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  1. Glory and the Evolution of Hobbes’s Disagreement Theory of War: From Elements to Leviathan.Arash Abizadeh - 2020 - History of Political Thought 41 (2):265-298.
    The centrality of glory, contempt, and revengefulness to Leviathan’s account of war is highlighted by three contextual features: Hobbes’s displacement of the traditional conception of glory as intrinsically intersubjective and comparative; his incorporation of the Aristotelian view that revengefulness is provoked by expressions of mere contempt; and the evolution of his account between 1640 and 1651. An archeology of Leviathan’s famous chapter thirteen confirms that Hobbes’s thesis throughout his career was that disagreement is the universal cause of war because prickly, (...)
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  2. Hobbes Et Spinoza Lecteurs de Tacite : Histoire Et politiqueHobbes and Spinoza as Readers of Tacitus: History and Politics.Marta Libertà De Bastiani - 2020 - Astérion 23.
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  3. Representation and Scholastic Political Thought.Sean Messarra - 2020 - History of European Ideas 46 (6):737-753.
    ABSTRACT This article traces the considerable development of a language of representation derived from Cicero's De officiis from late antiquity into early modern scholastic political thought. Cicero turned to the term persona, which signified the mask worn by actors of ancient theatre, to describe the particular duty of a magistrate who was understood ‘to bear the person of the city [se gerere personam civitatis]’. Thomas Hobbes's reliance on this terminology for his theory of the state in Leviathan is well known, (...)
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  4. Representation and the Fall.Eric Nelson - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (3):647-676.
    This article makes the case that the early modern debate over political representation was deeply intertwined with a theological debate over the Fall. The “resemblance” theory of representation adopted by English Parliamentarians was first formulated by Calvinists to make the case that Adam represented humanity, despite the fact that humanity had never authorized him to act in their name. The Royalist rejoinder, which treated authorization as a necessary and sufficient condition of representation, began life instead as a Pelagian response to (...)
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  5. Shakespeare Between Machiavelli and Hobbes: Dead Body Politics: By Andrew Moore, Lanham, MD, Lexington Books, 2016, Xiii+175 Pp., $90.00/£60.00. [REVIEW]Zoltán Gábor Szűcs - 2019 - The European Legacy 25 (2):229-231.
    Volume 25, Issue 2, February - March 2020, Page 229-231.
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  6. The Legacy Of Scotus In Modern Political Philosophy.Ignacio Miralbell - 2017 - Ideas Y Valores 66 (163):105-124.
    RESUMEN Se busca mostrar la fuerte herencia voluntarista tardo-medieval de origen escotista en la filosofía política moderna, sobre todo en Bodino, Maquiavelo y Hobbes, pero también en Locke, Rousseau y Kant. Se examina la concepción escotista del poder y su fundamentación filosófico-teológica, así como algunos tópicos de su "nueva" metafísica y antropología para desglosar sus consecuencias directas o indirectas en la filosofía política moderna. ABSTRACT The article seeks to demonstrate the strong late medieval voluntaristic legacy of Scotus in modern political (...)
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  7. La conciliación de lo político y lo religioso. Suárez y Hobbes sobre la potestad indirecta.Miguel Saralegui - 2017 - Anuario Filosófico 50 (2):297-321.
    En este artículo, se estudiará la defensa de Suárez de la potestad indirecta, así como la crítica de Hobbes, tema descuidado por la bibliografía. A pesar de que se suele considerar la postura suareciana como moderada, insistiré en su similitud con la teocracia. Por otra parte, aunque se reconocerá a Hobbes como más cercano a la solución contemporánea, se recordará que su pulsión monocrática le impide dar cuenta de cómo es posible la coexistencia armónica de un poder civil y otro (...)
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  8. Hobbes on Natural Philosophy as "True Physics" and Mixed Mathematics.Marcus P. Adams - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 56:43-51.
    I offer an alternative account of the relationship of Hobbesian geometry to natural philosophy by arguing that mixed mathematics provided Hobbes with a model for thinking about it. In mixed mathematics, one may borrow causal principles from one science and use them in another science without there being a deductive relationship between those two sciences. Natural philosophy for Hobbes is mixed because an explanation may combine observations from experience (the ‘that’) with causal principles from geometry (the ‘why’). My argument shows (...)
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  9. La curiosità e le passioni della conoscenza. Filosofia e scienze da Montaigne a Hobbes.Gregorio Baldin - 2016 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 71 (3):535-538.
