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  1. The Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (OP-ICESCR).Deepa Kansra & Mallika Ramachandran - manuscript
    Human rights treaties are often attached and complemented with Optional Protocols. The Optional protocol instruments are adopted after careful deliberation between different stakeholders including member states to human rights treaties. -/- The present document on Introduction to the International Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights- Optional Protocol [OP-ICESCR] is an addition to the on-going work on the Human Rights Framework on ESC Rights. It covers basic information on the objectives of the OP and the key provisions dealing with the (...)
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  2. Justice for People on the Move. Migration in Challenging Times. GilliBrock, 2020. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Xiii + 248 Pp, $99.99. [REVIEW]Mario J. Cunningham Matamoros - forthcoming - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
  3. Sharing for Relief: Associations of Trauma-Focused Interviews and Well-Being Among War-Affected Displaced Populations in the Middle East.Hawkar Ibrahim, Katharina Goessmann & Frank Neuner - forthcoming - Ethics and Behavior:1-17.
  4. The Convention on the Rights of the Person in Outer Space. Cometan - 2022 - Preston, UK: Astronist Institution.
    The Convention of the Rights of the Person in Outer Space, more informally known as the Space Rights Convention, is a human rights and animal rights document that outlines basic principles, rights and freedoms bestowed to different categories of species in outer space which including on extraterrestrial bodies (both planetary and sub-planetary), synthetic bodies (e.g. space stations), as well as on spacecraft (both commissioned and uncommissioned) travelling through space itself (which is often referred to in the Convention as the interspace (...)
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  5. 2022 Global Religious Recognition Report. Cometan - 2022 - Preston, UK: The Religious Recognition Project.
    Conditions for recognition of religion or belief (RoRB) continued to deteriorate around the world from June 2021 to June 2022. Authoritarian regimes bent on controlling religious activity maintained a foothold in Africa, Asia and parts of Central and South America. The liberties enshrined in the European Convention on Human Rights are at serious threat by the Russian Federation's invasion of Ukraine. While in Afghanistan, the Taliban's reclamation of power after twenty years of being kept at bay likely signals a new (...)
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  6. Is Law Spiritual?Deepa Kansra - 2022 - In Raman Mittal & Seema Singh (eds.), Law and Spirituality: Exploring the Bonds. Delhi: Mohan Law House. pp. 59-66.
    Today, major disciplines (including psychology, philosophy, science, etc.) are seeking to forge a deeper connection with spirituality/spiritual values. Emanating from these efforts are clues about the role of spirituality as an inspiration, a fertile source, and a benchmark for research, policy-making, and reforms. In the case of law/the law, scholars explore its relationship with spirituality in light of diverse topics including human rights, crime prevention, family relations, humanitarianism, development, education, security, conflict resolution, and freedom. A few of these works offer (...)
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  7. Monitoring Peace and Security Mandates for Human Rights.Deepa Kansra - 2022 - Artha: The Sri Ram Economics Journal 1 (1):188-192.
    The jurisprudence under international human rights treaties has had a considerable impact across countries. Known for addressing complex agendas, the work of expert bodies under the treaties has been credited and relied upon for filling the gaps in the realization of several objectives, including the peace and security agenda. -/- In 1982, the Human Rights Committee (ICCPR), in a General Comment observed that “states have the supreme duty to prevent wars, acts of genocide and other acts of mass violence ... (...)
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  8. The Cultural Revisionist Element Behind P. R. China’s Neo-Nazism: A Cross-Cultural and Cross-Religion Research.Yang Immanuel Pachankis - 2022 - International Journal of Advanced Multidisciplinary Research and Studies 2 (4):435-451.
    Modern and contemporary politics of P. R. China contain many elements similar to neo-Nazism if not anti-communist. The derivation from Communist doctrines was a less-known debate inside the CPC party leadership soon after the declaration on the founding of People’s Republic of China - notably between Mao, Zedong and the state leadership which resulted in the criminalization of the first president Liu, Shaoqi. The researcher, as a self-identified cisgender homosexual male and Christian, observed the cultural revisionist developments of the P. (...)
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  9. The Institutional Dictionary of Freedom of Religion or Belief.[author unknown] - 2021 - Preston, UK: Astral Publishing.
