About this topic
Summary What is hope, from a philosophical point of view?  Can hope be characterized in terms of belief (or degrees of belief) plus some sort of desire or affect? If this kind of “belief-plus” analysis insufficient to characterize hope, what other conditions are required? Are there different kinds of hope – some that are susceptible to belief-plus analysis, and others that aren’t? For instance, could we regard the “idle hope” that I win the lottery as constituted by the belief that it’s possible plus the desire that it happen, but then develop more robust conceptions of the kinds of hope that actively engage deliberation and moral psychology (e.g. the hope that I recover from this terminal diagnosis, despite the long odds)? How does a particular view of hope (or one of its kinds) relate to traditional accounts of hope as a human virtue? Is hope a virtue? If some kind of hope is a virtue, is it a moral virtue, or an intellectual one, or some sort of hybrid?
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621 found
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1 — 50 / 621
  1. The Art of Narrative Repair Through Bloch's Principle of Hope.Carolina Drake - manuscript
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  2. Having a sense of humor as a virtue.Mark Alfano, Mandi Astola & Paula Urbanowicz - forthcoming - Journal of Value Inquiry:1-22.
    Could having a sense of humor be a virtue? In this paper, we argue for an affirmative answer to this question. Like other virtues, a sense of humor enhances and inhibits the expression of various emotions, especially amusement, contempt, trust, and hope. Someone possesses a virtuous sense of humor to the extent that they are well-disposed to appropriately enhance or inhibit these emotions in themselves and others through both embodied reactions (e.g., smiling, laughter, eyerolls) and language (e.g., telling jokes, understanding (...)
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  3. Hope vs. hopelessness.Harold W. Bernard - forthcoming - Humanitas.
    Reviews concepts of hope, despair, and depression. Hope is viewed as the belief and expectation that one has some control over life and the future, that unpleasant events are products of both personal perspective and fate, and that problems will be mastered or will fade.
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  4. Hope and the myth of success: Toward a dialectics of hope.Frank M. Buckley - forthcoming - Humanitas.
    Regards an orientation toward success (i.e., winning the approval of others) as an obstacle to hope. Moods and expectations unrelieved by hope can degenerate into a compulsive idea that life is a process of losing and dying without any compensatory gains. The prime source of deepened hope is to move toward the experience of presence with another. Acknowledging the dialectic nature of hope is itself also a source of hope. Affirming life and love enables one to face their opposites—death and (...)
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  5. The Epistemology of Faith and Hope.Elizabeth Jackson - forthcoming - In Kurt Sylvan, Ernest Sosa, Jonathan Dancy & Matthias Steup (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Epistemology, 3rd edition. Wiley Blackwell.
    This paper surveys the epistemology of two attitudes: faith and hope. First, I examine descriptive questions about faith and hope. Faith and hope are resilient attitudes with unique cognitive and conative components; while related, they are also distinct, notably in that hope’s cognitive component is weaker than faith’s. I then turn to faith and hope's epistemic (ir)rationality, and discuss various ways that faith and hope can be rational and irrational. Finally, I discuss the relationship between faith, hope, and knowledge: while (...)
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  6. Commitment, hope, and despondency.Charles A. Kiesler - forthcoming - Humanitas.
    Discusses the relationship between commitment (pledging or binding oneself to certain acts), hope (anticipating that positive events will occur), despondency (anticipating negative events), and fatalism (believing that there is nothing one can do to affect the future). Factors contributing to despondency in the US include an emphasis on self and emotionality that gives the illusion of increased intimacy but avoids real caring and commitment toward others; experiences of alienation and aloneness; the high crime rate; and a loss of trust in (...)
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  7. From 'suspicion' to 'affirmation' : a study of the role of the imagination and prose rhythm, drawing upon the hermeneutical philosophy of Paul Ricoeur, in which there may be movement from suspicion to affirmation of reasonable hope.Raymond T. Shorthouse - forthcoming - Philosophical Explorations.
    The aim of this thesis is to show that a familiar hermeneutical movement from suspicion to affirmation of rational meaning, as a reader reflects on a narrative, is, in part, grounded in the narrative's rhythmic structure which mediates a sonorous condition of being appropriated by the reader. This hermeneutical process involves the reader in appropriating the temporal perspective which creates a 'space' for reflection in which a provisional conceptual unity is made possible, but subject to continuing movement from suspicion to (...)
