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  1. Hobbes on Mind: Practical Deliberation, Reasoning, and Language.Arash Abizadeh - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):1-34.
    Readers of Hobbes usually take his account of practical deliberation to be a passive process that does not respond to agents’ judgements about what normative reasons they have. This is ostensibly because deliberation is purely conative and/or excludes reasoning, or because Hobbesian reasoning is itself a process in which reasoners merely experience a succession of mental states (e.g. according to purely associative mental structures). I argue to the contrary that for Hobbes deliberation (and hence the basis for voluntary action) is (...)
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  2. Hobbes on the Passions and Powerlessness.Timo Airaksinen - 1993 - Hobbes Studies 6 (1):80-104.
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  3. Thomas Hobbes and the Science of Moral Virtue.Andrew Alexandra & David Boonin-Vail - 1996 - Philosophical Quarterly 46 (185):550.
    In Leviathan Thomas Hobbes defines moral philosophy as 'the science of Virtue and Vice', yet few modern readers take this description seriously. Moreover, it is typically assumed that Hobbes' ethical views are unrelated to his views of science. Influential modern interpreters have portrayed Hobbes as either an amoralist, or a moral contractarian, or a rule egoist, or a divine command theorist. David Boonin-Vail challenges all these assumptions and presents a new, and very unorthodox, interpretation of Hobbes's ethics. He shows that (...)
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  4. The Self in Social Theory a Psychoanalytic Account of its Construction in Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rawls, and Rousseau.C. Fred Alford - 1991
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  5. Felicidad Imposible. Hobbes, Kant, Schopenhauer.Isaac Alvarez - 1998 - Laguna 5:129-136.
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  6. Hobbes, Darwinism, And Conceptions Of Human Nature.Peter Amato - 2002 - Minerva 6:24-50.
    Despite providing the basic theoretical framework for Western biology and all related sciences, Darwinism continues tobe a controversial perspective when it comes to understanding ourselves as distinctly "human." In this paper, I try tocorrect a common misinterpretation of Thomas Hobbes' conceptualization of human nature which I think sheds light onsome of the significant misunderstandings and sources of objection to Darwinism. I begin by contrasting this commonmisreading of Hobbes' philosophy of human nature with an alternative reading that suggests a more subtle (...)
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  7. 4. Hobbes on Conscience Outside and Inside the Law.Edward Andrew - 2001 - In Conscience and its Critics: Protestant Conscience, Enlightenment Reason, and Modern Subjectivity. University of Toronto Press. pp. 63-78.
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  8. La antropología como ciencia natural: Hobbes.Gemma Vicente Arregui - 1990 - Thémata: Revista de Filosofía 7:125-148.
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  9. Hobbes's Psychology of Thought: Endeavours, Purpose and Curiosity.Jeffrey Barnouw - 1989 - History of European Ideas 10 (5):519-545.
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  10. La curiosité chez Hobbes.Jeffrey Barnouw - 1988 - Société Française de Philosophie, Bulletin 82 (2):41.
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  11. Hobbes, Thomas,'of Passions'+ Introduction and Text.Am Belgrado - 1988 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 43 (4):729-738.
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  12. Hobbesian Fear.Jan H. Blits - 1989 - Political Theory 17 (3):417-431.
  13. Thomas Hobbes and the Science of Moral Virtue.David Boonin - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    In Leviathan Thomas Hobbes defines moral philosophy as 'the science of Virtue and Vice', yet few modern readers take this description seriously. Moreover, it is typically assumed that Hobbes' ethical views are unrelated to his views of science. Influential modern interpreters have portrayed Hobbes as either an amoralist, or a moral contractarian, or a rule egoist, or a divine command theorist. David Boonin-Vail challenges all these assumptions and presents a new, and very unorthodox, interpretation of Hobbes's ethics. He shows that (...)
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  14. Thomas Hobbes and the Science of Moral Virtue.David Boonin-Vail - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    In Leviathan Thomas Hobbes defines moral philosophy as 'the science of Virtue and Vice', yet few modern readers take this description seriously. Moreover, it is typically assumed that Hobbes' ethical views are unrelated to his views of science. Influential modern interpreters have portrayed Hobbes as either an amoralist, or a moral contractarian, or a rule egoist, or a divine command theorist. David Boonin-Vail challenges all these assumptions and presents a new, and very unorthodox, interpretation of Hobbes's ethics. He shows that (...)
