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  1. Aristotle on Similarity, Pleasure, and the Justification of Our Choices of Friends.Vakirtzis Andreas - manuscript
  2. J.S. Mill's Test for Higher Pleasure.Troy Booher - manuscript
    of (from Studies in the History of Ethics).
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  3. A Comparison Of Plato's And Aristotle's Views On The Nature Of Pleasure.Angela Kind - unknown - Proceedings of the Heraclitean Society 21.
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  4. Pleasure and Pain in Classical Antiquity.William V. Harris (ed.) - forthcoming
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  5. Leibniz on Intellectual Pleasure, Perception of Perfection, and Power.Saja Parvizian - forthcoming - Theoria.
    Leibniz is unclear about the nature of pleasure. In some texts, he describes pleasure as a perception of perfection, while in other texts he describes pleasure as being caused by a perception of perfection. In this paper, I disambiguate two senses of ‘perception of perfection’, which clarifies Leibniz’s considered position. I argue that pleasure is a perception of an increase in a substance’s power which is caused by a substance’s knowledge of a perfection of the universe or God. This reading (...)
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  6. Aquinas, Sense Pleasure, and the State of Grace.Maria Suso Rispoli - forthcoming - New Blackfriars.
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  7. Pleasure: A History.Lisa Shapiro (ed.) - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
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  8. Power, Pleasure, and Profit: Insatiable Appetites From Machiavelli to Madison.K. Steven Vincent - forthcoming - The European Legacy:1-2.
    David Wootton has written an engaging book about the emergence of the theory that all human action is self-interested and that believes societies should be structured in ways that satisfy our “insa...
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  9. The Chinese Pleasure Book by Michael Nylan.Jeffery Lambert - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (4):1-5.
    In this vast and ambitious tome, Michael Nylan aims to "trace the evolution of pleasure theories in early China over the course of a millennium and a half", roughly from 400 BCE to 1100 CE. This involves dissecting the discourse surrounding a single graph, le 樂, which Nylan translates as pleasure, and actively distinguishes from other states such as happiness and joy. Nylan understands such pleasure as "deeper satisfactions" realized in long-term commitments and often relational in nature. In texts, pleasure (...)
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  10. Fighting Pleasure: Plato and the Expansive View of Courage.Nicholas Baima - 2019 - Journal of Value Inquiry 53 (2):255-273.
    In both the Laches (191d-e) and the Laws (1.633c-d, 1.634a-b, and 1. 635d), Plato has his protagonist defend the claim that courage (andreia) is not simply a matter of resisting pain and fear but about overcoming pleasure and desire as well. In this paper, I argue that Plato took the expansive view of courage seriously and that there are several reasons why we should too.
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  11. Aristotle on the Pleasure of Courage.Erica A. Holberg - 2019 - Polis 36 (2):289-312.
    Aristotle repeatedly qualifies the pleasure of courageous actions relative to other kinds of virtuous actions. This article argues that the pleasure of courageous actions is qualified because virtuous activity and its pleasure is dependent upon external conditions, and the external conditions of courageous actions are particularly constraining. The article shows that Curzer’s explanation of the qualified pleasure of courageous actions by the presence of pain violates Aristotle’s commitment to virtuous actions as being pleasant by their nature.
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  12. Inside Out: Pleasure in Chinese Intellectual Traditions.Ann A. Pang-White - 2019 - Journal of World Philosophies 4 (2):163-165.
    What is the role of pleasure in Chinese intellectual traditions? Do Chinese thinkers shun all desire for pleasure? Contrary to received opinion, The Chinese Pleasure Book illustrates and argues that early Chinese thinkers across traditions, from the fourth century BCE to the eleventh century CE, all assume that pleasure-seeking and pleasure-taking are part of the human condition and that it is right to engage in such actions. The volume is an ambitious project and Nylan has done a superb job.
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  13. Cicero Against Cassius on Pleasure and Virtue: A Complicated Passage From de Finibvs.Geert Roskam - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):725-733.
    In the first two books of De finibus, Cicero deals with the Epicurean view of the final goal of life. This philosophical discussion, which is preceded by a rhetorical proem that stands on itself, is framed as a dialogue between Torquatus, who defends the Epicurean position, Cicero, who attacks it, and Triarius, who confines himself to a few critical interventions. If philosophy starts in wonder, according to the celebrated passage from Plato's Theaetetus, the company meets this criterion admirably well, for (...)