    This Dictionary of Freedom of Religion or Belief is published by the Astronist Institution through its imprint press Astral Publishing and will stand as the third entry in the Institutional Reference Works series. This Dictionary of Freedom of Religion or Belief provides a vast selection of terms covering all areas of religious liberty advocacy, the history of freedom of religion, human rights violations effecting religious freedom, current affairs and the mechanisms that the United Nations and other key organisations have put (...)
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  10. The Promises of Standing Rock: Three Approaches to Human Rights.Benjamin Davis - 2021 - Humanity 12 (2):205-225.
    Any appeal to a right raises the question of a corresponding duty. If one bears a right, then who bears the duty to respect, protect, and enforce that right? In this essay, I contend that human rights claims need not be oriented to or reliant on the state. I start from and conclude with lessons from the 2016 protests at Standing Rock. Standing Rock, I argue, exemplifies critical theory that organizes communities through the language of human rights.
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  11. Determining the Number of Refugees to Be Resettled in the United States: An Ethical and Policy Analysis of Policy-Level Stakeholder Views.Rachel Fabi, Daniel Serwer, Namrita S. Singh, Govind Persad, Paul Spiegel & Leonard Rubenstein - 2021 - Journal of Immigrant and Refugee Studies 19 (2):142-156.
    Through engagement with key informants and review of ethical theories applicable to refugee policy, this paper examines the ethical and policy considerations that policy-level stakeholders believe should factor into setting the refugee resettlement ceiling. We find that the ceiling traditionally has been influenced by policy goals, underlying values, and practical considerations. These factors map onto several ethical approaches to resettlement. There is significant alignment between U.S. policy interests and ethical obligations toward refugees. We argue that the refugee ceiling should be (...)
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  12. Conceptual and Institutional Considerations in the Regulation of Technology for Human Rights.Deepa Kansra - 2021 - Indraprastha Technology Law Journal 1 (XIII):13-30.
    Today, a rights-based approach to technology regulation is central to national and international law-making. A human-rights-based approach would involve viewing technology from the prism of human rights objectives and principles. A more specific turn would be to evaluate their impact on specific rights, namely the right to life, right to peaceful assembly, right to development, right to redressal, rights against discrimination, right to education, etc. Normative frameworks have emerged to further protect human rights from technology-based harms. This paper covers a (...)
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  13. Neuro Rights, the New Human Rights.Deepa Kansra - 2021 - Rights Compass.
    The human mind has been a subject matter of study in psychology, law, science, philosophy and other disciplines. By definition, its potential is power, abilities and capacities including perception, knowledge, sensation, memory, belief, imagination, emotion, mood, appetite, intention, and action (Pardo, Patterson). In terms of role, it creates and shapes societal morality, culture, peace and democracy. Today, a rapidly advancing science–technology–artificial intelligence (AI) landscape is able to reach into the inner realms of the human mind. Technology, particularly neurotechnology enables access (...)
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  14. When Human Rights and Psychology Meet.Deepa Kansra - 2021 - The Human Rights Blog.
    A psychology-informed view of human rights has been taken into account by many scholars while examining the short-term and long-term effects of human rights violations on individuals and communities. In Trauma and Human Rights: Integrating Approaches to Address Human Suffering, for instance, the authors discuss the trauma-informed approach in the context of human rights violations, namely domestic violence, racial and other forms of discrimination, etc. In the paper on Trauma among children and legal implications, the authors advance a trauma-informed approach (...)
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  15. Laments of an Immigrant Ashore.Suleman Lazarus - 2021 - Lothlorien Poetry Journal 4:1-2.
    The poem gives a voice to many refugees who died crossing borders and many more asylum seekers who will lose their lives crossing international borders.
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  16. Blake, Michael. Justice, Migration, and Mercy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019. Pp. 280. $35.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW]Matthew Lister - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):600-605.
    For several years Michael Blake has been among the most important contributors to the philosophical literature on immigration. This book is therefore greatly anticipated, and develops a number of fruitful arguments. Although I will argue that the account is unsuccessful or incomplete at key points, it’s clearly an important work of relevance to those working on immigration, as well as to political philosophers more generally. In particular, Blake provides powerful arguments against the claim that “open borders” are required by liberal (...)
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  17. Refugees: The Politically Oppressed.Felix Bender - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 47 (5):615-633.
