About this topic
Summary

The subsection contains works on Hume in relation to a variety of other philosophers such as Aristotle, Bayle, Berkeley, Butler, Derrida, Husserl, Hutcheson, Kant, Locke, Malebranche and Reid.   

Related categories

1544 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 1544
  1. added 2020-05-22
    Hume = Small Hume.Jeffrey Ketland - 2002 - Analysis 62 (1):92–93.
    We can modify Hume’s Principle in the same manner that George Boolos suggested for modifying Frege’s Basic Law V. This leads to the principle Small Hume. Then, we can show that Small Hume is interderivable with Hume’s Principle.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. added 2020-02-12
    Hume, Newton, and the Design Argument.Wallace I. Matson - 1966 - Journal of Philosophy 63 (6):161-166.
  3. added 2020-02-12
    A History of Philosophy. Vol. V: Hobbes to Hume. By Frederick Copleston S.J. (London: Burns Oates and Washbourne. Pp. 413. Price 30s.).C. H. Whiteley - 1960 - Philosophy 35 (133):172-173.
  4. added 2020-02-11
    Learning From Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2002 - Mind 111 (442):367-373.
  5. added 2020-02-11
    Virtue by Consensus: The Moral Philosophy of Hutcheson, Hume and Adam Smith.Paul Russell - 1991 - Ethics 101 (4):873-875.
  6. added 2019-12-08
    Kant and the Scottish Enlightenment Ed. By Elizabeth Robinson and Chris W. Suprenant.Peter Thielke - 2019 - Hume Studies 42 (1):252-254.
    Given Kant's seemingly dismissive attitude toward Scottish philosophers of common sense—in the Prolegomena, he famously describes how painful it is to see them miss Hume's point—one might expect that a book titled Kant and the Scottish Enlightenment would be a rather slim volume. However, as Manfred Kuehn in Scottish Common Sense in Germany and elsewhere has made abundantly clear, Scottish philosophy played a large role in eighteenth-century Germany, and was a significant influence on Kant. The present volume, which stands as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. added 2019-12-08
    Mencius, Hume, and the Virtue of Humanity: Sources of Benevolent Moral Development.Jeremiah Carey & Rico Vitz - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-21.
    In this paper, we elucidate the moral psychology and what we might call the moral sociology of Mencius and of Hume, and we argue for three claims. First, we demonstrate that there are strong similarities between Mencius and Hume concerning some of the principal psychological sources of the virtue of humanity. Second, we show that there are strong similarities between the two concerning some of the principal social sources of the virtue of humanity. Third, we argue that there are related, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. added 2019-12-08
    The Opinion of Mankind: Sociability and the Theory of the State From Hobbes to Smith by Paul Sagar.Danielle Charette - 2019 - Hume Studies 42 (1):248-251.
    Paul Sagar's The Opinion of Mankind serves as an excellent synthesis of the topics of sociability and sovereignty in the history of modern political thought. The main thrust of the book is to marshal David Hume's and Adam Smith's resources as first-rate philosophers on behalf of a first-rate political theory. According to Sagar, Hume's and Smith's rich accounts of human sociability, sentiment, and historical contingency provide the foundations for what Sagar calls "the state without sovereignty". By this, he means that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. added 2019-12-08
    Scepticism and Literature: An Essay on Pope, Hume, Sterne, and Johnson. [REVIEW]B. O. X. M. A. - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (1):204-207.
    To carry on reasoning in the face of the implications of skepticism is what Fred Parker calls “sceptical thinking.” Not to be confused with the engineered vacillation leading to a tranquillizing suspense of judgement, it involves the double perspective of someone conducting a life, believing and reasoning as we do, while acutely aware that the whole endeavor is, in a sense, untenable. If, as Sir Philip Sidney famously said, an imaginative writer “nothing affirms, and therefore never lieth,” then the dilemma (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. added 2019-12-08
    Hume and Berkeley in the Prussian Academy: Louis Frédéric Ancillon’s “Dialogue Between Berkeley and Hume” of 1796.J. C. Laursen S. Charles - 2001 - Hume Studies 27 (1):85-98.
