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  1. Thinking Twice About Virtue and Vice.Guy Axtell - manuscript
    [FREE PUBLISHED VERSION AT LINK BELOW]. This chapter provides an empirical defense of credit theories of knowing against Alfano’s the-ses of inferential cognitive situationism and of epistemic situationism. It also develops a Nar-row-Broad Spectrum of agency-ascriptions in reply to Olin and Doris’ ‘trade-off problem.’ In order to support the claim that credit theories can treat many cases of success through heuristic cognitive strategies as credit-conferring, the paper develops the compatibility between VE and dual-process theories (DPT) in cognitive psychology. A genuine (...)
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  2. Unadaptive Consciousness In Evolutionary Psychology.Ron C. de Weijze - manuscript
    The role of consciousness in evolutionary psychology, apart from postponing, rerouting, reinterpreting or ignoring stimuli, may simply be independently confirming, as in any science’s methodology.
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  3. Is Nativism in Psychology Reconcilable with the Parity Thesis in Biology?Slobodan Perovic & Ljiljana Radenovic - 2008
    The Modern Synthesis of Darwinism and genetics regards non-genetic factors as merely constraints on the genetic variations that result in the characteristics of organisms. Even though the environment (including social interactions and culture) is as necessary as genes in terms of selection and inheritance, it does not contain the information that controls the development of the traits. S. Oyama’s account of the Parity Thesis, however, states that one cannot conceivably distinguish in a meaningful way between nature-based (i.e., gene-based) and nurture-based (...)
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  4. The Return of the Political Freud? Some Notes on the New Historiography of Psychoanalysis. [REVIEW]Shaul Bar-Haim - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences:095269511878769.
  5. History of Behavioral Neurology.Sergio Barberis & Cory Wright - forthcoming - Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Psychology.
    This chapter provides a brief overview of the history of behavioral neurology, dividing it roughly into six eras. In the ancient and classical eras, emphasis is placed on two transitions: firstly, from descriptions of head trauma and attempted neurosurgical treatments to the exploratory dissections during the Hellenistic period and the replacement of cardiocentrism; and secondly, to the more systematic investigations of Galenus and the rise of pneumatic ventricular theory. In the medieval through post-Renaissance eras, the scholastic consolidation of knowledge and (...)
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  6. The Conundrum of the Psychological Interface: On the Problems of Bridging the Biological and the Social.James Rupert Fletcher & Rasmus H. Birk - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences:095269512110705.
    In this article, we consider how certain types of contemporary biosocial psychiatric research conceptualise and explicate biology-social relations. We compare the historic biopsychosocial model to recent examples of social defeat research on schizophrenia and cultural neuroscience work on affective disorders. This comparison reveals how the contemporary turn towards the ‘biosocial’ within psychiatric research relies upon ideas of the psychological as an interface. This is problematic because psychological notions of ‘experience’ are used as the central mechanics of biosocial processes, but lack (...)
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  7. Fairbairn, Winnicott, and Guntrip on the Social Significance of Schizoids.Gal Gerson - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences:095269512110080.
    The mid-century object relations approach saw the category of schizoids as crucial to its own formation. Rooted in a developmental phase where the perception of the mother as a whole and real person had not yet been secured, the schizoid constitution impeded relationships and forced schizoids to communicate through a compliant persona while the kernel self remained isolated. Fairbairn, Winnicott, and Guntrip thought that schizoid features underlay many other pathologies that earlier, Freudian psychoanalysis had misidentified. To correct this, a move (...)
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  8. Documenting Insanity: Paperwork and Patient Narratives in Psychiatric History.Liana Glew - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences:095269512110689.
    Paperwork plays a key role in a how institutions accommodate, refuse, or manage disabled people. This article develops modes for reading paperwork that build on each other, beginning with recognizing the institutional pressures at work in shaping bureaucratic practices, then considering how a person's relationship to disability influences how they might encounter these practices, and ultimately noticing how the encounter between disabled/mad people and an institution might create something new, what the author calls archival excess. These methods for reading are (...)
