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  1. Hobbes’s Agnostic Theology Before Leviathan.Arash Abizadeh - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 47 (5):714-737.
    Prior to 1651, Hobbes was agnostic about the existence of God. Hobbes argued that God’s existence could neither be demonstrated nor proved, so that those who reason about God’s existence will systematically vacillate, sometimes thinking God exists, sometimes not, which for Hobbes is to say they will doubt God’s existence. Because this vacillation or doubt is inherent to the subject, reasoners like himself will judge that settling on one belief rather than another is epistemically unjustified. Hobbes’s agnosticism becomes apparent once (...)
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  2. Publicity, Privacy, and Religious Toleration in Hobbes's Leviathan.Arash Abizadeh - 2013 - Modern Intellectual History 10 (2):261-291.
    What motivated an absolutist Erastian who rejected religious freedom, defended uniform public worship, and deemed the public expression of disagreement a catalyst for war to endorse a movement known to history as the champion of toleration, no coercion in religion, and separation of church and state? At least three factors motivated Hobbes’s 1651 endorsement of Independency: the Erastianism of Cromwellian Independency, the influence of the politique tradition, and, paradoxically, the contribution of early-modern practices of toleration to maintaining the public sphere’s (...)
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  3. SA Lloyd, Ideals as Interests in Hobbes's Leviathan: The Power of Mind Over Matter Reviewed By.Timo Airaksinen - 1992 - Philosophy in Review 12 (5):340-342.
  4. A History of Atheism in Britain: From Hobbes to RusselI. [REVIEW]Shabbir Akhtar - 1991 - International Studies in Philosophy 23 (1):100-101.
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  5. La idea de religión en Hobbes. Su importancia política.Jorge Alfonso - 2012 - Pensamiento 68 (253):389.
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  6. La idea de religión en Hobbes: su importancia política.Jorge Alfonso - 2011 - Pensamiento 67:389-405.
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  7. The Idea of Religion in Hobbes. Its Political Importance.Jorge Alfonso - 2011 - Pensamiento 67 (253):389-405.
  8. “Kingdom of God” and Potentia Dei. An Interpretation of Divine Omnipotence in Hobbes’s Thought.Carlo Altini - 2013 - Hobbes Studies 26 (1):65-84.
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  9. "Potentia Dei" and Divine Foreknowledge in Hobbes' Theology.Carlo Altini - 2009 - Rivista di Filosofia 100 (2):209-236.
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  10. «Potentia Dei» e prescienza divina nella teologia di Hobbes.Carlo Altini - 2009 - Rivista di Filosofia 100 (2):209-236.
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  11. Ideals as Lnterests in Hobbes' Leviathan.Elizabeth Anderson - 1995 - International Studies in Philosophy 27 (2):123-124.
  12. Suite Hobessiana, Cuatro Ensayos: Imaginación, Antropología, Poder y Religión.O. Astorga (ed.) - 2009 - Fondo Editorial de la Facultad de Humanidades y Educación, Universidad Central de Venezuela.
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  13. Religión y poder en Hobbes y Marsilio de Padua: similitudes y diferencias.Bernardo Aznar - 2009 - Pensamiento 65 (244):221-259.
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  14. The Separation of Reason and Faith in Bacon and Hobbes, and Leibniz's Theodicy.Jeffrey Barnouw - 1981 - Journal of the History of Ideas 42 (4):607.
  15. Hobbes's Critique of Religion and Related Writings.Gabriel Bartlett & Svetozar Minkov (eds.) - 2011 - University of Chicago Press.
    Leo Strauss’s _The Political Philosophy of Hobbes_ deservedly ranks among his most widely acclaimed works. In it Strauss argues that the basis for Hobbes’s natural and political science is his interest in “self-knowledge of man as he really is.” The writings collected in this book, each written prior to that classic volume, complement that account. Thus at long last, this book allows us to have a complete picture of Strauss’s interpretation of Hobbes, the thinker pivotal to the fundamental theme of (...)
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  16. Civil Religion: A Dialogue in the History of Political Philosophy.Ronald Beiner - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Part I. Machiavelli, Hobbes, Rousseau: Three Versions of the Civil Religion Project: 1. Rousseau's problem; 2. The Machiavellian solution: paganization of Christianity; 3. Moses and Mohammed as founder-princes or legislators; 4. Re-founding and 'filiacide': Machiavelli's debt to Christianity; 5. The Hobbesian solution: Judaicization of Christianity; 6. Behemoth: Hobbesian 'theocracy' versus the real thing; 7. Geneva Manuscript: the apparent availability of a Rousseauian solution; 8. Social Contract: the ultimate unavailability of a Rousseauian solution; Part II. Responses to (...)