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  14. Pleasure and the Divided Soul in Plato's Republic Book 9.Brooks Sommerville - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):147-166.
    In Book 9 of Plato's Republic we find three proofs for the claim that the just person is happier than the unjust person. Curiously, Socrates does not seem to consider these arguments to be coequal when he announces the third and final proof as ‘the greatest and most decisive of the overthrows’. This remark raises a couple of related questions for the interpreter. Whatever precise sense we give to μέγιστον and κυριώτατον in this passage, Socrates is clearly appealing to an (...)
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  15. Attitudinal Pleasure in Plato’s Philebus.Brooks A. Sommerville - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (3):247-276.
    This paper addresses two interpretive puzzles in Plato’s Philebus. The first concerns the claim, endorsed by both interlocutors, that the most godlike of lives is a pleasureless life of pure thinking. This appears to run afoul of the verdict of the earlier so-called ‘Choice of Lives’ argument that a mixed life is superior to either of its ‘pure’ rivals. A second concerns Socrates’ discussion of false pleasure, in which he appears to be guilty of rank equivocation. I argue that we (...)
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  16. A Contemporary Account of Sensory Pleasure.Murat Aydede - 2018 - In Lisa Shapiro (ed.), Pleasure: A History. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 239-266.
    [This is the penultimate version, please send me an email for the final version]. Some sensations are pleasant, some unpleasant, and some are neither. Furthermore, those that are pleasant or unpleasant are so to different degrees. In this essay, I want to explore what kind of a difference is the difference between these three kinds of sensations. I will develop a comprehensive three-level account of sensory pleasure that is simultaneously adverbialist, functionalist and is also a version of a satisfied experiential-desire (...)
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  17. Alexander of Aphrodisias on Pleasure and Pain in Aristotle.Wei Cheng - 2018 - In William Harris (ed.), Pleasure and Pain in Classical Times. Leiden: pp. 174-200..
  18. Dyschereia and Aporia: The Formation of a Philosophical Term.Wei Cheng - 2018 - TAPA 148 (1):75-110.
    Plato’s nephew Speusippus has been widely accepted as the historical person behind the mask of the anti-hedonists in Phlb. 42b–44c. This hypothesis is supported by, inter alia, the link between Socrates’ char- acterization of them as δυσχερεῖς and the frequent references of δυσχέρεια as ἀπορία to Speusippus in Aristotle’s Metaphysics MN. This study argues against assigning any privileged status to Speusippus in the assimilation of δυσχέρεια with ἀπορία. Instead, based on a comprehensive survey of how δυσχερ- words were used in (...)
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  19. The Dual Essence of Pleasure: Willing, Imagining and Planning the Saussurean Sublime and Beautiful in Surviving Daunting Nature and Culture.Jui-Pi Chien - 2018 - Sign Systems Studies 46 (1):44-63.
    This study seeks to update and expand the models of mind and consciousness that Ferdinand de Saussure conceived for the appreciation of linguistic signs. As a response to his theorization of the dual essence of language, this study proposes a theorization of pleasure and understanding deriving from our engagement with daunting situations in nature and culture. To begin with, the author discusses current neuroimaging findings that reveal how we may gain from low-arousal emotions. Certain benefits have been recognized that increase (...)
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  20. The Physiology of Pleasure in Hippocratic Medicine: Models and Reverberations.João Gabriel Conque - 2018 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 24:17-33.
    The main aims of this article are to demonstrate the presence of two physiological conceptions of pleasure in the Hippocratic Corpus, pointing out the differences between them and conjecturing about the reverberation of one of them in Plato’s dialogue Gorgias. We can find in texts of Greek medicine a description of pleasure produced during sexual intercourse and another related to the occurrence of pleasure during nourishment. However, the second account, unlike the first one, is strongly marked by the notion of (...)
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  21. The Physiology of Pleasure in Hippocratic Medicine: Models and Reverberations.João Gabriel Conque - 2018 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 24:17-33.
    The main aims of this article are to demonstrate the presence of two physiological conceptions of pleasure in the Hippocratic Corpus, pointing out the differences between them and conjecturing about the reverberation of one of them in Plato’s dialogue Gorgias. We can find in texts of Greek medicine a description of pleasure produced during sexual intercourse and another related to the occurrence of pleasure during nourishment. However, the second account, unlike the first one, is strongly marked by the notion of (...)
