This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:

7 found
Order:
Material to categorize
  1. Olympe de Gouges on Slavery.Elisa Orrù - 2020 - Diacronìa 2 (2):95-121.
    In addition to authoring the Declaration of the Rights of Woman and of Citizen (1791), for which she is generally known today, Olympe de Gouges devoted several writings to denouncing slavery. In this article, I present the contents of these works by placing them in the context of both the Parisian debate and the situation in the colonies. Furthermore, I highlight the theoretical contribution of these writings with respect to the specific situation of slavery and, more generally, with respect to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Review of 'Thomas Paine and the Idea of Human Rights' by Robert Lamb. [REVIEW]Michael L. Frazer - 2016 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 1.
  3. Hohfeld Vs. The Legal Realists.David Frydrych - 2018 - Legal Theory 24 (4):291-344.
    2018 marked the centenary of Wesley Hohfeld’s untimely passing. Curiously, in recent years quite a few legal historians and philosophers have identified him as a Legal Realist. This article argues that Hohfeld was no such thing, that his work need not be understood in such lights, and that he in fact made a smaller contribution to jurisprudence than is generally believed. He has nothing to do with theories of official decision-making that identify “extra-legal” factors as the real drivers of judicial (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4. Rights Modelling.David Frydrych - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 30 (1):125-157.
    This paper has four aims. First it distinguishes two kinds of philosophical accounts of the ‘formal’ features of rights: models and theories. Models outline the ‘conceptually basic’ types of rights (if indeed a given model deems there to be more than one), their differences, and their relationships with duties, liabilities, etc. Theories of rights posit a supposed ultimate purpose for all rights and provide criteria for determining what counts as ‘a right’ in the first place. Second, the paper argues that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. What We Own Before Property: Hugo Grotius and the Suum.Alejandra Mancilla - 2015 - Grotiana 36 (1):63-77.
    _ Source: _Volume 36, Issue 1, pp 63 - 77 At the basis of modern natural law theories, the concept of the _suum_, i.e. what belongs to the person, has received little scholarly attention despite its importance both in explaining and justifying not only the genealogy of property, but also that of morality and war. In this essay I focus on Grotius’s account of the _suum_ and examine what it is, what things it includes, what rights it gives rise to, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6. Rawls and the Distribution of Human Resources By Those in the Animal Rights Community.Alan C. Clune - 2014 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):251-266.
    Until now, arguments for the distribution of resources by those who care about the plight of human-used animals have been either utilitarian or libertarian in nature. The utilitarian case has been made in writing by both activists and philosophers. The libertarian case is more a position that I have found comes naturally to many in the animal movement. In this article I make use of elements of Rawls’ A Theory of Justice to make a case for two principles of justice (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Natural Right and the American Imagination: Political Philosophy in Novel Form.George Anastaplo - 1993 - Review of Metaphysics 47 (1):172-173.
    The principal authors whose fiction is drawn upon in this fine book are James Fenimore Cooper, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Mark Twain, Ernest Hemingway, and William Faulkner. This book, which is clear and straightforward in its presentations, is obviously useful for providing graphic illustrations for, and heightening interest in, political science courses. The openness of students to engaging stories is thereby put to salutary use by a political scientist who always has something instructive to say about the often-familiar fiction that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark