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  1. Miskawayh on Pleasure.Peter Adamson - 2015 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 25 (2):199-223.
  2. The Paradox of Pleasure and Pain: A Study of the Concept of Pain in Aristotle.Rosemary Agonito - 1976 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 57 (2):105.
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  3. A Study of Plato's 'Philebus'.Rogers Garland Albritton - 1955 - Dissertation, Princeton University
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  4. Pleasure And Pain In Plato’s «Laws».Joseph Angert-Quilter - 2008 - Existentia 18 (1-2):135-146.
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  5. Epicurus on Pleasure and Happiness.Julia Annas - 1987 - Philosophical Topics 15 (2):5-21.
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  6. Aristotle on Pleasure and Goodness.Julia Annas - 1980 - In Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.), Essays on Aristotle's Ethics. University of California Press. pp. 285--99.
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  7. Pleasure: 'The Choice of Hercules'.Lorraine Marie Arangno - 2013 - The European Legacy 18 (2):197-208.
    In this article I contend that John Stuart Mill's Utilitarianism has been widely misunderstood, and hence the importance of his philosophical project has been diminished. This misunderstanding arises primarily from misconceptions regarding Mill's definition of pleasure. However, these misconceptions may be successfully resolved by reflecting on Mill's educational roots and his commitment to Greco-Roman philosophy. In particular, I hold that a deeper understanding of Mill's philosophical progenitors (i.e., Aristotle and Epicurus) would lead us to conclude that for Mill the 'pleasures' (...)
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  8. Impure Intellectual Pleasure and the Phaedrus.Kelly E. Arenson - 2016 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (1):21-45.
    This paper considers how Plato can account for the fact that pain features prominently in the intellectual pleasures of philosophers, given that in his view pleasures mixed with pain are ontologically deficient and inferior to ‘pure,’ painless pleasures. After ruling out the view that Plato does not believe intellectual pleasures are actually painful, I argue that he provides a coherent and overlooked account of pleasure in the Phaedrus, where purity does not factor into the philosopher’s judgment of pleasures at all; (...)
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  9. Review of Kurt Lampe, The Birth of Hedonism: The Cyrenaic Philosophers and Pleasure as a Way of Life. [REVIEW]Kelly E. Arenson - 2016 - Polis 33 (1):205-9.
  10. Pleasure.Kelly E. Arenson - 2009 - In M. Gagarin (ed.), Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome. Oxford University Press.
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  11. The Eudemian Ethics. Aristotle - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    The Eudemian Ethics is a major treatise on moral philosophy whose central concern is what makes life worth living. This is the first time it has been published in its entirety in any modern language. Anthony Kenny's fine translation is accompanied by a lucid introduction and explanatory notes.
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  12. Nicomachean Ethics. Aristotle - 1999 - Courier Dover Publications.
    Aristotle identifies the goal of life as happiness and discusses its attainment through the contemplation of philosophic truth.
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  13. The Moral Philosophy of Aristotle Consisting of a Translation of the Nicomachean Ethics, and of the Paraphrase Attributed to Andronicus of Rhodes, with an Introductory Analysis of Each Book.Edwin Aristotle, Walter Mooney Andronicus, William Archibald Hatch & Spooner - 1879 - Murray.
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  14. Aristotle on Pleasure a Translation of Part of the Seventh Book of the Nicomachean Ethics. With Notes.Francis Aristotle, C. Macpherson & Whittingham - 1854 - Francis Macpherson.
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  15. The Ethics of Aristotle the Nicomachean Ethics.J. A. K. Aristotle & Thomson - 1953 - Allen & Unwin.
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  16. The Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle.J. A. Aristotle, D. P. Smith & Chase - 1911 - Dent.
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  17. The Pocket Aristotle Selections From Psychology, Physics, Politics, Nicomachean Ethics, Metaphysics and Poetics.Justin Aristotle & Kaplan - 1958
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  18. Nicomachean Ethics.Michael Aristotle & Pakaluk - 1998
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  19. A New Translation of the Nicomachean Ethics of Artistotle.R. Aristotle, Brown Pearson & Hurst Longman - 1819 - Printed for R. Pearson; Sold Also by Messrs. Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, London.
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  20. Nicomachean Ethics.Roger Aristotle & Crisp - 2000
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  21. Santayana’s Qualification of Objectified Pleasure.Jerome Ashmore - 1964 - Memorias Del XIII Congreso Internacional de Filosofía 8:273-280.