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  9. On Some Antecedents of Behavioural Economics.Kristian Bondo Hansen & Thomas Presskorn-Thygesen - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences:095269512110009.
    Since its inception in the late 1970s, behavioural economics has gone from being an outlier to a widely recognized yet still contested subset of the economic sciences. One of the basic arguments in behavioural economics is that a more realistic psychology ought to inform economic theories. While the history of behavioural economics is often portrayed and articulated as spanning no more than a few decades, the practice of utilizing ideas from psychology to rethink theories of economics is over a century (...)
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  10. Johann Friedrich Herbart on Mind.Christoph Landerer & Wolfgang Huemer - forthcoming - In Sandra Lapointe (ed.), Philosophy of Mind in the Nineteenth Century. Routledge.
  11. Psychometric Origins of Depression.Susan McPherson & David Armstrong - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences:095269512110090.
    This article examines the historical construction of depression over about a hundred years, employing the social life of methods as an explanatory framework. Specifically, it considers how emerging methodologies in the measurement of psychological constructs contributed to changes in epistemological approaches to mental illness and created the conditions of possibility for major shifts in the construction of depression. While depression was once seen as a feature of psychotic personality, measurement technologies made it possible for it to be reconstructed as changeable (...)
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  12. Social Evolution, Progress and Teleology in Spencer's Synthetic Philosophy and Freudian Psychoanalysis.L. Nascimento - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences.
    This article aims to compare notions of progress and evolution in the social theories of Freud and Spencer. It argues 1) that the two authors had similarly complex theories that contained mixed elements of positivism and teleology; 2) In its positivist elements, both authors made use of unified natural laws and, in its teleological aspect, they made use of notions of final cause in that progress and the evolution of civilization was understood as a linear path of progressive development with (...)
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  13. Stressing the ‘Body Electric’: History and Psychology of the Techno-Ecologies of Work Stress.Jessica Pykett & Mark Paterson - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences:095269512210817.
    This article explores histories of the science of stress and its measurement from the mid 19th century, and brings these into dialogue with critical sociological analysis of emerging responses to work stress in policy and practice. In particular, it shows how the contemporary development of biomedical and consumer devices for stress self-monitoring is based on selectively rediscovering the biological determinants and biomarkers of stress, human functioning in terms of evolutionary ecology, and the physical health impacts of stress. It considers how (...)
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  14. Lesbian and Bisexual Women's Experiences of Aversion Therapy in England.Helen Spandler & Sarah Carr - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences:095269512110594.
    This article presents the findings of a study about the history of aversion therapy as a treatment technique in the English mental health system to convert lesbians and bisexual women into heterosexual women. We explored published psychiatric and psychological literature, as well as lesbian, gay, and bisexual archives and anthologies. We identified 10 examples of young women receiving aversion therapy in England in the 1960s and 1970s. We situate our discussion within the context of post-war British and transnational medical history. (...)
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  15. Interrogating Incoherence and Prospects for a Trans-Positive Psychiatry.Robert A. Wilson - forthcoming - Australasian Philosophical Review.
    Invited commentary on Nicole A. Vincent and Emma A. Jane, “Interrogating Incongruence: Conceptual and Normative Problems with ICD-11’s and DSM-5’s Diagnostic Categories for Transgender People” Australasian Philosophical Review, in press. -/- The core of Vincent and Jane’s Interrogating Incongruence is critical of the appeal to the concept of incongruence in DSM-5 and ICD-11 characterisations of trans people, a critique taken to be ground-clearing for more trans-positive, psychiatrically-infused medical interventions. I concur with Vincent and Jane’s ultimate goals but depart from the (...)
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  16. Freud in Cambridge Review Symposium.Felicity Callard & Sarah Marks - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):194-197.
  17. A. Joan Saab. Objects of Vision: Making Sense of What We See. (Perspectives on Sensory History, 3.) 150 Pp., Illus., Notes, Bibl., Index. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2020. $69.95 (Cloth); ISBN 9780271088105. E-Book Available. [REVIEW]Rachael Z. DeLue - 2022 - Isis 113 (1):169-170.