  10. Hobbes on the Order of Sciences: A Partial Defense of the Mathematization Thesis.Zvi Biener - 2016 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 54 (3):312-332.
    Accounts of Hobbes’s ‘system’ of sciences oscillate between two extremes. On one extreme, the system is portrayed as wholly axiomtic-deductive, with statecraft being deduced in an unbroken chain from the principles of logic and first philosophy. On the other, it is portrayed as rife with conceptual cracks and fissures, with Hobbes’s statements about its deductive structure amounting to mere window-dressing. This paper argues that a middle way is found by conceiving of Hobbes’s _Elements of Philosophy_ on the model of a (...)
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  11. Hobbes on ‘Conatus’: A Study in the Foundations of Hobbesian Philosophy.Douglas Jesseph - 2016 - Hobbes Studies 29 (1):66-85.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 66 - 85 This paper will deal with the notion of _conatus_ and the role it plays in Hobbes’s program for natural philosophy. As defined by Hobbes, the _conatus_ of a body is essentially its instantaneous motion, and he sees this as the means to account for a variety of phenomena in both natural philosophy and mathematics. Although I foucs principally on Hobbesian physics, I will also consider the extent to which Hobbes’s account (...)
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  12. Shakespeare Between Machiavelli and Hobbes: Dead Body Politics.Andrew Moore - 2016 - Lexington Books.
    Shakespeare between Machiavelli and Hobbes explores Shakespeare’s political outlook by comparing some of the playwright’s best-known works to the works of Italian political theorist Niccolò Machiavelli and English social contract theorist Thomas Hobbes. This ultimately reveals the materialist principles that underpin Shakespeare’s imaginary states.
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  13. The Hardwick Library and Hobbes’s Early Intellectual Development. [REVIEW]James Griffith - 2015 - Bulletin Hobbes, Archives de Philosophie 27:376-377.
    This is a review of a book edited by Richard Talaska.
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  14. Hobbes's and Zabarella's Methods: A Missing Link.Helen Hattab - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (3):461-485.
    early modern philosophers commonly appeal to a mathematical method to demonstrate their philosophical claims. Since such claims are not always followed by what we would recognize as mathematical proofs, they are often dismissed as mere rhetoric. René Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, and Benedict de Spinoza are perhaps the most well-known early modern philosophers who fall into this category. It is a matter of dispute whether the ordo geometricus amounts to more than a method of presentation in Spinoza’s philosophy. Descartes and Hobbes (...)
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  15. Hobbes, the Scriblerians and the History of Philosophy by Conal Condren.Douglas M. Jesseph - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (3):614-615.
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  16. A Very British Hobbes, or A More European Hobbes?Patricia Springborg - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):368-386.
    Malcolm’s English-Latin Leviathan is a marvelous technical accomplishment. My issues are with his contextualization, seeing Leviathan primarily as an advice book for Hobbes’s teenage pupil, the future Charles II. Malcolm’s localization involves minimalizing Leviathan's remoter sources, so the European Republic of Letters, for which Hobbes so painstakingly translated his works into Latin, is almost entirely missing, along with current European traditions of Hobbes scholarship. Is this very British Hobbes truly credible, or do we need a more European Hobbes to account (...)
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  17. Publicity, Privacy, and Religious Toleration in Hobbes's Leviathan.Arash Abizadeh - 2013 - Modern Intellectual History 10 (2):261-291.
    What motivated an absolutist Erastian who rejected religious freedom, defended uniform public worship, and deemed the public expression of disagreement a catalyst for war to endorse a movement known to history as the champion of toleration, no coercion in religion, and separation of church and state? At least three factors motivated Hobbes’s 1651 endorsement of Independency: the Erastianism of Cromwellian Independency, the influence of the politique tradition, and, paradoxically, the contribution of early-modern practices of toleration to maintaining the public sphere’s (...)
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  18. James Dundas on the Hobbesian State of Nature.Alexander Broadie - 2013 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (1):1-13.
    During the last few months of his life James Dundas, first Lord Arniston (c. 1620–79), wrote a monograph on moral philosophy. It appears never to have been mentioned in any work whether academic or otherwise. It includes a discussion promoting three doctrines against Hobbes. First, that something is simply good and something is simply bad, and that the first rule of morals is not self-love, but the glory of God. Secondly, the state of nature is not a state of war. (...)
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  19. Fourth Musketeer of Social Contract Theory.Charles Devellennes - 2013 - History of Political Thought 34 (3):459-478.
