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  1. On Arash Abizadeh, 'Hobbes and the Two Faces of Ethics'. [REVIEW]Michael LeBuffe - 2018 - European Hobbes Society 2018:NA.
    I would like to begin by congratulating Arash Abizadeh. Hobbes and the Two Faces of Ethics is a splendid book. Even where I have disagreed with Abizadeh, the book has been a great help to me in framing central issues and in setting out pressing questions for different interpretations. I am sure that it will be a valuable resource for students of Hobbes for many years. -/- Here I will discuss Abizadeh’s views on the science of morality in Hobbes, and (...)
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  2. Natural Philosophy, Deduction, and Geometry in the Hobbes-Boyle Debate.Marcus P. Adams - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):83-107.
    This paper examines Hobbes’s criticisms of Robert Boyle’s air-pump experiments in light of Hobbes’s account in _De Corpore_ and _De Homine_ of the relationship of natural philosophy to geometry. I argue that Hobbes’s criticisms rely upon his understanding of what counts as “true physics.” Instead of seeing Hobbes as defending natural philosophy as “a causal enterprise … [that] as such, secured total and irrevocable assent,” 1 I argue that, in his disagreement with Boyle, Hobbes relied upon his understanding of natural (...)
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  3. An Early European Critic of Hobbes’s De Corpore.Stephen Clucas - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):4-27.
    _ Source: _Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 4 - 27 The _Animadversiones in Elementorum Philosophiae_ by a little known Flemish scholar G. Moranus, published in Brussels in 1655 was an early European response to Hobbes’s _De Corpore_. Although it is has been referred to by various Hobbes scholars, such as Noel Malcolm, Doug Jesseph, and Alexander Bird it has been little studied. Previous scholarship has tended to focus on the mathematical criticisms of André Tacquet which Moranus included in the form (...)
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  4. The Parallelogram Rule From Pseudo-Aristotle to Newton.David Marshall Miller - 2017 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 71 (2):157-191.
    The history of the Parallelogram Rule for composing physical quantities, such as motions and forces, is marked by conceptual difficulties leading to false starts and halting progress. In particular, authors resisted the required assumption that the magnitude and the direction of a quantity can interact and are jointly necessary to represent the quantity. Consequently, the origins of the Rule cannot be traced to Pseudo-Aristotle or Stevin, as commonly held, but to Fermat, Hobbes, and subsequent developments in the latter part of (...)
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  5. Hobbes on Natural Philosophy as "True Physics" and Mixed Mathematics.Marcus P. Adams - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 56:43-51.
    I offer an alternative account of the relationship of Hobbesian geometry to natural philosophy by arguing that mixed mathematics provided Hobbes with a model for thinking about it. In mixed mathematics, one may borrow causal principles from one science and use them in another science without there being a deductive relationship between those two sciences. Natural philosophy for Hobbes is mixed because an explanation may combine observations from experience (the ‘that’) with causal principles from geometry (the ‘why’). My argument shows (...)
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  6. Visual Perception as Patterning: Cavendish Against Hobbes on Sensation.Marcus P. Adams - 2016 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 33 (3):193-214.
    Many of Margaret Cavendish’s criticisms of Thomas Hobbes in the Philosophical Letters (1664) relate to the disorder and damage that she holds would result if Hobbesian pressure were the cause of visual perception. In this paper, I argue that her “two men” thought experiment in Letter IV is aimed at a different goal: to show the explanatory potency of her account. First, I connect Cavendish’s view of visual perception as “patterning” to the “two men” thought experiment in Letter IV. Second, (...)
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  7. Hobbes on the Order of Sciences: A Partial Defense of the Mathematization Thesis.Zvi Biener - 2016 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 54 (3):312-332.