    Louis Frédéric Ancillon was a member of the Prussian Academy of Sciences and Belles Lettres whose imagined dialogue between Berkeley and Hume was read to the Academy in 1796 and published in 1799. It is important as an indicator of the reception of Hume and Berkeley in francophone philosophical circles in late eighteenth-century Prussia. Our introduction is followed by an English translation with notes.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. added 2019-12-06
    Protestantism and Liberty: Catharine Macaulay’s Politics of Religion as a Response to David Hume.Lucy Littlefield - forthcoming - Intellectual History Review:1-20.
  12. added 2019-12-06
    Sovereign Sentiments: Conceptions of Self-Control in David Hume, Adam Smith, and Jane Austen.Lauren Kopajtic - 2017 - Dissertation, Harvard University
    The mention of “self-control” calls up certain stock images: Saint Augustine struggling to renounce carnal pleasures; dispassionate Mr. Spock of Star Trek; the dieter faced with tempting desserts. In these stock images reason is almost always assigned the power and authority to govern passions, desires, and appetites. But what if the passions were given the power to rule—what if, instead of sovereign reason, there were sovereign sentiments? My dissertation examines three sentimentalist conceptions of self-control: David Hume’s conception of “strength of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. added 2019-06-07
    Falsi E Cortesi. Pregiudizi, Stereotipi E Caratteri Nazionali in Montesquieu, Hume E Algarotti. [REVIEW]Cesare Cuttica - 2003 - History of European Ideas 29 (4):489-493.
  14. added 2019-06-07
    Ezequiel Del Olaso, "Escepticismo E Ilustración. La Crisis Pirrónica de Hume y Rousseau". [REVIEW]Antonina M. Alberti - 1985 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 23 (4):589.
  15. added 2019-06-06
    Slaves of the Passions. [REVIEW]Melissa Barry - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (2):225-228.
    In Slaves of the Passions, Mark Schroeder provides a systematic, rigorously argued defense of a Humean theory of reasons for action, taking pains to respond to influential objections to the view. While inspired by Hume, Schroeder makes it clear that he aims to develop a Humean theory, not necessarily one that Hume himself embraced, and for this reason little is said about Hume in the book. One respect in which Schroeder takes himself to be departing from Hume is in developing (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  16. added 2019-06-06
    Simpatia e sociabilidade no pensamento de Hume.Fernão de Oliveira Salles - 2010 - Doispontos 7 (2).
    O objetivo deste texto é, primeiramente, expor os contornos gerais as críticas de David Hume ao que o filósofo escocês chamou epicurismo moderno. Trata-se das filosofias de Hobbes e de seus supostos epígonos, que, aos olhos de Hume, elegeram o amor próprio como origem fundamental de nossas ações e juízos. Num segundo momento, trata-se de delinear o lugar central do conceito de simpatia nesta crítica, bem como na constituição da moral humeana.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. added 2019-06-06
    Simpatia e sociabilidade no pensamento de Hume.Fernão de Oliveira Salles - 2010 - Dois Pontos 7 (2).
    O objetivo deste texto é, primeiramente, expor os contornos gerais as críticas de David Hume ao que o filósofo escocês chamou epicurismo moderno. Trata-se das filosofias de Hobbes e de seus supostos epígonos, que, aos olhos de Hume, elegeram o amor próprio como origem fundamental de nossas ações e juízos. Num segundo momento, trata-se de delinear o lugar central do conceito de simpatia nesta crítica, bem como na constituição da moral humeana.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. added 2019-06-06
    Knowledge, Reason and Taste: Kant's Response to Hume.Andy Hamilton - 2010 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):737-739.
  19. added 2019-06-06
    Review Essay: Paul Guyer's, Knowledge, Reason, and Taste: Kant's Response to Hume. [REVIEW]Corey W. Dyck - 2009 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (5):613-619.
  20. added 2019-06-06
    Of Hobbes and Hume: A Review of Paul Russell, the Riddle of Hume's Treatise: Skepticism, Naturalism and Irreligion 1. [REVIEW]James A. Harris - 2009 - Philosophical Books 50 (1):38-46.
  21. added 2019-06-06
    Sextus, Montaigne, Hume: Exercises in Skeptical Cartography.Brian Ribeiro - 2009 - Modern Schoolman 86 (1):7-34.
