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  1. Renee Bouveresse, Esthetique, psychologie et musique: l'esthetique experimentale et son origine philosophique chez David Hume.J. -P. Cometti - forthcoming - Revue Internationale de Philosophie.
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  2. Hume's Aesthetics.Ted Gracyk - forthcoming - The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Winter.
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  3. Hume’s “Projectivism” Explained.Miren Boehm - 2020 - Synthese: Humeanisms.
    Hume appeals to a mysterious mental process to explain how to world appears to possess features that are not present in sense perceptions, namely causal, moral, and aesthetic properties. He famously writes that the mind spreads itself onto the external world, and that we stain or gild natural objects with our sentiments. Projectivism is founded on these texts but it assumes a reading of Hume’s language as merely metaphorical. This assumption, however, conflicts sharply with the important explanatory role that “spreading” (...)
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  4. Sobre una posible influencia del Quijote en el pensamiento de Hume.Mario Edmundo Chávez Tortolero - 2020 - Ciudad de México, CDMX, México: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México / Itaca.
    A lo largo de este libro se ofrece una interpretación novedosa y sugerente del pensamiento de David Hume y del Quijote, leído y citado por aquél, siendo una obra muy influyente en la Inglaterra de su tiempo. El autor pretende mostrar que la influencia del Quijote en el pensamiento de Hume es posible, probable y plausible, para lo cual ofrece diversos argumentos. Desarrolla su interpretación mostrando que un fragmento extraído del Quijote es indispensable para la postulación del criterio del gusto (...)
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  5. Reading David Hume’s » Of the Standard of Taste «.Babette Babich (ed.) - 2019 - Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter.
    This collection dedicated to and including David Hume's "Of the Standard of Taste," offers a much needed resource for students and scholars of philosophical aesthetics, political reflection, value and judgments, economics, and art. The authors include experts in the philosophy of art, aesthetics, history of philosophy as well as the history of science. Contributors include Babette Babich, Howard Caygill, Timothy M.Costelloe, Andrej Démuth / Slávka Démuthová, Bernard Freydberg, Peter Kivy, Carolyn Korsmeyer, Christopher MacLachlan, Emilio Mazza, Roger Schiner, Roger Scruton, and (...)
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  6. David Hume y la cultura de la sensibilidad.Antonio José Cano López - 2019 - Mutatis Mutandis: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 13.
    La “Cultura de la Sensibilidad (Sensibility)” ha sido un término destacado por algunos crı́ticos, para denominar una época entre la Era Augusta y el movimiento romántico. La Sensibilidad (Sensibility) estuvo unida a un sentido de la compasión producida por el sufrimiento del otro. Su máxima expresión fue la “novela sentimental” de Richardson y Sterne. David Hume, con una moral fundada en los conceptos de simpatı́a y benevolencia, ha sido considerado como uno de los artı́fices de esta Cultura. Sin embargo, llevó (...)
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  7. The Standard of Taste in David Hume’s Philosophy.Li Shuren - 2019 - Yearbook for Eastern and Western Philosophy 2018 (3):184-192.
    Hume is perhaps the most skeptical of all the great philosophers; and so it might reasonably have been assumed that he would have doubted the existence of a standard of taste in an area of human activity, the arts, where very many people, not ordinarily considered of a skeptical turn of mind, have doubted the existence of any standard according to his 1757 essay Of the Standard of Taste.
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  8. David Hume in To the Lighthouse.Justin W. Keena - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):376-393.
    Imagine a reader expert in the scholarship on To the Lighthouse and yet ignorant of the novel itself. What would such a person, when finally sitting down to read it for the first time, know—or think they know—about its relationship to philosophy? Based solely on the reams of articles, book chapters, and monographs that place the novel in dialogue with one or more philosophers, the first-time reader of To the Lighthouse would predict with confidence and precision which thinkers are most (...)
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  9. From Hume’s “Delicacy” to Contemporary Art.Anne Sejten - 2018 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 26 (54).
