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Summary This subsection contains work relating to Hume's life.
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  1. Aprendiendo de la experiencia. Una nueva mirada sobre la interpretación de Ayer del empirismo de Hume.Sofı́a Calvente - 2019 - Mutatis Mutandis: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 13.
    Nos proponemos abordar dos aspectos poco estudiados de la contribución de Alfred Ayer a la comprensión de la filosofı́a de Hume: su consideración acerca del carácter inferencial de la percepción y su propuesta de que la experiencia tiene carácter público. En primer lugar, analizaremos cómo se ha entendido la concepción humeana de la experiencia. Sostendremos que la interpretación de Ayer contribuye a modificar la concepción privada y atomista de experiencia que usualmente se le atribuye a Hume, al afirmar que para (...)
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  2. The Infidel and the Professor: David Hume, Adam Smith, and the Friendship That Shaped Modern Thought. By Dennis C. Rasmussen. Pp. Xiii, 316, Princeton/Woodstock, Princeton University Press, 2017, $24.95. [REVIEW]Patrick Madigan - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (2):321-322.
  3. "Loose Bits of Paper" and "Uncorrect Thoughts": Hume's Early Memoranda in Context.Emilio Mazza & Gianluca Mori - 2019 - Hume Studies 42 (1):9-60.
    What are the Early Memoranda?1 When were they written? What are their sources? What is their purpose and their relation to Hume's works? These questions, usually addressed separately, are in fact tightly interwoven: they require an articulated response that embraces them all. Our response could be summarised as follows: far from being current reading notes, or even less the exhaustive diary of Hume's intellectual experience, the Early Memoranda are most likely second-tier texts, or—as James Harris recently conjectured—"notes taken from notes."2 (...)
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  4. James A. Harris, Hume: An Intellectual Biography , Pp. Xiii + 621.Marc Hanvelt - 2018 - Utilitas 30 (2):237-241.
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  5. Critical Notice: James A Harris’ Hume: An Intellectual Biography, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.Anders Kraal - 2018 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 48 (1):129-141.
    James Harris’s new Hume biography offers, among other things, ‘a series of conjectures as to what Hume’s intentions were in writing in the particular ways that he did about human nature, politics, economics, history, and religion’. The biography is particularly novel with regard to Hume’s intentions when writing about religion, which, Harris argues, were rather benign. Harris fails to appreciate the full extent of the difficulties attaching to his series of conjectures, however.
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  6. The Composition, Reception, and Early Influence of Hume’s Essays and Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals.Mark G. Spencer - 2018 - In Andrew Valls & Angela Coventry (eds.), David Hume on Morals, Politics, and Society. Yale University Press. pp. 241-264.
  7. The Friendship Between Two Great Thinkers: David Hume and Adam Smith.Viorel Tutui - 2018 - Meta: Research in Hermeneutics, Phenomenology, and Practical Philosophy 10 (2):611-618.
  8. The Infidel and the Professor: David Hume, Adam Smith, and the Friendship That Shaped Modern Thought by Dennis C. Rasmussen.Richard J. Fry - 2017 - Hume Studies 43 (1):146-148.
    In reading biographies or accounts of figures with which one agrees and sympathizes, there is a tendency that needs to be avoided, that is, of over -identifying with the figures in question and of too closely mapping one's own life and aspirations onto them.As such, there is some risk involved for a person like me in reading about the friendship between David Hume and Adam Smith. Dennis C. Rasmussen's excellent new volume, The Infidel and the Professor: David Hume, Adam Smith, (...)
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  9. Hume: An Intellectual Biography. [REVIEW]John P. Wright - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (4):823-832.
    This is a review article discussing James Harris’s excellent study of David Hume’s full philosophical career including his epistemology, moral philosophy, politics, economics, religion, and history. Harris argues against a common view that in his later writings Hume is merely working out and developing the ideas of his Treatise of Human Nature. He even argues that Hume’s two Enquiries are substantially new works and not mere recasting of his youthful Treatise. Harris writes that philosophy for Hume is a ‘a style (...)
