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  1. A Companion to Hobbes.Marcus P. Adams (ed.) - forthcoming - Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.
  2. Hobbes's Laws of Nature in Leviathan as a Synthetic Demonstration: Thought Experiments and Knowing the Causes.Marcus P. Adams - 2019 - Philosophers' Imprint 19.
    The status of the laws of nature in Hobbes’s Leviathan has been a continual point of disagreement among scholars. Many agree that since Hobbes claims that civil philosophy is a science, the answer lies in an understanding of the nature of Hobbesian science more generally. In this paper, I argue that Hobbes’s view of the construction of geometrical figures sheds light upon the status of the laws of nature. In short, I claim that the laws play the same role as (...)
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  3. On Arash Abizadeh, 'Hobbes and the Two Faces of Ethics'. [REVIEW]Michael LeBuffe - 2018 - European Hobbes Society 2018:NA.
    I would like to begin by congratulating Arash Abizadeh. Hobbes and the Two Faces of Ethics is a splendid book. Even where I have disagreed with Abizadeh, the book has been a great help to me in framing central issues and in setting out pressing questions for different interpretations. I am sure that it will be a valuable resource for students of Hobbes for many years. -/- Here I will discuss Abizadeh’s views on the science of morality in Hobbes, and (...)
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  4. Natural Philosophy, Deduction, and Geometry in the Hobbes-Boyle Debate.Marcus P. Adams - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):83-107.
    This paper examines Hobbes’s criticisms of Robert Boyle’s air-pump experiments in light of Hobbes’s account in _De Corpore_ and _De Homine_ of the relationship of natural philosophy to geometry. I argue that Hobbes’s criticisms rely upon his understanding of what counts as “true physics.” Instead of seeing Hobbes as defending natural philosophy as “a causal enterprise … [that] as such, secured total and irrevocable assent,” 1 I argue that, in his disagreement with Boyle, Hobbes relied upon his understanding of natural (...)
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  5. An Early European Critic of Hobbes’s De Corpore.Stephen Clucas - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):4-27.
    _ Source: _Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 4 - 27 The _Animadversiones in Elementorum Philosophiae_ by a little known Flemish scholar G. Moranus, published in Brussels in 1655 was an early European response to Hobbes’s _De Corpore_. Although it is has been referred to by various Hobbes scholars, such as Noel Malcolm, Doug Jesseph, and Alexander Bird it has been little studied. Previous scholarship has tended to focus on the mathematical criticisms of André Tacquet which Moranus included in the form (...)
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  6. Hobbes on Natural Philosophy as "True Physics" and Mixed Mathematics.Marcus P. Adams - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 56:43-51.
    I offer an alternative account of the relationship of Hobbesian geometry to natural philosophy by arguing that mixed mathematics provided Hobbes with a model for thinking about it. In mixed mathematics, one may borrow causal principles from one science and use them in another science without there being a deductive relationship between those two sciences. Natural philosophy for Hobbes is mixed because an explanation may combine observations from experience (the ‘that’) with causal principles from geometry (the ‘why’). My argument shows (...)
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  7. Visual Perception as Patterning: Cavendish Against Hobbes on Sensation.Marcus P. Adams - 2016 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 33 (3):193-214.
    Many of Margaret Cavendish’s criticisms of Thomas Hobbes in the Philosophical Letters (1664) relate to the disorder and damage that she holds would result if Hobbesian pressure were the cause of visual perception. In this paper, I argue that her “two men” thought experiment in Letter IV is aimed at a different goal: to show the explanatory potency of her account. First, I connect Cavendish’s view of visual perception as “patterning” to the “two men” thought experiment in Letter IV. Second, (...)
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  8. La curiosità e le passioni della conoscenza. Filosofia e scienze da Montaigne a Hobbes.Gregorio Baldin - 2016 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 71 (3):535-538.
  9. Hobbes on the Order of Sciences: A Partial Defense of the Mathematization Thesis.Zvi Biener - 2016 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 54 (3):312-332.
    Accounts of Hobbes’s ‘system’ of sciences oscillate between two extremes. On one extreme, the system is portrayed as wholly axiomtic-deductive, with statecraft being deduced in an unbroken chain from the principles of logic and first philosophy. On the other, it is portrayed as rife with conceptual cracks and fissures, with Hobbes’s statements about its deductive structure amounting to mere window-dressing. This paper argues that a middle way is found by conceiving of Hobbes’s _Elements of Philosophy_ on the model of a (...)