    Accounts of Hobbes’s ‘system’ of sciences oscillate between two extremes. On one extreme, the system is portrayed as wholly axiomtic-deductive, with statecraft being deduced in an unbroken chain from the principles of logic and first philosophy. On the other, it is portrayed as rife with conceptual cracks and fissures, with Hobbes’s statements about its deductive structure amounting to mere window-dressing. This paper argues that a middle way is found by conceiving of Hobbes’s _Elements of Philosophy_ on the model of a (...)
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  8. Springs, Nitre, and Conatus. The Role of the Heart in Hobbes's Physiology and Animal Locomotion.Rodolfo Garau - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (2):231-256.
    This paper focuses on an understudied aspect of Hobbes's natural philosophy: his approach to the domain of life. I concentrate on the role assigned by Hobbes to the heart, which occupies a central role in both his account of human physiology and of the origin of animal locomotion. With this, I have three goals in mind. First, I aim to offer a cross-section of Hobbes's effort to provide a mechanistic picture of human life. Second, I aim to contextualize Hobbes's views (...)
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  9. Optics in Hobbes’s Natural Philosophy.Franco Giudice - 2016 - Hobbes Studies 29 (1):86-102.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 86 - 102 The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the place that Hobbes assigns to optics in the context of his classification of sciences and disciplinary boundaries. To do this, I will begin with an account of Hobbes’s conception of philosophy or science, and particularly his distinction between true and hypothetical knowledge. I will also show that in his demarcation between mathematics or geometry and natural philosophy Hobbes was (...)
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  10. Hobbes, Galileo, and the Physics of Simple Circular Motions.John Henry - 2016 - Hobbes Studies 29 (1):9-38.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 9 - 38 Hobbes tried to develop a strict version of the mechanical philosophy, in which all physical phenomena were explained only in terms of bodies in motion, and the only forces allowed were forces of collision or impact. This ambition puts Hobbes into a select group of original thinkers, alongside Galileo, Isaac Beeckman, and Descartes. No other early modern thinkers developed a strict version of the mechanical philosophy. Natural philosophies relying solely on (...)
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  11. Hobbes on ‘Conatus’: A Study in the Foundations of Hobbesian Philosophy.Douglas Jesseph - 2016 - Hobbes Studies 29 (1):66-85.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 66 - 85 This paper will deal with the notion of _conatus_ and the role it plays in Hobbes’s program for natural philosophy. As defined by Hobbes, the _conatus_ of a body is essentially its instantaneous motion, and he sees this as the means to account for a variety of phenomena in both natural philosophy and mathematics. Although I foucs principally on Hobbesian physics, I will also consider the extent to which Hobbes’s account (...)
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  12. Optics, Simple Circular Motion and Conatus.Agostino Lupoli - 2016 - Hobbes Studies 29 (1):1-7.
  13. Hobbes’s Geometrical Optics.José Médina - 2016 - Hobbes Studies 29 (1):39-65.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 39 - 65 Since Euclid, optics has been considered a geometrical science, which Aristotle defines as a “mixed” mathematical science. Hobbes follows this tradition and clearly places optics among physical sciences. However, modern scholars point to a confusion between geometry and physics and do not seem to agree about the way Hobbes mixes both sciences. In this paper, I return to this alleged confusion and intend to emphasize the peculiarity of Hobbes’s geometrical optics. (...)
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  14. Diversity and Felicity: Hobbes’s Science of Human Flourishing.Ericka L. Tucker - 2016 - Science Et Esprit 68 (1):35-47.
    We do not generally take the Hobbesian project to be one that encourages human flourishing. I will argue that it is; indeed, I will propose that Hobbes attempts the first modern project to provide for the possibility of the diversity of human flourishing in the civil state. To do so, I will draw on the recent work of Donald Rutherford, who takes Hobbes to be a eudaimonist in the Aristotelian tradition.
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  15. The Wax and the Mechanical Mind: Reexamining Hobbes's Objections to Descartes's Meditations.Marcus P. Adams - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (3):403-424.