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  15. Prudence, Folly and Melancholy in the Thought of Thomas Hobbes.Gianfranco Borrelli - 1996 - Hobbes Studies 9 (1):88-97.
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  16. Hobbes and the Enlightenment Rejection of Military Virtue.Paul Alexander Clark - 1996 - Dissertation, The Catholic University of America
    Hobbes attempts to remove civil conflict through the creation of a state authority so powerful that no one will resist it. This study defends and develops the position of Leo Strauss that Hobbes uses fear of violent death the antidote for that he considers anti-social qualities. In the process Hobbes cultivates an anti-heroic morality. Those who are afraid to die will cooperate with the sovereign, but those who are not afraid to die become variables who cannot be accounted for in (...)
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  17. Descartes and Hobbes on the Passions.Richard Cobb-Stevens - 1990 - Analecta Husserliana 28:145.
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  18. Thomas Hobbes: Magnanimity, Felicity, and Justice.Andrew J. Corsa - 2013 - Hobbes Studies 26 (2):130-151.
    Thomas Hobbes’s concept of magnanimity, a descendant of Aristotle’s “greatness of soul,” plays a key role in Hobbes’s theory with respect to felicity and the virtue of justice. In his Critique du ‘De Mundo’, Hobbes implies that only genuinely magnanimous people can achieve the greatest felicity in their lives. A life of felicity is a life of pleasure, where the only pleasure that counts is the well grounded glory experienced by those who are magnanimous. Hobbes suggests that felicity involves the (...)
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  19. As paixões naturais e as ações humanas voluntárias em Thomas Hobbes: The natural passions and voluntary human actions in Thomas Hobbes.Delmo Mattos da Silva - 2009 - Controvérsia 5 (2).
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  20. Berkeley, Hobbes, and the Constitution of the Self.Stephen H. Daniel - 2015 - In Sébastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 69-81.
    By focusing on the exchange between Descartes and Hobbes on how the self is related to its activities, Berkeley draws attention to how he and Hobbes explain the forensic constitution of human subjectivity and moral/political responsibility in terms of passive obedience and conscientious submission to the laws of the sovereign. Formulated as the language of nature or as pronouncements of the supreme political power, those laws identify moral obligations by locating political subjects within those networks of sensible signs. When thus (...)
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  21. Egoism and Morality.Stephen Darwall - 2011 - In Desmond M. Clarke & Catherine Wilson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Early Modern Europe. Oxford University Press.
    This article examines changes in the conception of morality and egoism in early modern Europe. It explains that the postulate that human beings were fractious, covetous, and endowed with a strong drive towards self-aggrandizement was associated with Thomas Hobbes, and his writings produced a strong counterflow in the form of assertions and demonstrations of altruism and benevolence as natural endowments of human beings. It suggests that the modern ethical thought has defined itself by its concern with a specific ethical conception (...)
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  22. Hobbes on the Passions and Imagination: Tradition and Modernity.María L. Lukac de Stier - 2011 - Hobbes Studies 24 (1):78-90.
    This article introduces the doctrine of the passions in the Hobbesian work, showing its debt with tradition, especially the scholastic Aristotelian one, even if, at the same time, it offers some breach features with this tradition, which are also analysed. In addition, the fundamentals of imagination manifest themselves in the appetitive process, in Hobbes's doctrine as well as in the scholastic Aristotelian tradition, showing their similarities and differences.
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  23. A Sudden Surprise of the Soul: The Passion of Wonder in Hobbes and Descartes.Michael Funk Deckard - 2008 - Heythrop Journal 49 (6):948-963.
  24. Hobbes on Laughter.R. E. Ewin - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (202):29-40.
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  25. Virtues and Rights: The Moral Philosophy of Thomas Hobbes.R. E. Ewin - 1991 - Westview Press.
  26. Montaigne : une anthropologie des passions.Emiliano Ferrari - 2014 - Paris, France: Classiques Garnier.
    This is the first study dedicated to Montaigne's philosophy of the passions. It presents the wisdom of the Essays in a new light. Theoretically original, Montaigne’s anthropology of the passions has a great impact on modern philosophers as Descartes and Hobbes.
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  27. L’axe Montaigne-Hobbes : anthropologie et politique.Emiliano Ferrari & Thierry Gontier (eds.) - 2016 - Paris: Classiques Garnier.