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  10. Humean Eyes ('One Particular Shade of Blue').Angela Coventry & Emilio Mazza - 2016 - Cogent Arts and Humanities 3 (1).
    Why do Humean eyes matter? The subject of David Hume’s eyes and face leads us into some unexpected curiosities connected with events in his life and written works. We outline the scholars’ propensity to describe the face of their favourite philosopher and spread upon it their personal reading of his life and writings. We ask questions about portraits, their resemblance to the original as a standard of beauty. We survey eighteenth-century physiognomy, and the humourous paradox of the “fat philosopher,” both (...)
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  11. James Harris, Hume: An Intellectual Biography.Wade L. Robison - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):137-151.
  12. Review of James Harris, Hume: An Intellectual Biography. [REVIEW]Paul Russell - 2016 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 1.
    James A. Harris's biography of David Hume is the first such study to appear since Ernest Mossner's The Life of David Hume (1954). Unlike Mossner, Harris aims to write a specifically "intellectual biography", one that gives "a complete picture of Hume's ideas" and "relates Hume's works to the circumstances in which they were conceived and written" (vii). Harris's study turns on four central theses or claims about the character of Hume's thought and how it is structured and developed. The claims (...)
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  13. Hume: An Intellectual Biography.James A. Harris - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first book to provide a comprehensive overview of the entire career of one of Britain's greatest men of letters. It sets in biographical and historical context all of Hume's works, from A Treatise of Human Nature to The History of England, bringing to light the major influences on the course of Hume's intellectual development, and paying careful attention to the differences between the wide variety of literary genres with which Hume experimented. The major events in Hume's life (...)
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  14. Sympathy and Affectuum Imitatio: Spinoza and Hume as Social and Political Psychologists.Rudmer Bijlsma - 2014 - South African Journal of Philosophy 33 (1):1-18.
    This paper starts from the premise that Spinoza and Hume share a realisticnaturalistic approach to human nature. Human beings are finite parts of nature, and as such strongly interdependent creatures. This interdependence is reflected in the central social-psychological principles that Hume and Spinoza employ, respectively sympathy and affectuum imitatio. Both principles show the immediacy of the communication of passions, and the strong influence that other people’s passions exert over our own affective lives. Central to this paper are an analysis and (...)
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  15. Humean Moral Pluralism.Michael B. Gill - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Michael B. Gill offers a new account of Humean moral pluralism: the view that there are different moral reasons for action, which are based on human sentiments. He explores its historical origins, and argues that it offers the most compelling view of our moral experience. Together, pluralism and Humeanism make a philosophically powerful couple.
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  16. Hume A-Dying: Notes From Boswell.Christopher Norris - 2014 - Philosophy Pathways 186 (1).
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  17. Hume’s Damage Control.Annette C. Baier - 2012 - The Philosophers' Magazine 56:87-89.
    We want to know about philosophers’ lives in part to see how they applied their philosophy to their own lives. Plato’s account of Socrates’ life, trial, and death sets a great example here, perhaps never equalled, just as few philosophers equal Socrates in integrity and courage.
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  18. Hume’s Damage Control.Annette C. Baier - 2012 - The Philosophers' Magazine 56 (56):87-89.
    We want to know about philosophers’ lives in part to see how they applied their philosophy to their own lives. Plato’s account of Socrates’ life, trial, and death sets a great example here, perhaps never equalled, just as few philosophers equal Socrates in integrity and courage.
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  19. David Hume–a Timeline.A. Bailey & D. O'Brien - 2012 - In Alan Bailey & Dan O'Brien (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Hume. Continuum.
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  20. Hume's Life, Intellectual Context and Reception.Emilio Mazza - 2012 - In Alan Bailey & Dan O'Brien (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Hume. Continuum. pp. 20.
