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  1. The Absence of Reference in Hobbes’ Philosophy of Language.Arash Abizadeh - 2015 - Philosophers' Imprint 15.
    Against the dominant view in contemporary Hobbes scholarship, I argue that Hobbes’ philosophy of language implicitly denies that linguistic expressions refer to anything. I defend this thesis both textually, in light of what Hobbes actually said, and contextually, in light of Hobbes’ desertion of the vocabulary of suppositio, which was prevalent in semantics leading up to Hobbes. Hobbes explained away the apparent fact of linguistic reference via a reductive analysis: the relation between words and things wholly reduces to a composite (...)
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  2. Hobbes, Definitions, and Simplest Conceptions.Marcus P. Adams - 2014 - Hobbes Studies 27 (1):35-60.
    Several recent commentators argue that Thomas Hobbes’s account of the nature of science is conventionalist. Engaging in scientific practice on a conventionalist account is more a matter of making sure one connects one term to another properly rather than checking one’s claims, e.g., by experiment. In this paper, I argue that the conventionalist interpretation of Hobbesian science accords neither with Hobbes’s theoretical account in De corpore and Leviathan nor with Hobbes’s scientific practice in De homine and elsewhere. Closely tied to (...)
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  3. Aristotle's Poetics. Demetrius, on Style. And, Selections From Aristotle's Rhetoric. Together with Hobbes' Digest. And Horace's Ars Poetica. [REVIEW]Thomas Aristotle, Demetrius, Daniel Horace, T. Allen Hobbes & Twining - 1934 - J.M. Dent.
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  4. Why Did Hobbes Admire Aristotle's' Rhetoric'.P. Azzie - 2000 - Filozofia 55 (7):569-584.
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  5. Computatio Sive Logica.J. Bar - 1982 - Review of Metaphysics 35 (4):874-877.
  6. Reason as Reckoning: Hobbes's Natural Law as Right Reason.Jeffrey Barnouw - 2008 - Hobbes Studies 21 (1):38-62.
    Hobbes conception of reason as computation or reckoning is significantly different in Part I of De Corpore from what I take to be the later treatment in Leviathan. In the late actual computation with words starts with making an affirmation, framing a proposition. Reckoning then has to do with the consequences of propositions, or how they connect the facts, states of affairs or actions which they refer tor account. Starting from this it can be made clear how Hobbes understood the (...)
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  7. Persuasion in Hobbes's Leviathan.Jeffrey Barnouw - 1988 - Hobbes Studies 1 (1):3-25.
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  8. Linguaggio E Mondo in Hobbes.Anna Minerbi Belgrado - 1993
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  9. What Hobbes Does with Words.David R. Bell - 1969 - Philosophical Quarterly 19 (75):155-158.
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  10. Nominalism and Mechanistic Philosophy in the Thought of Hobbes. 2.J. Bernhardt - 1988 - Archives de Philosophie 51 (4):579-596.
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  11. Nominalisme et mécanisme chez Hobbes.Jean Bernhardt - 1985 - Archives de Philosophie 48 (2):235.
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  12. Semantics and Political Theory in Hobbes.Martin A. Bertman - 1988 - Hobbes Studies 1 (1):134-143.
  13. Hobbes and Performatives.Martin A. Bertman - 1978 - Critica 10 (30):41 - 53.
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  14. Hobbes: Language and the Is-Ought Problem.Martin A. Bertman - 1978 - Philosophical Studies 26:146-158.
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  15. Hobbes on Language and Reality.Martin A. Bertman - 1978 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 32 (126):536.
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  16. Brill Online Books and Journals.Martin A. Bertman, Gary B. Herbert, Giuseppe Duso, Juhana Lemetti & Jani Hakkarainen - 2009 - Hobbes Studies 22 (2).
  17. So-Called Regionalized Mechanism-Reply to an Article by Robinet, Andre on Thought and Language in the Works of Hobbes.L. Bescond - 1979 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 33 (129):527-528.
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  18. Talking Wolves Thomas Hobbes on the Language of Politics and the Politics of Language.Anat Biletzki - 1997
  19. Thomas Hobbes on "The General Use of Speech".Anat Biletzki - 1994 - Hobbes Studies 7 (1):3-27.
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  20. Leibniz and Hobbes on Arbitrary Truth.Martha B. Bolton - 1977 - Philosophy Research Archives 3:242-273.
    Leibniz repeatedly daims to refute "Hobbes' doctrine of arbitrary truth". I argue against several recent expositors of Hobbes that Hobbes' view comes to nothing more scandalous than "nominalism" about kind terms. Although some have recognized that it is this thesis which Leibniz claims to refute, his argument has not been correctly understood. I maintain that the argument rests upon Leibniz' theory of signs and his account of concepts. In brief, Leibniz argues that concepts have structures which correspond to structures of (...)
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  21. Book Symposium: Hobbes and Political Theory Introduction: Hobbes, Language and Liberty.Richard Bourke - 2009 - Hobbes Studies 22 (2):161-170.