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  17. La prospettiva religiosa nella filosofia civile di Thomas Hobbes.Germano Bellussi - 1967 - Filosofia 18 (4):593.
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  18. A History of Atheism in Britain: From Hobbes to Russell.David Berman - 2013 - Routledge.
    Probably no doctrine has excited as much horror and abuse as atheism. This first history of British atheism, first published in 1987, tries to explain this reaction while exhibiting the development of atheism from Hobbes to Russell. Although avowed atheism appeared surprisingly late – 1782 in Britain – there were covert atheists in the middle seventeenth century. By tracing its development from so early a date, Dr Berman gives an account of an important and fascinating strand of intellectual history.
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  19. Hobbes on Miracles (and God).Martin Bertman - 2007 - Hobbes Studies 20 (1):40-62.
    Hobbes accepts only one proof for God's existence: God as first cause of nature. Thus, the laws of nature express God's will, nothing else is knowable about God. The state projects God's will because it responds to the deepest natural -- security and prosperity -- by opposing anti-social tendencies. Thus, the sovereign, by right reason, is the public measurer of religion. In private, religion is a matter of faith. Christianity is based on the sole proposition that salvation comes by Christ. (...)
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  20. God and Man: Action and Reference in Hobbes.Martin A. Bertman - 1990 - Hobbes Studies 3 (1):18-34.
  21. Hobbes and the Imitation of God.Eric Brandon - 2001 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 44 (2):223 – 226.
    This note discusses the implications of an incorrect quotation that appeared in Ted H. Miller's article, 'Thomas Hobbes and the Constraints that Enable the Imitation of God', from Inquiry 42.2. Although surely inadvertent, this error is significant because the author uses it to support the thesis that Hobbes envisions philosophers imitating God by creating order out of chaos. The correct quotation from Leviathan does not support such a thesis, and the paragraph in Leviathan from which it is taken actually runs (...)
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  22. Hobbes's Grounds for Belief in a Deity.K. C. Brown - 1962 - Philosophy 37 (142):336 - 344.
    I Propose to re-explore here some aspects of a very shop-worn question: ‘Was Hobbes in any sense an atheist?’ Three centuries ago, Hobbes's personal security in part depended on the way his contemporaries answered this question; today, the validity of several current accounts of his philosophy are similarly bound up with it. These accounts vary extraordinarily, all the way from Polin's confident assertion that ‘ pour qui sait lire entre les lignes, … c'est ľatheísme qui triomphe implicitement ’, to Taylor's (...)
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  23. Hobbes on God and Obligation.Keith C. Brown - unknown
    An explanation of the system of textual references employed in this paper may perhaps be of convenience to the reader. As a rule, references to other works have here been incorporated in the main body of the text, with the aid of abbreviations usually derived from the initial letters of the main words in their titles. Thus "HLL, p. 21." refers to page twenty-one of Thomas Hobbes: Leben and Lehre, by F. Tonnies.
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  24. Hobbes: The Taylor Thesis.Stuart M. Brown - 1959 - Philosophical Review 68 (3):303-323.
  25. Hobbes and Bramhall on Liberty and Necessity.Vere Chappell (ed.) - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    Do human beings ever act freely, and if so what does freedom mean? Is everything that happens antecedently caused, and if so how is freedom possible? Is it right, even for God, to punish people for things that they cannot help doing? This volume presents the famous seventeenth-century controversy in which Thomas Hobbes and John Bramhall debate these questions and others. The complete texts of their initial contributions to the debate are included, together with selections from their subsequent replies to (...)
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  26. On the Definition of Religion in Hobbes' Leviathan.Jianhong Chen - 2006 - Bijdragen 67 (2):180-194.
    On the Definition of Religion in Hobbes’ Leviathan It has long been a controversial topic whether Hobbes was an atheistic philosopher or a sincere Christian. A clear understanding of the issue requires an investigation into Hobbes’ view of religion. This paper tends to provide such an examination. First, it analyses the legal point of view by which Hobbes distinguishes religion from superstition. Secondly, it examines the two elements by which Hobbes defines religion: fear and power. Thirdly, it explores what true (...)
