This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

95 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 95
  1. added 2018-04-08
    Note on the Individuation of Biological Traits.Mihnea D. I. Capraru - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy 115 (4):215-221.
    Bence Nanay has argued that we must abandon the etiological theory of teleological function because this theory explains functions and functional categories in a circular manner. Paul Griffiths argued earlier that we should retain the etiological theory and instead prevent the circularity by making etiologies independent of functional categories. Karen Neander and Alex Rosenberg reply to Nanay similarly, and argue that we should analyze functions in terms of natural selection acting not on functional categories, but merely on lineages. Nanay replies (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. added 2017-03-02
    Developmental Evolution of Novel Structures – Animals.A. C. Love & D. Urban - 2016 - In R. Kliman (ed.), Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Biology. Volume 3. Academic Press. pp. 136–145.
    The origination of novel structures has long been an intriguing topic for biologists. Over the past few decades it has served as a central theme in evolutionary developmental biology. Yet, definitions of evolutionary innovation and novelty are frequently debated and there remains disagreement about what kinds of causal factors best explain the origin of qualitatively new variation in the history of life. Here we examine aspects of these debates, survey three empirical case studies, and reflect on directions for future inquiry (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. added 2017-02-14
    A History of Character Concepts in Evolutionary Biology.Kurt M. Fristrup - 2001 - In G. P. Wagner (ed.), The Character Concept in Evolutionary Biology. Academic Press. pp. 15--37.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. added 2017-02-10
    The Character Concept in Evolutionary Biology.G. P. Wagner (ed.) - 2001 - Academic Press.
    " Because characters and the conception of characters are central to all studies of evolution, and because evolution is the central organizing principle of biology, this book will appeal to a wide cross-section of biologists.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  5. added 2017-02-01
    Forever Beyond Our Grasp?Patrick Forber - 2008 - Biology and Philosophy 23 (1):135-141.
    Does science successfully uncover the deep structure of the natural world? Or are the depths forever beyond our epistemic grasp? Since the decline of logical positivism and logical empiricism, scientific realism has become the consensus view: of course our scientific theories apprehend the deep structure of the world. What else could explain the remarkable success of science? This is the explanationist defense of scientific realism, the “ultimate argument.” Kyle Stanford starts here and, using the history of theorizing about biological inheritance (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  6. added 2017-02-01
    Higher-Order Homoplasy Tests.Mark Wilkinson - 1998 - Acta Biotheoretica 46 (2):109-116.
    The Le Quesne test of character compatibility uses pairwise comparisons of characters to detect homoplasy in phylogenetic character data. If a pair of characters fails this test we can conclude that a minimum of a single extra step is required by the pair of characters. The rationale of the Le Quesne test is extended to comparisons of triplets of characters. The triplet homoplasy test can reveal that that there is a minimum of four extra steps across a triplet of characters (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. added 2017-02-01
    Taxonomy: Psychological and Biological. [REVIEW]Muhammad Ali Khalidi - 1997 - Biology and Philosophy 12 (2):275-280.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. added 2017-01-29
    ChINs, Swarms, and Variational Modalities: Concepts in the Service of an Evolutionary Research Program.Alan C. Love - 2015 - Biology and Philosophy 30 (6):873-888.
    Günter Wagner’s Homology, Genes, and Evolutionary Innovation collects and synthesizes a vast array of empirical data, theoretical models, and conceptual analysis to set out a progressive research program with a central theoretical commitment: the genetic theory of homology. This research program diverges from standard approaches in evolutionary biology, provides sharpened contours to explanations of the origin of novelty, and expands the conceptual repertoire of evolutionary developmental biology. I concentrate on four aspects of the book in this essay review: the genetic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. added 2017-01-25
    Deep Homology: A View From Systematics.Robert W. Scotland - 2010 - Bioessays 32 (5):438-449.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. added 2017-01-23
    Abstract: Inherence and Homology.Davlde Scarso - 2006 - Chiasmi International 8:338-338.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. added 2017-01-17
    Darwin’s Functional Reasoning and Homology.A. C. Love - 2011 - In M. Wheeler (ed.), 150 Years of Evolution: Darwin’s Impact on Contemporary Thought & Culture. SDSU Press. pp. 49–67.
