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  1. Western Conceptions of the Individual. [REVIEW]Donald C. Abel - 1993 - Review of Metaphysics 46 (4):863-864.
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  2. Philosophic-Historical Truths Confer Juventus Winner of 2018/2019 UEFA Champions League.Opeyemi Adeyemi - 2018
    This article is a summarization of a research paper titled The Philosophy of the UEFA Champions League. Both the summary and the paper puts forward the hypothesis which seeks to prove and establish the real existence of metaphysics in the cosmos. Particularly that Eyjafjallajokul of April 2010 moved owing to call from human beings; an urgent call to the abstract force of planet earth, the spirit, to spring into action. Taking the UEFA Champions League as our laboratory, the conclusion will (...)
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  3. Dissociation.Joe Barnhardt - 1998 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 5 (2/3):33-37.
    My hypothesis is that human personhood has ancient biological roots which make it possible for social reinforcers to contribute to the gradual construction of real persons who are always deeper than the stories about them. Multiple persons do sometimes emerge from one human organism. Rather than try to prove they are real, I explore the consequences of assuming them to be genuine emergentsthat become social environment to one another. I suggest that the multiple-persons phenomenon has profoundly influenced the development of (...)
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  4. Animalism.Stephan Blatti - 2014 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Among the questions to be raised under the heading of “personal identity” are these: “What are we?” (fundamental nature question) and “Under what conditions do we persist through time?” (persistence question). Against the dominant neo-Lockean approach to these questions, the view known as animalism answers that each of us is an organism of the species Homo sapiens and that the conditions of our persistence are those of animals. Beyond describing the content and historical background of animalism and its rivals, this (...)
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  5. The Moral Dimension in Locke's Account of Persons and Personal Identity.Ruth Boeker - 2014 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 31 (3):229-247.
    I offer an interpretation of John Locke’s account of persons and personal identity that gives full credit to Locke’s claim that “person” is a forensic term, sheds new light on the relation between Locke’s characterizations of a person in sections 9 and 26, and explains how Locke links his moral and legal account of personhood to his account of personal identity in terms of sameness of consciousness. I show that Locke’s claim that sameness of consciousness is necessary for personal identity (...)
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  6. John Locke: Identity, Persons, and Personal Identity.Ruth Boeker - 2013 - Oxford Bibliographies in Philosophy.
    John Locke offered a very rich and influential account of persons and personal identity in “Of Identity and Diversity,” which is chapter 27 of Book 2 of his An Essay concerning Human Understanding. He added it to the second edition in 1694 upon the recommendation of his friend William Molyneux. Locke’s theory was soon after its publication discussed by his contemporaries and has influenced many present-day discussions of personal identity. Distinctive about Locke’s theory is that he argues that the notion (...)
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  7. Locke on Personal Identity: Consciousness and Concernment. [REVIEW]Ruth Boeker - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):803-6.
  8. Self-Hood and the Flow of Experience.Barry Dainton - 2012 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 84 (1):161-200.
    Analytic philosophy in the 20 th century was largely hostile territory to the self as traditionally conceived, and this tradition has been continued in two recent works: Mark Johnston’s Surviving Death , and Galen Strawson’s Selves . I have argued previously that it is perfectly possible to combine a naturalistic worldview with a conception of the self as a subject of experience , a thing whose only essential attribute is a capacity for unifi ed and continuous experience. I argue here (...)
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  9. The Discovery of the Self in Antiquity.Lloyd P. Gerson - 1992 - The Personalist Forum 8 (1):249-257.
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  10. A Humean Argument for Personal Identity.Amihud Gilead - 2008 - Metaphysica 9 (1):1-16.
    Considering various arguments in Hume’s Treatise, I reconstruct a Humean argument against personal identity or unity. According to this argument, each distinct perception is separable from the bundle of perceptions to which it belongs and is thus transferable either to the external, material reality or to another psychical reality, another bundle of perceptions. Nevertheless, such transference (Hume’s word!) is entirely illegitimate, otherwise Hume’s argument against causal inference would have failed; furthermore, it violates private, psychical accessibility. I suggest a Humean thought (...)
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  11. No Self to Be Found: The Search for Personal Identity.James Giles - 1997 - University Press of America.
    This book is a exploration of the notion of personal identity. Here it is shown how the various attempts to give an account of personal identity are all based on false assumptions and so inevitably run aground. One of the first Western thinkers to realize this was David Hume, the 18th century empiricist philosopher who argued that self was a fiction. A new interpretation of Hume's no-self theory is put forward by arguing for an eliminative rather than a reductive point (...)
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  12. «Михаил Иванович Туган-Барановский».Leonid Grinin - 2015 - In Leonid Grinin, V. Bondrenko & Andrey Korotayev (eds.), Кондратьевские волны: наследие и современность. Volgograd,Russia: Uchitel Publishing House. pp. 182-183.