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  10. Optics in Hobbes’s Natural Philosophy.Franco Giudice - 2016 - Hobbes Studies 29 (1):86-102.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 86 - 102 The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the place that Hobbes assigns to optics in the context of his classification of sciences and disciplinary boundaries. To do this, I will begin with an account of Hobbes’s conception of philosophy or science, and particularly his distinction between true and hypothetical knowledge. I will also show that in his demarcation between mathematics or geometry and natural philosophy Hobbes was (...)
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  11. Hobbes, Galileo, and the Physics of Simple Circular Motions.John Henry - 2016 - Hobbes Studies 29 (1):9-38.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 9 - 38 Hobbes tried to develop a strict version of the mechanical philosophy, in which all physical phenomena were explained only in terms of bodies in motion, and the only forces allowed were forces of collision or impact. This ambition puts Hobbes into a select group of original thinkers, alongside Galileo, Isaac Beeckman, and Descartes. No other early modern thinkers developed a strict version of the mechanical philosophy. Natural philosophies relying solely on (...)
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  12. Hobbes on ‘Conatus’: A Study in the Foundations of Hobbesian Philosophy.Douglas Jesseph - 2016 - Hobbes Studies 29 (1):66-85.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 66 - 85 This paper will deal with the notion of _conatus_ and the role it plays in Hobbes’s program for natural philosophy. As defined by Hobbes, the _conatus_ of a body is essentially its instantaneous motion, and he sees this as the means to account for a variety of phenomena in both natural philosophy and mathematics. Although I foucs principally on Hobbesian physics, I will also consider the extent to which Hobbes’s account (...)
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  13. Optics, Simple Circular Motion and Conatus.Agostino Lupoli - 2016 - Hobbes Studies 29 (1):1-7.
  14. Le signe et les fondements de la certitude chez Hobbes.Éric Marquer - 2016 - Methodos 16.
    Hobbes établit une distinction entre signes certains et signes incertains, qui correspond à la distinction entre science et prudence. Mais il précise toutefois que les signes de la science ne sont pas tous certains, ni infaillibles. Cette recommandation n’est pas tant une critique de la science, qu’une mise en garde adressée à ceux qui renoncent à leur jugement naturel et s’en remettent aveuglément à l’autorité des livres. La certitude dépend donc d’un bon usage des signes de la part du sujet (...)
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  15. Hobbes’s Geometrical Optics.José Médina - 2016 - Hobbes Studies 29 (1):39-65.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 39 - 65 Since Euclid, optics has been considered a geometrical science, which Aristotle defines as a “mixed” mathematical science. Hobbes follows this tradition and clearly places optics among physical sciences. However, modern scholars point to a confusion between geometry and physics and do not seem to agree about the way Hobbes mixes both sciences. In this paper, I return to this alleged confusion and intend to emphasize the peculiarity of Hobbes’s geometrical optics. (...)
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  16. Hobbes on the Scientific Study of the Human Mind.Laurens van Apeldoorn - 2015 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 97 (3).
    Name der Zeitschrift: Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie Jahrgang: 97 Heft: 3 Seiten: 308-333.
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  17. Hobbes, Definitions, and Simplest Conceptions.Marcus P. Adams - 2014 - Hobbes Studies 27 (1):35-60.
    Several recent commentators argue that Thomas Hobbes’s account of the nature of science is conventionalist. Engaging in scientific practice on a conventionalist account is more a matter of making sure one connects one term to another properly rather than checking one’s claims, e.g., by experiment. In this paper, I argue that the conventionalist interpretation of Hobbesian science accords neither with Hobbes’s theoretical account in De corpore and Leviathan nor with Hobbes’s scientific practice in De homine and elsewhere. Closely tied to (...)
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  18. Hobbes's and Zabarella's Methods: A Missing Link.Helen Hattab - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (3):461-485.
    early modern philosophers commonly appeal to a mathematical method to demonstrate their philosophical claims. Since such claims are not always followed by what we would recognize as mathematical proofs, they are often dismissed as mere rhetoric. René Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, and Benedict de Spinoza are perhaps the most well-known early modern philosophers who fall into this category. It is a matter of dispute whether the ordo geometricus amounts to more than a method of presentation in Spinoza’s philosophy. Descartes and Hobbes (...)
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  19. The Theory of Material Qualities.Peter R. Anstey - 2013 - In The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 240.