    David Hume’s essay “Of the Standard of Taste” —which represents a major step towards clarifying eighteenth-century philosophy’s dawning aesthetics in terms of taste—also relates closely to literal, physical taste. From the analogy between gustatory and critical taste, Hume, apt at judging works of art, puts together a contradictory argument of subjectivism and the normativity of common sense. However, a careful reading of the text unveils a way of appealing to art criticism as a vital component in edifying a philosophically more (...)
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  10. Eighteenth Century British Aesthetics.James Shelley - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    18th-century British aesthetics addressed itself to a variety of questions: What is taste? What is beauty? Is there is a standard of taste and of beauty? What is the relation between the beauty of nature and that of artistic representation? What is the relation between one fine art and another? How ought the fine arts be ranked one against another? What is the nature of the sublime and ought it be ranked with the beautiful? What is the nature of genius (...)
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  11. Hume, Halos, and Rough Heroes: Moral and Aesthetic Defects in Works of Fiction.E. M. Dadlez - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):91-102.
    The starting point of this paper is a recent exchange in the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism1 that pits moderate moralism against robust immoralism and has Humean antecedents. I will proceed by agreeing in part with both, but fully with neither, thereby annoying as many people as possible in one go. I believe, with Anne Eaton, the proponent of robust immoralism, that fictions which valorize what she calls "rough heroes" can arouse both aesthetically compelling and morally troubling reactions. On (...)
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  12. El nacimiento de la estética moderna: D. Hume y A.G. Baumgarten. La estética como ciencia del conocimiento sensitivo / The birth of modern aesthetics. Aesthetics as the science of sensitive knowledge: D. Hume and A.G. Baumgarten. [REVIEW]Paula Lizarraga Gutiérrez - 2017 - Cauriensia 12:491-512.
    En este artículo se plantea el nacimiento de la Estética moderna a partir de la tradición filosófica empirista y racionalista. Se analizan sus aportes al campo de la Estética como disciplinas filosóficas, sus aciertos y sus errores, y se plantea una solución intermedia para elevar esta disciplina al ámbito científico que pasaría por un fundamento realista moderado que articulara el conocimiento sensible.
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  13. Hume's Narrow Circle Aesthetically Expanded.S. K. Wertz - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (4):1-4.
    How does aesthetic education begin and expand over time? David Hume’s idea of the narrow circle provides us with an answer when considering this question. He uses the narrow circle to explain how moral practices evolve, and by analogy, we can also use this conception to explain how aesthetic practices evolve. So I will first of all begin with a discussion of his essay “The Standard of Taste.”1 In this essay, Hume gives an excellent profile of the critic who has (...)
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  14. Hume by Don Garrett. [REVIEW]John Bricke - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (1):172-173.
    Don Garrett’s Hume constitutes a demanding introduction to the entirety of Hume’s philosophy as articulated in the Treatise, the two Enquiries, and the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. Its goal is to provide a clear representation of the problems Hume addresses, the solutions he provides to those problems, and the arguments he constructs in so doing. Achieving its three goals remarkably well, Garrett’s Hume provides what, in my judgment, is the very best introduction to Hume’s philosophy available. It will be an (...)
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  15. A Humean Approach to the Problem of Disgust and Aesthetic Appreciation.Eva M. Dadlez - 2016 - Essays in Philosophy 17 (1):55-67.
    Carolyn Korsmeyer has offered some compelling arguments for the role of disgust in aesthetic appreciation. In the course of this project, she considers and holds up for justifiable criticism the account of emotional conversion proposed by David Hume in “Of Tragedy”. I will consider variant interpretations of Humean conversion and pinpoint a proposal that may afford an explanation of the ways in which aesthetic absorption can depend on and be intensified by the emotion of disgust.
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  16. Sobre la imaginación y la fantasía en el pensamiento de Hume.Mario Edmundo Chávez Tortolero - 2016 - In Imaginación y conocimiento. De Descartes a Freud. México: Corinter/Gedisa. pp. 51-62.
  17. David Hume sobre los valores estéticos. Hacia una interpretación objetivista.Agustín Arrieta Urtizberea - 2016 - Agora 35 (1).