    Scientists exhibit different styles in their reasoning about the natural world (e.g., experimental, historical, or statistical). These styles have been characterized, categorized, and combined in many ways throughout the history of science.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. added 2017-01-14
    Homology and the Evolutionary Process: Reply to Haig, Love and Brown on “Homology, Genes and Evolutionary Innovation”.Günter P. Wagner - 2015 - Biology and Philosophy 30 (6):901-912.
    This paper responds to the essay reviews by David Haig, Alan Love and Rachel Brown of my recently published book “Homology, Genes and Evolutionary Innovation”. The issues addressed here relate to: the notion of classes and individuals, issues of explanatory value of adaptive and structuralist explanations in evolutionary biology, the role of homology in evolutionary theory, the limits of a pluralist stance vis a vis alternative explanations of homology, as well as the question whether and to what extend the perspective (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. added 2017-01-14
    Why Development Matters.Rachael L. Brown - 2015 - Biology and Philosophy 30 (6):889-899.
    Günter Wagner’s Homology, Genes, and Evolutionary Innovation is a compelling, and empirically well-supported account of the evolution of character identity and character origination which emphasizes the importance of homology and novelty as central explananda for 21st century evolutionary biology. In this essay review, I focus on the similarities and differences between the structuralist picture of evolutionary biology advocated by Wagner, and that presented by standard evolutionary theory. First, I outline the ways in which Wagner’s genetic theory of homology diverges from (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. added 2017-01-14
    Homology and Homophony in Biological Systems. I. Concurrent Common Complexing Proteins in Murine Tumors: A Doubly Blind Study.Robert R. Pascal - 1984 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 27 (2):276-278.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. added 2016-12-08
    A Modal Theory of Function.Bence Nanay - 2010 - Journal of Philosophy 107 (8):412-431.
    The function of a trait token is usually defined in terms of some properties of other (past, present, future) tokens of the same trait type. I argue that this strategy is problematic, as trait types are (at least partly) individuated by their functional properties, which would lead to circularity. In order to avoid this problem, I suggest a way to define the function of a trait token in terms of the properties of the very same trait token. To able to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  16. added 2016-12-08
    Functional Homology and Functional Variation in Evolutionary Cognitive Science.Claudia Lorena García - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (2):124-135.
    Most cognitive scientists nowadays tend to think that at least some of the mind’s capacities are the product of biological evolution, yet important conceptual problems remain for all scientists in order to be able to speak coherently of mental or cognitive systems as having evolved naturally. Two of these important problems concern the articulation of adequate, interesting, and empirically useful concepts of homology and variation as applied to cognitive systems. However, systems in cognitive science are usually understood as functional systems (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. added 2016-11-01
    A Theory of Conceptual Advance: Explaining Conceptual Change in Evolutionary, Molecular, and Evolutionary Developmental Biology.Ingo Brigandt - 2006 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    The theory of concepts advanced in the dissertation aims at accounting for a) how a concept makes successful practice possible, and b) how a scientific concept can be subject to rational change in the course of history. Traditional accounts in the philosophy of science have usually studied concepts in terms only of their reference; their concern is to establish a stability of reference in order to address the incommensurability problem. My discussion, in contrast, suggests that each scientific concept consists of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. added 2016-10-14
    Angry Rats and Scaredy Cats: Lessons From Competing Cognitive Homologies.Isaac Wiegman - 2016 - Biological Theory 11 (4):224-240.
    There have been several recent attempts to think about psychological kinds as homologies. Nevertheless, there are serious epistemic challenges for individuating homologous psychological kinds, or cognitive homologies. Some of these challenges are revealed when we look at competing claims of cognitive homology. This paper considers two competing homology claims that compare human anger with putative aggression systems of nonhuman animals. The competition between these hypotheses has been difficult to resolve in part because of what I call the boundary problem: boundaries (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. added 2016-09-02
    Natural Kinds and Classification in Scientific Practice.Catherine Kendig (ed.) - 2016 - Routledge.