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  8. Hope, hopelessness, and violence.Ezra Stotland - forthcoming - Humanitas.
    Suggests that the form of violence, its direction and purpose, and the conditions that start and end it, are determined mainly by the degree of hope or hopelessness giving rise to it. Violence is defined as an action whose intent is to harm another person. "Emotional violence" is an effort to reduce anxiety, which if successful arouses hope. "Instrumental violence" is directed at a specific goal in a more dispassionate manner. Societies should find moral equivalents to these 2 forms of (...)
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  9. An Archaeology of Hope and Despair in the Tale of Aragorn and Arwen.John Whitmire - forthcoming - Tolkien Studies.
    Hope is arguably the linchpin virtue of The Lord of the Rings. In this essay, as part of a larger project intended to establish this claim, I take up Appendix A.I.v to The Lord of the Rings, the relatively self-contained “Part of the Tale of Aragorn and Arwen.” Through a close study of the drafts for this section available in the Tolkien Archives at Marquette University, only some of which have been previously published in The Peoples of Middle-earth, as well (...)
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  10. Hoffen wider die Hoffnung.Christoph Jäger - 2024 - Zur Debatte 54 (1):84-95.
  11. Despair and Hopelessness.Jack M. C. Kwong - 2024 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 10 (2):225-242.
    It has recently been argued that hope is polysemous in that it sometimes refers to hoping and other times to being hopeful. That it has these two distinct senses is reflected in the observation that a person can hope for an outcome without being hopeful that it will occur. Below, I offer a new argument for this distinction. My strategy is to show that accepting this distinction yields a rich account of two distinct ways in which hope can be lost, (...)
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  12. An Epistemology of Belongingness: Dreaming A First Nation’s Ontology of Hope.Hope O'Chin - 2024 - Springer Nature Switzerland.
    The intent of this book focuses on Australia’s First Nations truth, voice, recognition, diversity, and respect. Hope O’Chin explains that knowledge about Australian First Nations culture and learning can be seen through new conceptual lens, which she refers to as an Ontology of Dreaming Hope for Australians. The book proposes to move from ontological propositions embedded in pedagogies and methodologies that center on the relevance of Indigenous epistemes and ways of doing. O’Chin offers a conceptual framing for engaging with Indigenous (...)
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  13. Hope and Knowledge.Trevor Adams - 2023 - Southwest Philosophy Review 39 (1):137-144.
    This paper will explore an epistemic aspect of hope, namely hope’s relationship to knowledge. It has been taken for granted that people do not hope for things to occur that they know will occur. I will be giving an argument that hope and knowledge are compatible, and I will defend that argument against one primary objection. More specifically, I will argue that there are instances when an agent knows that p and still hopes that p.
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  14. Espérer.François-Xavier Bellamy - 2023 - Paris: Bernard Grasset.
    Ce livre voudrait offrir un itinéraire en philosophie, a priori éloigné de l'actualité donc; mais il part malgré tout de nos inquiétudes d'aujourd'hui. Alors que la violence semble s'imposer de nouveau, dans les confrontations géopolitiques, mais aussi dans notre société et même dans les mots de la vie publique, faut-il nous y résigner? Est-ce se bercer d'illusion que de croire qu'un bien peut advenir? La politique et la vie éthique peuvent-ils se fixer pour cap une vie meilleure, une vie heureuse?"--Page (...)
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  15. When my heart says so..." hope as delusion in Schopenhauer's philosophy.Marie-Michèle Blondin - 2023 - In Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic.
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  16. Demoralization and Hope: A Psychological Reading of Kant’s Moral Argument.Andrew Chignell - 2023 - The Monist 106 (1):46-60.
    Kant’s “primacy of the practical” doctrine says that we can form morally justified commitments regarding what exists, even in the absence of sufficient epistemic grounds. In this paper I critically examine three different varieties of Kant’s “moral proof” that can be found in the critical works. My claim is that the third variety—the “moral-psychological argument” based in the need to sustain moral hope and avoid demoralization—has some intriguing advantages over the other two. It starts with a premise that more clearly (...)