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  27. James E. Crimmins, Ed., Religion, Secularization and Political Thought, Thomas Hobbes to J. S. Mill, London, Routledge, 1990, Pp. 202. [REVIEW]Gregory Claeys - 1992 - Utilitas 4 (2):333.
  28. Hobbes parmi les mouvements religieux de son temps.M. Clive - 1978 - Revue des Sciences Philosophiques Et Théologiques 62 (1):41.
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  29. The Socinian Connection: Further Thoughts on the Religion of Hobbes.C. A. J. Coady - 1986 - Religious Studies 22 (2):277 - 280.
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  30. The Socinian Connection – Further Thoughts on the Religion of Hobbes: C. A. J. COADY.C. A. J. Coady - 1986 - Religious Studies 22 (2):277-280.
    Peter Geach supports his case that the religion of Thomas Hobbes was both genuine and a version of Socinianism principally by comparing the theological and scriptural sections of Leviathan with the main doctrines of Socinianism and its latter-day developments in Unitarianism and Christadelphianism. He pays particular attention to comparisons with the Racovian Catechism, the theological writings of Joseph Priestley and the Christadelphian document Christendom Astray by Robert Roberts.
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  31. Thomas Hobbes, Heresy, and the Theological Project of Leviathan.Jeffrey R. Collins - 2013 - Hobbes Studies 26 (1):6-33.
  32. Theology and Politics in Thomas Hobbes's Trinitarian Theory.Andrés Jiménez Colodrero - 2011 - Hobbes Studies 24 (1):62-77.
    This article intends to analyse the Hobbesian version of the Christian dogma of the Trinity as it is observed in the corresponding sections of Leviathan , De Cive and Heresy , and alluded to in other texts (controversy with Bramhall). It shall be important to specify: (a) As a starting point, the exact place of such concept within the general problem expressed by the difference between "political theology" and "theologico-political problem" (C. Altini); (b) The main items of the philosopher's Trinitarian (...)
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  33. Hobbes and Christianity Reassessing the Bible in Leviathan.Paul D. Cooke - 1996
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  34. Hobbes and the Bible: How Human Rights Became Divine Law.Paul David Cooke - 1991 - Dissertation, Harvard University
    Hobbes's Leviathan cannot fully save men from the state of nature unless some sense of transcendence is taken into account as an antidote to the fear of death. To supply this transcendence Hobbes retains the Bible, from which he extracts an antidote for politically dangerous human anxieties in order to complete his plan for peace. Holding death at bay through political arrangements is not enough; human beings need a further sense of overcoming--a means of meeting death when it can no (...)
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  35. L’altération Du Christianisme.: Hobbes et la trinité.Philippe Crignon - 2007 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 81 (2):235-263.
    La théorie politique élaborée par Hobbes dans le Léviathan substitue le schème de la représentation à celui de l’Incarnation, hérité de saint Paul et saint Jean, qui avait permis jusqu’alors de penser l’unité d’une communauté. Ainsi, c’est moins l’extension politique du christianisme qui est affectée par cette substitution que sa nature même. L’objet de cet article est de le montrer à travers le cas privilégié de la Trinité, figure protypique de la « communauté » . En redéfinissant la notion de (...)
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  36. D. Berman, A History of Atheism in Britain, From Hobbes to Russell, London and New York, Routledge, 1990, Pp. X + 253.James E. Crimmins - 1993 - Utilitas 5 (2):337.
  37. Calvin and Hobbes, or, Hobbes as an Orthodox Christian.E. M. Curley - 1996 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (2):257-271.
    Notes and Discussions Calvin and Hobbes, or, Hobbes as an Orthodox Christian Three years ago, in the proceedings of an Italian conference on Hobbes and Spinoza, I published an article arguing that Hobbes was at best a deist, and most likely an atheist? In a recent book on Hobbes, A. P. Martinich devoted an appendix to criticizing that article, as part of his case that Hobbes is not merely a theist, but an orthodox Christian, and specifically, that he had "a (...)
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  38. Reply to Professor Martinich.E. M. Curley - 1996 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (2):285-287.
    Reply to Professor Martinich The editor of this journal has invited me to reply to Professor Martinich's reply to my reply to his reply to my article, on the condition that I should be brief. I shall try to be very brief. Our discussion has probably reached a point at which we can expect dimin- ishing returns. I shall try also to avoid even the slightest hint of irony, though I am not sure I can succeed in that. I am (...)