    Holbach's famous materialistic and atheistic philosophy is less known for its political dimension. Yet the author proposed an original theory of the social contract in his works of the 1770s. This article details the main features of his political thought and of his social contract, notably his proposal of an 'Ethocracy' grounded in utility and justice. This Ethocracy paves the way for a pluralist republicanism that has original features in the history of ideas. Holbach was a reader of Hobbes and (...)
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  20. Substance and Essence.Michael Edwards - 2013 - In Peter R. Anstey (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 192.
    This chapter examines the changes in the concept of substance and essence in British philosophy during the seventeenth century. It analyzes the roles played by substance and essence in different versions of scholastic and Aristotelian philosophy studied and taught during this period, and considers the criticism of Thomas Hobbes, Robert Boyle, and John Locke on these issues. The chapter suggests that Hobbes, Boyle, and Locke engaged with the context of scholastic logic and metaphysics in their discussions of substance and their (...)
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  21. Mortal Gods: Science, Politics, and the Humanist Ambitions of Thomas Hobbes. [REVIEW]James Griffith - 2013 - Bulletin Hobbes, Archives de Philosophie 25:354-355.
    This is a review of a book by Ted H. Miller.
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  22. Condren, Conal . Hobbes, the Scriblerians and the History of Philosophy. London: Pickering & Chatto, 234 Pp., £60, ISBN: 978-1-84893-223-4. [REVIEW]Elliott Karstadt - 2013 - Hobbes Studies 26 (2):195-199.
  23. Richard A. Talaska, The Hardwick Library and Hobbes’s Early Intellectual Development, Philosophy Documentation Center , 2013, 148 Pp., ISBN: 978-1-889680-02-6, 30 $. [REVIEW]Noel Malcolm - 2013 - Hobbes Studies 26 (2):200-203.
  24. Mimetic Theories of Religion and Violence.Wolfgang Palaver - 2013 - The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Violence:533-553.
    This chapter concentrates on the mimetic theory of Rene Girard in evaluating foundational myths of violence. It shows Girard's notion of the scapegoating mechanism, whereby a substitute victim absorbs the mimetic animosities of the entire group and thereby promotes peace, as applicable to the disturbing tendency to direct violence outward toward exogenous groups. According to Girard, competition is the main source of human violence. His explanation, that violence has its roots in competition or mimetic rivalry, contributes to Thomas Hobbes, who (...)
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  25. Baiting the Bear: The Anglicant Attack on Hobbes in the Later 1660s.Jon Parkin - 2013 - History of Political Thought 34 (3):421-458.
    During the later 1660s Thomas Hobbes clearly believed that he was being targeted by dangerous enemies but to date little evidence has been brought to substantiate Hobbes's claims. This article considers evidence suggesting that Hobbes was in fact in danger from clerical and lay enemies who regarded the elderly thinker as a dangerous ideological threat to church and state. What they did, and how Hobbes responded to their actions, helps us to understand the philosopher's place in the politics of the (...)
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  26. The Hardwick Library and Hobbes's Early Intellectual Development.Richard A. Talaska - 2013 - Philosophy Documentation Center.
    This work publishes the entirety of Hobbes's MS E.1.A, "Old Catalogue," the 1630s catalogue of the Hardwick/Chatsworth library. The author provides handwriting samples and a full discussion of the problem of identifying Hobbes's handwriting to prove that the "Old Catalogue" is in Hobbes's own handwriting. He goes on to prove that almost all the books in the library were purchased by the Devonshires for Hobbes's own purposes, and that the Catalogue dates to the 1630s.
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  27. Margaret Cavendish and Thomas Hobbes on Freedom, Education, and Women.Karen Detlefsen - 2012 - In Nancy J. Hirschmann & Joanne H. Wright (eds.), Feminist Interpretations of Thomas Hobbes. The Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 149-168.
    In this paper, I argue that Margaret Cavendish’s account of freedom, and the role of education in freedom, is better able to account for the specifics of women’s lives than are Thomas Hobbes’ accounts of these topics. The differences between the two is grounded in their differing conceptions of the metaphysics of human nature, though the full richness of Cavendish’s approach to women, their minds and their freedom can be appreciated only if we take account of her plays, accepting them (...)
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  28. Toland, Leibniz, and Active Matter.Stewart Duncan - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 6:249-78.
    In the early years of the eighteenth century Leibniz had several interactions with John Toland. These included, from 1702 to 1704, discussions of materialism. Those discussions culminated with the consideration of Toland's 1704 Letters to Serena, where Toland argued that matter is necessarily active. In this paper I argue for two main theses about this exchange and its consequences for our wider understanding. The first is that, despite many claims that Toland was at the time of Letters to Serena a (...)