    Who should be recognized as a refugee? This article seeks to uncover the normative arguments at the core of legal and philosophical conceptions of refugeehood. It identifies three analytically distinct approaches grounding the right to refugee status and argues that all three are normatively inadequate. Refugee status should neither be grounded in individual persecution for specific reasons (classical approach) nor in individual persecution for any discriminatory reasons (human rights approach). It should also not be based solely on harm (humanitarian approach). (...)
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  18. What Could Human Rights Do? A Decolonial Inquiry.Benjamin Davis - 2020 - Transmodernity 5 (9):1-22.
    It is one thing to consider what human rights have been and another to inquire into what they could be. In this essay, I present a history of human rights vis-à-vis decolonization. I follow the scholarship of Samuel Moyn to suggest that human rights presented a “moral alternative” to political utopias. The question remains how to politicize the moral energy around human rights today. I argue that defending what Édouard Glissant calls a “right to opacity” could politicize the ethical energy (...)
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  19. Advancing the Human Right to Science Under the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.Deepa Kansra - 2020 - RMLNLU Law Review.
    At this juncture, the relevance of the human right to science is undeniable. The right, for a long time, has been a subject matter of deliberation under Article 15 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, 1966 (ICESCR). Most of these deliberations emphasised the need for a concise meaning and scope of the right to science. In the year 2020, the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR) under the ICESCR made two interventions with the objective (...)
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  20. Philosophical Foundations for Complementary Protection.Matthew J. Lister - 2020 - In David Miller & Christine Straehle (eds.), The Political Philosophy of Refuge. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 211-231.
    A Significant percentage of the people outside their country of citizenship or residence who are unable to meet their basic needs on their own, and need international protection, do not fall under the definition set out in the UN Refugee Convention. This has led many - both academic commentators and activists - to call for a new, expanded refugee definition, preferably backed up by a new, binding, international convention. In earlier work I have resisted this call, arguing that there is (...)
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  21. African Challenges to the International Criminal Court: An Example of Populism?Renee Nicole Souris - 2020 - In AMINTAPHIL: The Philosophical Foundations of Law and Justice. pp. 255-268.
    Recent global efforts of the United States and England to withdraw from international institutions, along with recent challenges to human rights courts from Poland and Hungary, have been described as part of a growing global populist backlash against the liberal international order. Several scholars have even identified the recent threat of mass withdrawal of African states from the International Criminal Court (ICC) as part of this global populist backlash. Are the African challenges to the ICC part of a global populist (...)
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  22. Dignity, Development, and the Gravity of Child Soldiering.Renée Nicole Souris - 2020 - Archiv Fuer Rechts Und Sozialphilosophie 106 (3):465-475.
    This paper critically examines different formulations of the view that the crime of using child soldiers is less serious than other international crimes. The first formulation presents a sociological argument toward this conclusion and the second a deontological argument. After arguing that the second formulation is stronger, because it is grounded in a coherent ethical framework, I then construct a deontological argument to counter it, which construes the wrong of child soldiering as an attack on the developing child's right to (...)
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  23. The Challenge of Educating Refugee Children to Avoid Creating Tomorrow’s Extremists.Stephan Urs Breu - 2019 - In Craig Paterson & Stephan U. Breu (eds.), Law, Ethics and Society: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. Miami, Florida, USA: JHPU Press. pp. 55 - 66.
    An estimated 65 million people have been forced to flee their homelands in the last few years. Average length of displacement for a refugee is now estimated at 17 years. A whole generation of young people are forced to spend their whole youth in refugee camps and can only be educated there. On the other side the international community is strongly underfinancing any education efforts by aid agencies and international organizations. So, it is common that classes have as many as (...)
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  24. Our Responsibilities to Refugees.David Miller - 2019 - Proceedings of the 2018 ZiF Workshop “Studying Migration Policies at the Interface Between Empirical Research and Normative Analysisandquot;.
    The paper explores the basis of the responsibilities we owe to refugees. That we have such responsibilities is a very widely shared intuition: the need of those fleeing from persecution seems to call out for a response on our part. But what exactly are our obligations to such people? Who are they owed to and why do we have them? The paper argues in favour of a human rights approach to refugee protection that includes the requirement of the implementation of (...)