    This chapter examines the main theories of material qualities developed by leading British philosophers during the seventeenth century, describes the taxonomy of qualities during this period, and analyzes the epistemological and metaphysical theses that influenced the development of the theory of material qualities in Great Britain. It also considers the relevant works of Thomas Hobbes, Walter Charleton, Robert Boyle, John Locke, and Isaac Newton.
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  20. El Leviathan como autómata: método y política en Thomas Hobbes.Diego Fernández Peychaux - 2013 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 30 (2):413-430.
    En el presente artículo se señala la tensión entre las pretensiones normativas de los textos políticos de Thomas Hobbes, y la identificación del método resolutivo-compositivo de las ciencias como aquél aplicado en esos textos. Para resolver esta dificultad se apela a los textos epistemológicos del autor en los que leer el ejemplo del reloj desde una nueva perspectiva. Así, si el método hobbesiano responde a la necesidad de la innovación normativa, no sólo niega una intencionalidad apologética para una realidad histórica (...)
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  21. Hobbes's Leviathan: New Science of Man.Christopher Lazarski - 2013 - In Janusz Grygiensl (ed.), Human Rights and Politics. Erida.
    Leviathan by Hobbes is one of the most original books in political theory ever written. Broad is scope, rich in ideas and bold in its claims; it contains much more than just political theory. The article focuses on Hobbes’s presentation of human nature, in particular in light of the then new thesis that universe is matter in motion; on observation how human automata whom Hobbes created (as it were) live in state of nature and under authority of “the leviathan”; and (...)
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  22. Reorientation: Leo Strauss in the 1930s.Martin D. Yaffe & Richard S. Ruderman (eds.) - 2013 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Introduction; Martin D. Yaffe and Richard S. Ruderman -- 1. How Strauss Became Strauss; Heinrich Meier -- 2. Spinoza's Critique of Religion: Reading Too Literally and Not Reading Literally Enough; Steven Frank -- 3. The Light Shed on the Crucial Development of Strauss's Thought by his Correspondence with Gerhard Krüger; Thomas L. Pangle -- 4. Strauss on Hermann Cohen's 'Idealizing' Appropriation of Maimonides as a Platonist; Martin D. Yaffe -- 5. Strauss on the Religious and (...)
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  23. Hobbes's First Philosophy and Galilean Science.Luc Foisneau - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (4):795 - 809.
    Review of Gianni Paganini (transl.), Moto, luogo e tempo di Thomas Hobbes. Torino: UTET, 2010, pp. 708.
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  24. A Note From the Editor.Martin Bertman - 2009 - Hobbes Studies 22 (1):1-1.
  25. Thomas Hobbes.Stewart Duncan - 2009 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), whose current reputation rests largely on his political philosophy, was a thinker with wide ranging interests. In philosophy, he defended a range of materialist, nominalist, and empiricist views against Cartesian and Aristotelian alternatives. In physics, his work was influential on Leibniz, and lead him into disputes with Boyle and the experimentalists of the early Royal Society. In history, he translated Thucydides's History of the Peloponnesian War into English, and later wrote his own history of the Long Parliament. (...)
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  26. Hobbes, Thomas — Methodology.Stephen Finn - 2008 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  27. Hobbes 'Forgotten Natural Histories'.Robin Bunce - 2006 - Hobbes Studies 19 (1):77-104.
    Thomas Hobbes' natural philosophy is often characterised as rationalistic in opposition to the emerging inductivist method employed by Francis Bacon and fellows of the Gresham College - later the Royal Society. Where as the inductivists researched and published a multitude of natural histories, Hobbes' mature publications contain little natural historical information. Nonetheless, Hobbes read numerous natural histories and incorporated them into his works and often used details from these histories to support important theoretical moves. He also wrote a number of (...)
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  28. The End of Philosophy (the Case of Hobbes).Kinch Hoekstra - 2006 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (1):23–60.
    In the first three sections, I argue that Hobbes has a distinctive conception of philosophy, the highest value of which is not truth, but human benefit; and that his philosophical utterances are constrained by this value (both insofar as they are philosophical in particular, and insofar as they are public utterances of any kind). I address an evidentiary problem for this view in the penultimate section, and then turn to the question of how such a conception of philosophy requires different (...)
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  29. Logical consistence and operating base in Thomas Hobbes. [Spanish].Rusbel Martínez Rodríguez - 2006 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 5:50-69.
    El objetivo principal de este artículo es precisar los elementos que operan en el substrato de la filosofía de Thomas Hobbes y que permiten dar coherencia lógica a su sistema. Para ello se apela a la idea de concepto operatorio desarrollada por Eugen Fink, a la vez que se llama la atención sobre la importancia de considerar la filosofía hobbesiana en su totalidad. Esto implica que cualquier análisis de la teoría política de Hobbes debe considerar las relaciones existentes con las (...)