    Hobbes's place in the history of political philosophy is a highly controversial one. An international symposium held at Queen Mary, University of London in February 2009 was devoted to debating his significance and legacy. The event focussed on recent books on Hobbes by Quentin Skinner and Philip Pettit, and was organised around four commentaries on these new works by distinguished scholars. This paper is designed to introduce the subject of the symposium together with the commentaries and subsequent responses from Petit (...)
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  22. Image, Rhetoric, and Politics in the Early Thomas Hobbes.Todd Wayne Butler - 2006 - Journal of the History of Ideas 67 (3):465-487.
  23. Nominalism, Abstraction, and Generality in Hobbes.G. K. Callaghan - 2001 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 18 (1):37 - 55.
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  24. Strong Wits and Spider Webs: A Study in Hobbes' Philosophy of Language. By Deborah Hansen Soles.K. Cameron - 2000 - The European Legacy 5 (3):444-445.
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  25. Hobbes et la fiction originaire du langage.E. Clemens - 1982 - Cahiers du Centre D’Études Phénoménologiques:101-113.
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  26. Thomas Hobbes and the 'Far-Fetched'.Elizabeth J. Cook - 1981 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 44:222-232.
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  27. Language as a Factor of Integration or Segregation in Modern States.Margarita Costa - 2011 - Hobbes Studies 24 (1):15-23.
    This paper aims at showing that Hobbes's theory of language, which allows men to communicate among themselves like no other animal species, is an importante factor in the integration of modern states. Both his nominalism and the fact that he considers language previous to reason play a role in the formation of social groups. This leads him, as Johnston points out, to make political order depend upon linguistic order. In consequence, Hobbes aims at building a political philosophy by introducing a (...)
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  28. Language and Money. A Simile and its Meaning in 17th Century Philosophy of Language.Marcelo Dascal - 1976 - Studia Leibnitiana 8 (2):187 - 218.
    Trois philosophes du 17ème siècle, à son début, vers sa moitié et près de sa fin, ont utilisé la comparaison entre mots et monnaie: Bacon, Hobbes et Leibniz, respectivement. Quoique leurs textes à cet égard soient très semblables, ils emploient cette comparaison pour expliquer des thèses assez différentes sur la nature et les fonctions du langage. Cet article essaye de dégager ces différences, en les rapportant aux différentes philosophies du langage de ces auteurs. Il est aussi suggéré que de telles (...)
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  29. Hobbes, Language and Philip Pettit.Hannah Dawson - 2009 - Hobbes Studies 22 (2):219-230.
    In this article I explore two aspects of Pettit's thesis about Hobbes' innovation with regard to the transformative and central role of language in thought and politics. First, I argue that while Hobbes had many debts to both traditionalists and innovators, he did break new ground in characterising language as in some ways constitutive of thought - a conclusion he came to as a consequence not only of his extreme nominalism, but also of his views on the exceptional sensibility of (...)
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  30. Hobbes's Logic: Language and Scientific Method.Willem R. de Jong - 1986 - History and Philosophy of Logic 7 (2):123-142.
    This paper analyses the relationship between Hobbes's theory of language and his theory of science and method. It is shown that Hobbes, at least in his Computatio sive Logica (1655), deviates in some measure from the traditional (Aristotelian) model of language. In this model speech is considered to be a fairly unproblematic expression of thought, which itself is independent of language. Basing himself on a nominalist account of universals, Hobbes states that the demonstration or assertion of universal propositions presupposes speech (...)
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  31. Did Hobbes Have a Semantic Theory of Truth?Williem R. De Jong - 1990 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (1):63.
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  32. Hobbes y la formación del análisis del discurso ideológico.Ezequiel de Olaso - 1980 - Revista Latinoamericana de Filosofia 6 (1):3.
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  33. T. A. Moxon: Aristotle's Poetics, Demetrius On Style, and Selections From Aristotle's Rhetoric, Together with Hobbes' Digest and Horace's Ars Poetica. Pp. Xiv + 268. (Everyman's Library.) London and Toronto Dent, 1934. [REVIEW]J. D. Denniston - 1934 - The Classical Review 48 (05):192-193.
  34. Reason and Rhetoric in the Philosophy of Hobbes. By Quentin Skinner.J. F. Dienstag - 1999 - The European Legacy 4:94-95.
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  35. Hobbes's Theory of Definition.Jeremiah J. Dolan - 2001 - Dissertation, New School for Social Research
    Thomas Hobbes made original and philosophically important contributions to the theory of definition in the seventeenth century. Hobbes explicitly challenged the predominance of the traditional paradigm of definition per genus proximum et differentiam specificam. In place of this classifying or "generic" method of definition, Hobbes introduced and insisted upon the primacy of the method of "generating" or "genetic" definition. Instead of defining by classifying, by locating a definiendum relative to the next higher genus and specific difference, a generating definition defines (...)
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  36. Myślenie bez języka — problem w ujęciu Thomasa Hobbesa i Olivera Sacksa.Katarzyna Doliwa - 2018 - Rocznik Filozoficzny Ignatianum 23 (2):61-84.