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  25. International Law and Political Philosophy: Uncovering New Linkages.Steven Ratner - 2019 - Philosophy Compass 14 (2):e12564.
    Despite a common agenda of normative analysis of the international order, philosophical work on international political morality and international law and legal scholarship have, until recently, worked at a distance from one another.The mutual suspicion can be traced to different aims and methodologies, including a divide between work on matters of deep structure, on the one hand, and practical institutional analysis and prescription, on the other. Yet international law is a key part of the normative practices ofstates, has a direct (...)
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  26. Review of Rowan Cruft, S. Matthew Liao, and Massimo Renzo (Eds.), Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights. [REVIEW]Robert Mark Simpson - 2019 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 16 (4):517-520.
    This is a review of a long, comprehensive, and mostly very good collection of philosophical essays on human rights. I briefly summarise the main ideas put forward in some of the essays that I most admired in the collection. While the collection includes essays from proponents of a wide range of theoretical and methodological perspectives, I suggest in my review that the collection's overall function is to serve as a kind of demonstrative rejoinder to those philosophers, like Raz, who argue (...)
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  27. كيف يفوز المختلون الاجتماعيون السبعة الذين يحكمون الصين بالحرب العالمية الثالثة والثالثة لوقفهم.Michael Richard Starks - 2019 - In الانتحار من قبل الديمقراطية نعي لأمريكا والعالم. Las Vegas, NV USA: Reality Press. pp. 40-44.
    أول شيء يجب أن نضع في اعتبارنا هو أنه عندما نقول أن الصين تقول هذا أو الصين يفعل ذلك، ونحن لا نتحدث عن الشعب الصيني، ولكن من المختلين الاجتماعيين الذين يسيطرون على الح ش ص - الحزب الشيوعي الصيني، أي القتلة المتسلسلين الشيخوخة السبعة (SSSSK) من ال (هـ) اللجنة الدائمة للحزب الشيوعي الصيني أو الأعضاء الخمسة والعشر في المكتب السياسي وما إلى ذلك. -/- خطط الح ش ص للحرب العالمية الثالثة والسيطرة الكاملة وضعت بوضوح في منشورات الحكومة الصينية والخطب وهذا (...)
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  28. When the Practice Gets Complicated: Human Rights, Migrants, and Political Institutions.Jelena Belic - 2017 - In Reidar Maliks & Johan Schaffer (eds.), Moral and Political Conceptions of Human Rights: Implications for Theory and Practice. pp. 181 - 203.
  29. What's So Good About Environmental Human Rights?: Constitutional Versus International Environmental Rights.Daniel P. Corrigan - 2017 - In Markku Oksanen and Ashley Dodsworth and Selina O'Doherty (ed.), Environmental Human Rights: A Political Theory Perspective. New York: Routledge. pp. 124-148.
    In recent decades, environmental rights have been increasingly developed at both the national and international level, along with increased adjudication of these rights in both national (constitutional) courts and international human rights courts. These parallel trends raise a question as to whether it is better to develop and adjudicate environmental rights at the national or international level. This article considers the case made by James May and Erin Daly in favor of developing environmental rights at the national constitutional level and (...)
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  30. Too Liberal for Global Governance? International Legal Human Rights System and Indigenous Peoples’ Right to Self-Determination.Ranjoo Seodu Herr - 2017 - Journal of International Political Theory 13 (2):196-214.
    This article considers whether the international legal human rights system founded on liberal individualism, as endorsed by liberal theorists, can function as a fair universal legal regime. This question is examined in relation to the collective right to self-determination demanded by indigenous peoples, who are paradigmatic decent nonliberal peoples. Indigenous peoples’ collective right to self-determination has been internationally recognized in the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which was adopted by the United Nations in 2007. This historic event may (...)
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  31. Is There a Human Right to Internet Access?Jesse Tomalty - 2017 - Philosophy Now 118:6-8.
  32. Leif Wenar, Blood Oil[REVIEW]David Wiens - 2017 - Ethics 127 (3):813-817.
  33. The Review of "Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights". [REVIEW]Jelena Belic - 2016 - Public Law 4:741 - 745.
  34. Dignity- A Regenerative Idea.Deepa Kansra - 2016 - Indian Law Institute Law Review (ILI Law Review) 2 (Winter):202-203.