    «Михаил Иванович Туган-Барановский» – расширенный биографический очерк Н. Д. Кондратьева, изданный в 1923 г. отдельной книгой в Петроградском издательстве «Колос» (125 с.).
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  13. 'Editorial Introduction' in Mihretu P. Guta and Sophie Gibb (Eds.). Insights Into the First-Person Perspective and the Self: An Interdisciplinary Approach.Mihretu P. Guta - 2015 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 22 (11-22):8-19.
    The essays in this volume focus on the notion of the first-person pro-noun ‘I’, the notion of the self or person,1 and the notion of the first-person perspective. Let us call these the three notions. Ever since Descartes set the initial tone in his Meditations, modern philosophical controversies concerning the three notions have continued unabated. Part of the reason for ongoing debates has to do with the sorts of questions that the three notions give rise to.
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  14. Locke's Theory of Personal Identity.Paul Helm - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (208):173 - 185.
    It is widely held that Locke propounded a theory of personal identity in terms of consciousness and memory. By ‘theory’ here is meant a set of necessary and sufficient conditions indicating what personal identity consists in. It is also held that this theory is open to obvious and damaging objections, so much so that it has to be supplemented in terms of bodily continuity, either because memory alone is not sufficient, or because the concept of memory is itself dependent upon (...)
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  15. David Hume on Personal Identity and the Indirect Passions.Robert S. Henderson - 1990 - Hume Studies 16 (1):33-44.
  16. Metafizyka krytyczna Otto Liebmanna.Tomasz Kubalica - 2014 - Folia Philosophica 32:47-64.
    In this paper I analyse the notion of critique, its subject and scope of validity in the context of critical metaphysics of Otto Liebmann. The main argument is preceded by introductory remarks in which historical context and intellectual background of this notion are discussed. The main focus of the paper is on the standpoint of Otto Liebmann, author of curricular for neo-Kantianism "Kant und die Epigonen", and who — however usually conceived to be forerunner of neo-Kantianism — quite paradoxically takes (...)
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  17. From Introspection to Essence: The Auditory Nature of Inner Speech.Peter Langland-Hassan - forthcoming - In Peter Langland-Hassan & Agustin Vicente (eds.), Inner Speech: New Voices. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    To some it is a shallow platitude that inner speech always has an auditory-phonological component. To others, it is an empirical hypothesis with accumulating support. To yet others it is a false dogma. In this chapter, I defend the claim that inner speech always has an auditory-phonological component, confining the claim to adults with ordinary speech and hearing. It is one thing, I emphasize, to assert that inner speech often, or even typically, has an auditory-phonological component—quite another to propose that (...)
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  18. Locke Against Himself: The Case For Re-Evaluating the "Lockean" Concept of Personal Identity.Ben Larson - unknown
  19. L'antropologia di k. Wojtyla come sintesi del pensiero clasico e della modernità.Antonio Malo - 2006 - Acta Philosophica: Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia 15 (1):11-28.
    Convinced that anthropology constitutes the nucleus of K. Wojtyla's thought, the author attempts to discover what kind of anthropology is at the basis of Wojtyla's philosophical writings and the implications of that anthropology. The analysis of the basic structures of Wojtyla's anthropology (the experience of that which occurs and that of action, the structure of the person-act, the transcendence of the person in truth, gift, etc.) leads the author to hold that Wojtyla's philosophy can be considered a coherent metaphysics of (...)
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  20. Sources of Dignity for Persons: Capacities, Friendship, Love and Subjectivity.Matthew Nevius - unknown
    Many people seem to understand the term 'dignity' as applying to all human persons regardless of their race, creed, sex, or religious beliefs. As to what the concept 'dignity' means is a difficult and complex problem. Is the concept 'dignity' an empty concept, void of meaning? What does it mean when we say that this or that person has dignity? Most of the current philosophical literature has very little to say as to what dignity is. I will argue that what (...)
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  21. La question métaphysique de l’identité d’un point de vue aristotélicien : L’hylémorphisme (d’Aristote), l’ADN (de Berti) et l’essence (de Lowe).Alejandro Pérez - 2016 - Scientia et Fides 4 (1):1-15.
    Can we reify the form of a substance? Is it possible to identify DNA as the principle of our personal and numerical identity? These questions will be studied through Berti’s reading of Aristotle’s hylomorphism. Indeed, Enrico Berti proposes the identification of the DNA to the Aristotelian notion of form, thesis which raises many questions from an exegetical point of view and a metaphysical perspective. We will present the sources of Berti’s reading and one of the main objections made by Aristotle. (...)
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  22. Affects and Activity in Leibniz's De Affectibus.Markku Roinila - 2015 - In Adrian Nita (ed.), Leibniz’s Metaphysics and Adoption of Substantial Forms: Between Continuity and Transformation. Springer. pp. 73-88.