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  17. Hopeful Pessimism: The Kantian Mind at the End of All Things.Andrew Chignell - 2023 - In Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic. pp. 35-52.
  18. The Focus Theory of Hope.Andrew Chignell - 2023 - Philosophical Quarterly 73 (1):44-63.
    Most elpistologists now agree that hope for a specific outcome involves more than just desire plus the presupposition that the outcome is possible. This paper argues that the additional element of hope is a disposition to focus on the desired outcome in a certain way. I first survey the debate about the nature of hope in the recent literature, offer objections to some important competing accounts, and describe and defend the view that hope involves a kind of focus or attention. (...)
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  19. For What May the Aesthete Hope? Focus and Standstill in “The Unhappiest One” and “Rotation of Crops”.Andrew Chignell & Elizabeth Li - 2023 - In Ryan S. Kemp & Walter Wietzke (eds.), Kierkegaard's _Either/Or_: A Critical Guide. Cambridge. pp. 42-61.
    In this chapter, we argue that a distinct concept of “aesthetic hope” emerges from the way Kierkegaard’s Aesthete treats hope [Haab] and its relationship to recollection [Erindring] in “The Unhappiest One” and “Rotation of Crops.” We first show that aesthetic hope is distinct from the two other kinds of hope discussed by Kierkegaard: temporal hope and eternal hope. We then consider the suggestion that aesthetic hope is also an expression of despair – an inverse hope against hope, which seeks to (...)
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  20. The night is normal: a guide through spiritual pain.Alicia Britt Chole - 2023 - Carol Stream, Illinois: Tyndale House Publishers.
    It's unnerving, isn't it? When our faith feels ungrounded, untethered... unreal. When our certainty is adrift, as though an undercurrent has pulled us away from shore into the deep, into the darkness. This is disillusionment. This is spiritual pain. And if this is you, please know that you are not alone. (And you are not as far away from safety as you may feel or fear.) Though faith shines best in full sun, it grows depth in the dark. The night (...)
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  21. How place shapes the aspirations of hope: the allegory of the privileged and the underprivileged.Victor Counted & David A. Newheiser - 2023 - Journal of Positive Psychology 2023.
    We articulate a holistic understanding of hope, going beyond the common conceptualization of hope in terms of positive affect and cognition by considering what hope means for the underprivileged. In the recognition that hope is always situated in a particular place, we explore the perspective of the privileged and the underprivileged, clarifying how spatial contexts shape their goals for the future and their agency toward attaining these goals. Where some people experience precarity due to their disability, race, gender, sexuality, and (...)
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  22. Knowledge, faith, and ambiguity : hope in the work of novalis and Karoline Von Günderrode.Anna Ezekiel - 2023 - In Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Both Novalis and Günderrode provide grounds for a number of different kinds of hope. The first part of this chapter briefly sketches the most obvious of these: the hope for union with loved ones after death. This section also explains Günderrode’s metaphysics, which entails significant differences from Novalis in the other areas of hope that she identifies. Part two explores “epistemological hope”: the hope for knowledge or experience of that which lies outside the limitations of reason. Part three considers Günderrode’s (...)
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  23. The autonomy of the heart : forberg on action without belief.Kevin Harrelson - 2023 - In Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic. pp. 125-139.
  24. Kant, Beck, and the highest good.Fiacha D. Heneghan - 2023 - In Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic.
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  25. Humboldt, Bildung, language, and hope.Susan-Judith Hoffmann - 2023 - In Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic.
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  26. Faithfully Taking Pascal’s Wager.Elizabeth Jackson - 2023 - The Monist 106 (1):35–45.
    I examine the relationship between taking Pascal’s wager, faith, and hope. First, I argue that many who take Pascal’s wager have genuine faith that God exists. The person of faith and the wagerer have several things in common, including a commitment to God and positive cognitive and conative attitudes toward God’s existence. If one’s credences in theism are too low to have faith, I argue that the wagerer can still hope that God exists, another commitment-justifying theological virtue. I conclude with (...)
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  27. Faith: Contemporary Perspectives.Elizabeth Jackson - 2023 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Faith is a trusting commitment to someone or something. Faith helps us meet our goals, keeps our relationships secure, and enables us to retain our commitments over time. Faith is thus a central part of a flourishing life. -/- This article is about the philosophy of faith. There are many philosophical questions about faith, such as: What is faith? What are its main components or features? What are the different kinds of faith? What is the relationship between faith and other (...)