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  18. Freud in Cambridge: An Institutional Romance? [REVIEW]Jessica Dubow - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):212-218.
  19. Fort/Da/Freud.Paul Kingsbury - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):198-204.
  20. Ido Hartogsohn. American Trip: Set, Setting, and the Psychedelic Experience in the Twentieth Century. 432 Pp., Bibl., Index. Cambridge, Mass./London: MIT Press, 2020. $35 (Paper); ISBN 9780262539142. [REVIEW]Alex Mold - 2022 - Isis 113 (1):213-214.
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  21. A Public Inquiry Into Freud’s Influence Upon Cambridge. [REVIEW]Steve Pile - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):205-211.
    Review Symposium on John Forrester and Laura Cameron’s Freud In Cambridge.
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  22. Madness, Virtue, and Ecology: A Classical Indian Approach to Psychiatric Disturbance.Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):3-31.
    The Caraka Saṃhitā, the first classical Indian medical compendium, covers a wide variety of pharmacological and therapeutic treatment, while also sketching out a philosophical anthropology of the human subject who is the patient of the physicians for whom this text was composed. In this article, I outline some of the relevant aspects of this anthropology – in particular, its understanding of ‘mind’ and other elements that constitute the subject – before exploring two ways in which it approaches ‘psychiatric’ disorder: one (...)
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  23. L'intelligenza tra natura e cultura.Davide Serpico - 2022 - Turin: Rosenberg & Sellier.
    ENG: We all have our own ideas about what it is like to be intelligent. Indeed, even the experts disagree on this topic. This has generated diverse theories on the nature of intelligence and its genetic and environmental bases. Many scientific and philosophical questions thus remain unaddressed: is it possible to characterize intelligence in scientific terms? What do IQ tests measure? How is intelligence influenced by genetics, epigenetics, and the environment? What are the ethical and social implications of the research (...)
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  24. Writing the History of Postcolonial and Transcultural Psychiatry in Africa. [REVIEW]Ana Antic - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (3-4):374-384.
  25. Types, Norms, and Normalisation: Hormone Research and Treatments in Italy, Argentina, and Brazil, C. 1900–50.Chiara Beccalossi - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (2):113-137.
    Displacing the physiological model that had held sway in 19th-century medical thinking, early 20th-century hormone research promoted an understanding of the body and sexual desires in which variations in sex characteristics and non-reproductive sexual behaviours such as homosexuality were attributed to anomalies in the internal secretions produced by the testes or the ovaries. Biotypology, a new brand of medical science conceived and led by the Italian endocrinologist Nicola Pende, employed hormone research to study human types and hormone treatments to normalise (...)
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  26. Working in Cases: British Psychiatric Social Workers and a History of Psychoanalysis From the Middle, C.1930–60.Juliana Broad - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (3-4):169-194.
    Histories of psychoanalysis largely respect the boundaries drawn by the psychoanalytic profession, suggesting that the development of psychoanalytic theories and techniques has been the exclusive remit of professionally trained analysts. In this article, I offer an historical example that poses a challenge to this orthodoxy. Based on extensive archival material, I show how British psychiatric social workers, a little-studied group of specialist mental hygiene workers, advanced key organisational, observational, and theoretical insights that shaped mid-century British psychoanalysis. In their daily work (...)
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  27. A Neglected Chapter in the History of Philosophy of Mathematical Thought Experiments: Insights From Jean Piaget’s Reception of Edmond Goblot.Marco Buzzoni - 2021 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 11 (1):282-304.
  28. Normality: A Collection of Essays.Peter Cryle & Elizabeth Stephens - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (2):3-8.
    This article introduces a collection of articles written in response to a recently published intellectual and cultural history of normality by Peter Cryle and Elizabeth Stephens. It points to the fact that this special issue considerably extends and enriches the topical range of the book. The articles that follow discuss, in order, schooling in France at the time of the Revolution, phrenology in Europe and the US from 1840 to 1940, relations between commercial practice and scientific craniometry in 19th-century Britain (...)