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  29. Contextualising Ideas.David Edmonds - 2012 - The Philosophers' Magazine 56 (56):70-74.
    To understand Machiavelli’s concerns it helps to know about his complex relationship with the Medicis. To comprehend what animates Thomas Hobbes we need to recognise that he was writing in the aftermath of the English civil war.
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  30. The Book of Lord Shang Compared with Machiavelli and Hobbes.Markus Fischer - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):201-221.
    This essay argues that political realism is an effective heuristic for understanding The Book of Lord Shang, which it compares to the political thought of Machiavelli and Hobbes. It first lays out the premises of political realism as they emerge from this comparison: the real is the guiding heuristic of political realism; historical change is the fundamental condition; the nature of human beings is selfish but can also form customs favorable to political order. Based on these premises, the essay then (...)
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  31. “Hobbes Is of the Opposite Opinion” Kant and Hobbes on the Three Authorities in the State.Paul Guyer - 2012 - Hobbes Studies 25 (1):91-119.
    Like Hobbes and unlike Locke, Kant denied the possibility of a right to rebellion. But unlike Hobbes, Kant did not argue for a unitary head of state in whom legislative, judicial, and executive powers are inseparable, and thus did not believe that the executive power in a state to whom must be conceded a monopoly of coercion also defines all rights in the state. Instead, Kant insisted upon the necessary division of authority in a state into a separate legislature, executive, (...)
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  32. The 17th Century Political Cartesianism and its Opponents; or, Imaging the State From Point Fixe.Julia Ivanova & Pavel Sokolov - 2012 - Russian Sociological Review 11 (2):5-24.
    The paper focuses upon two samples of early modern “civil sciences”: rhetorical inquiry dealing with contingency and mathesis politica traditionally referring to the intellectual context of early Enlightenment. The study deals with the main tendencies that shaped early Enlightenment political science consisting of criticism of the necessitarian ethical rhetorical paradigm, an appeal to rhetorical competence, search for a way to “tame” contingency and thus to learn how to understand the human will’s universe of effects and how to control it. Special (...)
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  33. Hobbes, Descartes, and Ideas: A Secret Debate.Gianluca Mori - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):197-212.
  34. Machiavelli, Hobbes, and Rousseau.John Plamenatz (ed.) - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Introduction, Mark Philp -- Machiavelli, Hobbes, and Rousseau: Introductory Lecture -- Part One: Machiavelli -- 1. The Morally Neutral Political Scientist -- 2. Virtue and the Double Standard -- 3. Republics and Freedom -- 4. Machiavelli: an Egalitarian? -- 5. The Leader, the Legislator, the Prince, and the Patriot -- Part Two: Hobbes -- 6. A General Assessment of his Political Philosophy -- 7. Obligation, Law, and Covenant I -- 8. Obligation, Law, and Covenant II (...)
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  35. Margaret Cavendish's Early Engagement with Descartes and Hobbes: Philosophical Revisitation and Poetic Selection.L. E. Semler - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (3):327-353.
  36. Winstanley, Hobbes, and the Sin of the World.Denys Turner - 2012 - In Zoë Bennett & David B. Gowler (eds.), Radical Christian Voices and Practice: Essays in Honour of Christopher Rowland. Oxford University Press. pp. 137.
  37. Hobbes's First Philosophy and Galilean Science.Luc Foisneau - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (4):795 - 809.
    Review of Gianni Paganini (transl.), Moto, luogo e tempo di Thomas Hobbes. Torino: UTET, 2010, pp. 708.
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  38. Virtue in Hobbes: Seen From Machiavellian Point of View.Juhana Lemetti - 2011 - In Leonidas Donskis (ed.), Niccolò Machiavelli: History, Power, and Virtue. Rodopi. pp. 226--79.
  39. The Title of Hobbes's Refutation of Thomas White's De Mundo.Noel Malcolm - 2011 - Hobbes Studies 24 (2):179-188.
    Hobbes's manuscript refutation of Thomas White bears no title. Some modern scholars have proposed, on the basis of references to it by Mersenne, that the work was entitled 'De motu, loco et tempore', and the abbreviated version of this, 'De motu', has become current in modern scholarship. This research note analyses Mersenne's references, and concludes that this apparent title was a descriptive phrase introduced by Mersenne himself. The full description included the term 'philosophia' ; this suggests a double focus, not (...)