    Despite their divergences, I argue that Sextus, Montaigne, and Hume are committed to several substantive points of commonality and that these commonalities justify us in speaking of them as belonging to a unitary Pyrrhonist tradition. In this tradition, Pyrrhonizing doubt serves to chart the boundary of that-which-resists-doubt, thereby simultaneously charting the shape of that complex of nature and custom which constitutes the bedrock of human life — the life that remains after doubt has done its worst.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. added 2019-06-06
    Hume, Malebranche and ‘Rationalism’: P. J. E. Kail.P. J. E. Kail - 2008 - Philosophy 83 (3):311-332.
    Traditionally Hume is seen as offering an ‘empiricist’ critique of ‘rationalism’. This view is often illustrated – or rejected – by comparing Hume's views with those of Descartes'. However the textual evidence shows that Hume's most sustained engagement with a canonical ‘rationalist’ is with Nicolas Malebranche. The author shows that the fundamental differences between the two on the self and causal power do indeed rest on a principled distinction between ‘rationalism’ and ‘empiricism’, and that there is some truth in the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  23. added 2019-06-06
    Review of The Existence of God: Mulla Sadra's Seddiqin Argument Versus Criticisms of Kant and Hume, by Hamidreza Ayatollahy. [REVIEW]Nazif Muhtaroğlu - 2008 - Philosophy East and West 58 (2):283-285.
  24. added 2019-06-06
    “Whatever Begins to Be Must Have a Cause of Existence”: Hume’s Analysis and Kant's Response.Henry E. Allison - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):525-546.
  25. added 2019-06-06
    Her Conclusions—With Which He Is in Love: Why Hume Would Fancy Anscombe: Articles.Margaret Watkins - 2008 - Christian Bioethics 14 (2):175-186.
    Elizabeth Anscombe tangos with Hume in the middle of her march toward the three theses of "Modern Moral Philosophy" that we should abandon moral philosophy "until we have an adequate philosophy of psychology"; that the concepts of moral obligation and moral duty, of what is morally right and wrong, and of the moral sense of 'ought' "ought to be jettisoned if this is psychologically possible;" and that "the differences between the well-known English writers on moral philosophy from Sidgwick to the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. added 2019-06-06
    Humean and Kantian Influences on Husserl’s Later Ethics.Christopher Arroyo - 2006 - Philosophy Today 50 (Supplement):57-74.
  27. added 2019-06-06
    Carnap and Quine: Twentieth-Century Echoes of Kant and Hume.Michael Friedman - 2006 - Philosophical Topics 34 (1/2):35-58.
  28. added 2019-06-06
    Charting the Road of Inquiry: Deleuze’s Humean Pragmatics and the Challenge of Badiou.Jeffrey Bell - 2006 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (3):399-425.
    This essay responds to Badiou’s charge that Deleuze fails to set forth a philosophy that is “beyond categorical oppositions.” It is argued that this criticism of Deleuze is founded upon a misreading of the Deleuzean distinction between the virtual and the actual, a reading that carries forward Badiou’s misreading of Spinoza and, hence, of Deleuze’s Spinozism. With this corrected, we show how the virtualactual distinction operates within the experimental philosophy, or pragmatics, that Deleuze, and later Deleuze and Guattari, sets forth. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  29. added 2019-06-06
    Hume and Rawls on the Circumstances and Priority of Justice: This Article Addresses a Historical Puzzle That Arises From Sandel's Critique of Rawls's Use of Hume's 'Circumstances of Justice', and a Related Philosophical Puzzle About the Priority of Justice Over Other Values. Sandel Questioned Whether a Remedy for Selfishness Could Be the First Virtue. Yet, as Rawls Understood, Hume's Theory Gave Justice Priority Over Other Personal Virtues, and Was Not Incompatible with Rawls's Claim That Justice Was the First Virtue of Institutions. Rawls Was Mistaken, However, to Think That There Was Room for Moral Disagreement Within a Humean Account of the Circumstances of Justice. Sandel Turns Out to Have Been Right That There Was a Problem in Rawls's Account of the Circumstances and Priority of Justice, but Wrong About What This Problem Was. Justice Can Come First, in Humean Circumstances, but in the Partly Non-Humean Circumstances Rawls Described, Agreeing to Put Justice First is a Form of Moral. [REVIEW]Lister Andrew - 2005 - History of Political Thought 26 (4):664-695.