    Partiendo de la descripción subjetivista que Noël Carroll hace de las ideas estéticas de David Hume en On Criticism, propongo una interpretación objetivista de las mismas. Para ello, muestro que hay cierta confusión en la obra del filósofo escocés cuando vincula los valores estéticos con las cualidades secundarias lockeanas. Creemos que esa vinculación requiere de cierto esclarecimiento. Para ello me apoyo en distinciones ya clásicas propuestas por Kripke. A partir de ahí, muestro que Hume es más objetivista de lo que (...)
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  18. Educating Sentiment: Hume's Contribution to the Philosophy of the Curriculum Regarding the Teaching of Art.Dorit Barchana-Lorand - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (1):107-128.
    From the perspective of art education, the worst-case philosophical scenario is the hedonist-subjectivist account of art. If we measure art by the pleasure we gain from it, it may seem senseless to attempt teaching the reception of art. David Hume's ‘Of the Standard of Taste’ provides an argument for the art-education enthusiast, explaining that—even on a subjectivist account—art education crystallises our own preferences. While I refer to a historical debate and provide a close reading of an 18th-century essay, my goal (...)
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  19. Re-Placing Hume. [REVIEW]Jon K. Burmeister - 2015 - Research in Phenomenology 45 (1):161-167.
  20. Shelley on Hume's Standard of Taste and the Impossibility of Sound Disagreement Among the Ideal Critics.Víctor Durà-vilà - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (3):341-345.
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  21. When True Judges Differ: Reply to Durà‐Vilà.James Shelley - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (3):345-348.
    I defend my reading of Hume's "Of the Standard of Taste" against objections raised by Victor Durà‐Vilà. Two points are central to my defense. One is that Hume takes the joint verdict of true judges to indicate, rather than constitute, the standard of beauty. Two is that Hume requires a joint verdict because individual verdicts need not be expressive of human nature.
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  22. “Hume Sweet Hume”: Skepticism, Idealism, and Burial in Finnegans Wake.Richard Barlow - 2014 - Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):266-275.
    What is the relationship between the Irish modernist writings of James Joyce and the Scottish empirical philosophy of David Hume? Here I discuss Joyce’s conception of Hume as a philosopher and explore the presence of Hume’s work in Joyce’s final masterpiece, Finnegans Wake. How then did Joyce conceive of Hume’s thought, and to what extent did he engage with it? Well, in his lecture “Realism and Idealism in English Literature,” given at Trieste in 1912, Joyce denounces the interest in the (...)
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  23. Book Review: Extended Sentiments and Enlarged Interests: Hume’s Politics The Politics of Eloquence: David Hume’s Polite Rhetoric, by Marc Hanvelt and Hume’s Politics: Coordination and Crisis in the History of England, by Andrew SablThe Politics of Eloquence: David Hume’s Polite Rhetoric, by HanveltMarc. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2012.Hume’s Politics: Coordination and Crisis in the History of England, by SablAndrew. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2012. [REVIEW]Ross Carroll - 2014 - Political Theory 42 (3):377-384.
  24. What Can Hume Teach Us About Film Evaluation.Robert R. Clewis - 2014 - Aisthema 1 (2):1-22.
    This article identifies three distinct temporal notions in Hume’s aesthetics: passing the test of time, repeated viewing of a work, and the personal aging of the critic. It applies these ideas to the evaluation and enjoyment of films. It characterizes positive, negative, and ambivalent film aging, which are associated with nostalgia, boredom, and comic amusement, respectively, and which bear on our enjoyment, not evaluation, of film. The paper discusses Allen’s Zelig, Antonioni’s La Notte, Cameron’s The Terminator, Lucas’s Star Wars, Scorsese’s (...)
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  25. Courage in Art Appreciation: A Humean Perspective.V. Dura-Vila - 2014 - British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (1):77-95.