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  29. Cold War Pavlov: Homosexual Aversion Therapy in the 1960s.Kate Davison - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (1):89-119.
    Homosexual aversion therapy enjoyed two brief but intense periods of clinical experimentation: between 1950 and 1962 in Czechoslovakia, and between 1962 and 1975 in the British Commonwealth. The specific context of its emergence was the geopolitical polarization of the Cold War and a parallel polarization within psychological medicine between Pavlovian and Freudian paradigms. In 1949, the Pavlovian paradigm became the guiding doctrine in the Communist bloc, characterized by a psychophysiological or materialist understanding of mental illness. It was taken up by (...)
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  30. Eigenpsychisches und Fremdpsychisches: Rudolf Carnaps Verhältnis zur Psychologie zwischen 1928 und 1932.Uljana Feest - 2021 - In Christian Damböck & Gereon Wolters (eds.), Der Junge Carnap in Historischem Kontext: 1918–1935 / Young Carnap in an Historical Context: 1918–1935. Springer Verlag. pp. 169-184.
    Carnaps Werk zwischen den späten 1920er- und frühen 1930er-Jahren nimmt verschiedentlich auf Begrifflichkeiten und Debatten der philosophischen und experimentellen Psychologie seiner Zeit Bezug. Diese Bezugnahmen sind jedoch nicht immer konsistent oder explizit. Beispielsweise bedient Carnap sich sowohl im Aufbau als auch in seinen Ausführungen zur Psychologie in einer physikalischen Sprache einiger Grundannahmen der experimentellen Psychologie, führt dies jedoch nicht konsequent zu Ende. Umgekehrt sieht er seine Auffassungen zur Physikalisierung der psychologischen Sprache nicht zuletzt auch als potenzielles Korrektiv für die existierende (...)
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  31. Félida, Doubled Personality, and the ‘Normal State’ in Late 19th-Century French Psychology.Kim M. Hajek - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (2):66-89.
    The case of Félida X and her ‘doubled personality’ served in the last quarter of the 19th century as a proving ground for a distinctively French form of psychology that bore the stamp of physiology, including the comparative term normal state. Debates around Félida’s case provided the occasion for reflection about how that term and its opposites could take their places in the emerging discursive field of psychopathology. This article centres its analysis on Eugène Azam’s 1876–77 study of Félida, and (...)
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  32. Mothering in the Frame: Cinematic Microanalysis and the Pathogenic Mother, 1945–67.Katie Joice - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (5):105-131.
    This article examines the use of cinematic microanalysis to capture, decompose, and interpret mother–infant interaction in the decades following the Second World War. Focusing on the films and writings of Margaret Mead, Ray Birdwhistell, René Spitz, and Sylvia Brody, it examines the intellectual culture, and visual methodologies, that transformed ‘pathogenic’ mothering into an observable process. In turn, it argues that the significance assigned to the ‘small behaviours’ of mothers provided an epistemological foundation for the nascent discipline of infant psychiatry. This (...)
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  33. Daniela Finzi; Herman Westerink (Editors). Dora, Hysteria, and Gender: Reconsidering Freud’s Case Study. (Figures of the Unconscious, 16.) 152 Pp., Notes. Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2018. €29.50 (Paper); ISBN 9789461662613. [REVIEW]Shruti Kapila - 2021 - Isis 112 (1):201-202.
  34. Ideology and Science: The Story of Polish Psychology in the Communist Period.Leszek Koczanowicz & Iwona Koczanowicz-Dehnel - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (3-4):195-217.
    This article presents a fragment of the history of psychology in Poland, discussing its development in the years 1945–56, which saw sweeping political and geographical transformations. In that maelstrom of history, psychology was particularly affected by the effects of geopolitical changes, which led to its symbolic ‘arrest’ in 1952, when psychological practice was prohibited and all psychology courses were abolished at universities. Amnesty was declared only in 1956, with the demise of the so-called Stalinist ‘cult of personality’ and the onset (...)