    Against a background of civil, political and religious conflict, Montaigne and Hobbes redeveloped a form of anthropological and political thinking that ushered in modernity. This collective work is as much concerned with the points where the two authors converge as with the difference in the paths they follow.
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  28. What Moves a Person to Reflect Morally?Mary Beth Fitzpatrick - 2003 - Dissertation, The Florida State University
    We are asking what motivates human beings to reflect morally, which is both a philosophically interesting question and one that would seem necessarily interesting for anyone involved in character education. What motivates us to think about subjects with a moral eye, makes us reason our way to moral clarity, and sustains our efforts until we reach moral judgments. Here, we limit the response to this question to the moral theories of Hobbes and Hume, from which we hope to infer how (...)
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  29. Virtude e Felicidade em Aristóteles e Hobbes.Yara Frateschi - 2008 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 2 (2).
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  30. Hedonism and Virtue.Erin Frykholm & Donald Rutherford - 2013 - In Peter R. Anstey (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 415.
    This chapter examines the views of seventeenth-century British philosophers on the relation between virtue and hedonism, explaining that many philosophers believed that a defense of virtue required rejection of hedonism. It discusses the reformulation of moral philosophy proposed by Thomas Hobbes, and analyzes the reactions of Richard Cumberland and Cambridge Platonists Ralph Cudworth and Henry More. The chapter also considers the revival of Epicureanism and early modern natural law theory.
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  31. The Tradition of Political Hedonism From Hobbes to J. S. Mill.Timothy Fuller - 1984 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (4):499-501.
  32. Hobbes and Psychological Egoism.Bernard Gert - 1967 - Journal of the History of Ideas 28 (4):503-520.
    Hobbes has served for both philosophers and political scientists as the paradigm case of someone who held an egoistic view of human nature. In this article I shall attempt to show that the almost unanimous view that Hobbes held psychological egoism is mistaken, and further that Hobbes's political theory does not demand an egoistic psychology, but on the contrary is incompatible with psychological egoism. I do not maintain that Hobbes was completely consistent; in fact, I shall show that there was (...)
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  33. Hobbes, Mechanism, and Egoism.Bernard Gert - 1965 - Philosophical Quarterly 15 (61):341-349.
  34. Thomas Hobbess Theory of Conscience.Mark Hanin - 2012 - History of Political Thought 33 (1):55-85.
    Thomas Hobbes assigned indispensable, peace-directed roles to conscience in his moral and political philosophy. This paper first locates Hobbes's definition of conscience in its historical context by highlighting commonalities with scholastic and seventeenth-century doctrines. Second, it shows that Hobbes imposed numerous stringent obligations on conscience in the natural condition. Third, it analyses Hobbes's account of conscience as 'shared knowledge' in Chapter 7 of Leviathan and considers the possible targets for his polemics. Finally, it lays out the chief responsibilities of conscience (...)
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  35. Thomas Hobbes' Dialectic of Desire.Gary B. Herbert - 1976 - New Scholasticism 50 (2):137-163.
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  36. The Place of Laughter in Hobbes's Theory of Emotions.David Heyd - 1982 - Journal of the History of Ideas 43 (2):285.
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  37. What Motive to Virtue? Early Modern Empirical Naturalist Theories of Moral Obligation.Brady John Hoback - unknown
    In this dissertation, I argue for a set of interpretations regarding the relationship between moral obligation and reasons for acting in the theories of Hobbes, Hutcheson, and Hume. Several commentators have noted affinities between these naturalist moral theories and contemporary ethical internalism. I argue that attempts to locate internalist theses in these figures are not entirely successful in any clear way. I follow Stephen Darwall's suggestion that addressing the question “why be moral?” is one of the fundamental problems of modern (...)
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  38. "Of Passions ", a cura di Anna Minerbi Belgrado.Thomas Hobbes - 1988 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 43 (4):729.
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  39. Prudence in Hobbes's Political Philosophy.A. Vanden Houten - 2002 - History of Political Thought 23 (2):288-302.
    This essay explores three questions: What are the salient features of Hobbes's concept of prudence? Prudence for Hobbes is a capacity to predict the future rooted in experience. Second, can 'Hobbesian individuals' have significantly different capacities for prudence? Challenging a common view, asserted even by Hobbes himself, I contend that Hobbes's own conception of prudence yields significant variation across individuals' capacities for prudence. Finally, what is the role of prudence in Hobbes's political thought? A consequence of the significant variation among (...)