    This article addresses a historical puzzle that arises from Sandel's critique of Rawls's use of Hume's 'circumstances of justice', and a related philosophical puzzle about the priority of justice over other values. Sandel questioned whether a remedy for selfishness could be the first virtue. Yet, as Rawls understood, Hume's theory gave justice priority over other personal virtues, and was not incompatible with Rawls's claim that justice was the first virtue of institutions. Rawls was mistaken, however, to think that there was (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. added 2019-06-06
    Psychologism and Cognitive Theory in Hume and Kant: A Response to Kitcher.Claudia M. Schmidt - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (4):621-641.
  31. added 2019-06-06
    Walking the Tightrope of Reason: The Precarious Life of a Rational Animal. [REVIEW]Ira Singer - 2005 - Hume Studies 31 (1):169-172.
    This lively little book — 170 small-format pages, excluding front and end matter — has its origin in the author’s 1995 Romanell-Phi Beta Kappa lectures at Dartmouth College. Consistent with this origin, it speaks primarily to a general audience rather than to philosophical specialists. Nevertheless, even specialist readers will find Walking the Tightrope of Reason valuable. It revisits figures and issues that have long and productively occupied Fogelin, and here we see his thoughts about these figures and issues clearly and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. added 2019-06-06
    Sympathy and Approbation in Hume and Smith: A Solution to the Other Rational Species Problem 1.David M. Levy & Sandra J. Peart - 2004 - Economics and Philosophy 20 (2):331-349.
    David Hume's sympathetic principle applies to physical equals. In his account, we sympathize with those like us. By contrast, Adam Smith's sympathetic principle induces equality. We consider Hume's “other rational species” problem to see whether Smith's wider sympathetic principle would alter Hume's conclusion that “superior” beings will enslave “inferior” beings. We show that Smith introduces the notion of “generosity,” which functions as if it were Hume's justice even when there is no possibility of contract.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  33. added 2019-06-06
    The Cambridge Companion to the Scottish Enlightenment.Alexander Broadie (ed.) - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge Companion to the Scottish Enlightenment offers a philosophical perspective on an eighteenth-century movement that has been profoundly influential on western culture. A distinguished team of contributors examines the writings of David Hume, Adam Smith, Thomas Reid, Adam Ferguson, Colin Maclaurin and other Scottish thinkers, in fields including philosophy, natural theology, economics, anthropology, natural science and law. In addition, the contributors relate the Scottish Enlightenment to its historical context and assess its impact and legacy in Europe, America and beyond. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34. added 2019-06-06
    Thomas Reid and the Problem of Induction: From Common Experience to Common Sense.Benjamin W. Redekop - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (1):35-57.
    By the middle of the eighteenth century the new science had challenged the intellectual primacy of common experience in favor of recondite, expert and even counter-intuitive knowledge increasingly mediated by specialized instruments. Meanwhile modern philosophy had also problematized the perceptions of common experience — in the case of David Hume this included our perception of causal relations in nature, a fundamental precondition of scientific endeavor.In this article I argue that, in responding to the ‘problem of induction’ as advanced by Hume, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. added 2019-06-06
    The Significance for Psychology of Bradley’s Humean View of the Self.Fred Wilson - 1999 - Bradley Studies 5 (1):5-44.
    James Mark Baldwin was one of the leaders in the new experimental psychology that developed at the end of the 19th century. In a discussion of F. H. Bradley’s view of the self, he makes an apparently odd remark. Baldwin describes Bradley’s account of the active self, the self of volition and desire. In particular, he refers to Bradley’s account of the feeling of self activity. On the latter, certain contents defining the ‘I’ remain constant, while there is change in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. added 2019-06-06
    Hume, Berlin y la Búsqueda de Un Horizonte Humano Común.José Panea - 1999 - Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 22 (1):177-200.
  37. added 2019-06-06
    The Invention of Autonomy. [REVIEW]John Marshall - 1999 - Hume Studies 25 (1/2):207-224.