    In this paper I will discuss the doctrine of substance which emerges from Leibniz’s unpublished early memoir De affectibus of 1679. The memoir marks a new stage in Leibniz’s views of the mind. The motivation for this change can be found in Leibniz’s rejection of the Cartesian theory of passion and action in the 1670s. His early Aristotelianism and some features of Cartesianism persisted to which Leibniz added influences from Hobbes and Spinoza. His nascent dynamical concept of substance is seemingly (...)
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  23. The Evident Connexion: Hume on Personal Identity by Galen Strawson. [REVIEW]Abe Roth - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (3):491-492.
    Hume understands identity as “invariableness and uninterruptedness” through a supposed change in time, something true only of objects he calls steadfast. And Hume discerns nothing steadfast about the mind or self—nothing like a substance or soul underlying the changing and interrupted succession of perceptions we experience in ourselves. I nevertheless think of myself as the same person over time. A central concern of the Treatise discussion of personal identity is to give a psychological explanation of how we arrive at this (...)
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  24. What Was Hume's Problem with Personal Identity?Abraham Sesshu Roth - 2000 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (1):91-114.
    An appreciation of Hume’s psychology of object identity allows us to recognize certain tensions in his discussion of the origin of our belief in personal identity---tensions which have gone largely unnoticed in the secondary literature. This will serve to provide a new solution to the problem of explaining why Hume finds that discussion of personal identity so problematic when he famously disavows it in the Appendix to the Treatise. It turns out that the two psychological mechanisms which respectively generate the (...)
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  25. What Was Hume's Problem with Personal Identity?Abraham Sesshu Roth - 2000 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 61 (1):91-114.
    An appreciation of Hume's psychology of object identity allows us to recognize certain tensions in his discussion of the origin of our belief in personal identity-tensions which have gone largely unnoticed in the secondary literature. This will serve to provide a new solution to the problem of explaining why Hume finds that discussion of personal identity so problematic when he famously disavows it in the Appendix to the Treatise. It turns out that the two psychological mechanisms which respectively generate the (...)
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  26. Hume and James on Personal Identity.Robert J. Roth - 1990 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 64 (2):233-247.
  27. The Dynamic Process of Being : Two Process-Ontological Theories of Personal Identity.Daniel R. Siakel - 2014 - Process Studies 43 (2):4-28.
    The purpose of this article is to introduce, interpret, and develop two incompatible process -ontological theories of personal identity that have received little attention in analytic metaphysics. The first theory derives from the notion of personal identity proposed in Alfred North Whitehead’s philosophy, but I interpret this notion differently from previous commentators. The Whiteheadian theory may appeal to those who believe that personal identity involves an entity or entities that are essentially dynamic, but has nothing to do with diachronic objectual (...)
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  28. Endlichkeit ohne Unendlichkeit? Anmerkungen zu Heideggers Wegkreuzung mit Hegel im Seinsproblem.Anne Sophie Spann - 2012 - Philosophisches Jahrbuch 119 119 (2):283-316.
    In destructing traditional metaphysics, Heidegger accuses German Idealism of eliminating the finite in favour of the infinite. Particularly Hegel is criticized for ignoring the true finitude of Dasein and thereby misinterpreting being as infinite absolute. The paper explores this criticism in three steps. First, the main features of Heidegger’s early metaphysics of finite Dasein as developed in Being and Time will be traced, followed, second, by an examination of Heidegger’s claim that Hegel’s absolute has a temporal-finite origin. Taking a closer (...)
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  29. Parfit, Personal Identity, and What Matters.Clay Davis Splawn - unknown
    The problem of personal identity has vexed philosophers since its initial formulation by John Locke. He argued that "person" is a distinct ontological entity' y from "man." In so doing, he initiated a separation of the physical and psychological which nearly all later philosophers follow. Some, unsatisfied by Locke's preference for the psychological, argue that physicality is the essential feature of personhood. Others, more inclined to support Locke, argue that psychology is the essential feature. A large portion of the discussion (...)
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  30. Hume on Identity: A Defense.Jim Stone - 1981 - Philosophical Studies 40 (2):275 - 282.
  31. Сократ как пророк. Архаические черты ксенофонто-платоновского образа Сократа.Dmitrii Vorobev - 2017 - Философская Мысль 11:47-58.
    The object of this work is the traditional image of the philosopher Socrates, created by Plato and Xenophon. The author changes the research context, proceeding from the idea that philosophy in the Ancient Greece during the time of Socrates have not yet separated from the religion. Special place within the Greek religion holds the mantic – the ritual art of interpreting symbols, sent by the supernatural forces. An expert in the field of mantic were called mantis or prophet; they featured (...)
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