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  35. Psychological Theory as Administrative Politics: Boris Lomov’s Systems Approach in the Context of the Soviet Science Establishment.Vladimir Konnov - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (3-4):218-242.
    The article is a study into the advent of the ‘systems approach’ in Soviet psychology in the 1970s. This arose mainly through the theoretical publications of B. F. Lomov, written after he had been appointed director of the newly established Institute of Psychology. These publications are examined as reflections of those interests related to the sociopolitical role of the director of this leading psychology institution, which was officially charged with building a common theoretical and methodological framework for all Soviet psychology. (...)
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  36. Psychoanalysis and the Antinomies of an Archaeologist: Andrea Carandini, the Ruins of Rome, and the Writing of History.Tom McCaskie - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (3-4):49-75.
    Freud’s fascination with the ruins of ancient Rome was an element in the formation and development of psychology. This article concerns the intersection of psychoanalysis with archaeology and history in the study of that city. Its substantive content is an analysis of the life and career of Andrea Carandini, the best-known Roman archaeologist of the past 40 years. He has said and written much about his changing views of himself and about what he is trying to do in his approach (...)
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  37. Hermann Lotzes Philosophie der Psychologie.Nikolay Milkov - 2021 - In Hermann Lotze, Medizinische Psychologie oder Physiologie der Seele. Heidelberg: Springer-Spektrum. pp. 1-28.
    Die Psychologie hat sich im zweiten Viertel des 19. Jahrhunderts langsam zu einer autonomen Disziplin entwickelt. Im Unterschied zu den anderen Figuren in dieser Entwicklung, Johann Friedrich Herbart, Ernst Heinrich Weber und Gustav Theodor Fechner, hat Lotze in seiner Medicinische Psychologie (1852) von Anfang an die neue Disziplin, die Psychologie, konsequent in enger Verbindung mit der Philosophie entwickelt. Damit hat er die Hoffnung gebremst, die Psychologie völlig experimentellen Untersuchungen zu überlassen, die um diese Zeit schon viele gepflegt haben. Lotze scheute (...)
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  38. A ‘Commonsense’ Psychoanalysis: Listening to the Psychosocial Dreamer in Interwar Glasgow Psychiatry.Sarah Phelan - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (3-4):142-168.
    This article historicises a dream analytic intervention launched in the 1930s by Scottish psychiatrist and future professor of psychological medicine at the University of Glasgow, Thomas Ferguson Rodger. Intimate therapeutic meetings with five male patients are preserved within the so-called ‘dream books’, six manuscript notebooks from Rodger’s earlier career. Investigating one such case history in parallel with lecture material, this article elucidates the origins of Rodger’s adapted, rapport-centred psychotherapy, offered in his post-war National Health Service, Glasgow-based department. Oriented in a (...)
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  39. The Past of Predicting the Future: A Review of the Multidisciplinary History of Affective Forecasting.Maya A. Pilin - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (3-4):290-306.
    Affective forecasting refers to the ability to predict future emotions, a skill that is essential to making decisions on a daily basis. Studies of the concept have determined that individuals are often inaccurate in making such affective forecasts. However, the mechanisms of these errors are not yet clear. In order to better understand why affective forecasting errors occur, this article seeks to trace the theoretical roots of this theory with a focus on its multidisciplinary history. The roots of affective forecasting (...)
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  40. Kinsey and the Psychoanalysts: Cross-Disciplinary Knowledge Production in Post-War US Sex Research.Katie Sutton - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (1):120-147.
    The historical forces of war and migration impacted heavily on the disciplinary locations, practitioners, and structures of sexology and psychoanalysis that had developed in the first decades of the 20th century. By the late 1940s, the US was fast becoming the world centre of each of these prominent fields within the modern human sciences. During these years, the work of Alfred C. Kinsey and his team became synonymous with a distinctly North American brand of empirical sex research. This article offers (...)
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  41. The Synthesis of Consciousness and the Latent Life of the Mind: Philosophy, Psychopathology, and ‘Cryptopsychism’ in Fin-de-Siècle France.Pietro Terzi - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (3-4):98-120.