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  30. Galileo, Hobbes, and the Book of Nature.Douglas Michael Jesseph - 2004 - Perspectives on Science 12 (2):191-211.
    : This paper investigates the influence of Galileo's natural philosophy on the philosophical and methodological doctrines of Thomas Hobbes. In particular, I argue that what Hobbes took away from his encounter with Galileo was the fundamental idea that the world is a mechanical system in which everything can be understood in terms of mathematically-specifiable laws of motion. After tracing the history of Hobbes's encounters with Galilean science (through the "Welbeck group" connected with William Cavendish, earl of Newcastle and the "Mersenne (...)
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  31. The Mechanization of Aristotelianism: The Late Aristotelian Setting of Thomas Hobbes' Natural Philosophy. [REVIEW]George Wright - 2004 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (1):101-103.
  32. Cees Leijenhorst. The Mechanisation of Aristotelianism: The Late Aristotelian Setting of Thomas Hobbes’ Natural Philosophy. Xvi+242 Pp., Bibl., Index. Leiden/Boston: Brill, 2002. $97, €83. [REVIEW]Alexander Bird - 2003 - Isis 94 (4):725-726.
  33. Hobbes: Metaphysics and Method.Stewart D. R. Duncan - 2003 - Dissertation, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey - New Brunswick
    This dissertation discusses the work of Thomas Hobbes, and has two main themes. The first is Hobbes's materialism, and the second is Hobbes's relationships to other philosophers, in particular his place in the mechanist movement that is said to have replaced Aristotelianism as the dominant philosophy in the seventeenth century. -/- I argue that Hobbes does not, for most of his career, believe the general materialist view that bodies are the only substances. He believes, rather, that ideas, which are our (...)
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  34. Re-Thinking Hobbes's Materialistic and Mechanistic Projects.Robert Arp - 2002 - Hobbes Studies 15 (1):3-31.
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  35. Bible, science et souveraineté chez bacon et hobbes.Jeffrey Barnouw - 2001 - Revue de Théologie Et de Philosophie 133 (3):247-265.
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  36. Hobbes's Theory of Definition.Jeremiah J. Dolan - 2001 - Dissertation, New School for Social Research
    Thomas Hobbes made original and philosophically important contributions to the theory of definition in the seventeenth century. Hobbes explicitly challenged the predominance of the traditional paradigm of definition per genus proximum et differentiam specificam. In place of this classifying or "generic" method of definition, Hobbes introduced and insisted upon the primacy of the method of "generating" or "genetic" definition. Instead of defining by classifying, by locating a definiendum relative to the next higher genus and specific difference, a generating definition defines (...)
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  37. Hobbes on Hypotheses in Natural Philosophy.Frank Horstmann - 2001 - The Monist 84 (4):487-501.
    Thomas Hobbes adheres to a conception of philosophy as causal knowledge that bears the mark of the Aristotelian tradition, as Cees Leijenhorst has elaborated in another issue of The Monist. Referring to Aristotle, Hobbes states explicitly in two mathematical studies of the 1660’s: “To know is to know by causes.” But according to Hobbes, we encounter obstacles when we search for causes in the field of natural philosophy. Consequently, his well-known definition of philosophy consists of two parts. The earliest version, (...)
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  38. The Power of Images: Mathematics and Metaphysics in Hobbes's Optics.Antoni Malet - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (2):303-333.
    This paper deals with Hobbes's theory of optical images, developed in his optical magnum opus, ‘A Minute or First Draught of the Optiques’, and published in abridged version in De homine. The paper suggests that Hobbes's theory of vision and images serves him to ground his philosophy of man on his philosophy of body. Furthermore, since this part of Hobbes's work on optics is the most thoroughly geometrical, it reveals a good deal about the role of mathematics in Hobbes's philosophy. (...)
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  39. Geometrical Physics: Mathematics in the Natural Philosophy of Thomas Hobbes.Kathryn A. Morris - 2001 - Dissertation, Mcgill University (Canada)
    My thesis examines Thomas Hobbes's attempt to develop a mathematical account of nature. I argue that Hobbes's conception of how we should think quantitatively about the world was deeply indebted to the ideas of his ancient and medieval predecessors. These ideas were often amenable to Hobbes's vision of a demonstrative, geometrically-based science. However, he was forced to adapt the ancient and medieval models to the demands of his own thoroughgoing materialism. This hybrid resulted in a distinctive, if only partially successful, (...)