    In this article I argue that a high capacity for courage, in the sense of the strength of character that enables one to face distress, angst or psychological pain, is required of Hume’s ideal critics just as the other well-known five characteristics are. I also explore the implications of my proposal for several aspects of Hume’s aesthetics, including the one brought into relief by Shelley’s interpretation of Hume along the lines of distinguishing between the perceptual and affective stages in aesthetic (...)
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  26. Hume.Don Garrett - 2014 - Routledge.
    Beginning with an overview of Hume's life and work, Don Garrett introduces in clear and accessible style the central aspects of Hume's thought. These include Hume's lifelong exploration of the human mind; his theories of inductive inference and causation; skepticism and personal identity; moral and political philosophy; aesthetics; and philosophy of religion. The final chapter considers the influence and legacy of Hume's thought today. Throughout, Garrett draws on and explains many of Hume's central works, including his Treatise of Human Nature (...)
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  27. Reading Hume’s ‘Of the Standard of Taste’: Taking Hume Seriously.Ka Wing Kwok - 2014 - Dissertation, Lingnan University
    This thesis presents an interpretation of David Hume’s essay ‘Of the Standard of Taste’. The most distinguishing feature of this interpretation is the emphasis placed on the significance of Hume’s general philosophical position in a faithful reading of this philosophical classic. The success of this interpretation will show that Hume’s essay should be read as an integral part of his system of philosophy. There are three parts in this thesis. The first part is an overview of some key aspects of (...)
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  28. El pluralismo moral de David Hume.Agustin Arrieta & Agustin Vicente - 2013 - Critica 45 (134):17-42.
    In this paper, we argue for an objectivist pluralist interpretation of Hume’s moral philosophy. We begin by approaching the pluralist/relativist distinction in aesthetics. Then we move to ethics, and present some reasons which justify considering Hume a normative pluralist, and, in particular, an objectivist pluralist. Our argument will make use of Hume’s idea that there are foru sources of value, and of his notion of artificial lives/moralities.
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  29. Hume on Art Critics, Wise Men, and the Virtues of Taste.Tina Baceski - 2013 - Hume Studies 39 (2):233-256.
    In this paper I compare two models of expert judgment: the art critic in Hume’s “Of the Standard of Taste” and the “wise man” in “Of Miracles.” The art critic is a true judge of beauty because he has made himself into a person who is optimally receptive to beauty. He possesses the virtues of taste: “Strong sense, united to delicate sentiment, improved by practice, perfected by comparison, and cleared of all prejudice”. But the virtues of the art critic, I (...)
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  30. On Standard and Taste. Wittgenstein and Aesthetic Judgment.Jean-Pierre Cometti - 2013 - Aisthesis: Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 6 (1):5-15.
    The question of aesthetic judgment is related to a lot of paradoxes that have marked sustainably the reflection on arts, and even arts as such during their modern history. These paradoxes have found a first formulation, apparently clear, in the very famous Hume's essay: "On the standard of taste", but without to lead to a real resolution. In this paper, I would like to approach the question of Hume by starting from what Wittgenstein suggested about aesthetic judgment in his Cambridge (...)
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  31. Not Moderately Moral: Why Hume Is Not a "Moderate Moralist".E. M. Dadlez & Jeanette Bicknell - 2013 - Philosophy and Literature 37 (2):330-342.
    If philosophers held popularity contests, David Hume would be a perennial winner. Witty, a bon vivant, and champion of reason over bigotry and superstition, it is not surprising that many contemporary thinkers want to recruit him as an ally or claim his views as precursors to their own. In the debate over the moral content of artworks and its possible relevance for artistic and aesthetic value, the group whose views are known variously as “ethicism,” “moralism,” or “moderate moralism” has claimed (...)
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  32. Hume and the Recreative Imagination.Fabian Dorsch - 2013 - Rivista di Estetica 53:25-54.
    Two particular approaches to the imagination as a recreative capacity have recently gained prominence: neo-Humeanism and simulationatism. According to neo-Humeanism, imaginings have cognitions as a constitutive part of their representational contents; while simulationalists maintain that, in imagining, we essentially simulate the occurrence of certain cognitive states. Two other kinds of constitutive dependence, that figure regularly in the debate, concern the necessity of cogni­tions for, respectively, the causation and the semantic power of imaginings. In what follows, I dis­cuss each of these (...)
