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  1. Building Better Citizens.Gordon Hull - 2015 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (1):105-129.
    Hobbes rejects the Aristotelian political animal, a move that enables a malleable psychology in which we are driven by our passions and responses to external objects. Our psychology is accordingly overdetermined by our socio-cultural environment, and managing that environment becomes a central task of the state. A particular problem is what I call the “ontological illusion,” the constitutive human tendency to ontologize products of the imagination. I argue that Hobbes’s strategies for managing the ontological illusion govern part four of Leviathan. (...)
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  2. A Companion to Hobbes.Marcus P. Adams (ed.) - forthcoming - Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.
  3. Linking Faith and Trust: Of Contracts and Covenants.Ionut Untea - 2019 - Teoria 39 (1):157-168.
    Trust is so intimately linked with faith that sometimes trust needs faith to unfold in a relationship. I argue that the role of this faith element in trust is to elevate the status of the one in which we trust so as to emphasize the equal dignity of all the participants in the relationship of trust. Against views that focus on a «rational» trust based on an exaggerated emphasis on the capacity of self-trust as a point of departure for the (...)
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  4. Hobbes on Mind: Practical Deliberation, Reasoning, and Language.Arash Abizadeh - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):1-34.
    Readers of Hobbes usually take his account of practical deliberation to be a passive process that does not respond to agents’ judgements about what normative reasons they have. This is ostensibly because deliberation is purely conative and/or excludes reasoning, or because Hobbesian reasoning is itself a process in which reasoners merely experience a succession of mental states (e.g. according to purely associative mental structures). I argue to the contrary that for Hobbes deliberation (and hence the basis for voluntary action) is (...)
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  5. Global Duties in the Face of Uncertainty.Sylvie Loriaux - 2017 - Diametros 53:75-95.
    This paper aims to highlight the role played by uncertainties in global justice theories. It will start by identifying four kinds of uncertainties that could potentially have an impact on the nature, content and very existence of global duties: first, uncertainties regarding the causes of global injustices; second, uncertainties regarding the consequences of global justice initiatives; third, uncertainties pertaining to the 'imperfect' character of certain global duties; and fourth, uncertainties regarding the conduct of others. It will discuss each of these (...)
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  6. Il controllo delle passioni. Ascesa e caduta della meraviglia da Descartes a Spinoza.Emanuela Scribano - 2017 - Ingenium. Revista Electrónica de Pensamiento Moderno y Metodología En Historia de Las Ideas 11:151-161.
    Descartes deems wonder the first among the passions. Pride and generosity originate from it. To maintain that generosity originates from wonder, Descartes has to deal with serious and hard theoretical issues. Descartes, I shall argue, tackles these issues to endow generosity with a role in the monitoring passions. I back this conjecture examining Hobbes’ and Spinoza’s theories of passions.
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  7. L’axe Montaigne-Hobbes : anthropologie et politique.Emiliano Ferrari & Thierry Gontier (eds.) - 2016 - Paris: Classiques Garnier.
    Against a background of civil, political and religious conflict, Montaigne and Hobbes redeveloped a form of anthropological and political thinking that ushered in modernity. This collective work is as much concerned with the points where the two authors converge as with the difference in the paths they follow.
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  8. Hobbes and the Artifice of Eternity.Christopher Scott McClure - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    Thomas Hobbes argues that the fear of violent death is the most reliable passion on which to found political society. His role in shaping the contemporary view of religion and honor in the West is pivotal, yet his ideas are famously riddled with contradictions. In this breakthrough study, McClure finds evidence that Hobbes' apparent inconsistencies are intentional, part of a sophisticated rhetorical strategy meant to make man more afraid of death than he naturally is. Hobbes subtly undermined two of the (...)
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  9. Diversity and Felicity: Hobbes’s Science of Human Flourishing.Ericka L. Tucker - 2016 - Science Et Esprit 68 (1):35-47.
    We do not generally take the Hobbesian project to be one that encourages human flourishing. I will argue that it is; indeed, I will propose that Hobbes attempts the first modern project to provide for the possibility of the diversity of human flourishing in the civil state. To do so, I will draw on the recent work of Donald Rutherford, who takes Hobbes to be a eudaimonist in the Aristotelian tradition.
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  10. Hobbes and Modern Political Thought.Yves Charles Zarka - 2016 - Edinburgh University Press.