    AN ATTEMPT to understand the role of dignity in human rights is worthwhile and challenging. Popularly referred to as a “constitutional principle”, “moral precept”, or a “supreme virtue”, dignity has allowed legal systems to adopt evolutionary and impactful practices concerning the welfare of human beings. Defined also as the precursor and basis to the various human rights defined and adopted, dignity continues to facilitate the integration of diverse interests and stakeholders within the framework of human rights thought and practice. By (...)
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  35. The Place of Persecution and Non-State Action in Refugee Protection.Matthew Lister - 2016 - In Alex Sager (ed.), The Ethics and Politics of Immigration: Core Issues and Emerging Trends. Lanham, MD, USA: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 45-60.
    Crises of forced migration are, unfortunately, nothing new. At the time of the writing of this paper, at least two such crises were in full swing – mass movements from the Middle East and parts of Africa to the E.U., and major movements from Central America to the Southern U.S. border, including movements by large numbers of families and unaccompanied minors. These movements are complex, with multiple causes, and it is always risky to attempt to craft either general policy or (...)
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  36. Autonomous Killer Robots Are Probably Good News.Vincent C. Müller - 2016 - In Ezio Di Nucci & Filippo Santonio de Sio (eds.), Drones and responsibility: Legal, philosophical and socio-technical perspectives on the use of remotely controlled weapons. London: Ashgate. pp. 67-81.
    Will future lethal autonomous weapon systems (LAWS), or ‘killer robots’, be a threat to humanity? The European Parliament has called for a moratorium or ban of LAWS; the ‘Contracting Parties to the Geneva Convention at the United Nations’ are presently discussing such a ban, which is supported by the great majority of writers and campaigners on the issue. However, the main arguments in favour of a ban are unsound. LAWS do not support extrajudicial killings, they do not take responsibility away (...)
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  37. Complicity and Compromise in the Law of Nations.Steven R. Ratner - 2016 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (3):559-573.
    This paper considers the implications of Chiara Lepora and Robert Goodin's On Complicity and Compromise (OUP, 2013) for our understanding of international law. That volume systematizes and evaluates individuals’ ethical choices in getting (too) close to evil acts. For the law of nations, these concepts are relevant in three critical ways. First, they capture the dilemmas of those charged with implementing international law, e.g., Red Cross delegates pledged to confidentiality learning of torture in a prison. Second, they offer a rubric (...)
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  38. Just War and Robots’ Killings.Thomas W. Simpson & Vincent C. Müller - 2016 - Philosophical Quarterly 66 (263):302-22.
    May lethal autonomous weapons systems—‘killer robots ’—be used in war? The majority of writers argue against their use, and those who have argued in favour have done so on a consequentialist basis. We defend the moral permissibility of killer robots, but on the basis of the non-aggregative structure of right assumed by Just War theory. This is necessary because the most important argument against killer robots, the responsibility trilemma proposed by Rob Sparrow, makes the same assumptions. We show that the (...)
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  39. Justifying International Legal Human Rights.Jesse Tomalty - 2016 - Ethics and International Affairs 30 (4):483-490.
    In The Heart of Human Rights, Allen Buchanan emphasizes the distinction between moral human rights (MHRs) on the one hand and international legal human rights (ILHRs) on the other. MHRs are the moral rights held universally by all humans simply in virtue of being human. ILHRs are the legal rights of international practice, which are articulated in the United Nations’ International Bill of Rights and related legal documents. One of the most controversial aspects of Buchanan’s account of human rights is (...)
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  40. Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights.Rowan Cruft, S. Matthew Liao & Massimo Renzo (eds.) - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    What makes something a human right? What is the relationship between the moral foundations of human rights and human rights law? What are the difficulties of appealing to human rights? This book offers the first comprehensive survey of current thinking on the philosophical foundations of human rights. Divided into four parts, this book focuses firstly on the moral grounds of human rights, for example in our dignity, agency, interests or needs. Secondly, it looks at the implications that different moral perspectives (...)
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  41. Arendt on Resentment: Articulating Intersubjectivity.Grace Hunt - 2015 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 29 (3):283-290.
    ABSTRACT This article develops an Arendtian conception of resentment and shows that resentment as a response to injustice is in fact only possible within a community of persons engaged in moral and recognitive relations. While Arendt is better known for her work on forgiveness—characterized as a creative rather than vindictive response to injury—this article suggests that Arendt provides a unique way of thinking about resentment as essentially a response to another human's subjectivity. But when injury is massive, so beyond the (...)