    Many critics, Descartes himself included, have seen Hobbes as uncharitable or even incoherent in his Objections to the Meditations on First Philosophy. I argue that when understood within the wider context of his views of the late 1630s and early 1640s, Hobbes's Objections are coherent and reflect his goal of providing an epistemology consistent with a mechanical philosophy. I demonstrate the importance of this epistemology for understanding his Fourth Objection concerning the nature of the wax and contend that Hobbes's brief (...)
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  16. Politicized Physics in Seventeenth Century Philosophy: Essays on Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, and Spinoza.Robert J. Roecklein - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    This book examines the role that natural philosophy plays in the emergence of Early Modern political thought. Robert J. Roecklein argues that the natural philosophy of Early Modernity, especially its indictment of sense perception, constitutes a major political foundation for the more concrete doctrines of political science developed by Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, and Spinoza.
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  17. Hobbes and the Phantasm of Space.Edward Slowik - 2014 - Hobbes Studies 27 (1):61-79.
    This essay examines Hobbes’ philosophy of space, with emphasis placed on the variety of interpretations that his concept of imaginary space has elicited from commentators. The process by which the idea of space is acquired from experience, as well as the role of nominalism, will be offered as important factors in tracking down the elusive content of Hobbes’ conception of imaginary space.
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  18. The Fate of Nebuchadnezzar: Curiosity and Human Nature in Hobbes.Kathryn Tabb - 2014 - Hobbes Studies 27 (1):13-34.
    This paper makes a case for the centrality of the passion of curiosity to Hobbes’s account of human nature. Hobbes describes curiosity as one of only a few capacities differentiating human beings from animals, and I argue that it is in fact the fundamen- tal cause of humanity’s uniqueness, generating other important difference-makers such as language, science and politics. I qualify Philip Pettit’s (2008) claim that Hobbes believes language to be the essence of human difference, contending that Pettit grants language (...)
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  19. Moto, Luogo E Tempo. [REVIEW]Martine Pécharman - 2011 - Hobbes Studies 24 (2):210-215.
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  20. Hobbes : Matter, Motion, and Cause.George MacDonald Ross - 2009 - In Robin Le Poidevin (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Metaphysics. Routledge.
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  21. Hobbes in Search of One Engine: The de Motu, Loco Et Tempore.Gianni Paganini - 2008 - Rinascimento 48:527-541.
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  22. Hobbes alla ricerca del primo motore: il De motu, loco et tempore.Gianni Paganini - 2008 - Rinascimento 11:527.
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  23. Stephen J. Finn, Thomas Hobbes and the Politics of Natural Philosophy.L. Foisneau - 2007 - Philosophy in Review 27 (5):339.
  24. Stephen J. Finn, Thomas Hobbes and the Politics of Natural Philosophy Reviewed By.Luc Foisneau - 2007 - Philosophy in Review 27 (5):339-341.
  25. A teoria óptica de Hobbes.Cláudio R. C. Leivas - 2007 - Princípios 14 (21):39-53.
    la82 12.00 Normal 0 21 false false false PT-BR X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 O presente artigo procura apresentar as linhas gerais da teoria óptica de Hobbes. Antes de examinarmos o desenvolvimento de seus estudos ópticos, porém, faremos um breve resumo de concepções ópticas anteriores na tentativa de situar o leitor no contexto da história da óptica.
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  26. Hobbesian Mechanics.Doug Jesseph - 2006 - In Daniel Garber & Steven Nadler (eds.), Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 3--119.
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  27. Hobbes Eo Movimento da Luz No Breve Tratado.Guilherme Rodrigues Neto - 2006 - Scientiae Studia 4 (2):251-305.
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  28. Hobbes and the Movement of Light in the A Short Tract.Guilherme Rodrigues Neto - 2006 - Scientiae Studia 4 (2):251-305.
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  29. Hobbes e o movimento da luz no Breve tratado.Guilherme Rodrigues Neto - 2006 - Scientiae Studia 4 (2):251-305.