  11. Berkeley, Hobbes, and the Constitution of the Self.Stephen H. Daniel - 2015 - In Sébastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 69-81.
    By focusing on the exchange between Descartes and Hobbes on how the self is related to its activities, Berkeley draws attention to how he and Hobbes explain the forensic constitution of human subjectivity and moral/political responsibility in terms of passive obedience and conscientious submission to the laws of the sovereign. Formulated as the language of nature or as pronouncements of the supreme political power, those laws identify moral obligations by locating political subjects within those networks of sensible signs. When thus (...)
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  12. Hobbes and Normative Egoism.Alex Worsnip - 2015 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 97 (4):481-512.
    Is Hobbes a normative egoist? That is: does Hobbes think that an agent’s normative reasons are all grounded in her own good? A once-dominant tradition of Hobbes scholarship answers ‘yes’. In an important recent work, however, S.A. Lloyd has argued that the answer to the question is ‘no’, and built an alternative non-egoistic interpretation of Hobbes that stresses reciprocity and mutual justifiability. My aim in this paper is to articulate and defend an original ‘middle way’ interpretation of Hobbes which steers (...)
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  13. Montaigne : une anthropologie des passions.Emiliano Ferrari - 2014 - Paris, France: Classiques Garnier.
    This is the first study dedicated to Montaigne's philosophy of the passions. It presents the wisdom of the Essays in a new light. Theoretically original, Montaigne’s anthropology of the passions has a great impact on modern philosophers as Descartes and Hobbes.
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  14. Thomas Hobbes: Magnanimity, Felicity, and Justice.Andrew J. Corsa - 2013 - Hobbes Studies 26 (2):130-151.
    Thomas Hobbes’s concept of magnanimity, a descendant of Aristotle’s “greatness of soul,” plays a key role in Hobbes’s theory with respect to felicity and the virtue of justice. In his Critique du ‘De Mundo’, Hobbes implies that only genuinely magnanimous people can achieve the greatest felicity in their lives. A life of felicity is a life of pleasure, where the only pleasure that counts is the well grounded glory experienced by those who are magnanimous. Hobbes suggests that felicity involves the (...)
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  15. Hedonism and Virtue.Erin Frykholm & Donald Rutherford - 2013 - In Peter R. Anstey (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 415.
    This chapter examines the views of seventeenth-century British philosophers on the relation between virtue and hedonism, explaining that many philosophers believed that a defense of virtue required rejection of hedonism. It discusses the reformulation of moral philosophy proposed by Thomas Hobbes, and analyzes the reactions of Richard Cumberland and Cambridge Platonists Ralph Cudworth and Henry More. The chapter also considers the revival of Epicureanism and early modern natural law theory.
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  16. Hobbes and the Rationality of Self-Preservation: Grounding Morality on the Desires We Should Have.C. D. Meyers - 2013 - The European Legacy 18 (3):269-286.
    In deriving his moral code, Hobbes does not appeal to any mind-independent good, natural human telos, or innate human sympathies. Instead he assumes a subjectivist theory of value and an egoistic theory of human motivation. Some critics, however, doubt that his laws of nature can be constructed from such scant material. Hobbes ultimately justifies the acceptance of moral laws by the fact that they promote self-preservation. But, as Hobbes himself acknowledges, not everyone prefers survival over natural liberty. In this essay (...)
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  17. Homo Homini Deus Est-Homo Homini Lupus Est. Some Remarks Concerning Hobbes' View of Human Nature.Jakub Szczepański - 2013 - Archiwum Historii Filozofii I Myśli Społecznej 58.
    The subject of the article is the question concerning Thomas Hobbes’ view of human nature. This question goes hand in hand with his famous sentence: homo hominilupus est. In the first part of article, the provenance of this citation is described. Subsequentsections are devoted to an attempt to establish how accurately Hobbes saw the basic features of the human condition. The next issue under consideration is the proper sense of another famous Hobbesian citation: bellum omnium contra omnes.The conclusion of the (...)
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  18. Thomas Hobbess Theory of Conscience.Mark Hanin - 2012 - History of Political Thought 33 (1):55-85.
    Thomas Hobbes assigned indispensable, peace-directed roles to conscience in his moral and political philosophy. This paper first locates Hobbes's definition of conscience in its historical context by highlighting commonalities with scholastic and seventeenth-century doctrines. Second, it shows that Hobbes imposed numerous stringent obligations on conscience in the natural condition. Third, it analyses Hobbes's account of conscience as 'shared knowledge' in Chapter 7 of Leviathan and considers the possible targets for his polemics. Finally, it lays out the chief responsibilities of conscience (...)
