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Summary What is hope, from a philosophical point of view?  Can hope be characterized in terms of belief (or degrees of belief) plus some sort of desire or affect? If this kind of “belief-plus” analysis insufficient to characterize hope, what other conditions are required? Are there different kinds of hope – some that are susceptible to belief-plus analysis, and others that aren’t? For instance, could we regard the “idle hope” that I win the lottery as constituted by the belief that it’s possible plus the desire that it happen, but then develop more robust conceptions of the kinds of hope that actively engage deliberation and moral psychology (e.g. the hope that I recover from this terminal diagnosis, despite the long odds)? How does a particular view of hope (or one of its kinds) relate to traditional accounts of hope as a human virtue? Is hope a virtue? If some kind of hope is a virtue, is it a moral virtue, or an intellectual one, or some sort of hybrid?
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1 — 50 / 482
  1. added 2020-05-11
    The Intersection of Hopes and Dreams.Michael Milona - forthcoming - Journal of Social Philosophy.
    A familiar injunction is to follow your dreams. But what are these dreams? Despite their importance, philosophers have almost entirely ignored the topic. This paper fills this gap by advancing an account of the psychological makeup and the normative powers of dreams. To elucidate their psychology, I identify the salient features of dreams. I argue that these features are explained by the hypothesis that dreams are a species of hope. More specifically, the proposal is that dreams fit the standard model (...)
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  2. added 2020-04-16
    Belief, Faith, and Hope: On the Rationality of Long-Term Commitment.Elizabeth Jackson - forthcoming - Mind.
    I examine three attitudes: belief, faith, and hope. I argue that all three attitudes play the same role in rationalizing action. First, I explain two models of rational action—the decision-theory model and the belief-desire model. Both models entail there are two components of rational action: an epistemic component and a conative component. Then, using this framework, I show how belief, faith, and hope that p can all make it rational to accept, or act as if, p. I conclude by showing (...)
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  3. added 2020-02-08
    The Dialectics of Disaster: A Preface to Hope.William Leon McBride - 1985 - Ethics 95 (4):967-968.
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  4. added 2020-01-31
    Discovering the Virtue of Hope.Michael Milona - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    This paper asks whether there is a moral virtue of hope, and if so, what it is. The enterprise is motivated by a historical asymmetry, namely that while Christian thinkers have long classed hope as a theological virtue, it has not traditionally been classed as a moral one. But this is puzzling, for hoping well is not confined to the sphere of religion; and consequently we might expect that if the theological virtue is structurally sound, there will be a secular, (...)
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  5. added 2019-12-04
    Hope in Christianity.Anne Jeffrey - 2019 - In Titus Stahl & Claudia Blöser (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Hope. London: pp. 37-56.
    In this essay I aim to illuminate the nature of Christian hope by looking at the tradition’s answers to three philosophical questions and then comparing them to those of contemporary secular accounts. First, What are the possible objects of hope? Next, What are the psychological conditions a person must meet to have hope? Finally, What makes a hope rational and what makes it good for human life? I conclude by suggesting that the role of hope in bringing about social goods (...)
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  6. added 2019-06-06
    Hope, Virtue, and the Postulate of God: A Reappraisal of Kant's Pure Practical Rational Belief.M. Jamie Ferreira - 2014 - Religious Studies 50 (1):3-26.
    After identifying contrasting formulations of the practical postulates of reason in Kant's second critique, I analyse the context of each formulation, showing both how the postulate of the of God is consistent with Kant's understanding of a significant transition arising from practical needs as well as how the postulate of the existence of God can be seen as a acting out a . My goal is to re-examine Kant's view of the relation between the practical and theoretical employments of reason (...)
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  7. added 2019-06-06
    Kant’s Religious Argument for the Existence of God: The Ultimate Dependence of Human Destiny on Divine Assistance.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2009 - Faith and Philosophy 26 (1):3-22.
    After reviewing Kant’s well-known criticisms of the traditional proofs of God’s existence and his preferred moral argument, this paper presents a detailedanalysis of a densely-packed theistic argument in Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason. Humanity’s ultimate moral destiny can be fulfilled only through organized religion, for only by participating in a religious community can we overcome the evil in human nature. Yet we cannot conceive how such a community can even be founded without presupposing God’s existence. Viewing God as (...)
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  8. added 2019-06-06
    Book Note: Lear, Jonathan, Radical Hope: Ethics in the Face of Cultural Devastation, Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 2006, Pp. 197, US$15.95. [REVIEW]Stan van Hooft - 2009 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (2):356-356.