    This edited volume of 13 new essays aims to turn past discussions of natural kinds on their head. Instead of presenting a metaphysical view of kinds based largely on an unempirical vantage point, it pursues questions of kindedness which take the use of kinds and activities of kinding in practice as significant in the articulation of them as kinds. The book brings philosophical study of current and historical episodes and case studies from various scientific disciplines to bear on natural kinds (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. added 2016-04-16
    Bodily Parts in the Structure-Function Dialectic.Ingo Brigandt - 2017 - In Scott Lidgard & Lynn K. Nyhart (eds.), Biological Individuality: Integrating Scientific, Philosophical, and Historical Perspectives. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. pp. 249–274.
    Understanding the organization of an organism by individuating meaningful parts and accounting for organismal properties by studying the interaction of bodily parts is a central practice in many areas of biology. While structures are obvious bodily parts and structure and function have often been seen as antagonistic principles in the study of organismal organization, my tenet is that structures and functions are on a par. I articulate a notion of function (functions as activities), according to which functions are bodily parts (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. added 2016-01-25
    Homologizing as Kinding.Catherine Kendig - 2016 - In C. Kendig (ed.), Natural Kinds and Classification in Scientific Practice. Routledge.
    Homology is a natural kind concept, but one that has been notoriously elusive to pin down. There has been sustained debate over the nature of correspondence and the units of comparison. But this continued debate over its meaning has focused on defining homology rather than on its use in practice. The aim of this chapter is to concentrate on the practices of homologizing. I define “homologizing” to be a concept-in-use. Practices of homologizing are kinds of rule following, the satisfaction of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. added 2015-09-10
    Evidential Criteria of Homology for Comparative Psychology.Isaac Wiegman - manuscript
    While the homology concept has taken on importance in thinking about the nature of psychological kinds, no one has shown how comparative psychological and behavioral evidence can distinguish between competing homology claims. I adapt the operational criteria of homology to accomplish this. I consider two competing homology claims that compare human anger with putative aggression systems of nonhuman animals, and demonstrate the effectiveness of these criteria in adjudicating between these claims.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. added 2015-03-23
    1 C0ncept (s) 0f Homology 1.1 Common Usages of the Term Homology.Alessandro Minelli & Giuseppe Fusco - 2013 - In Kostas Kampourakis (ed.), The Philosophy of Biology: A Companion for Educators. Springer. pp. 1--289.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. added 2015-03-23
    Homology in Biology.Paul Nelson & Jonathan Wells - 2003 - In John Angus Campbell & Stephen C. Meyer (eds.), Darwinism, Design, and Public Education. Michigan State University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. added 2015-03-23
    Homology and DNA Sequence Data.W. C. Wheeler - 2001 - In G. P. Wagner (ed.), The Character Concept in Evolutionary Biology. Academic Press. pp. 303--317.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26. added 2015-03-22
    Do the Hominid-Specific Regions of XY Homology Contain Candidate Genes Potentially Involved in a Critical Event Linked to Speciation?Carole A. Sargent, Patricia Blanco & Nabeel A. Affara - 2002 - In The Speciation of Modern Homo Sapiens. pp. 231-250.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. added 2015-03-22
    Analogy and Homology as an Instrument of Understanding and Error.J. Kamaryt - 1995 - Filosoficky Casopis 43 (4):565-583.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. added 2015-03-20
    Hierarchical Phylogenetics as a Quantitative Analytical Framework for Evolutionary Developmental Biology.Jeanne M. Serb & Todd H. Oakley - 2005 - Bioessays 27 (11):1158-1166.
  29. added 2014-12-05
    Essay: Homology.Ingo Brigandt - 2011 - The Embryo Project Encyclopedia.