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  19. «Passionate thought». Ragione e passioni in Thomas Hobbes.Gianni Paganini - 2012 - Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 8 (3):248-265.
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  20. Hobbes and the Problem of Egoism.Slobodan Sadžakov - 2012 - Filozofska Istrazivanja 32 (1):63-77.
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  21. Hobbes I Problem Egoizma.Slobodan Sadžakov - 2012 - Filozofska Istrazivanja 32 (1):63-77.
    U radu se razmatra Hobbesovo shvaćanje egoizma, posebno u kontekstu njegove koncepcije individualnosti te koncepcije prirodnog stanja i države. Hobbesovo učenje sagledano je kao istinski početak novovjekovnog razmatranja egoizma i prekid s kršćansko-srednjovjekovnim načinom ocjenjivanja egoizma koje podrazumijeva striktnu osudu egoističkog djelanja.Text examines Hobbes’ understanding of egoism, especially in the context of his concept of individuality and the concept of the state of nature and civil government. Hobbes’ views are considered to be the true beginning of the modern discussion on (...)
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  22. Egoism and Morality.Stephen Darwall - 2011 - In Desmond M. Clarke & Catherine Wilson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Early Modern Europe. Oxford University Press.
    This article examines changes in the conception of morality and egoism in early modern Europe. It explains that the postulate that human beings were fractious, covetous, and endowed with a strong drive towards self-aggrandizement was associated with Thomas Hobbes, and his writings produced a strong counterflow in the form of assertions and demonstrations of altruism and benevolence as natural endowments of human beings. It suggests that the modern ethical thought has defined itself by its concern with a specific ethical conception (...)
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  23. Hobbes on the Passions and Imagination: Tradition and Modernity.María L. Lukac de Stier - 2011 - Hobbes Studies 24 (1):78-90.
    This article introduces the doctrine of the passions in the Hobbesian work, showing its debt with tradition, especially the scholastic Aristotelian one, even if, at the same time, it offers some breach features with this tradition, which are also analysed. In addition, the fundamentals of imagination manifest themselves in the appetitive process, in Hobbes's doctrine as well as in the scholastic Aristotelian tradition, showing their similarities and differences.
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  24. Happiness in a Mechanistic Universe: Thomas Hobbes on the Nature and Attainability of Happiness.Severin V. Kitanov - 2011 - Hobbes Studies 24 (2):117-136.
    The article revisits the originality of Hobbes's concept of happiness on the basis of Hobbes's two accounts found respectively in Thomas White's De Mundo Examined and Leviathan. It is argued that Hobbes's claim that happiness consists in the unhindered advance from one acquired good to another ought to be understood against the background of Hobbes's theory of sensation and the imagination, on the one hand, and Hobbes's doctrine of conatus, on the other. It is further claimed that the account of (...)
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  25. How We Are Moral: Benevolence, Utility, and Self-Love in Hobbes and Hume.Jenna Kreyche - 2011 - Stance 4:27-38.
    In this paper, I reconstruct Hobbes’ theory of self-love. I then examine Hume’s arguments that self-love does not properly account for moral behavior and self-love is unnecessary for moral theory. I argue that Hobbesian self-love can account for both of Hume’s objections. Further, I use an analysis of Hobbes’ Deliberation to show, contra Hume, that self-love does not entail a lack of intention in moral action.
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  26. Hobbes on the Passions and Imagination: Tradition and Modernity.María Lukac de Stier - 2011 - Hobbes Studies 24 (1):78-90.
    This article introduces the doctrine of the passions in the Hobbesian work, showing its debt with tradition, especially the scholastic Aristotelian one, even if, at the same time, it offers some breach features with this tradition, which are also analysed. In addition, the fundamentals of imagination manifest themselves in the appetitive process, in Hobbes's doctrine as well as in the scholastic Aristotelian tradition, showing their similarities and differences.
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  27. Hobbes: Motives and Reasons.Johan Olsthoorn - 2011 - Philosophical Forum 42 (3):293-294.
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  28. Hobbes, d'Holbach et la théorie des passions : importance du passage par la physique et la théorie de la connaissance.Anne Staquet - 2011 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 71 (3):385-404.