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  22. Pleasure, Pain, and the Unity of Soul in Plato's Protagoras.Vanessa de Harven & Wolfgang-Rainer Mann - 2018 - In William V. Harris (ed.), Pleasure and Pain in Classical Times. pp. 111-138.
  23. Pleasure and Pain in Classical Times.William Harris (ed.) - 2018 - Brill.
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  24. Hume on Pleasure and Value and the Kantian Challenge.André Klaudat - 2018 - Filosofia Unisinos 19 (2).
  25. John Stuart Mill: "Pleasure" in the Laws of Psychology and the Principle of Morals.Dominique Kuenzle - 2018 - In Lisa Shapiro (ed.), Pleasure: A History. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophical thinking about pleasure today, especially in the context of normative ethics, is deeply influenced by the concept’s function within Bentham’s and Mill’s Utilitarianism, according to which the moral quality of any action depends on its tendency to “maximize pleasure” and “minimize pain”. According to Mill’s own philosophy of science and language, the content and function of “pleasure” is determined by its role in scientific induction, specifically within the associationist psychological theory Mill shares with his father, James Mill. Pleasures, it (...)
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  26. Lingering: Pleasure, Desire, and Life in Kant's Critique of Judgment.Robert Lehman - 2018 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 32 (2):217-242.
    So just what Dante scorns as unworthy alike of heaven and hell, Botticelli accepts, that middle world in which men take no side in great conflicts, and decide no great causes, and make great refusals.In what follows, I examine a notion of desire that, I shall claim, is implicit in Immanuel Kant's theorization of aesthetic judgment in the Critique of Judgment.1 At first, this undertaking is likely to seem misguided. After all, Kant grounds his attempt to provide an a priori (...)
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  27. A Comparative Study on Farabi and Avicenna's Viewpoints About the Ultimate Goal of Art and The Role of Entertainment, Wonder and Pleasure.Nadia Maftouni & Mahmoud Nuri - 2018 - Avicennian Philosophy Journal 22 (59):27-40.
    In various and sundry works, Farabi and Avicenna turn to art, its objectivity, and miscellaneous functions. In their writings, art’s aims and functions become pronounced; however, art’s goals and applications can be deduced from their theory of imagination. The power of imagination can depict the sensory forms, imaginary forma, as well as intelligible truths. The ultimate goal of the individuals vs. society is to provide the public with intelligible happiness; however, entertainment, wonder, and pleasure are reckoned as acceptable benefits of (...)
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  28. Pleasure and Purpose in Kant’s Theory of Taste.Alexander Rueger - 2018 - Kant-Studien 109 (1):101-123.
    In the Critique of Judgment Kant repeatedly points out that it is only the pleasure of taste that reveals to us the need to introduce a third faculty of the mind with its own a priori principle. In order to elucidate this claim I discuss two general principles about pleasure that Kant presents, the transcendental definition of pleasure from § 10 and the principle from the Introduction that connects pleasure with the achievement of an aim. Precursors of these principles had (...)
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  29. Aristotle on the Heterogeneity of Pleasure.Matthew Strohl - 2018 - In Lisa Shapiro (ed.), Pleasure: A History.
    In Nicomachean Ethics X.5, Aristotle gives a series of arguments for the claim that pleasures differ from one another in kind in accordance with the differences in kind among the activities they arise in connection with. I develop an interpretation of these arguments based on an interpretation of his theory of pleasure (which I have defended elsewhere) according to which pleasure is the perfection of perfect activity. In the course of developing this interpretation, I reconstruct Aristotle’s phenomenology of pleasure, arguing (...)
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  30. Rethinking the Division of Pleasure in Plato’s Philebus.Thomas Tuozzo - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 2 (2):325-329.
    In the Philebus Socrates presents his division of the kinds of pleasures and pains to an interlocutor who confesses himself incapable of employing the dialectical method of division that this task ideally requires and is committed to defending a hedonist theory of value. These two features of his interlocutor affect the way in which Socrates presents his accounts of pleasure and pain. The philosophical reader needs to rethink the accounts of pleasure and pain to produce an account that is free (...)
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  31. Pleasure and Friendship in Aristotle’s Ethics.Andreas Vakirtzis - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 2 (2):331-335.
    Why do we choose agent X and not Y to be our friend? I examine aspects of Aristotle’s theories of virtuous friendship and pleasure to answer this question. Specifically, I argue that pleasure is connected to the good, and has two fundamental functions for Aristotle: 1) it is a judgment of value, and 2) it accompanies good activity. Furthermore, I show that the pleasure from the good plays an instrumental role in the friendship among virtuous agents. In particular, it is (...)