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  40. Il piacere dell'amicizia. Hobbes, Gassendi e il circolo neo-epicureo dell'Accademia di Montmor.Gianni Paganini - 2011 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 66 (1).
    The article regards the transformation of friendship in Hobbes’s work. From simple acceptance of the Aristotelian definition in The Whole Art of Rhetoric, Hobbes passes in the Elements to a dual approach. On one hand, he goes so far as to reaffirm the natural sociability of man solely through friendship but, on the other, he subordinates the whole question of passions to the new concept of power, which involves the redefinition of friendship as an "Instrumentall power". In Leviathan this connection (...)
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  41. Thomas Hobbes and the Ethics of Freedom.Thomas Pink - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (5):541 - 563.
    Abstract Freedom in the sense of free will is a multiway power to do any one of a number of things, leaving it up to us which one of a range of options by way of action we perform. What are the ethical implications of our possession of such a power? The paper examines the pre-Hobbesian scholastic view of writers such as Peter Lombard and Francisco Suárez: freedom as a multiway power is linked to the right to liberty understood as (...)
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  42. 'The Matter, Forme, and Power of a Common-Wealth': Thomas Hobbes and Late Renaissance Commentary on Aristotle's Politics.Annabel Brett - 2010 - Hobbes Studies 23 (1):72-102.
    Hobbes's relation to the later Aristotelian tradition, in both its scholastic and its humanists variants, has been increasingly explored by scholars. However, on two fundamental points (the naturalness of the city and the use of the matter/form distinction in the political works), there is more to be said in this connection. A close examination of a range of late Renaissance commentaries on Aristotle's Politics shows that they elucidate a picture of pre-civic human nature that had (contrary to Hobbes's implication) much (...)
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  43. Leibniz on Hobbes’s Materialism.Stewart Duncan - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (1):11-18.
    I consider Leibniz's thoughts about Hobbes's materialism, focusing on his less-discussed later thoughts about the topic. Leibniz understood Hobbes to have argued for his materialism from his imagistic theory of ideas. Leibniz offered several criticisms of this argument and the resulting materialism itself. Several of these criticisms occur in texts in which Leibniz was engaging with the generation of British philosophers after Hobbes. Of particular interest is Leibniz's correspondence with Damaris Masham. Leibniz may have been trying to communicate with Locke, (...)
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  44. 'Promising' Ideas: Hobbes and Contract in Spinoza's Political Philosophy.Don Garrett - 2010 - In Yitzhak Y. Melamed & Michael A. Rosenthal (eds.), Spinoza's 'Theological-Political Treatise': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press. pp. 192.
  45. Infinitesimal Differences: Controversies Between Leibniz and His Contemporaries. [REVIEW]Françoise Monnoyeur-Broitman - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (4):527-528.
    Leibniz is well known for his formulation of the infinitesimal calculus. Nevertheless, the nature and logic of his discovery are seldom questioned: does it belong more to mathematics or metaphysics, and how is it connected to his physics? This book, composed of fourteen essays, investigates the nature and foundation of the calculus, its relationship to the physics of force and principle of continuity, and its overall method and metaphysics. The Leibnizian calculus is presented in its origin and context together with (...)
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  46. Hobbes and Renaissance Philosophy.Gianni Paganini - 2010 - Hobbes Studies 23 (1):1-5.
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  47. Hobbes's "Mortal God" and Renaissance Hermeticism.Gianni Paganini - 2010 - Hobbes Studies 23 (1):7-28.
    Research made by Schuhmann and Bredekamp has pointed up the unsuspected links between Hobbes and one of the ancient traditions best loved by Renaissance philosophy: Hermeticism. Our goal will be to proceed further and to stress the Hermetic significance implicit in the formula "mortal God". If Asclepius can act as a source for the theme of the fabrication of gods, it does not fit in with the antithesis ("mortal god/immortal God") typical of the Leviathan. A proper source for this topic (...)
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  48. Religión y poder en Hobbes y Marsilio de Padua: similitudes y diferencias.Bernardo Aznar - 2009 - Pensamiento 65 (244):221-259.
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  49. Roberto Bellarmino E Thomas Hobbes: Teologie Politiche a Confronto.Enrica Fabbri - 2009 - Aracne.
  50. Of Hobbes and Hume: A Review of Paul Russell, the Riddle of Hume's Treatise: Skepticism, Naturalism and Irreligion 1. [REVIEW]James A. Harris - 2009 - Philosophical Books 50 (1):38-46.
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