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  29. From Desire to Civility: Is Xunzi a Hobbesian?Kim Sungmoon - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (3):291-309.
    This article argues that, contrary to conventional wisdom, Xunzi’s and Hobbes’s understandings of human nature are qualitatively different, which is responsible for the difference in their respective normative political theory of a civil polity. This article has two main theses: first, where Hobbes’s deepest concern was with human beings’ unsocial passions, Xunzi was most concerned with human beings’ appetitive desires ( yu 欲), material self-interest, and resulting social strife; second, as a result, where Hobbes strove to transform the pathological (anti-)politics (...)
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  30. Simpatia e sociabilidade no pensamento de Hume.Fernão de Oliveira Salles - 2010 - Doispontos 7 (2).
    O objetivo deste texto é, primeiramente, expor os contornos gerais as críticas de David Hume ao que o filósofo escocês chamou epicurismo moderno. Trata-se das filosofias de Hobbes e de seus supostos epígonos, que, aos olhos de Hume, elegeram o amor próprio como origem fundamental de nossas ações e juízos. Num segundo momento, trata-se de delinear o lugar central do conceito de simpatia nesta crítica, bem como na constituição da moral humeana.
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  31. Simpatia e sociabilidade no pensamento de Hume.Fernão de Oliveira Salles - 2010 - Dois Pontos 7 (2).
    O objetivo deste texto é, primeiramente, expor os contornos gerais as críticas de David Hume ao que o filósofo escocês chamou epicurismo moderno. Trata-se das filosofias de Hobbes e de seus supostos epígonos, que, aos olhos de Hume, elegeram o amor próprio como origem fundamental de nossas ações e juízos. Num segundo momento, trata-se de delinear o lugar central do conceito de simpatia nesta crítica, bem como na constituição da moral humeana.
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  32. 17th and 18th Century Theories of Emotions.Amy Morgan Schmitter - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    1. Introduction: 1.1 Difficulties of Approach; 1.2 Philosophical Background. 2. The Context of Early Modern Theories of the Passions: 2.1 Changing Vocabulary; 2.2 Taxonomies; 2.3 Philosophical Issues in Theories of the Emotions. SUPPLEMENTARY DOCUMENTS: Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance Theories of the Emotions; Descartes; Hobbes; Malebranche; Spinoza; Shaftsbury; Hutcheson; Hume.
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  33. Thomas Hobbes's Doctrine of Conscience and Theories of Synderesis in Renaissance England.Dominique Weber - 2010 - Hobbes Studies 23 (1):54-71.
    Is there a specifically "Hobbesian moment" in the extremely complex history of the idea of conscience? In order to answer this question and to understand why Hobbes's conception of conscience was so innovative, one needs to look at the materials he used to build his system, including the medieval doctrine of synderesis. The article examines the way this doctrine was both perpetuated and altered in Renaissance England.
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  34. As paixões naturais e as ações humanas voluntárias em Thomas Hobbes: The natural passions and voluntary human actions in Thomas Hobbes.Delmo Mattos da Silva - 2009 - Controvérsia 5 (2).
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  35. Rational Egoism: A Selective and Critical History.Robert Shaver - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    The position of rational egoism centres upon the thought that the rational thing to do must be to pursue one's own self-interest. Focusing on the work of Hobbes and Sidgwick, this book is an extensive history and evaluation of rational egoism. They are, after the ancients, the foremost exponents of rational egoism. He also considers other figures - Grotius, Samuel Clarke, John Clarke, Butler, Hume, Reid, Kant, Paley and Bentham - and a related position: the instrumental theory of rationality. Robert (...)
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  36. A Sudden Surprise of the Soul: The Passion of Wonder in Hobbes and Descartes.Michael Funk Deckard - 2008 - Heythrop Journal 49 (6):948-963.
  37. Virtude e Felicidade em Aristóteles e Hobbes.Yara Frateschi - 2008 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 2 (2).
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  38. Love and the Leviathan.Haig Patapan & Jeffrey Sikkenga - 2008 - Political Theory 36 (6):803-826.
    Hobbes's understanding of love, and its significance for his political thought, has received insufficient attention. This essay contends that Hobbes has a consistent and comprehensive teaching on love that directly repudiates what he regards as the Platonic teaching on eros. In attacking the Platonic idea of eros, Hobbes undermines a pillar of classical political philosophy and articulates a significant aspect of his new understanding of the passions in terms of power, which is itself a critical part of his new political (...)