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  9. added 2019-06-06
    Heraclitus’s Hope for the Unhoped.Dror Post - 2009 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):229-240.
    The Concept “hope,”, appears in two of Heraclitus’s fragments. This essay offers an attentive reading of these fragments and examines the role of hope in Heraclitus’s thinking. The essay is divided into two parts. The first part examines the meaning of the Greek notion for hope,, by looking into archaic and classical sources, particularly the myth about the origin of hope in Hesiod’s Works and Days. Based upon the renewed understanding of the concept, the second part of the essay examines (...)
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  10. added 2019-06-06
    "Deeper Down in the Domain of Human Hearts": Hope in Isak Dinesen's Babette's Feast.Maire Mullins - 2009 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 12 (1):16-37.
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  11. added 2019-06-06
    Pascal's Wager: Pragmatic Arguments and Belief in God - By Jeff Jordan.Robert Anderson - 2008 - Philosophical Books 49 (1):94-96.
  12. added 2019-06-06
    Review: Maintaining the Future of Hope. [REVIEW]Irmline Veit-Brause - 2008 - History and Theory 47 (2):249-260.
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  13. added 2019-06-06
    Full of Hope and Fear: The Liberalism of Isaiah Berlin Revisited.Thomas Nys - 2007 - Polish Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):99-117.
    In this paper I argue that Isaiah Berlin’s theory of freedom should not be interpreted in a reductive sense. The distinction between negative and positive freedom, as different concepts and possibly conflicting values, truly holds. Moreover, Berlin’s theory as a whole leaves room for both a comprehensive liberalism which advocates autonomy, critical reflection and personal judgement, as well as a liberalism of fear which defends a minimal level of decency and modesty aims at a modus vivendi. I think Berlin’s liberalism (...)
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  14. added 2019-06-06
    When the House Is on Fire: Finding Hope in the Midst of Democratic Despair.C. W. Dawson - 2007 - Radical Philosophy Today 5:111-132.
    This paper is a philosophical, socio-political, analysis of the problem of democratic despair and the possibility of finding hope in the midst of it. The analysis spring boards from a dialectical discussion on the state of Black America between Harry Belafonte, Minister Louis Farrakhan, and Cornel West, to an examination of the reasons for believing this house called America is on fire. The paper then moves to two possible responses for African Americans to the burning house: separatism, and radical cultural (...)
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  15. added 2019-06-06
    Europe as a “Special Area for Human Hope”.Alessandro Ferrara - 2007 - Constellations 14 (3):315-331.
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  16. added 2019-06-06
    Marcel and Ricoeur: Mystery and Hope at the Boundary of Reason in the Postmodern Situation.Patrick L. Bourgeois - 2006 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 80 (3):421-433.
    This article on mystery and hope at the boundary of reason in the postmodern situation responds to the challenge of postmodern thinking to philosophyby a recourse to the works of Gabriel Marcel and his best disciple, Paul Ricoeur. It develops along the lines of their interpretation of hope as a central phenomenon in human experience and existence, thus shedding light on the philosophical enterprise for the future. It is our purpose to dwell briefly on this postmodern challenge and then, incorporating (...)
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  17. added 2019-06-06
    God and the Moral Order: A Reply to Layman.Peter Byrne - 2006 - Faith and Philosophy 23 (2):201-208.
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  18. added 2019-06-06
    The Apocalypse of Hope: Political Violence in the Writings of Sartre and Fanon.Nicolas de Warren - 2006 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 27 (1):25-59.
    “The apocalypse of hope” and other comparable flourishes in the writings of Frantz Fanon and Jean-Paul Sartre on political violence strike an alarming tone. In The Wretched of the Earth, Fanon advocates the way of revolutionary violence as the inevitable consequence of colonialism and its systematic exploitation of colonized natives. In his role of agent provocateur, Sartre’s preface to Fanon’s influential and controversial work characteristically dramatizes this redemptive promise of violence: “to gun down a European is to kill two birds (...)
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  19. added 2019-06-06
    Robert B. Westbrook, Democratic Hope: Pragmatism and the Politics of Truth. [REVIEW]Cheryl Misak - 2006 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):279-282.
  20. added 2019-06-06
    Marcel and Dewey on Hope: Radical Differences, Noteworthy Similarities.Stephen M. Fishman & Lucille McCarthy - 2005 - Philosophy Today 49 (2):184-199.