    Homology is a central concept of comparative and evolutionary biology, referring to the presence of the same bodily parts (e.g., morphological structures) in different species. The existence of homologies is explained by common ancestry, and according to modern definitions of homology, two structures in different species are homologous if they are derived from the same structure in the common ancestor. Homology has traditionally been contrasted with analogy, the presence of similar traits in different species not necessarily due to common ancestry (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. added 2014-04-02
    Developmental Causation and the Problem of Homology.David A. Baum - 2013 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 5 (20150505).
    While it is generally agreed that the concept of homology refers to individuated traits that have been inherited from common ancestry, we still lack an adequate account of trait individuation or inheritance. Here I propose that we utilize a counterfactual criterion of causation to link each trait with a developmental-causal (DC) gene. A DC gene is made up of the genetic information (which might or might not be physically contiguous in the genome) that is needed for the production of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. added 2014-04-02
    Convergence as Evidence.Adrian Currie - 2013 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (4):763-786.
    The comparative method grants epistemic access to the biological past. Comparing lineages provides empirical traction on both hypotheses about particular lineages and models of trait evolution. Understanding this evidential role is important. Although philosophers have recently turned their attention to relations of descent, little work exists exploring the status of evidence from convergences. I argue that, where they exist, convergences play a central role in the confirmation of adaptive hypotheses. I focus on ‘analogous inferences’, show how such inferences ought to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  32. added 2014-04-02
    An Oxymoric Homology — Homosexuality and Cultural Homologie.Paul Egan - 2003 - Semiotics:193-199.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. added 2014-03-25
    Developmental Genetics and Traditional Homology.Jessica A. Bolker & Rudolf A. Raff - 1996 - Bioessays 18 (6):489-494.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  34. added 2014-03-24
    Homology and the Origin of Correspondence.Ingo Brigandt - 2002 - Biology and Philosophy 17 (3):389–407.
    Homology is a natural kind term and a precise account of what homologyis has to come out of theories about the role of homologues in evolution anddevelopment. Definitions of homology are discussed with respect to the questionas to whether they are able to give a non-circular account of thecorrespondenceor sameness referred to by homology. It is argued that standard accounts tiehomology to operational criteria or specific research projects, but are not yetable to offer a concept of homology that does not (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  35. added 2014-03-24
    A Recapitulation of the Rise and Fall of the Cell Lineage Research Program: The Evolutionary-Developmental Relationship of Cleavage to Homology, Body Plans and Life History. [REVIEW]Robert Guralnick - 2002 - Journal of the History of Biology 35 (3):537 - 567.
    American biologists in the late nineteenth century pioneered the descriptive-comparative study of all cell divisions from zygote to gastrulation -- the cell lineage. Data from cell lineages were crucial to evolutionary and developmental questions of the day. One of the main questions was the ultimate causation of developmental patterns -- historical or mechanical. E. B. Wilson's groundbreaking lineage work on the polychaete worm Nereis in 1892 set the stage for (1) an attack on Haeckel's phylogenetic-historical notion of recapitulation and (2) (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. added 2014-03-23
    Once More on the Homology Thesis: A Response to Smith's Reply.Christopher Arthur - 2003 - Historical Materialism 11 (1):195-198.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. added 2014-03-22
    Homology.Adam S. Wilkins - 1998 - Bioessays 20 (12):1052-1053.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. added 2014-03-21
    Steven Rose's Alternative to Ultra-Darwinism.David L. Hull - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):896-896.
    Stephen Rose's formulation of evolutionary theory is too scattered and impressionistic to serve as a genuine alternative to ultra- Darwinism. In addition, he has muddied a distinction that is crucial to our understanding of evolutionary phenomenona – the distinction between homologies and homoplasies.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. added 2014-03-20
    Homologous Tails? Or Tales of Homology?James D. McGhee - 2000 - Bioessays 22 (9):781-785.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  40. added 2014-03-20
    Defining Sameness: Historical, Biological, and Generative Homology.Ann B. Butler & William M. Saidel - 2000 - Bioessays 22 (9):846-853.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  41. added 2014-03-19
    Pattern Cladism, Homology, and Theory-Neutrality.Christopher H. Pearson - 2010 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 32 (4).
