background and Scientific Legacy of E. B. Titchener's Psychology: Understanding Introspectionism.Christian Beenfeldt - 2013 - Springer.
    ​This volume offers a new understanding of Titchener’s influential system of psychology popularly known as introspectionism, structuralism and as classical introspective psychology. Adopting a new perspective on introspectionism and seeking to assess the reasons behind its famous implosion, this book reopens and rewrites the chapter in the history of early scientific psychology pertaining to the nature of E. B. Titchener’s psychological system. -/- Arguing against the view that Titchener’s system was undone by an overreliance on introspection, the author explains how (...)
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  14. The Unconscious: A Conceptual Analysis.Alasdair Chalmers MacIntyre - 2004 - Routledge.
    This edition includes a substantial new preface by the author, in which he discusses repression, determinism, transference, and practical rationality, and offers a comparison of Aristotle and Lacan on the concept of desire. MacIntyre takes the opportunity to reflect both on the reviews and criticisms of the first edition and also on his own philosophical stance.
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  15. Behavior, Knowledge, Fact. [REVIEW]E. M. A. - 1936 - Journal of Philosophy 33 (6):165-166.
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  16. History and Systems of Psychology.James F. Brennan - 1982
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  17. Readings in the History and Systems of Psychology.James F. Brennan - 1994
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  18. Outlines of Psychology, Tr. By E.B. Titchener.Oswald Külpe & Edward Bradford Titchener - 1895
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  19. Franz Brentano on the Ontology of Mind.Kevin Mulligan & Barry Smith - 1985 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 45 (4):627-644.
    This is a review article on Franz Brentano’s Descriptive Psychology published in 1982. We provide a detailed exposition of Brentano’s work on this topic, focusing on the unity of consciousness, the modes of connection and the types of part, including separable parts, distinctive parts, logical parts and what Brentano calls modificational quasi-parts. We also deal with Brentano’s account of the objects of sensation and the experience of time.
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  20. History of Psychology. Edited and Abridged by R.S. Peters.George Sidney Brett - 1967 - M.I.T. Press.
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  21. In the Eye's Mind: Vision and the Helmholtz-Hering Controversy by R. Steven Turner. [REVIEW]Gary Hatfield - 1995 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 86 (4):664-665.
    Review of: R. Steven Turner, In the Eye's Mind: Vision and the Helmholtz-Hering Controversy. xiv + 338 pp., frontis., illus., figs., tables, bibl., index. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1994.
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  22. Die Experimentelle Analyse des Bewußtseins Bei Vittorio Benussi.Mauro Antonelli (ed.) - 1994 - Rodopi.
    Der Triestiner Vittorio Benussi , Mitglied der Grazer gegenstandstheoretischen und psychologischen Schule um Alexius Meinong, war einer der bedeutendsten Experimentalpsychologen seiner Zeit. Seine Pionierleistungen auf dem Gebiet der experimentellen Gestaltpsychologie gerieten jedoch bald durch die fortschreitende Durchsetzung der Berliner Schule der Gestalttheorie in Vergessenheit, so daß sein Werk bis heute weitgehend unbekannt geblieben ist.Benussis wissenschaftliche Tätigkeit, die sich durch eine streng experimentelle Vorgangsweise auszeichnet, erweist sich rückblickend als fruchtbarer Anknüpfungspunkt für die zeitgenössische Kognitionswissenschaft. Dies ermöglicht eine Neubewertung seiner wissenschaftlichen Arbeit (...)
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  23. Slow and Fast Thinking, Historical-Cultural Psychology and Major Trends of Modern Epistemology: Unveiling a Fundamental Convergence.Nathalie Bulle - 2014 - Mind and Society 13 (1):149-166.
    There exists a fundamental convergence between some major trends of modern epistemology—as outlined, for instance, by Filmer Northrop and Henry Margenau—and the theories actually developed within sciences of the human mind where two types of thought—one implicit and, the other, explicit—tend to refer to two different lines of development. Moreover, these theories can find in the psychology of Lev Vygotsky some seminal hypotheses of a major importance. In order to highlight this convergence, we parallel the role played by structured conceptual (...)
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  24. Freud's Dual Process Theory and the Place of the a-Rational.Linda A. W. Brakel & Howard Shevrin - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):527-528.
    In this commentary on Stanovich & West (S&W) we call attention to two points: (1) Freud's original dual process theory, which antedates others by some seventy-five years, deserves inclusion in any consideration of dual process theories. His concepts of primary and secondary processes (Systems 1 and 2, respectively) anticipate significant aspects of current dual process theories and provide an explanation for many of their characteristics. (2) System 1 is neither rational nor irrational, but instead a-rational. Nevertheless, both the a-rational System (...)