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  21. added 2019-06-06
    Critical Remembrance and Eschatological Hope in Edward Schillebeeckx's Theology of Suffering for Others.Elizabeth K. Tillar - 2003 - Heythrop Journal 44 (1):15-42.
    Biblical prototypes of suffering for others – the eschatological prophet and messianic high priest – are correlated in the present article with Edward Schillebeeckx's examination of two vital concepts to provide the basis for a critical praxis: anamnesis, or the critical remembrance of history, and eschatological hope. The dialectical opposites of anamnesis and hope, which Schillebeeckx deems crucial for solidarity with suffering and its alleviation, are embodied by the prototypical scriptural figures. Indeed, critical remembrance and hope are intrinsic to the (...)
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  22. added 2019-06-06
    Hope’s Confrontation with a Possible Self-Destruction of Humanity.Bernard Schumacher - 2001 - International Philosophical Quarterly 41 (3):333-346.
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  23. added 2019-06-06
    4.2 On Hope, Heaven, and Hell.Nicholas J. Healy - 1997 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 1 (3):80-91.
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  24. added 2019-06-06
    Death Camp Survival and the Possibility of Hope: A Dialogue with Karl Rahner.Marie Baird - 1997 - Philosophy and Theology 10 (2):385-419.
    This paper will argue that many survivors’ ability to take up their existence hopefully is rooted in the deeply visceral and unintegrable memory of “living the existence of a walking corpse” that constitutes the ontic basis for their most fundamental presence to self, others, and God. I will show, secondly, that Karl Rahner’s theological formulation of witness as “an act of self transcendence in which the subject reaches up to the unsurpassable and sovereign Mystery which we call God” does indeed (...)
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  25. added 2019-06-06
    Kant and Richard Schaeffler’s Catholic Theology of Hope.Elizabeth C. Galbraith - 1996 - Philosophy and Theology 9 (3/4):333-350.
    This essay follows Richard Schaeffler in identifying Kant’s moral philosophy as a possible framework for a Catholic theology of hope. Whereas Ernst Bloch criticized Kant for failing to sever his theory of hope from its religious ties, Jürgen Moltmann criticizes Kant for failing to appreciate the true meaning of Christian hope for the kingdom of God. The present essay argues that Moltmann neglects, as much as Bloch did, the significance of God to Kant’s account of the kingdom. A Catholic theology (...)
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  26. added 2019-06-06
    The Sufficiency of Hope: The Conceptual Foundations of Religion. [REVIEW]P. A. W. - 1982 - Review of Metaphysics 36 (1):182-184.
    Following the lead of Kant more fully than the master himself, Muyskens defends the thesis that so-called "religious beliefs," or at least fundamental ones like the beliefs in the existence of God and life after death, should be construed more on the model of hope than on the model of belief, as we find the latter in more mundane contexts. He is not so hardy as to claim that religious believers generally hold their beliefs as hopes. On the contrary, he (...)
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  27. added 2019-06-06
    The Sufficiency of Hope: The Conceptual Foundations of Religion. [REVIEW]Gordon D. Kaufman - 1981 - International Studies in Philosophy 13 (2):108-109.
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  28. added 2019-06-06
    The Sufficiency of Hope: The Conceptual Foundations of Religion. [REVIEW]Joseph J. Godfrey - 1980 - International Philosophical Quarterly 20 (3):368-370.
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  29. added 2019-06-06
    VI.—On the “Moral” Argument for God's Existence.W. D. Lamont - 1930 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 31 (1):103-126.
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  30. added 2019-06-06
    XVI.—The Moral Argument for Theism.W. R. Matthews - 1918 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 18 (1):385-409.
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  31. added 2019-06-05
    Hope as Virtue: Opens Up a New Space for Exploring Hopefulness at the End of Life and Raises Some Interesting Questions.Daniel Munday - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):187-189.
    Barilan’s (2012) essay “From Hope in Palliative Care to Hope as a Virtue and a Life Skill” provides a novel way of exploring hope as experienced by people at the end of life. He proposes that hope can be usefully seen as an Aristotelian virtue; something to be “conscientiously chosen” as a “habit of behavior, perceptiveness and mental response, holistically considered” (Barilan 2012, 166). Hope coalesces with other virtues, particularly courage, in the terminally ill, to enable human flourishing even at (...)
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  32. added 2019-06-05
    From Hope in Palliative Care to Hope as a Virtue and a Life Skill.Y. Michael Barilan - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):165-181.