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  22. Nicomachean Ethics NE VII. 14, 1154a 22-B34: The Pain of the Living and Divine Pleasure.Gwenaëlle Aubry - 2009 - In Carlo Natali (ed.), Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, Book Vii: Symposium Aristotelicum. Oxford University Press.
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  23. Nicomachean Ethics VII. 14 (1154a22-B34) : The Pain of the Living and Divine Pleasure.Gwenaëlle Aubry - 2009 - In Carlo Natali (ed.), Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford University Press.
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  24. Processes as Pleasures in EN Vii 11-14.Joachim Aufderheide - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):135-157.
  25. The Ethics Weinman Pleasure in Aristotle's Ethics. Pp. X + 157. London and New York: Continuum, 2007. Cased, £70, US$135. ISBN: 978-0-8264-9604-1. [REVIEW]Joachim Aufderheide - 2012 - The Classical Review 62 (1):82-83.
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  26. The Value of Pleasure in Plato's Philebus and Aristotle's Ethics.Joachim Aufderheide - unknown
    This thesis is a study of the theories of pleasure as proposed in Plato’s Philebus, Aristotle’s EN VII.11-14 and EN X.1-5, with particular emphasis on the value of pleasure. Focusing on the Philebus in Chapters 1 and 2, I argue that the account of pleasure as restorative process of a harmonious state in the soul is in tension with Plato’s claim that some pleasures are good in their own right. I show that there are in fact two ways in which (...)
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  27. Fools and Malicious Pleasure in Plato's Philebus.Emily A. Austin - 2012 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (2):125-139.
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  28. A Contemporary Account of Sensory Pleasure.Murat Aydede - forthcoming - In Lisa Shapiro (ed.), Pleasure: A History. Oxford University Press.
    [This is the penultimate version, please send me an email for the final version]. Some sensations are pleasant, some unpleasant, and some are neither. Furthermore, those that are pleasant or unpleasant are so to different degrees. In this essay, I want to explore what kind of a difference is the difference between these three kinds of sensations. I will develop a comprehensive three-level account of sensory pleasure that is simultaneously adverbialist, functionalist and is also a version of a satisfied experiential-desire (...)
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  29. Hume's Place in the History of Ethics.Annette Baier - 2013 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 399.
    This chapter begins with a description of the general character of Hume's ethics, which are Epicurean in that he assumes that pleasure is good, and every good thing is pleasing. All virtues, for him, are ‘agreeable or useful’ to their possessor or to others, and the useful is defined as what can be expected to yield future pleasure. The discussion then covers Hume's views on sympathy and the principles governing our approbations; trust and its enlargement by social ‘artifices’; natural virtues, (...)
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  30. Pleasure and Power, Virtues and Vices.Dirk Baltzly, Dougal Blyth & Harold Tarrant (eds.) - 2001 - Prudentia Supplement.
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  31. Aristotle and Ryle on Pleasure.Edward Totterson Bartlett - 1970 - Dissertation, University of Washington
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  32. Nicomachean Ethics, Commentaries on Aristotle's.István P. Bejczy - 2011 - In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. pp. 889--892.
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  33. Alle lust Wil eeuwigheid: Een Kleine freudiaanse taxonomie Van de lust.P. Vanden Berghe - 2000 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 62 (1):27 - 65.
    This article deals with the following question. Does Freud's description of pleasureas the result of a (significant) reduction of tension (pleasure principle), imply that all pleasure is to be understood in terms of tension, and moreover, in terms of a transition between two states of tension, and again in terms of a reduction of tension? Although Freud certainly provides grounds for such an interpretation, a closer reading of his work (in particular his Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality, 1905) (...)
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  34. A Note On The Added Seventh Book Of The Nicomachean Ethics In Arabic.Lawrence Berman - 1962 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 82 (4):555-556.
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  35. Socrates and Callicles on Pleasure.Scott Berman - 1991 - Phronesis 36 (2):117-140.
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  36. Lust en onlust: Poging tot een filosofische fundering Van de psychoanalytische begrippen.Rudolf Bernet - 2001 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 63 (3):517 - 541.
    A correct understanding of what Freud means by “pleasure” and what he thinks of the possible ways to obtain pleasure requires an examination of his conceptions of the drive and of the libidinal body. Both theories are built on a variety of traditional philosophical views, the examination of which can help to overcome some of their obscurities. The reference to Leibniz and his Aristotelian understanding of the relation between pleasure and the force (vis activa) which animates the substance and maintains (...)