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  25. Mind as a Scientific Object: A Historical-Philosophical Exploration.Thomas Hardy Leahey - 2004 - In Christina E. Erneling (ed.), The Mind as a Scientific Object: Between Brain and Culture. Oxford University Press.
  26. The Strange Case of the Freudian Case History: The Role of Long Case Histories in the Development of Psychoanalysis.Anne Sealey - 2011 - History of the Human Sciences 24 (1):36-50.
    Sigmund Freud’s five long case histories have been the focus of seemingly endless fascination and criticism. This article examines how the long case-history genre developed and its impact on the professionalization of psychoanalysis. It argues that the long case histories, using a distinctive form that highlighted the peculiarities of psychoanalytic theory, served as exemplars in the discipline. In doing so, the article extends John Forrester’s work on ‘thinking in cases’ to show the practical implications of that style of reasoning. The (...)
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  27. Nineteenth Century Pioneers in the Study of Dissociation: William James and Psychical Research.Carlos S. Alvarado & Stanley Krippner - 2010 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (11-12):11-12.
    Following recent trends in the historiography of psychology and psychiatry we argue that psychical research was an important influence in the development of concepts about dissociation. To illustrate this point, we discuss American psychologist and philosopher William James's writings about mediumship, secondary personalities, and hypnosis. Some of James's work on the topic took place in the context of research conducted by the American Society for Psychical Research, such as his early work with the medium Leonora E. Piper . James Following (...)
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  28. The Rise and Decline of Character: Humoral Psychology in Ancient and Early Modern Medical Theory.J. Bos - 2009 - History of the Human Sciences 22 (3):29-50.
    Humoralism, the view that the human body is composed of a limited number of elementary fluids, is one of the most characteristic aspects of ancient medicine. The psychological dimension of humoral theory in the ancient world has thus far received a relatively small amount of scholarly attention. Medical psychology in the ancient world can only be correctly understood by relating it to psychological thought in other fields, such as ethics and rhetoric. The concept that ties these various domains together is (...)
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  29. A History of Consciousness : From Kant and Hegel to Derrida and Foucault.D. C. Hoy - 1991 - History of the Human Sciences 4 (2):261-281.
    Would a history of the human sciences seem strange if it featured a chapter on the history of consciousness? An argument for including such a chapter could point out that consciousness is often thought to be essential to what it is to be human. Yet the discipline that makes this.
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  30. The Graphic Strategy: The Uses and Functions of Illustrations in Wundt's Grundzüge.Douwe Draaisma & Sarah De Rijcke - 2001 - History of the Human Sciences 14 (1):1-24.
    Illustrations played an important role in the articulation of Wundt’s experimental program. Focusing on the woodcuts of apparatus and experimental designs in the six editions of his Grundzüge der physiologischen Psychologie (published between 1873 and 1911), we investigate the uses and functions of illustrations in the experimental culture of the physiological and psychological sciences. We will first present some statistics on the increasing number of illustrations Wundt included in each new edition of his handbook. Next we will show how Wundt (...)
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  31. Insects, Instincts and Boundary Work in Early Social Psychology.Diane M. Rodgers - 2013 - History of the Human Sciences 26 (1):68-89.
    Insects factored as ‘symbols of instinct’, necessary as a rhetorical device in the boundary work of early social psychology. They were symbolically used to draw a dividing line between humans and animals, clarifying views on instinct and consciousness. These debates were also waged to determine if social psychology was a subfield of sociology or psychology. The exchange between psychologist James Mark Baldwin and sociologist Charles Abram Ellwood exemplifies this particular aspect of boundary work. After providing a general background of the (...)
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  32. Introduction.Michel Ferrari - 2010 - History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):1-14.
    The history of the science of consciousness is difficult to trace because it involves an ongoing debate over the aims involved in the study of consciousness that historically engaged people working in a variety of different, often overlapping, philosophical projects. At least three main aims of these different projects can be identified: (1) providing an ultimate foundation for natural science; (2) providing an empirical study of experience; and (3) promoting human well-being by relieving suffering and encouraging human flourishing. Each of (...)
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  33. Do Brains Think? Comparative Anatomy and the End of the Great Chain of Being in 19th-Century Britain.Elfed Huw Price - 2012 - History of the Human Sciences 25 (3):32-50.
    The nature of the relationship between mind and body is one of the greatest remaining mysteries. As such, the historical origin of the current dominant belief that mind is a function of the brain takes on especial significance. In this article I aim to explore and explain how and why this belief emerged in early 19th-century Britain. Between 1815 and 1819 two brain-based physiologies of mind were the subject of controversy and debate in Britain: the system of phrenology devised by (...)
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  34. The Curious Rise and Fall of Experimental Psychology in Mind.Christopher D. Green - 2009 - History of the Human Sciences 22 (1):37-57.