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  39. The Covenant with God in Hobbes's Leviathan.Edwin Curley - 2004 - In Tom Sorell & Luc Foisneau (eds.), Leviathan After 350 Years. Clarendon Press.
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  40. Thomas Hobbes, the Taylor Thesis and Alasdair Macintyre.Jean Curthoys - 1998 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 6 (1):1 – 24.
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  41. Hobbes as Reformation Theologian: Implications of the Free-Will Controversy.Leopold Damrosch - 1979 - Journal of the History of Ideas 40 (3):339.
  42. Ideals as Interests in Hobbes's Leviathan: The Power of Mind Over Matter.The Two Gods of Leviathan: Thomas Hobbes on Religion and Politics.Stephen Darwall, S. A. Lloyd & A. P. Martinich - 1994 - Philosophical Review 103 (4):748.
  43. Hobbes: Religion and Ideology. Notes on the Political Utilization of Religion.E. de Olaso - 1993 - In Richard H. Popkin & Arie Johan Vanderjagt (eds.), Scepticism and Irreligion in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. E.J. Brill.
  44. Comfort in Annihilation: Three Studies in Materialism and Mortality.Liam P. Dempsey & Byron Stoyles - 2010 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 15 (1):119-140.
    This paper considers three accounts of the relationship between personal immortality and materialism. In particular, the pagan mortalism of the Epicureans is compared with the Christian mortalism of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. It is argued 1) that there are significant similarities between these views, 2) that Locke and Hobbes were, to some extent, influenced by the Epicureans, and 3) that the relation between (im)mortality and (im)materialism is not as straightforward as is commonly supposed.
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  45. God as the Equilibrium of the Hobbesian Political Philosophical System.Andrés Di Leo Razuk - 2011 - Hobbes Studies 24 (1):24-43.
    In this work we will try to demonstrate the presence and the role that God has in Thomas Hobbes's political philosophy. We consider that this religious belief, that it is the system's equilibrium, guaranties that the Hobbesian political project does not fall into revolutionary or totalitarian excesses. Thus, we shall analyse the arguments of the existence of God that are introduced by the philosopher Malmesbury with the objective of proving that reason does not necessarily lead to atheism, but that such (...)
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  46. God as the Equilibrium of the Hobbesian Political Philosophical System.Razuk Di Leo - 2011 - Hobbes Studies 24 (1):24-43.
    In this work we will try to demonstrate the presence and the role that God has in Thomas Hobbes's political philosophy. We consider that this religious belief, that it is the system's equilibrium, guaranties that the Hobbesian political project does not fall into revolutionary or totalitarian excesses. Thus, we shall analyse the arguments of the existence of God that are introduced by the philosopher Malmesbury with the objective of proving that reason does not necessarily lead to atheism, but that such (...)
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  47. Hobbes & Secularization: Christianity and the Political Problem of Religion.Paul Dumouchel - 1995 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 2 (1):39-56.
  48. Materialism.Stewart Duncan - 2013 - In S. A. Lloyd (ed.), Bloomsbury Companion to Hobbes. Continuum.
    This is a short (1,000 word) introduction to Hobbes's materialism, covering (briefly) such issues as what the relevant notion of materialism is, Hobbes's debate with Descartes, and what Hobbes's arguments for materialism were.
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  49. Debating Materialism: Cavendish, Hobbes, and More.Stewart Duncan - 2012 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (4):391-409.
    This paper discusses the materialist views of Margaret Cavendish, focusing on the relationships between her views and those of two of her contemporaries, Thomas Hobbes and Henry More. It argues for two main claims. First, Cavendish's views sit, often rather neatly, between those of Hobbes and More. She agreed with Hobbes on some issues and More on others, while carving out a distinctive alternative view. Secondly, the exchange between Hobbes, More, and Cavendish illustrates a more general puzzle about just what (...)
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  50. Toland, Leibniz, and Active Matter.Stewart Duncan - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 6:249-78.
    In the early years of the eighteenth century Leibniz had several interactions with John Toland. These included, from 1702 to 1704, discussions of materialism. Those discussions culminated with the consideration of Toland's 1704 Letters to Serena, where Toland argued that matter is necessarily active. In this paper I argue for two main theses about this exchange and its consequences for our wider understanding. The first is that, despite many claims that Toland was at the time of Letters to Serena a (...)
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