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  21. The Pursuits of Philosophy: An Introduction to the Life and Thought of David Hume.Annette Baier - 2011 - Harvard University Press.
    Childhood and youth: loss of faith and a passion for literature -- "At a distance from relations": writing his treatise in France -- Hume after the treatise -- Hume as librarian and historian -- Hume's life as a man in the public eye -- Hume's final years in Edinburgh -- Death and character.
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  22. Zaretsky, Robert & Scott, John: La querella de los filósofos. Rousseau, Hume y los límites del entendimiento humano. Barcelona, 2009. [REVIEW]María Cintia Caram - 2011 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 52:219-220.
  23. David Hume at 300.Howard Darmstadter - 2011 - Philosophy Now 83:6-9.
    A general introduction to the philosophy of David Hume.
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  24. Finding Inspiration in Hume.Peter Millican - 2011 - The Philosophers' Magazine 54:69-74.
    As time moves on, both our philosophical language and our conceptual frameworks evolve, since they are highly abstract and not closely tethered to the relatively solid ground of ordinary life. So to understand Hume’s thinking, it becomes necessary to “translate” what he says into categories increasingly different from his own.
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  25. Hume's Reading of the Classics at Ninewells, 1749–51.Moritz Baumstark - 2010 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (1):63-77.
    This article provides a re-evaluation of David Hume's intensive reading of the classics at an important moment of his literary and intellectual career. It sets out to reconstruct the extent and depth of this reading as well as the uses – scholarly, philosophical and polemical – to which Hume put the information he had gathered in the course of it. The article contends that Hume read the classics against the grain to collect data on a wide range of cultural information (...)
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  26. Review of Robert Zaretsky and John T. Scott THE PHILOSOPHERS’ QUARREL. [REVIEW]Paul Russell - 2010 - Times Literary Supplement 5616:29.
  27. “Waving Amouchoir À Lawilkes”: Hume, Radicalism and Thenorth Briton.Ben Dew - 2009 - Modern Intellectual History 6 (2):235-260.
    This article examines the use of David Hume's political writing by the extra-parliamentary opposition writers of the 1760s and early 1770s. The disturbances surrounding the publication of North Briton 45 and Wilkes's abortive attempts to become MP for Middlesex attracted a level of public support which was remarkable for its size, social diversity and ideological coherence. Hume, as is well known, reacted angrily to this growth in popular politics, condemning both the “mobs” that swept through London in the latter part (...)
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  28. On the Interpretation of Hume's Epistemology.João Monteiro - 2009 - Abstracta 5 (2):100-112.
    At the end of his life, Hume neglected his first work, and declared that he wished his readers to take into account only the later versions of his theories of the understanding, the passions and morals. This poses a special problem of interpretation: is there a difference between a "young Hume" and a "mature Hume", as in the case of Hegel, and several other thinkers? Is there in Hume's work anything comparable with the shift from the pre-critical to the critical (...)
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  29. Crito’s “Impartial Observations on a Late Dramatick Work,” From the Caledonian Mercury, No. 5456 , [2–3].M. A. Box - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (2):245-252.
    The following review by "Crito" was reproduced in shortened form in 1888 (Dibdin, Annals, 89-90) and is not now readily available. It is transcribed and edited here as illustrative of the events prompting David Hume's dedication to John Home of Four Dissertations in 1757. The possibility that Crito was in fact Hume deserves exploring, though the question remains speculative given the evidence available.The review appeared as a letter in the Caledonian Mercury and the Edinburgh Evening Courant, both on 18 December (...)
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  30. Hume: Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion: And Other Writings.Dorothy Coleman (ed.) - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    David Hume's Dialogues concerning Natural Religion, first published in 1779, is one of the most influential works in the philosophy of religion and the most artful instance of philosophical dialogue since the dialogues of Plato. It presents a fictional conversation between a sceptic, an orthodox Christian, and a Newtonian theist concerning evidence for the existence of an intelligent cause of nature based on observable features of the world. This edition presents it together with several of Hume's other, shorter writings about (...)