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  32. Pleasure Principle and Perfect Happiness: Morality in Jacques Lacan and Zhuangzi.Quan Wang - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (3):259-276.
    ABSTRACTJacques Lacan studied Chinese classics and received much inspiration from Zhuangzi. This paper concentrates on the comparative study of morality in those two thinkers from three connecting levels, namely, nature as the source of ethical codes, reason as the means to arrive at the ethical state, and pleasure as the ultimate purpose of morality. The investigation into the topic is enlightening for posthuman morality. Zhuangzi’s idea of the poetics of oneness inspires the Lacanian concept of the Real and ushers us (...)
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  33. How Are We to Read Beyond the Pleasure Principle?Monique David-Ménard - 2017 - Oxford Literary Review 39 (2):246-264.
    This paper considers Freud's 1920 text, Beyond the Pleasure Principle, in light of Jacques Derrida's critical commentary on it in The Post Card. Against the deconstructive reading that highlights the performative aspects of Freud's speculative remarks, David-Ménard reads Freud's theory of the death drive as an epistemological and experimental hypothesis necessary for giving an account of the complexity and diversity of the clinical phenomenon of repetition in psychoanalysis. Though the death drive never appears locatable as such in the various examples (...)
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  34. The Measure of Pleasure: A Note on the Protagoras.Richard Davies - 2017 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 3 (3):301-315.
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  35. The Peak of Experiencing Pleasure by Intellective Soul and Obstacles of Apprehending It in Avicenna’s View.’Asgar Dirbaz & Mas’Oodeh Fazel Yeganeh - 2017 - Journal of Philosophical Theological Research 19 (73):26-45.
    Pleasure is a long-discussed issue in philosophy, because it is the result of soul and its powers which are discussed in philosophy. Therefore, such philosophers as Aristotle, Farabi, Avicenna, and Mulla Sadra have discussed it extensively in their writings. In his various works, Avicenna has scrutinized the problem of pleasure. Having referred to one type of pleasure special for each human power, he regards the apprehension of absolute good as the most delightful thing for intellective soul, which should be achieved (...)
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  36. Pleasure and the Meaning of Life According to Ibn Sina's Viewpoint.Seyede Narjes Emranian & Amir Abbas Alizamani - 2017 - Avicennian Philosophy Journal 21 (57):67-85.
    Applying analytical and descriptive approaches, this inquiry reveals the relationship between the meaning of life and the role of pleasure in achieving it Ibn Sina presents well-being as something which is desired for- itself and end for-itself and believes that well-being is a necessary and sufficient condition for a meaningful life. In his view, there is a deep relation between meaning and pleasure. Pleasure is the direct and innate perception of individual perceptual faculty to what in his/her view is good (...)
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  37. The Divine Method and the Disunity of Pleasure in the Philebus.Emily Fletcher - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):179-208.
    the philebus is a puzzling dialogue, both for the substantive views it puts forward,1 and for the unexpected twists and turns of the discussion. Commentators frequently complain about the dialogue's lack of unity, due to its many apparently unnecessary digressions and interruptions.2 The discussion of the so-called 'divine method' seems to be one of the worst offenders on this score, for it is described and exemplified at length, only to be set aside as unnecessary shortly afterwards.I argue that the divine (...)
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  38. Renunciation, Pleasure, and the Good Life in the Saṃnyāsa Upaniṣads.Christopher G. Framarin - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):140-159.
    The Saṃnyāsa Upaniṣads characterize the life of the saṃnyāsin as devoid of earthly pleasures. At the same time, these and other texts record confusion and suspicion toward those who would pursue such a life, and disbelief that such severe austerity could be required. To many, the saṃnyāsin seems to forsake the good life in forsaking earthly pleasures. I call this the ‘Precluded Pleasures Objection’ to the saṃnyāsin ideal. A number of replies to the Precluded Pleasures Objection might be drawn from (...)
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  39. The Science of Measuring Pleasure and Pain.Cynthia Freeland - 2017 - In Olof Pettersson & Vigdis Songe-Møller (eds.), Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry. Springer.
    Near the end of the Protagoras there is a famous argument in which Socrates appears to deny the possibility of weakness of will. The passage is part of a longer examination of whether virtue can be taught and of the unity of the virtues. Socrates and Protagoras discuss whether it makes sense to say, as people commonly do, that they sometimes choose to do things they know are not best for them because they are “overcome by pleasure.” Supposedly “the many” (...)