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  40. Hobbes on Explanation and Understanding.Ioli Patellis - 2001 - Journal of the History of Ideas 62 (3):445-462.
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  41. The Method in Hobbes' Madness.Alan Carter - 1999 - Hobbes Studies 12 (1):72-89.
    Hobbes appears to subscribe to a form of the resolutive/compositive method not only as the appropriate means for understanding the natural world but also as the correct means for understanding the political world. However, the view that Hobbes adopts this methodology for understanding both 'bodies politic' and 'natural bodies' has been challenged in Tom Sorell's widely praised study of Hobbes' philosophy. In this article, I first rebut Sorell's challenge, and then consider several other objections which might be levelled against the (...)
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  42. Making Certain: Thomas Hobbes, Geometry, and the Educational Politics of Early Modernity.Ted Harold Miller - 1999 - Dissertation, University of California, San Diego
    Our understanding of Hobbes is pivotal to our grasp of modernity, and yet we misunderstand him. Specifically, we have misconstrued the way his philosophy exemplifies modern political reason. Contrary to the conventional view, Hobbes should not be thought of as the first modern political scientist. His works are not abstract schema devoted to explaining the logic of commonwealths or the actions of rationally self-interested actors. Rather than explanatory, Hobbes's science was didactic: it was written to craft and fashion obedient selves. (...)
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  43. Hobbes' Dialogue of the Common Laws and the Difference Between "Natural" and "Civil Philosophy".Giuseppe Mario Saccone - 1999 - Hobbes Studies 12 (1):3-25.
    This article explains the apparent tension between Hobbes' late work A Dialogue between A Philosopher and A Student of the Common Laws of England and his avowed goal of a deductive philosophy which eschews rhetoric and history, by analysing the difference between Hobbes' civil and natural philosophy. A Dialogue's simultaneous use of deduction, rhetoric, and historical citation is congruent with the method applied by Hobbes in Leviathan in order to construct his "civil philosophy". This highlights Hobbes' awareness increasing with the (...)
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  44. Study Four. Empiricist Inductive Methodology: Hobbes and Hume.Fred Wilson - 1999 - In The Logic and Methodology of Science in Early Modern Thought: Seven Studies. University of Toronto Press. pp. 290-318.
  45. Science and Moral Skepticism in Hobbes.Sam Black - 1997 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 27 (2):173 - 207.
    Here lyes that mighty Man of SenseWho, full of years, departed hence,To teach the other world Intelligence,This was the prodigious Man,who vanquish’ d Pope and Puritan,By the Magic of Leviathan.Had he not Controversy wanted,His deeper Thoughts had not been scanted;Therefore good Spirits him transplant:Wise as he was, he could not tellWhether he went to Heaven or Hell.Beyond the Tenth Sphere, if there be a wide place,He'll prove by his Art there's no infinite space:And all good Angels may thank him, for (...)
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  46. Hobbes on Demonstration and Construction.David P. Gauthier - 1997 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (4):509-521.
    Hobbes on Demonstration and Construction DAVID GAUTHIER 1~ IN 1656 Hobbes published Six Lessons to the Professors of Mathematics, with an Epistle Dedicatory to the Marquis of Dorchester, Lord Pierrepont. In this Epistle, Hobbes distinguishes the demonstrable from the indemonstrable arts: "demonstrable are those the construction of the subject whereof is in the power of the artist himself, who, in his demonstration, does no more but deduce the consequences of his own operation" . Although this passage, with the explication Hobbes (...)
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  47. Why Strong Sociologists Abhor a Vacuum: Shapin and Schaffer on the Boyle/Hobbes Controversy.Christopher Norris - 1997 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 23 (4):9-40.
  48. Hobbes's Political Geometry.Jeremy Valentine - 1997 - History of the Human Sciences 10 (2):23-40.
  49. Steven Shapin, Simon Schaffer, Leviathan et la pompe à air: Hobbes et Boyle entre science et politique. Trad, de l'anglais par Thierry Plélat avec la collab. de Sylvie Barjansky (Paris: La Découverte, 1993). [REVIEW]Jean Bernhardt - 1996 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 49 (2-3):368-369.
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  50. Hobbes and the Method of Natural Science.Douglas Jesseph - 1996 - In Tom Sorell (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Hobbes. Cambridge University Press. pp. 86--107.
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