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  30. Review of Stephen J. Finn, Thomas Hobbes and the Politics of Natural Philosophy[REVIEW]Susanne Sreedhar - 2006 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (10).
  31. Beyond the Air-Pump: Hobbes, Boyle and the Omnipotence of God.Luc Foisneau - 2004 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 1.
  32. Galileo, Hobbes, and the Book of Nature.Douglas Michael Jesseph - 2004 - Perspectives on Science 12 (2):191-211.
    : This paper investigates the influence of Galileo's natural philosophy on the philosophical and methodological doctrines of Thomas Hobbes. In particular, I argue that what Hobbes took away from his encounter with Galileo was the fundamental idea that the world is a mechanical system in which everything can be understood in terms of mathematically-specifiable laws of motion. After tracing the history of Hobbes's encounters with Galilean science (through the "Welbeck group" connected with William Cavendish, earl of Newcastle and the "Mersenne (...)
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  33. The Mechanisation of Aristotelianism. The Late Aristotelian Setting of Thomas Hobbes' Natural Philosophy.Cees Leijenhorst - 2004 - Studia Leibnitiana 36 (2):255-257.
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  34. El papel de un descubrimiento anatómico en la solución de un problema filosófico o cómo Harvey acude a socorrer a Hobbes.Alejandra Marín - 2004 - Cuadrante Phi.
    There is no doubt about considering Thomas Hobbes as one of the most radical shields of XVII century mechanistic materialism, which explains phenomena according to laws of bodily motion. Agreeing to such an explicatory system, every single movement is caused by an external one, which implies that there is neither a self-moving body nor a body whose cause of motion is itself. However, a main idea is conceived by Hobbes himself, namely, the consideration of a vital or animal motion in (...)
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  35. The Mechanization of Aristotelianism: The Late Aristotelian Setting of Thomas Hobbes' Natural Philosophy. [REVIEW]George Wright - 2004 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (1):101-103.
  36. Cees Leijenhorst. The Mechanisation of Aristotelianism: The Late Aristotelian Setting of Thomas Hobbes’ Natural Philosophy. Xvi+242 Pp., Bibl., Index. Leiden/Boston: Brill, 2002. $97, €83. [REVIEW]Alexander Bird - 2003 - Isis 94 (4):725-726.
  37. The Mechanisation of Aristotelianism: The Late Aristotelian Setting of Thomas Hobbes’ Natural Philosophy. [REVIEW]Alexander Bird - 2003 - Isis 94:725-726.
  38. The Mechanisation of Aristotelianism: The Late Aristotelian Setting of Thomas Hobbes' Natural Philosophy.Cornelis Hendrik Leijenhorst - 2002 - Brill.
    This book discusses the Aristotelian setting of Thomas Hobbes' main work on natural philosophy, "De Corpore (1655).
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  39. Conatus in Hobbes' De Corpore.Martin A. Bertman - 2001 - Hobbes Studies 14 (1):25-39.
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  40. Power (Conatus-Endeavour) in the "Kinetic Actualism" and in the "Inertial" Psychology of Thomas Hobbes1.Agostino Lupoli - 2001 - Hobbes Studies 14 (1):83-103.
  41. The Power of Images: Mathematics and Metaphysics in Hobbes's Optics.Antoni Malet - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (2):303-333.
    This paper deals with Hobbes's theory of optical images, developed in his optical magnum opus, ‘A Minute or First Draught of the Optiques’, and published in abridged version in De homine. The paper suggests that Hobbes's theory of vision and images serves him to ground his philosophy of man on his philosophy of body. Furthermore, since this part of Hobbes's work on optics is the most thoroughly geometrical, it reveals a good deal about the role of mathematics in Hobbes's philosophy. (...)
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  42. Conatus as Active Power in Hobbes.Juhani Pietarinen - 2001 - Hobbes Studies 14 (1):71-82.