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  33. David Hume: Essays and Treatises on Philosophical Subjects.L. Falkenstein & N. MacArthur - 2013 - Broadview Press.
    This is the first edition in over a century to present David Hume's Enquiry concerning Human Understanding, Dissertation on the Passions, Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals, and Natural History of Religion in the format he intended: collected together in a single volume. Hume has suffered a fate unusual among great philosophers. His principal philosophical work is no longer published in the form in which he intended it to be read. It has been divided into separate parts, only some of (...)
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  34. Essays and Treatises on Philosophical Subjects.Lorne Falkenstein & Neil McArthur (eds.) - 2013 - Broadview Press.
    This is the first edition in over a century to present David Hume’s _Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding_, _Dissertation on the Passions_, _Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals_, and _Natural History of Religion_ in the format he intended: collected together in a single volume. Hume has suffered a fate unusual among great philosophers. His principal philosophical work is no longer published in the form in which he intended it to be read. It has been divided into separate parts, only some of (...)
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  35. Hume and the Joint Verdict of True Judges.James Shelley - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (2):145-153.
    Malcolm Budd speaks for many when he locates the "principal weakness" of Hume's account of the standard of taste in Hume's "blithe optimism about the uniformity of response of his true judges of artistic value". I argue that Hume's optimism is not blithe. I argue, in particular, that it follows from Hume's definition of a true judge that true judges will never disagree, and that it follows from his appeal to the test of time that true judges will agree often (...)
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  36. Hume’s Aesthetic Move: The Legitimization of Sentiment.Dabney Townsend - 2013 - The European Legacy 18 (5):552-562.
    Hume consistently treats all of the passions, emotions, and feelings, so called, as sentiments in the tradition of Shaftesbury. Further, for Hume, sentiment is the epistemic basis of a disciplined form of thinking, and, as such, it implies both a moral and an aesthetic epistemology (though ?aesthetic? is anachronistic when applied to Hume). When sentiment is understood in this way, it becomes the primary evidence for knowledge. Properly disciplined, sentiment can play the role that clear and distinct ideas played for (...)
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  37. On Nietzsche's Judgment of Style and Hume's Quixotic Taste: On the Science of Aesthetics and "Playing" the Satyr.Babette Babich - 2012 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 43 (2):240-259.
    "Homer and Classical Philology," Nietzsche's 1869 inaugural lecture at the University of Basel, addresses not only the history of the Homer question as a problem but also raises the question of the discipline of classical philology as science . Thematically, Nietzsche's first lecture as a professor of classical philology focuses on the significance of style as such. In this meta-scholarly context, the issue of scholarly discernment is explored in terms of aesthetic judgment, as a judgment of taste, a focus Nietzsche (...)
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  38. Hume’s Aesthetic Standard.Elisa Galgut - 2012 - Hume Studies 38 (2):183-200.
    In his famous essay “Of the Standard of Taste,” Hume seeks to reconcile two conflicting intuitions—one affirming the subjectivity and variety of taste and the other acknowledging the existence of an artistic standard that is both based on taste and has stood the test of time—by postulating “ideal critics”1 who can serve as the arbiters of taste. However, because philosophers disagree about the role of the ideal critics themselves, instead of settling the matter, Hume’s attempt at reconciliation has created more (...)
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  39. Aesthetics: The Key Thinkers.Alessandro Giovannelli (ed.) - 2012 - Continuum.
    Offers a comprehensive historical overview of the field of aesthetics. Eighteen specially commissioned essays introduce and explore the contributions of those philosophers who have shaped the subject, from its origins in the work of the ancient Greeks to contemporary developments in the 21st Century. -/- The book reconstructs the history of aesthetics, clearly illustrating the most important attempts to address such crucial issues as the nature of aesthetic judgment, the status of art, and the place of the arts within society. (...)
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  40. David Hume.Alan Goldman - 2012 - In Aesthetics: The Key Thinkers. pp. 48-60.