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  37. Plato on Tyranny, Philosophy, and Pleasure.Martin A. Bertman - 1985 - Apeiron 19 (2):152 - 160.
  38. Pleasure and the Two Happinesses in Aristotle.Martin A. Bertman - 1972 - Apeiron 6 (2):30 - 36.
  39. Review of Foucault, The Use of Pleasure. [REVIEW]Carole Blair - 1988 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 21 (3):237-240.
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  40. Pleasures of Benthamism, K. Blake.Kathleen Blake - 2012 - Revue D’Études Benthamiennes (11).
    Le propos est précédé par une illustration, la seule de l’ouvrage, extraite d’une Histoire de l’industrie du coton en Grande-Bretagne parue en 1835. Il s’agit de la reproduction d’un dessin représentant le processus d’impression de motifs sur du calicot. On y voit deux hommes travailler, de façon semble-t-il minutieuse, sur deux grandes machines installées dans un atelier spacieux. L’illustration est égayée par les motifs imprimés sur les pans de tissu, qui occupent une grande partie de l’esp..
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  41. Pleasures of Benthamism: Victorian Literature, Utility, Political Economy.Kathleen Blake - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    A fresh look at the often-censured but imperfectly understood traditions of Utilitarianism and political economy in relation to Victorian literature and culture. Setting the writings of Bentham, Smith, Malthus, Mill, Dickens, Carlyle, Trollope, Eliot, Gaskell, and Tagore in historical context, Blake widens awareness of commonalities across the age.
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  42. Pleasure, Measure, and Metaphysics in Plato's "Republic" and "Philebus".Sherry Ruth Blum - 1991 - Dissertation, University of Pennsylvania
    This essay is intended to support a certain picture of the relationship between metaphysics and ethics in Plato's thought. According to that picture, Plato's moral theory remained the same with respect to its central tenets throughout the dialogues, while his metaphysical theory grew more complex, partly as a result of his attempt to provide a strong theoretical foundation for his moral theory. The particular moral views that I use as an example to illustrate this thesis are related to Plato's treatment (...)
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  43. Nicomachean Ethics VII, 1150a9-1150b28: Akrasia and Self-Control, and Softness and Endurance.Chris Bobonich - 2009 - In Carlo Natali (ed.), Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, Book Vii: Symposium Aristotelicum. Oxford University Press.
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  44. Socrates' Critique of Hedonism:: A Reading of the Philebus.David Bolotin - 1985 - Interpretation 13 (1):1-13.
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  45. J.S. Mill's Test for Higher Pleasure.Troy Booher - manuscript
    of (from Studies in the History of Ethics).
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  46. Like the Bloom on Youths: How Pleasure Completes Our Lives.Johan Brannmark - 2006 - In T. D. J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.
  47. The Theory of Pleasure According to Epicurus.Victor Brochard & Eve Grace - 2009 - Interpretation 37 (1):47-83.
    A reprint of the article "La théorie du plaisir d'après Épicure" (The Theory of Pleasure According to Epicurus), by Victor Brochard, and translated and edited by Eve Grace, which appeared in the 1904 issue of the "Journal des Savants" is presented. The article focuses on philosopher Epicurus' theory of pleasure. It notes that most historians believe that pleasure, in the view of Epicurus, is reducible to the absence of pain. The philosopher states that the pleasure of the belly is the (...)
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  48. Pleasure and the Levels Analogy: An Exegetical Note on Republic 584d-585a.J. Butler - 2004 - Classical Quarterly 54 (2):614-618.
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  49. Pleasures Neither True nor Pure: Plato's Argument for the Superiority of the Philosopher's Pleasures. "Republic", 583b-587c. [REVIEW]James Patrick Butler - 1996 - Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison
    In Book IX of the Republic, Plato presents an argument purporting to show that the philosophical life is most pleasant because pleasures other than those of the intelligent person are "not altogether true or pure". The first part considers one type of experience, the relief from pain , and argues that though it may appear pleasant, it is not pleasant. The second part argues that intellectual processes of replenishment provide a "truer" fulfillment which, in turn, causes a true pleasure, but (...)
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  50. Philebus and Epinomis. [REVIEW]B. C. - 1956 - Review of Metaphysics 10 (2):367-368.
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