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  40. Building Better Citizens.Gordon Hull - 2015 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (1):105-129.
    Hobbes rejects the Aristotelian political animal, a move that enables a malleable psychology in which we are driven by our passions and responses to external objects. Our psychology is accordingly overdetermined by our socio-cultural environment, and managing that environment becomes a central task of the state. A particular problem is what I call the “ontological illusion,” the constitutive human tendency to ontologize products of the imagination. I argue that Hobbes’s strategies for managing the ontological illusion govern part four of Leviathan. (...)
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  41. Passion and Action: The Emotions in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy.Susan James - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Passion and Action is an exploration of the role of the passions in seventeenth-century thought. Susan James offers fresh readings of a broad range of thinkers, including such canonical figures as Hobbes, Descartes, Malebranche, Spinoza, Pascal, and Locke, and shows that a full understanding of their philosophies must take account of their interpretations of our affective life. This ground-breaking study throws new light upon the shaping of our ideas about the mind, knowledge, and action, and provides a historical context for (...)
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  42. Hobbes on Human Nature and the Necessity of Manners.Peter Johnson - 1998 - Angelaki 3 (1):67 – 76.
  43. Late Scholastic Theories of the Passions: Controversies in the Thomist Tradition.Peter King - 2002 - In Henrik Lagerlund & Mikko Yrjonsuri (eds.), Emotions and Choice From Boethius to Descartes. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 229--258.
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  44. Happiness in a Mechanistic Universe: Thomas Hobbes on the Nature and Attainability of Happiness.Severin V. Kitanov - 2011 - Hobbes Studies 24 (2):117-136.
    The article revisits the originality of Hobbes's concept of happiness on the basis of Hobbes's two accounts found respectively in Thomas White's De Mundo Examined and Leviathan. It is argued that Hobbes's claim that happiness consists in the unhindered advance from one acquired good to another ought to be understood against the background of Hobbes's theory of sensation and the imagination, on the one hand, and Hobbes's doctrine of conatus, on the other. It is further claimed that the account of (...)
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  45. How We Are Moral: Benevolence, Utility, and Self-Love in Hobbes and Hume.Jenna Kreyche - 2011 - Stance 4:27-38.
    In this paper, I reconstruct Hobbes’ theory of self-love. I then examine Hume’s arguments that self-love does not properly account for moral behavior and self-love is unnecessary for moral theory. I argue that Hobbesian self-love can account for both of Hume’s objections. Further, I use an analysis of Hobbes’ Deliberation to show, contra Hume, that self-love does not entail a lack of intention in moral action.
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  46. Two Types of Seventeenth Century Naturalistic Ethics.Michael Leon Lebuffe - 2000 - Dissertation, University of California, San Diego
    Whereas Spinoza's ethics is often thought to be a recasting of Hobbesian ethics, I argue that his theory of motivation is better than Hobbes's, that his theory of value is richer than Hobbes's, and that both are highly distinctive. Edwin Curley and Jonathan Bennett both attribute to Spinoza an ethical theory similar to Hobbes's: all human agents necessarily want to do whatever they think will preserve them, and anything valuable has moral value just because it is a necessary means to (...)
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  47. Hobbes on the Passions and Imagination: Tradition and Modernity.María Lukac de Stier - 2011 - Hobbes Studies 24 (1):78-90.
    This article introduces the doctrine of the passions in the Hobbesian work, showing its debt with tradition, especially the scholastic Aristotelian one, even if, at the same time, it offers some breach features with this tradition, which are also analysed. In addition, the fundamentals of imagination manifest themselves in the appetitive process, in Hobbes's doctrine as well as in the scholastic Aristotelian tradition, showing their similarities and differences.
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  48. Individual Egoism as Motivation for Human Praxis.Maria L. Lukac De Stier - 1993 - Hobbes Studies 6 (1):43-57.
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  49. (Power 8conatus-Endeavour) in the "Kinetic Actualism" and in the "Inertial" Psychology of Thomas Hobbes.Agostino Lupoli - 2001 - Hobbes Studies 14 (1):83-103.
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  50. Power (Conatus-Endeavour) in the "Kinetic Actualism" and in the "Inertial" Psychology of Thomas Hobbes1.Agostino Lupoli - 2001 - Hobbes Studies 14 (1):83-103.
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