    The journal Mind is now a wholly philosophical journal. At the time of its founding, in 1876, however, its mission was rather different in character. Its aim was to discover whether scientific psychology was a truly viable enterprise and, if so, what its boundaries with philosophy, with other scientific disciplines, and with the earlier generation of discredited attempts at `scientific' studies of the mind (e.g. phrenology, mesmerism) might be. Although at first Mind published mostly philosophical pieces and literature reviews, by (...)
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  35. William James on a Phenomenological Psychology of Immediate Experience: The True Foundation for a Science of Consciousness?Eugene Taylor - 2010 - History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):119-130.
    Throughout his career, William James defended personal consciousness. In his Principles of Psychology (1890), he declared that psychology is the scientific study of states of consciousness as such and that he intended to presume from the outset that the thinker was the thought. But while writing it, he had been investigating a dynamic psychology of the subconscious, which found a major place in his Gifford Lectures, published as The Varieties of Religious Experience in 1902. This was the clearest statement James (...)
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  36. Baldwin, Cattell and the Psychological Review: A Collaboration and its Discontents.Michael M. Sokal - 1997 - History of the Human Sciences 10 (1):57-89.
    This paper provides a detailed account of the origins of the Psycho logical Review in 1894, of the policies and practices of its editors (James Mark Baldwin and James McKeen Cattell) during its first decade, and of the public and private disagreements that led them to dissolve their collaboration in 1904. In doing so, it sheds light on the significant roles played by specialized scientific journals in the development of specific scientific specialities, and illustrates the value for historical exploration of (...)
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  37. Democratizing Mental Health Motherhood, Therapeutic Community and the Emergence of the Psychiatric Family at the Cassel Hospital in Post-Second World War Britain.Teri Chettiar - 2012 - History of the Human Sciences 25 (5):107-122.
    Shortly following the Second World War, and under the medical direction of ex-army psychiatrist T. F. Main, the Cassel Hospital for Functional Nervous Disorders emerged as a pioneering democratic ‘therapeutic community’ in the treatment of mental illness. This definitive movement away from conventional ‘custodial’ assumptions about the function of the psychiatric hospital initially grew out of a commitment to sharing therapeutic responsibility between patients and staff and to preserving patients’ pre-admission responsibilities and social identities. However, by the mid-1950s, hospital practices (...)
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  38. Psychical Research and the Origins of American Psychology Hugo Münsterberg, William James and Eusapia Palladino.Andreas Sommer - 2012 - History of the Human Sciences 25 (2):23-44.
    Largely unacknowledged by historians of the human sciences, late-19th-century psychical researchers were actively involved in the making of fledgling academic psychology. Moreover, with few exceptions historians have failed to discuss the wider implications of the fact that the founder of academic psychology in America, William James, considered himself a psychical researcher and sought to integrate the scientific study of mediumship, telepathy and other controversial topics into the nascent discipline. Analysing the celebrated exposure of the medium Eusapia Palladino by German-born Harvard (...)
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  39. The Fukurai Affair Parapsychology and the History of Psychology in Japan.Miki Takasuna - 2012 - History of the Human Sciences 25 (2):149-164.
    The history of psychology in Japan from the late 19th century until the first half of the 20th century did not follow a smooth course. After the first psychological laboratory was established at Tokyo Imperial University in 1903, psychology in Japan developed as individual specialties until the Japanese Psychological Association was established in 1927. During that time, Tomokichi Fukurai, an associate professor at Tokyo Imperial University, became involved with psychical research until he was forced out in 1913. The Fukurai affair, (...)
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  40. Ralph Cudworth and the Theological Origins of Consciousness.Benjamin Carter - 2010 - History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):29-47.
    The English Neoplatonic philosopher Ralph Cudworth introduced the term ‘consciousness’ into the English philosophical lexicon. Cudworth uses the term to define the form and structure of cognitive acts, including acts of freewill. In this article I highlight the important role of theological disputes over the place and extent of human freewill within an overarching system of providence. Cudworth’s intellectual development can be understood in the main as an increasingly detailed and nuanced reaction to the strict voluntarist Calvinism that is typified (...)
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  41. Wundt, Vygotsky and Bandura: A Cultural-Historical Science of Consciousness in Three Acts.Michel Ferrari, David K. Robinson & Anton Yasnitsky - 2010 - History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):95-118.
    This article looks at three historical efforts to coordinate the scientific study of biological and cultural aspects of human consciousness into a single comprehensive theory of human development that includes the evolution of the human body, cultural evolution and personal development: specifically, the research programs of Wilhelm Wundt, Lev Vygotsky and Albert Bandura. The lack of historical relations between these similar efforts is striking, and suggests that the effort to promote cultural and personal sources of consciousness arises as a natural (...)
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  42. From Milgram to Zimbardo: The Double Birth of Postwar Psychology/Psychologization.Jan De Vos - 2010 - History of the Human Sciences 23 (5):156-175.