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  40. Is Pleasure Any Good? Weakness of Will and the Art of Measurement in Plato’s Protagoras.Vivil Valvik Haraldsen - 2017 - In Olof Pettersson & Vigdis Songe-Møller (eds.), Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry. Springer.
    This article is concerned with the famous passage toward the end of the Protagoras often referred to as containing the argument against the possibility of akrasia or weakness of will, where Socrates sets out a hedonistic position and on its basis argues against the possibility of being overcome by pleasure. The article explores the function of the hedonistic position in the philosophical argumentation of the dialogue. To this purpose, it traces the repeated emphasis in the text that the hedonistic thesis (...)
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  41. The Possibility of Culture: Pleasure and Moral Development in Kant’s Aesthetics.Samuel Hughes - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (3):334-337.
    © British Society of Aesthetics 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comRecent interpretations of Kant’s ethics have tended to foreground its more humane characteristics, stressing the prominence of emotion, habituation and virtue, distancing us from the harsh and mechanical Kant of legend.1 At the same time there has been increasing interest among aestheticians in the moral significance of the aesthetic and in the role it may (...)
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  42. Kant on Animal and Human Pleasure.Alexandra Newton - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 47 (4):518-540.
    Feeling, for any animal, is a faculty of comparing objects or representations with regard to whether they promote its vital powers or hinder them. But whereas these comparisons presuppose a species-concept in non-rational animals, nature has not equipped the human being with a universal principle or life-form that would determine what agrees or disagrees with it. As humans, we must determine our mode of life for ourselves. Contrary to other interpretations, I argue that this places the human capacity for pleasure (...)
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  43. Varieties of Pleasure in Plato and Aristotle.Anthony Price - 2017 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 52:177-208.
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  44. Communicability Without Communication: Kant and Proust on Aesthetic Pleasure.Joseph Tanke - 2017 - Diacritics 45 (1):76-92.
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  45. Impure Intellectual Pleasure and the Phaedrus.Kelly E. Arenson - 2016 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (1):21-45.
    This paper considers how Plato can account for the fact that pain features prominently in the intellectual pleasures of philosophers, given that in his view pleasures mixed with pain are ontologically deficient and inferior to ‘pure,’ painless pleasures. After ruling out the view that Plato does not believe intellectual pleasures are actually painful, I argue that he provides a coherent and overlooked account of pleasure in the Phaedrus, where purity does not factor into the philosopher’s judgment of pleasures at all; (...)
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  46. Aristotle Against Delos: Pleasure in Nicomachean Ethics X.Joachim Aufderheide - 2016 - Phronesis 61 (3):284-306.
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  47. The Unity of Definition in the Nicomachean Ethics.Anna Cremaldi - 2016 - Southwest Philosophy Review 32 (2):95-113.
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  48. The Importance of Pleasure in the Moral for Kant's Ethics.Erica A. Holberg - 2016 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 54 (2):226-246.
    I argue for a new reading of Kant's claim that respect is the moral incentive; this reading accommodates the central insights of the affectivist and intellectualist readings of respect, while avoiding shortcomings of each. I show that within Kant's ethical system, the feeling of respect should be understood as paradigmatic of a kind of pleasure, pleasure in the moral. The motivational power of respect arises from its nature as pleasurable feeling, but the feeling does not directly motivate individual dutiful actions. (...)
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  49. Plotinus and Epicurus: Matter, Perception, Pleasure.Angela Longo & Daniela Patrizia Taormina (eds.) - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    This volume investigates the reasons why Plotinus, a philosopher inspired by Plato, made critical use of Epicurean philosophy. Eminent scholars show that some fundamental Epicurean conceptions pertaining to ethics, physics, epistemology and theology are drawn upon in the Enneads to discuss crucial notions such as pleasure and happiness, providence and fate, matter and the role of sense perception, intuition and intellectual evidence in relation to the process of knowledge acquisition. By focusing on the meaning of these terms in Epicureanism, Plotinus (...)
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  50. Hedonistic Theories of Well-Being in Antiquity.Tim O'Keefe - 2016 - In Guy Fletcher (ed.), Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Well-Being.
    Focuses on the theories of the Epicureans and Cyrenaics in light of Plato's and Aristotle's criticisms of hedonism. Closes with a brief discussion of how the Pyrrhonian skeptical conception of the telos compares to the Epicureans'.
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