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  28. The Primacy of Hope for Human Flourishing.Anne Jeffrey & Krista Mehari - 2023 - The Monist 106 (1):12-24.
    In this paper we argue that the eudaimonist virtue of hope holds pride of place in development of psychological traits that promote human flourishing. The argument is part theoretical and part empirical. On the theoretical side, hope, the virtue, is the disposition to envision future good possibilities for oneself and one’s community and to move towards those possibilities. This renders hope necessary for any agent’s self-conscious pursuit of the goods that constitute flourishing, and also for the development of other virtues. (...)
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  29. Impact of a Participatory Action Approach to Virtue Promotion Among Early Adolescents.Anne Jeffrey, Krista Mehari, Marie Chastang, Megan Blanton & Joseph Currier - 2023 - Journal of Positive Psychology 2023.
    Research on interventions that aim to cultivate character strengths, or virtues, has been conducted primarily among highly resourced, predominantly White communities, and the interventions have been developed to reflect the values of those communities. The purpose of this study was to use a participatory action research approach to develop a virtue intervention focused on addressing the community-identified problem of violence in a predominantly Black community, and to test its effectiveness in a pilot study. Participants were 37 youth (M age = (...)
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  30. Transdisciplinary Participatory Action Research: How Philosophers, Psychologists, and Practitioners Can Work Well Together To Promote Adolescent Character Development Within Context.Anne Jeffrey, Krista Mehari, Marie Chastang & Sarah Schnitker - 2023 - Journal of Positive Psychology 18.
    Character strengths research has the potential to imply that youth have character deficits or moral failings that cause their problematic behavior. This ignores the impact of context, especially for youth who are members of historically marginalized groups in under resourced communities. On the other hand, framing youth who are members of underrepresented groups solely as products of oppression undermines their agency and the power of collective action. It may be possible to promote character development in a contextually relevant, culturally grounded (...)
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  31. Between faith and reason : is J.H. Tieftrunk's concept of hope a postulate?Ingomar Kloos - 2023 - In Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic. Translated by Anna Ezekiel.
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  32. Hope, Trust, and Forgiveness: Essays in Finitude.John T. Lysaker - 2023 - London: University of Chicago Press.
    A new ethics of human finitude developed through three experimental essays. As ethical beings, we strive for lives that are meaningful and praiseworthy. But we are finite. We do not know, so we hope. We need, so we trust. We err, so we forgive. In this book, philosopher John T. Lysaker draws our attention to the ways in which these three capacities—hope, trust, and forgiveness—contend with human limits. Each experience is vital to human flourishing, yet each also poses significant personal (...)
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  33. Global Faith, Trust and Hope.Finlay Malcolm - 2023 - The Monist 106 (1):94-103.
    This paper develops an account of faith as a global trait of character, and explores how it relates to trust and hope. This account is developed in terms of the functional role faith occupies: what it is that global faith does in our lives. Global faith is taken to be a disposition to persevere in seeing the good in situations, events, circumstances, and people. This trait is explored through real and fictionalised situations of difficulty and strife, and when looking back (...)
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  34. Mind subverted to madness: The psychological force of hope as affect in Kant and J. C. Hoffbauer.Katerina Mihaylova - 2023 - In Anna Ezekiel & Katerina Mihaylova (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic. pp. 141-152.
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  35. Between faith and reason : is J.H. Tieftrunk's concept of hope a postulate?Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel - 2023 - In Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Johann Heinrich Tieftrunk has a place among the early Kantians in Halle as both a theologian and a philosophical thinker. After situating Tieftrunk within this intellectual history and determining his theological and philosophical position, this paper provides a chronological account of the concept of hope—which lies at the basis of Kant’s moral philosophy—in Tieftrunk’s writings on philosophy of religion. In particular, the discussion centers on the relationship between the foundation of hope in the moral law and the exclusion of a (...)
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  36. Between need and permission : the role of hope in Kant's critical foundation of moral faith.Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel - 2023 - In Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic.