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  42. Problem Aksjologicznej Legitymizacji Uniwersalnego Systemu Ochrony Praw Człowieka.Marek Piechowiak - 2015 - In Elżbieta Karska (ed.), Globalne problemy ochrony praw człowieka. Katedra Ochrony Praw Człowieka i Prawa Międzynarodowego UKSW. pp. 86-100.
    Problem of Axiological Legitimization of the Universal System of the Protection of Human Rights Summary In this paper it is argued that legitimization of the universal system (UN-system) of the protection of human rights depends primary not from the content of values recognised as fundamental but rather from metaaxiological solutions related to the way of existence and to the possibility of cognition of these values. Legitimisation is based on the recognition of an objective nature and of cognoscibility of basic values. (...)
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  43. Problem Aksjologicznej Legitymizacji Uniwersalnego Systemu Ochrony Praw Człowieka [Problem of Axiological Legitimization of the Universal System of the Protection of Human Rights].Marek Piechowiak - 2015 - In Elżbieta Karska (ed.), Globalne Problemy Ochrony Praw Człowieka. Katedra Ochrony Praw Człowieka I Prawa Międzynarodowego Uksw. pp. 86-100.
    Problem of Axiological Legitimization of the Universal System of the Protection of Human Rights Summary In this paper it is argued that legitimization of the universal system of the protection of human rights depends primary not from the content of values recognised as fundamental but rather from metaaxiological solutions related to the way of existence and to the possibility of cognition of these values. Legitimisation is based on the recognition of an objective nature and of cognoscibility of basic values. Realisation (...)
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  44. The Thin Justice of International Law: A Moral Reckoning of the Law of Nations.Steven R. Ratner - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    Offering a new interdisciplinary approach to global justice and integrating the insights of international relations and contemporary ethics, this book asks whether the core norms of international law are just by appraising them according to a standard of global justice grounded in the advancement of peace and protection of human rights.
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  45. Standard Threats: How to Violate Basic Human Rights.Anthony R. Reeves - 2015 - Social Theory and Practice 41 (3):403-434.
    The paper addresses the nature of duties grounded in human rights. Rather than being protections against harm, per se, I contend that human rights largely shield against risk impositions to protected interests. “Risk imposition” is a normative idea requiring explication, but understanding dutiful action in its terms enables human rights to provide prospective policy guidance, hold institutions accountable, operate in non-ideal circumstances, embody impartiality among persons, and define the moral status of agencies in international relations. Slightly differently, I indicate a (...)
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  46. Recovering the Human in Human Rights.Diana Tietjens Meyers - 2014 - Law, Culture, and Humanities:1-30.
    It is often said that human rights are the rights that people possess simply in virtue of being human – that is, in virtue of their intrinsic, dignity-defining common humanity. Yet, on closer inspection the human rights landscape doesn’t look so even. Once we bring perpetrators of human rights abuse and their victims into the picture, attributions of humanity to persons become unstable. In this essay, I trace the ways in which rights discourse ascribes variable humanity to certain categories of (...)
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  47. Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice, 3rd Edition.Jack Donnelly - 2013 - Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
  48. Globalization, International Law, and Human Rights, by Jeffrey F. Addicott, Md. Jahid Hossain Bhuiyan, Tareq M.R. Chowdhury (Eds.), 2012. [REVIEW]Deepa Kansra - 2013 - Journal of the Indian Law Institute 55:245-248.
  49. Between Revelation and Reason: Human Dignity in Karl Barth and Gaudium Et Spes.David Kirchhoffer - 2013 - In David Kirchhoffer, Robyn Horner & Patrick McArdle (eds.), Being HumanGroundwork for a Theological Anthropology for the 21st Century. Preston:
  50. Who Are Refugees?Matthew Lister* - 2013 - Law and Philosophy 32 (5):645-671.
    Hundreds of millions of people around the world are unable to meet their needs on their own, and do not receive adequate protection or support from their home states. These people, if they are to be provided for, need assistance from the international community. If we are to meet our duties to these people, we must have ways of knowing who should be eligible for different forms of relief. One prominent proposal from scholars and activists has been to classify all (...)
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