    The idea of active power played central role in the 17th Century philosophy and science. The idea is as follows: if not prevented, bodies necessarily do certain things in virtue of their power. This kind of thought naturally arose from what might properly be called the law of persistence, according to which moving bodies continue their motion unchanged if no new external force intervenes.1 What bodies do in virtue of their power was called actions, and in terms of actions such (...)
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  43. Hobbesian Reaction: Towards and Beyond Newton's Third Law of Motion.Abel B. Franco Rubio de la Torre - 2001 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 20 (1-2):73-93.
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  44. Hobbes and the Sine Law of Refraction.Frank Horstmann - 2000 - Annals of Science 57 (4):415-440.
    At the beginning of the seventeenth century, the sine law of refraction had been discovered. Thus, natural philosophers tried even more to find a cause of refraction and to demonstrate the law. One of them was Thomas Hobbes, who was the author of the Leviathan and also worked on optics. At first, in the Hobbes analogy, he was influenced by Ibn al-Haytham, just as Descartes was in his famous proof in the Dioptrique. In his later optical scripts Tractatus Opticus I, (...)
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  45. Hobbes und das Sinusgesetz der Refraktion.Frank Horstmann - 2000 - Annals of Science 57 (4):415-440.
    At the beginning of the seventeenth century, the sine law of refraction had been discovered. Thus, natural philosophers tried even more to find a cause of refraction and to demonstrate the law. One of them was Thomas Hobbes, who was the author of the Leviathan and also worked on optics. At first, in the Hobbes analogy , he was influenced by Ibn al-Haytham, just as Descartes was in his famous proof in the Dioptrique . In his later optical scripts Tractatus (...)
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  46. Hobbes e o conatus: da física à teoria das paixões.Maria Isabel Limongi - 2000 - Discurso 31:417-440.
    A noção de conatus desempenha na física hobbesiana um papel inequívoco: o de.explicar as determinações de um movimento sem recorrer à idéia de uma potencialidade ou inclinação para o movimento. Nossa questão consiste em saber se a noção de conatus cumpre a mesma função na teoria das paixões, e, a partir daí, na medida em que respondamos afirmativamente esta questão, trata-se de procurar compreender, minimamente que seja, ao que consiste para Hobbes uma paixão.
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  47. Ein Baustein Zur Kepler-Rezeption: Thomas Hobbes' Physica Coelestis.Frank Horstmann - 1998 - Studia Leibnitiana 30 (2):135-160.
    In the field of astronomy, Thomas Hobbes's mechanistic philosophy was influenced by Johannes Kepler. Whereas Galilei still sticks to the circular motion of the planets, Hobbes takes over the Keplerian ellipses. According to Kepler, he defines astronomy as ' celestial physics'. As a consequence, he tries to determine the cause for the planetary motion and the reason why the orbit of the earth is eccentric. Hobbes modifies Kepler's explanation given in the Epitome astronomiae Copernicanae that the earth consists of two (...)
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  48. Motion, Sensation, and the Infinite: The Lasting Impression of Hobbes on Leibniz.Catherine Wilson - 1997 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 5 (2):339 – 351.
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  49. Jesuit Concepts of Spatium Imaginarium and Thomas Hobbes's Doctrine of Space1.Cees Leijenhorst - 1996 - Early Science and Medicine 1 (3):355-380.
    Thomas Hobbes's doctrine of space is here considered as an example of the Nachzuirkung of Jesuit commentaries on Aristotle's natural philosophy in seventeenth-century mechanistic science. Hobbes's doctrine of space can be reconstructed in terms of his intensive dialogue with late scholasticism, as represented in the works of several important Jesuit authors. Although he presents his concept of space as an alternative to the Aristotelian notion of place, there are some remarkable similarities between Hobbes's alternative notion of space and the concept (...)
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  50. 6 Hobbes on Light and Vision.Jan Prins - 1996 - In Tom Sorell (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Hobbes. Cambridge University Press. pp. 129.
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