    Milgram’s series of obedience experiments and Zimbardo’s Stanford Prison Experiment are probably the two best-known psychological studies. As such, they can be understood as central to the broad process of psychologization in the postwar era. This article will consider the extent to which this process of psychologization can be understood as a simple overflow from the discipline of psychology to wider society or whether, in fact, this process is actually inextricably connected to the science of psychology as such. In so (...)
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  43. Sentient Nature and Human Economy: The 'Human'science of Early Nationalökonomie.Richard Bowler - 2005 - History of the Human Sciences 18 (1):23-54.
    Over the course of the 18th century, scholarly examinations of animal nature and behavior rejected ‘mechanical’, overly deterministic hypotheses, suggesting instead that animal action proceeded from a psycho-physiological sentient capacity. Though the ultimate causes of this capacity appeared to elude explanation, they expressed themselves in behaviors that scholars described and analyzed. Interpretations of sentient, animal nature also bore on the contemporary understanding of human nature: like animals, human beings were also considered to possess a psycho-physiological nature that motivated them to (...)
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  44. The Reflexive Project: Reconstructing the Moral Agent.Alfred I. Tauber - 2005 - History of the Human Sciences 18 (4):49-75.
    In the 17th century, ‘reflexivity’ was coined as a new term for introspection and self-awareness. It thus was poised to serve the instrumental function of combating skepticism by asserting a knowing self. In this Cartesian paradigm, introspection ends in an entity of self-identity. An alternate interpretation recognized how an infinite regress of reflexivity would render ‘the self’ elusive, if not unknowable. Reflexivity in this latter mode was rediscovered by post-Kantian philosophers, most notably Hegel, who defined the self in its self-reflective (...)
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  45. The Reflexivity of Cognitive Science: The Scientist as Model of Human Nature.Jamie Cohen-Cole - 2005 - History of the Human Sciences 18 (4):107-139.
    This article examines how experimental psychology experienced a revolution as cognitive science replaced behaviorism in the mid-20th century. This transition in the scientific account of human nature involved making normal what had once been normative: borrowing ideas of democratic thinking from political culture and conceptions of good thinking from philosophy of science to describe humans as active, creatively thinking beings, rather than as organisms that simply respond to environmental conditions. Reflexive social and intellectual practices were central to this process as (...)
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  46. 'Psychotherapy': The Invention of a Word.Sonu Shamdasani - 2005 - History of the Human Sciences 18 (1):1-22.
    This paper traces the manner in which the word ‘psychotherapy’ was invented and how it became taken up and disseminated in the English-, French- and German-speaking medical worlds at the end of the 19th century. It explores how it was used as an appellation for a variety of practices, and then increasingly became perceived as a distinct entity in its own right. Finally it shows how the fate of the word ‘psychotherapy’ enables Freud’s invention of ‘psychoanalysis’ to be located.
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  47. Contested Psychiatric Ontology and Feminist Critique 'Female Sexual Dysfunction'and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual.Katherine Angel - 2012 - History of the Human Sciences 25 (4):3-24.
    In this article I discuss the emergence of Female Sexual Dysfunction (FSD) within American psychiatry and beyond in the postwar period, setting out what I believe to be important and suggestive questions neglected in existing scholarship. Tracing the nomenclature within successive editions of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), I consider the reification of the term ‘FSD’, and the activism and scholarship that the rise of the category has occasioned. I suggest that analysis of FSD benefits from (...)
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  48. Book Review: Portrait of the Psychiatrist as a Young Man: The Early Writing and Work of R.D. Laing, 1927–60. [REVIEW]Peter Barham - 2012 - History of the Human Sciences 25 (4):125-130.
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  49. The Invention of the Psychosocial: An Introduction.Rhodri Hayward - 2012 - History of the Human Sciences 25 (5):3-12.
    Although the compound adjective ‘psychosocial’ was first used by academic psychologists in the 1890s, it was only in the interwar period that psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers began to develop detailed models of the psychosocial domain. These models marked a significant departure from earlier ideas of the relationship between society and human nature. Whereas Freudians and Darwinians had described an antagonistic relationship between biological instincts and social forces, interwar authors insisted that individual personality was made possible through collective organization. This (...)
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  50. Psychology and Psychical Research in France Around the End of the 19th Century.Régine Plas - 2012 - History of the Human Sciences 25 (2):91-107.
    During the last third of the 19th century, the ‘new’ French psychology developed within ‘the hypnotic context’ opened up by Charcot. In spite of their claims to the scientific nature of their hypnotic experiments, Charcot and his followers were unable to avoid the miracles that had accompanied mesmerism, the forerunner of hypnosis. The hysterics hypnotized in the Salpêtrière Hospital were expected to have supernormal faculties and these experiments opened the door to psychical research. In 1885 the first French psychology society (...)
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