    In fin-de-siècle France, we witness a strange circulation of concepts between philosophy, theoretical and experimental psychology, and the borderline realm of what we would now call meta- or parapsychology. This was a time characterized by a complex process of redefinition of the disciplinary frontiers between philosophy and psychology, which favoured the birth of hybrid conceptualities and stark oppositions as well. Furthermore, the great scientific advances in physics, physiology, and psychology fostered hope for a full rational explanation of reality, even of (...)
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  42. Dehumanization, Disability, and Eugenics.Robert A. Wilson - 2021 - In Maria Kronfeldner (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Dehumanization. New York, NY, USA: pp. 173-186.
    This paper explores the relationship between eugenics, disability, and dehumanization, with a focus on forms of eugenics beyond Nazi eugenics.
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  43. Thomas Dodman. What Nostalgia Was: War, Empire, and the Time of a Deadly Emotion. Xi + 275 Pp., Notes, Index. Chicago/London: University of Chicago Press, 2018. $35 (Paper); ISBN 9780226492940. Cloth and E-Book Available. [REVIEW]Fay Bound Alberti - 2020 - Isis 111 (4):859-860.
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  44. Proving Nothing and Illustrating Much: The Case of Michael Balint.Shaul Bar-Haim - 2020 - History of the Human Sciences 33 (3-4):47-65.
    John Forrester’s book Thinking in Cases does not provide one ultimate definition of what it means to ‘think in cases’, but rather several alternatives: a ‘style of reasoning’, ‘paradigms’ or ‘exemplars’, and ‘language games’, to mention only a few. But for Forrester, the stories behind each of the figures who suggested these different models for thinking are as important as the models themselves. In other words, the question for Forrester is not only what ‘thinking in cases’ is, but also who (...)
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  45. Must We Mean What We Do? – Review Symposium on Leys’s The Ascent of Affect.Clive Barnett - 2020 - History of the Human Sciences 33 (2):115-126.
  46. From the Ashes, a Fertile Opportunity for Historicism – Review Symposium on Leys’s The Ascent of Affect.Rob Boddice - 2020 - History of the Human Sciences 33 (2):126-133.
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  47. On Kuhn’s Case, and Piaget's: A Critical Two-Sited Hauntology.Jeremy Trevelyan Burman - 2020 - History of the Human Sciences 33 (3-4):129-159.
    Picking up on John Forrester’s disclosure that he felt ‘haunted’ by the suspicion that Thomas Kuhn’s interests had become his own, this essay complexifies our understanding of both of their legacies by presenting two sites for that haunting. The first is located by engaging Forrester’s argument that the connection between Kuhn and psychoanalysis was direct. However, recent archival discoveries suggest that that is incorrect. Instead, Kuhn’s influence in this regard was Jean Piaget. And it is Piaget’s thinking that was influenced (...)
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  48. Controversies Over the Soul and its Origin.Davide Cellamare - 2020 - Early Science and Medicine 25 (2):195-204.
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  49. An Even-Handed Debate? The Sexed/Gendered Controversy Over Laterality Genes in British Psychology, 1970s–1990s.Tabea Cornel - 2020 - History of the Human Sciences 33 (5):138-166.
    This article provides insight into the entwinement of the allegedly neutral category of handedness with questions of sex/gender, reproduction, dis/ability, and scientific authority. In the 1860s, Paul Broca suggested that the speech centre sat in the left brain hemisphere in most humans, and that right-handedness stemmed from this asymmetry. One century later, British psychologists Marian Annett and Chris McManus proposed biologically unconfirmed theories of how handedness and brain asymmetry were passed on in families. Their idea to integrate chance into genetic (...)
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  50. Andrew J. Vinchur. The Early Years of Industrial and Organizational Psychology. Xi + 363 Pp., Figs., Tables, App., Bibl., Indexes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. £28.99 (Paper). ISBN 9781107671683. [REVIEW]Maarten Derksen - 2020 - Isis 111 (2):414-414.
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