    This paper aims at explicating a theory of hope that is also suitable for gravely ill people and based on virtue ethics, research in the psychology of “well-being,” and the philosophy of palliative care. The working hypotheses of the theory are that hope is conditioned neither by past events nor by present needs, but is not necessarily oriented toward the future, especially the distant future; that hope is related to personal agency and to freedom; and that hope is deliberative, hence (...)
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  33. added 2019-06-05
    Hope and Friendship: Being and Having.Y. Michael Barilan - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):191-195.
    In its first part, the paper explores the challenge of conceptualizing the Thomist theological virtue of hope in Aristotelian terms that are compatible with non-Thomist and even atheist metaphysics as well. I argue that the key concept in this endeavor is friendship—as an Aristotelian virtue, as relational value in Thomist theology, as a recognized value in supportive care and as a kind of ‘personal hope.’ Then, the paper proceeds to examine the possible differences between hope as a virtue and hope (...)
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  34. added 2019-06-05
    Hope as a Virtue in an Aristotelian Context.Barbro Fröding - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):183-186.
    Michael Barilan’s article “From Hope in Palliative Care to Hope as a Virtue and a Life Skill” is an interesting and informative contribution to the debate on the nature of ‘a good death.’ Broadly speaking, the author seeks to explore “the roles and meanings of promotion focus goals in human life” and how hope can aid in alleviating suffering (Barilan 2012, 171). The subject is topical and courtesy of being clinically active, Barilan is able to add a welcome perspective. Very (...)
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  35. added 2019-06-05
    Nero's Fiddle: On Hope, Despair, and the Ecological Crisis.Andrew Fiala - 2010 - Ethics and the Environment 15 (1):51.
    We are in the midst of a global ecological crisis. And yet, like Nero, we fiddle while Rome burns. Global warming is happening. Human population is growing. Land and water supplies are used and depleted at an ever-expanding rate. Species and habitats are destroyed and biodiversity is lost. Pollution and toxic waste pile up. Despite several decades of acute awareness of these ecological problems, we have made little progress toward sustainable solutions.This points us to a somewhat paradoxical feature of political (...)
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  36. added 2019-06-05
    Pragmatism and Social Hope: Deepening Democracy in Global Contexts By Judith M. Green. Ólafsson - 2010 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (4):641.
    At the end of her book, Pragmatism and Social Hope, Judith Green asks why one should want to spend time on expanding opportunities for participation in democratic governance (248). The reason, according to her, is a desire that a "deeper rationality of human spirit" would direct decision-making in the world. We are currently captives of economic/military/political rationality, according to her. Only through participatory democracy, or "second-strand democracy" can the spell be broken (195). Although this does not become apparent until one (...)
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  37. added 2019-06-05
    Book Reviews : Truth and Hope, by Peter Geach. Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 2001. 103 Pp. Hb. No Price. ISBN 0-268-4215-2. [REVIEW]Helen Oppenheimer - 2002 - Studies in Christian Ethics 15 (1):122-124.
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  38. added 2019-06-05
    I—The Presidential Address: “From Hope and Fear Set Free”.Isaiah Berlin - 1963 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 64 (1):1-30.
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  39. added 2019-05-31
    Therapeutic Misconception: Hope, Trust and Misconception in Paediatric Research.Simon Woods, Lynn E. Hagger & Pauline McCormack - 2014 - Health Care Analysis 22 (1):3-21.
    Although the therapeutic misconception (TM) has been well described over a period of approximately 20 years, there has been disagreement about its implications for informed consent to research. In this paper we review some of the history and debate over the ethical implications of TM but also bring a new perspective to those debates. Drawing upon our experience of working in the context of translational research for rare childhood diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we consider the ethical and legal (...)
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  40. added 2019-05-23
    Knowledge, Hope, and Fallibilism.Matthew A. Benton - 2018, early view - Synthese:1-17.
    Hope, in its propositional construction "I hope that p," is compatible with a stated chance for the speaker that not-p. On fallibilist construals of knowledge, knowledge is compatible with a chance of being wrong, such that one can know that p even though there is an epistemic chance for one that not-p. But self-ascriptions of propositional hope that p seem to be incompatible, in some sense, with self-ascriptions of knowing whether p. Data from conjoining hope self-ascription with outright assertions, with (...)
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  41. added 2019-04-18
    Emotional Hope.Katie Stockdale - 2019 - In Claudia Blöser & Titus Stahl (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Hope. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 115-133.