    Thomas Hobbes, który badaniu języka poświęcił wiele miejsca, zastanawiał się, czy możliwe jest myślenie — myślenie w ogóle i myślenie abstrakcyjne — bez języka? Hobbes zakładał, że ludzie pozbawieni języka mogą tworzyć własne, niedoskonałe, prywatne języki, pozwalające im na swoiście rozumiane rozumowanie. Na Hobbesowskie pytanie trzysta lat później odpowiada twierdząco wybitny neurolog i literat Oliver Sacks. Na podstawie danych, jakie przyniosła mu praca z osobami głuchymi, nieznającymi żadnego, nawet migowego, języka, dowodzi, że słowa i inne znaki umowne stają się niezbędne (...)
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  37. Hobbes on the Signification of Evaluative Language.Stewart Duncan - forthcoming - Hobbes Studies.
    Hobbes repeatedly expressed concerns about moral and political language, e.g., about the bad consequences of various uses and misuses of language. He did not simply focus on the consequences though. He also attempted to understand the problems, using the central semantic notion in his philosophy of language, signification. Hobbes, in both the Elements of Law and Leviathan, argues that a wide variety of terms – including ‘good’, ‘bad’, and the names of virtues and vices – have a double and inconstant (...)
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  38. Hobbes, Universal Names, and Nominalism.Stewart Duncan - 2017 - In Stefano Di Bella & Tad M. Schmaltz (eds.), The Problem of Universals in Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Thomas Hobbes was, rather famously, a nominalist. The core of that nominalism is the belief that the only universal things are universal names: there are no universal objects, or universal ideas. This paper looks at what Hobbes's views about universal names were, how they evolved over time, and how Hobbes argued for them. The remainder of the paper considers two objections to Hobbes's view: a criticism made by several of Hobbes's contemporaries, that Hobbes's view could not account for people saying (...)
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  39. Hobbes on Language: Propositions, Truth, and Absurdity.Stewart Duncan - 2016 - In A. P. Martinich & Kinch Hoekstra (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Hobbes. Oxford University Press. pp. 57-72.
    Language was central to Hobbes's understanding of human beings and their mental abilities, and criticism of other philosophers' uses of language became a favorite critical tool for him. This paper connects Hobbes's theories about language to his criticisms of others' language, examining Hobbes's theories of propositions and truth, and how they relate to his claims that various sorts of proposition are absurd. It considers whether Hobbes in fact means anything more by 'absurd' than 'false'. And it pays particular attention to (...)
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  40. Hobbes, Signification, and Insignificant Names.Stewart Duncan - 2011 - Hobbes Studies 24 (2):158-178.
    The notion of signification is an important part of Hobbes's philosophy of language. It also has broader relevance, as Hobbes argues that key terms used by his opponents are insignificant. However Hobbes's talk about names' signification is puzzling, as he appears to have advocated conflicting views. This paper argues that Hobbes endorsed two different views of names' signification in two different contexts. When stating his theoretical views about signification, Hobbes claimed that names signify ideas. Elsewhere he talked as if words (...)
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  41. Thomas Hobbes.Stewart Duncan - 2009 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), whose current reputation rests largely on his political philosophy, was a thinker with wide ranging interests. In philosophy, he defended a range of materialist, nominalist, and empiricist views against Cartesian and Aristotelian alternatives. In physics, his work was influential on Leibniz, and lead him into disputes with Boyle and the experimentalists of the early Royal Society. In history, he translated Thucydides's History of the Peloponnesian War into English, and later wrote his own history of the Long Parliament. (...)
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  42. Review of James R. Martel, Subverting the Leviathan. [REVIEW]Stewart Duncan - 2009 - Restoration, Studies in English Literary Culture, 1660-1700 33:57-9.
  43. Analogy and Equivocation in Hobbes.S. Morris Engel - 1962 - Philosophy 37 (142):326 - 335.
    The failures of a philosophic system are often a good deal more revealing than its successes, for such failures test its strength and mark the limits of its endurance. Yet if these failures disclose any uniform pattern they are not only revealing but instructive and can be turned to good account.
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  44. Hobbes's "Table of Absurdity".S. Morris Engel - 1961 - Philosophical Review 70 (4):533-543.
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  45. Made With Words: Hobbes on Language, Mind and Politics.R. E. Ewin - 2009 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (4):678-681.
  46. Conscience and the Concealment of Metaphor in Hobbes's.Karen S. Feldman - 2001 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 34 (1).
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  47. Conscience and the Concealments of Metaphor in Hobbes's "Leviathan".Karen S. Feldman - 2001 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 34 (1):21 - 37.
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  48. A paixão e a linguagem na mecânica da paz política no leviatã de Thomas Hobbes.Francisco Luciano Teixeira Filho - 2015 - Argumentos 7 (14):100-112.
    O artigo trata da ideia de paz política desde a mecânica dos corpos no Leviatã de Thomas Hobbes. Buscou-se compreender como um pressuposto egoísta pode chegar a uma ideia de consenso pela linguagem.
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  49. Hobbes' Mechanistic Analysis of Speech.Desmond FitzGerald - 1983 - Semiotics:135-143.
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  50. :Reason and Rhetoric in the Philosophy of Hobbes.Richard F. Flathman - 1998 - Ethics 108 (4):820-823.
1 — 50 / 137