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42. added 2014-03-18
    The Developmental Genetic Toolkit and the Molecular Homology—Analogy Paradox.Stuart A. Newman - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (1):12-16.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. added 2014-03-17
    Homology Across Inheritance Systems.Russell Powell & Nicholas Shea - 2014 - Biology and Philosophy 29 (6):781-806.
    Recent work on inheritance systems can be divided into inclusive conceptions, according to which genetic and non-genetic inheritance are both involved in the development and transmission of nearly all animal behavioral traits, and more demanding conceptions of what it takes for non-genetic resources involved in development to qualify as a distinct inheritance system. It might be thought that, if a more stringent conception is adopted, homologies could not subsist across two distinct inheritance systems. Indeed, it is commonly assumed that homology (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44. added 2014-03-15
    Defining Vision: What Homology Thinking Contributes.Mohan Matthen - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (5):675-689.
    The specialization of visual function within biological function is reason for introducing “homology thinking” into explanations of the visual system. It is argued that such specialization arises when organisms evolve by differentiation from their predecessors. Thus, it is essentially historical, and visual function should be regarded as a lineage property. The colour vision of birds and mammals do not function the same way as one another, on this account, because each is an adaptation to special needs of the visual functions (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  45. added 2014-03-15
    The Importance of Homology for Biology and Philosophy.Ingo Brigandt & Paul Edmund Griffiths - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (5):633-641.
    Editors' introduction to the special issue on homology (Biology and Philosophy Vol. 22, Issue 5, 2007).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  46. added 2014-03-15
    The Phenomena of Homology.Paul Edmund Griffiths - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (5):643-658.
    Philosophical discussions of biological classification have failed to recognise the central role of homology in the classification of biological parts and processes. One reason for this is a misunderstanding of the relationship between judgments of homology and the core explanatory theories of biology. The textbook characterisation of homology as identity by descent is commonly regarded as a definition. I suggest instead that it is one of several attempts to explain the phenomena of homology. Twenty years ago the ‘new experimentalist’ movement (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  47. added 2014-03-15
    Psychological Categories as Homologies: Lessons From Ethology.Marc Ereshefsky - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (5):659-674.
    Biology and Philosophy, forthcoming 2007.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  48. added 2014-03-15
    Typology Now: Homology and Developmental Constraints Explain Evolvability.Ingo Brigandt - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (5):709-725.
    By linking the concepts of homology and morphological organization to evolvability, this paper attempts to (1) bridge the gap between developmental and phylogenetic approaches to homology and to (2) show that developmental constraints and natural selection are compatible and in fact complementary. I conceive of a homologue as a unit of morphological evolvability, i.e., as a part of an organism that can exhibit heritable phenotypic variation independently of the organism’s other homologues. An account of homology therefore consists in explaining how (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  49. added 2014-03-15
    Functional Homology and Homology of Function: Biological Concepts and Philosophical Consequences.Alan Love - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (5):691-708.
    “Functional homology” appears regularly in different areas of biological research and yet it is apparently a contradiction in terms—homology concerns identity of structure regardless of form and function. I argue that despite this conceptual tension there is a legitimate conception of ‘homology of function’, which can be recovered by utilizing a distinction from pre-Darwinian physiology (use versus activity) to identify an appropriate meaning of ‘function’. This account is directly applicable to molecular developmental biology and shares a connection to the theme (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  50. added 2014-03-14
    The Importance of Comparative and Phylogenetic Analyses in the Study of Adaptation.James R. Roney & Dario Maestripieri - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):525-525.
    Homology can provide strong evidence against exapted learning mechanism (ELM) explanations for psychological and behavioral traits. Homologous traits are constructed by commonly inherited developmental mechanisms. As such, demonstration of homology for a trait argues for its construction by an inherited rather than an exapted developmental process. We conclude that comparative evidence can play an important evidentiary role within evolutionary psychology.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 95