    My aim in this chapter is not to offer yet another theory of hope, but to re-orient the discussion about the nature of hope to focus on hope’s place in our hearts: on how, exactly, hope makes us feel. Although philosophers writing on hope have certainly paid attention to hope’s affective dimensions, when affect is discussed, it is often assumed that hope is positively valenced. I argue that descriptions of the phenomenology of hope as positively valenced paint hope as brighter (...)
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  42. added 2019-04-15
    Epistemological Aspects of Hope.Matthew A. Benton - 2019 - In Claudia Blöser & Titus Stahl (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Hope. London: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 135-151.
    Hope is an attitude with a distinctive epistemological dimension: it is incompatible with knowledge. This chapter examines hope as it relates to knowledge but also to probability and inductive considerations. Such epistemic constraints can make hope either impossible, or, when hope remains possible, they affect how one’s epistemic situation can make hope rational rather than irrational. Such issues are especially relevant to when hopefulness may permissibly figure in practical deliberation over a course of action. So I consider cases of second-order (...)
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  43. added 2019-02-01
    Pragmatism as Transition: Historicity and Hope in James, Dewey, and Rorty.Colin Koopman - 2009 - New York, NY, USA: Columbia University Press.
    Pragmatism is America's best-known native philosophy. It espouses a practical set of beliefs and principles that focus on the improvement of our lives. Yet the split between classical and contemporary pragmatists has divided the tradition against itself. Classical pragmatists, such as John Dewey and William James, believed we should heed the lessons of experience. Neopragmatists, including Richard Rorty, Hilary Putnam, and Jürgen Habermas, argue instead from the perspective of a linguistic turn, which makes little use of the idea of experience. (...)
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  44. added 2018-09-21
    Hope.Michael Milona & Katie Stockdale - 2018 - 1000-Word Philosophy.
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  45. added 2018-08-12
    What is Hope?Jack M. C. Kwong - 2019 - European Journal of Philosophy 27 (1):243-254.
    According to the standard account, to hope for an outcome is to desire it and to believe that its realization is possible, though not inevitable. This account, however, faces certain difficulties: It cannot explain how people can display differing strengths in hope; it cannot distinguish hope from despair; and it cannot explain substantial hopes. This paper proposes an account of hope that can meet these deficiencies. Briefly, it argues that in addition to possessing the relevant belief–desire structure as allowed in (...)
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  46. added 2018-05-31
    A Perceptual Theory of Hope.Michael Milona & Katie Stockdale - 2018 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 5.
    This paper addresses the question of what the attitude of hope consists in. We argue that shortcomings in recent theories of hope have methodological roots in that they proceed with little regard for the rich body of literature on the emotions. Taking insights from work in the philosophy of emotions, we argue that hope involves a kind of normative perception. We then develop a strategy for determining the content of this perception, arguing that hope is a perception of practical reasons. (...)
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  47. added 2018-04-03
    Hope.Claudia Bloeser & Titus Stahl - 2017 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  48. added 2018-03-09
    Finding Hope.Michael Milona - 2019 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 49 (5):710-729.
    This paper defends a theory of hope according to which hopes are composed of a desire and a belief that the object of the desire is possible. Although belief plus desire theories of hope are now widely rejected, this is due to important oversights. One is a failure to recognize the relation that hope-constituting desires and beliefs must stand in to constitute a hope. A second is an oversimplification of the explanatory power of hope-constituting desires. The final portion of the (...)
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  49. added 2018-02-17
    Comments on Jonathan Lear’s Radical Hope.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 144 (1):63-70.
    Cultural devastation, and the proper response to it, is the central concern of "Radical Hope". I address an uncertainty in Lear's book, reflected in a wavering over the difference between a culture's way of life becoming impossible and its way of life becoming unintelligible. At his best, Lear asks the radical ontological question: when the cultural collapse is such that the old way of life has become not only impossible but retroactively unimaginable,—when nothing one can do makes sense anymore,—how can (...)
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  50. added 2018-01-11
    Ideal Theory After Auschwitz? The Practical Uses and Ideological Abuses of Political Theory as Reconciliation.Benjamin McKean - 2017 - Journal of Politics 79 (4):1177-1190.
    Contemporary debates about ideal and nonideal theory rest on an underlying consensus that the primary practical task of political theory is directing action. This overlooks other urgent practical work that theory can do, including showing how injustice can be made bearable and how resisting it can be meaningful. I illustrate this important possibility by revisiting the purpose for which John Rawls originally developed the concept of ideal theory: reconciling a democratic public to living in a flawed world that may otherwise (...)
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