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  41. The Temporality of Taste in Eighteenth-Century British Writing.James Noggle - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    This book discusses the disruptive power of the concept of taste in the works of a number of important British writers, including poets such as Alexander Pope and Joseph Warton, philosophical historians such as David Hume and Anna Barbauld, and novelists such as Frances Burney and William Beckford.
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  42. 'Of the Standard of Taste': Decisions, Rules and Critical Argument.M. W. Rowe - 2012 - In Alan Bailey & Dan O'Brien (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Hume. Continuum. pp. 349.
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  43. The Fiction of the Standard of Taste: David Hume on the Social Constitution of Beauty. Stradella - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (4):32-47.
    Originally published as one of the Four Dissertations and then included in the 1758 edition of the Essays, the 1757 paper “Of the Standard of Taste” qualifies as David Hume’s official contribution to criticism.1 A few exceptions aside, no real or thorough effort has been taken by its critics to place the essay in the overall context of Hume’s science of human nature.2 Hume has certainly his share of responsibility in this: “Most of these essays were wrote with a View (...)
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  44. Mocking Hume: Comments on J. W. Mock’s “Possible Influences by and Upon David Hume and the Writing ‘Of the Standard of Taste’”.Darian C. De Bolt - 2011 - Southwest Philosophy Review 27 (2):33-36.
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  45. A Treatise of Human Nature: Volume 1: Texts.David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press UK.
    David and Mary Norton present the definitive scholarly edition of one of the greatest philosophical works ever written. This first volume contains the critical text of David Hume's Treatise of Human Nature, followed by the shortin which Hume set out the key arguments of the larger work; the volume concludes with A Letter from a Gentleman to his Friend in Edinburgh, Hume's defence of the Treatise when it was under attack from ministers seeking to prevent Hume's appointment as Professor of (...)
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  46. Delicacy in Hume's Theory of Taste.Theodore Gracyk - 2011 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (1):1-16.
    David Hume's celebrated essay ‘‘Of the Standard of Taste’’ is the central text for understanding Hume's aesthetic theory, yet an important claim in that essay has received inadequate attention in the literature. Although it is understood that Hume stresses the importance of delicacy of taste, it is less well understood that this delicacy is a delicacy of imagination, which is distinct from a delicacy of perception. Using both the essay and other texts to elucidate this thesis, it appears that Hume's (...)
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  47. Remarks on the Varieties of Prejudice in Hume's Essay on Taste.Peter Kivy - 2011 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (1):111-114.
    The last of Hume's five requirements of the ‘‘true judge in the finer arts’’, is that he be ‘‘cleared of all prejudice……'. I argue here that, lurking in this innocuous-sounding requirement of the true judge, is a complexity that reveals a significant tension in Hume's argument. It is that tension that I want briefly to explore.
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  48. Mixed Feelings, Mixed Metaphors: Hume On Tragic Pleasure: Articles.Amyas Merivale - 2011 - British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (3):259-269.
    The principle with which Hume accounts for the seemingly unaccountable pleasure that we take in tragic drama is placed in its theoretical context, and the various metaphors that Hume uses in describing this principle are examined. These metaphors are then brought to bear on an interpretative controversy concerning the result of Hume's principle for the subordinate passion. It is argued that, while Hume's considered position should have been that this passion is destroyed at the end of the process, it is (...)
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  49. Possible Influences by and Upon David Hume and the Writing “Of the Standard of Taste”.James W. Mock - 2011 - Southwest Philosophy Review 27 (1):83-91.
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  50. Humean Aesthetics and the Rhetorical Public Sphere.David Randall - 2011 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2011 (157):148-163.
    ExcerptIn The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, the following quotation from Kant, cited in part here, underpinned Habermas's conception of the public sphere as derived from the discourse of reason: [T]he judgments of every understanding must be in agreement (consentientia uni tertio, consentiunt inter se). Thus, whether assent is conviction or mere persuasion, its touchstone externally is the possibility of communicating assent and of finding it to be valid for every human being's reason.1 This quotation included the word “judgment” (...)
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