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  39. Human Nature and Moral Education in Mencius, Xunzi, Hobbes, and Rousseau.Eric Schwitzgebel - 2007 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 24 (2):147 - 168.
    (2007) History of Philosophy Quarterly. 24, 147-168.
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  40. Thomas Hobbes on Melancholy.Mauro Simonazzi - 2006 - Hobbes Studies 19 (1):31-57.
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  41. L’analyse des passions dans la dissolution du corps politique : Spinoza et Hobbes.Julie Saada-Gendron - 2005 - Astérion 3.
    Les théories contractualistes de l’âge classique se fondent sur la conception d’un état de nature qui devient, à cause de ses contradictions internes, un état de guerre auquel il faut remédier par un artifice rationnel, le pacte. Alors même que ces contradictions sont issues des passions humaines, celles-ci semblent impensables dans le cadre purement juridique de ces théories, où ne sont analysés ni les mécanismes passionnels d’adhésion au politique, ni la menace de dissolution de l’État. Nous nous attachons à comparer (...)
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  42. Hobbes and the Classical Theory of Laughter.Quentin Skinner - 2004 - In Tom Sorell & Luc Foisneau (eds.), Leviathan After 350 Years. Oxford University Press. pp. 139--166.
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  43. Hobbes, el melancólico y la política.Nicolás Vainer - 2004 - Estudios de Filosofía (Universidad de Antioquia) 30:89-97.
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  44. What Moves a Person to Reflect Morally?Mary Beth Fitzpatrick - 2003 - Dissertation, The Florida State University
    We are asking what motivates human beings to reflect morally, which is both a philosophically interesting question and one that would seem necessarily interesting for anyone involved in character education. What motivates us to think about subjects with a moral eye, makes us reason our way to moral clarity, and sustains our efforts until we reach moral judgments. Here, we limit the response to this question to the moral theories of Hobbes and Hume, from which we hope to infer how (...)
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  45. Hobbes, Darwinism, And Conceptions Of Human Nature.Peter Amato - 2002 - Minerva 6:24-50.
    Despite providing the basic theoretical framework for Western biology and all related sciences, Darwinism continues tobe a controversial perspective when it comes to understanding ourselves as distinctly "human." In this paper, I try tocorrect a common misinterpretation of Thomas Hobbes' conceptualization of human nature which I think sheds light onsome of the significant misunderstandings and sources of objection to Darwinism. I begin by contrasting this commonmisreading of Hobbes' philosophy of human nature with an alternative reading that suggests a more subtle (...)
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  46. Prudence in Hobbes's Political Philosophy.A. Vanden Houten - 2002 - History of Political Thought 23 (2):288-302.
    This essay explores three questions: What are the salient features of Hobbes's concept of prudence? Prudence for Hobbes is a capacity to predict the future rooted in experience. Second, can 'Hobbesian individuals' have significantly different capacities for prudence? Challenging a common view, asserted even by Hobbes himself, I contend that Hobbes's own conception of prudence yields significant variation across individuals' capacities for prudence. Finally, what is the role of prudence in Hobbes's political thought? A consequence of the significant variation among (...)
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  47. Late Scholastic Theories of the Passions: Controversies in the Thomist Tradition.Peter King - 2002 - In Henrik Lagerlund & Mikko Yrjonsuri (eds.), Emotions and Choice From Boethius to Descartes. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 229--258.
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  48. Toward a Critical Ethic: Hobbes, Kant, and Nietzsche on Feelings and Foundations.William W. Sokoloff - 2002 - Dissertation, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    The texts that play a major role in my dissertation include Hobbes's Leviathan, Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals and Critique of Practical Reason, and Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil and Toward a Genealogy of Morals. My research is situated on the border between ethics and politics because I challenge the belief that ethical conduct always requires universal laws. The articulation of an ethical sensibility that is not grounded on a universal law has been one of the thorniest issues (...)
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  49. 4. Hobbes on Conscience Outside and Inside the Law.Edward Andrew - 2001 - In Conscience and its Critics: Protestant Conscience, Enlightenment Reason, and Modern Subjectivity. University of Toronto Press. pp. 63-78.
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  50. Hobbes on Laughter.R. E. Ewin - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (202):29-40.
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