    In J. B. Schneewind's The Invention of Autonomy we are given a monumental history of moral philosophy of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, a history more comprehensive and richer in detail than one would have thought possible in a single volume. Though the daunting erudition, agreeably unobtrusive, inspires confidence, it is Schneewind's gift of narrative that makes his book such a pleasure and his story so compelling. Schneewind originally conceived the book, he tells us, to "broaden our historical comprehension of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. added 2019-06-06
    Hume, Popper: el conocimiento de las determinaciones del objeto.Juan Antonio Valor Yébenes - 1997 - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España] 31 (1):41-72.
    In this paper I try to explain why Husserl did not continue with the philosophical program of the Third Logical Investigation. I suggest to carry on with this program, that could be named “absolute objectivism”, as an empiricist alternative to transcendental philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. added 2019-06-06
    "Magic Buffalo" and Berkeley's Theory of Vision: Learning in Society.David M. Levy - 1993 - Hume Studies 19 (1):223-226.
  40. added 2019-06-06
    Peter Jones, Ed., "The "Science of Man" in the Scottish Enlightenment: Hume, Reid, and Their Contemporaries". [REVIEW]Mark H. Waymack - 1992 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (2):307.
  41. added 2019-06-06
    Changing the Name of the Game: Kant’s Cognitivism Versus Hume’s Psychologism.Patricia Kitcher - 1991 - Philosophical Topics 19 (1):201-236.
  42. added 2019-06-06
    V. M. Hope, "Virtue by Consensus: The Moral Philosophy of Hutcheson, Hume, and Adam Smith". [REVIEW]Marie Martin - 1991 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (2):314.
  43. added 2019-06-06
    Sense, Reason and Causality in Hume and Kant.A. T. Nuyen - 1990 - Société Française de Philosophie, Bulletin 81 (1):57.
    It is argued that Hume has two notions of causation, one psychological and the other philosophical. Kant's criticism of Hume overlooks the fact that Hume's scepticism is directed only at the latter. At the psychological level, Hume could have accepted Kant's argument without abandoning his own account of causation. The real difference between Hume and Kant is that Hume is not and Kant is concerned with the conditions for the possibility of sense experience. Hume is concerned only with the philosophical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44. added 2019-06-06
    Naturnotwendigkeit und Freiheit. Zu Kants Theorie der Kausalität als Antwort auf Hume.Bernhard Rang - 1990 - Société Française de Philosophie, Bulletin 81 (1):24.
  45. added 2019-06-06
    ‘Utility’ and the ‘Utility Principle’: Hume, Smith, Bentham, Mill.Douglas G. Long - 1990 - Utilitas 2 (1):12-39.
    David Hume, Adam Smith, Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill are often viewed as contributors to or participants in a common tradition of thought roughly characterized as ‘the liberal tradition’ or the tradition of ‘bourgeois ideology’. This view, however useful it may be for polemical or proselytizing purposes, is in some important respects historiographically unsound. This is not to deny the importance of asking what twentieth-century liberals or conservatives might find in the works of, say, David Hume to support their (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  46. added 2019-06-06
    Human Nature and Historical Knowledge: Hume, Hegel and Vico.Leon Pompa - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents a study of the nature and conditions of historical knowledge, conducted through a study of the relevant theories of Hume, Hegel and Vico. It is usually thought that in order to establish historical facts, we have to have a theory of human nature to support our arguments. Hume, Hegel and Vico all subscribed to this view, and are therefore discussed in detail. Professor Pompa goes on to argue that there is in fact no way of discovering anything (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. added 2019-06-06
    M. Jamie Ferreira, "Scepticism and Reasonable Doubt. The British Naturalist Tradition in Wilkins, Hume, Reid and Newman". [REVIEW]Henry G. Van Leeuwen - 1989 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (2):312.
  48. added 2019-06-06
    John Richetti, "Philosophical Writing: Locke, Berkeley, Hume". [REVIEW]Richard W. F. Kroll - 1985 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 23 (3):437.
  49. added 2019-06-06
    Wolfgang Farr, Ed., "Hume Und Kant: Interpretation Und Diskussion". [REVIEW]Ralf Meerbote - 1984 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (3):375.
  50. added 2019-06-06
    From Descartes to Hume: Continental Metaphysics and the Development of Modern Philosophy. [REVIEW]Richard A. Watson - 1984 - International Studies in Philosophy 16 (3):98-99.
1 — 50 / 1544