    This paper considers the systematic relationship between faith and reason in Kant’s grounding and limiting of moral faith in the Canon of Pure Reason in the Critique of Pure Reason. The first section addresses the interrelationship between Kant’s critique of knowledge and his critique of faith. The second section defines the complex interplay of theoretical and practical issues in Kant’s critical question of what a morally acting agent may hope for regarding the overall outcome of his actions. The third section (...)
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  37. Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism.Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.) - 2023 - London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic.
    A history of the development of the concept of hope in German philosophy immediately after Kant.
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  38. What may I hope?" Schleiermacher's answer to Kant's third question.Jörg Noller - 2023 - In Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic.
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  39. Holy unhappiness: God, goodness, and the myth of the blessed life.Amanda Held Opelt - 2023 - New York: Worthy.
    American Christians have developed a long list of expectations about what the life with God will feel like. Many Christians rightly deny the Prosperity Gospel-the idea that God wants you to be healthy and wealthy- but instead embrace its more subtle spin-off, the Emotional Prosperity Gospel, or the belief that God wants you to always experience happiness and fulfillment. Our society has become increasingly averse to sadness and emotional discomfort. Too often, people of faith assume that difficult feelings are a (...)
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  40. Hope for divine aid in Kant's religion.Lawrence Pasternack - 2023 - In Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic.
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  41. Hope and faith : Kierkegaard's call for the self to develop its relationship to itself.Esther Oluffa Pedersen - 2023 - In Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic.
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  42. Fichte on optimism and pessimism.Rory Phillips - 2023 - In Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic. pp. 109-123.
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  43. C.A. Eschenmayer : history as the realm of freedom and moral development.Cristiana Senigaglia - 2023 - In Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic.
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  44. Friedrich Creuzer and the claims of the symbolic.Allen Speight - 2023 - In Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic.
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  45. How Can Hope Be Rational in the Context of Global Poverty?Katie Stockdale - 2023 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 26 (3):425-430.
    This paper is a critical discussion of Claudia Blöser’s (2022) “Global Poverty and Kantian Hope.” While Blöser shows that a lack of hope is often rational in the context of global poverty, I argue that some people’s hopes in the face of poverty might actually be rational, and that understanding the rationality of a person’s hope may require knowing more about the unique circumstances of their lives. I suggest that Blöser’s work on ‘fundamental hopes’ (with Titus Stahl) (2017) may be (...)
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  46. In the hope of a philosopher of nature.Daniel Whistler - 2023 - In Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic.
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  47. The Lord of the Rings as Philosophy: Environmental Enchantment and Resistance in Peter Jackson and J.R.R. Tolkien.John Whitmire & David Henderson - 2023 - The Palgrave Handbook of Popular Culture as Philosophy.
    A key philosophical feature of Peter Jackson’s film interpretation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s _The Lord of the Rings_ is its use of fantasy to inspire a “recovery” of the actual or, in other words, a reawakening to the beauty of nature and the many possible ways of living in healthier ecological relation to the world. Though none of these ways is perfectly achieved, this pluralistic view is demonstrated in the various lifeways of Hobbits, Elves, Men, and Ents. All of the positive (...)
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  48. Good catastrophe: the tide-turning power of hope.Benjamin Windle - 2023 - Minneapolis, Minnesota: Bethany House Publishing, a division of Baker Publishing Group.
    In a gritty and unique take on the story of Job, Pastor Benjamin Windle shows that "the good life" is not one devoid of problems, pain, and heartache. It's one lived with hope engineered for adversity. You can flourish in the storms of life when you find the Ultimate Hope in the midst of unavoidable pain.
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  49. Why Kant’s Hope Took a Historical Turn in Practical Philosophy.Jaeha Woo - 2023 - Con-Textos Kantianos 17:43-55.
    In the beginning of his critical period, Kant treated the perfect attainment of the highest good—the unconditioned totality of ends which would uphold the perfect proportionality between moral virtue and happiness—as both the ground of hope for deserved happiness and the final end of our moral life. But I argue that Kant moved in the direction of de-emphasizing the latter aspect of the highest good, not because it is inappropriate or impossible for us to promote this ideal, but because the (...)
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  50. Undirected directionality : Jakob Friedrich Fries on hope, faith, and comprehensive feelings.Paul G. Ziche - 2023 - In Katerina Mihaylova & Anna Ezekiel (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Optimism. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: Bloomsbury Academic.
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