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  31. Editorial Material, Including, Historical Account of A Treatise of Human Nature From its Beginnings to the Time of Hume's Death.David Fate Norton - 2007 - In David Hume (ed.), A Treatise of Human Nature: A Critical Edition. Oxford University Press.
  32. Hume's "Life" and the Virtues of the Dying.Donald C. Ainslie - 2006 - In Thomas Mathien & D. G. Wright (eds.), Autobiography as Philosophy: The Philosophical Uses of Self-Presentation. Routledge.
  33. Hume’s Deathbed Reading.Annette C. Baier - 2006 - Hume Studies 32 (2):347-356.
    Adam Smith’s famous account of Hume’s death, in his letter to Strahan, included a reference to what Hume had been reading shortly before his death, Lucian’s “Dialogues of the Dead.” But when one reads those, one becomes puzzled by Smith’s report that Hume had been trying out excuses to delay death, for no such scene occurs in those Lucian dialogues. Fortunately Smith’s was not the only letter written about exactly what Lucian dialogue Hume was reading.
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  34. Hume's Intellectual Development, 1711-1752.M. A. Stewart - 2005 - In Marina Frasca-Spada & P. J. E. Kail (eds.), Impressions of Hume. Oxford University Press.
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  35. David Hume: Life and Writings.James Fieser - 2004 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  36. The Great Infidel: A Life of David Hume.Roderick Graham - 2004 - Birlinn.
    This complete life story of David Hume, one of Scotland’s greatest thinkers, follows the Enlightenment from its early roots to its full blossoming in 18th-century Edinburgh. Using original sources, many for the first time, this biography details every aspect of the philosopher’s life—from the lukewarm reception of his now pivotal work, Treatise of Human Nature, to the fame and near excommunication brought about by his famous Essays and History. Also detailed are the stories behind his nickname, “The Great Infidel,” the (...)
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  37. Part Four: Hume and the Road Back to Common Life.Murray Miles - 2003 - In Inroads: Paths in Ancient and Modern Western Philosophy. University of Toronto Press. pp. 485-556.
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  38. The Obituary of a Vain Philosopher: Adam Smith's Reflections on Hume's Life.Eric Schliesser - 2003 - Hume Studies 29 (2):327-362.
  39. Magnanimity and Modernity: Self-Love in the Scottish Enlightenment.Ryan Patrick Hanley - 2002 - Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    David Hume and Adam Smith are often regarded as founding fathers of modern social science and champions of self-interested material acquisitiveness. Against this view I argue that their moral and political philosophies are better understood as modern installments in the classical tradition of virtue ethics. By focusing on Hume and Smith's conception of self-love and particularly on their distinction of self-love from self-interest, I demonstrate their dedication to encouraging virtues beyond the instrumental virtues of the market. ;Hume and Smith regard (...)
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  40. Three Deaths and Enlightenment Thought: Hume, Johnson, Marat.Stephan Miller - 2001 - Bucknell University Press.
    In recent years there has been an extended debate about Enlightenment thought. Though many scholars have concluded that there were several 'Enlightenments,' some continue to make generalizations about the Englightenment and some speak about 'the Enlightment agenda.' After discussing the cult of the deathbed scene in eighteenth-century Britain and France, the author looks at three currents of Enlightment thought implicit in the deathbed 'projects' of David Hume, Samuel Johnson, and Jean Paul Marat. Although Hume and Johnson hold profoundly different views (...)
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  41. Hume's Intellectual Development.Alexander Stewart - 2000 - .
  42. Hume's Biography and Hume's Philosophy: ‘My Own Life’ and an Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding.Stephen Buckle - 1999 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (1):1 – 25.
    Hume's passing remark that his "ruling passion" was his "love of literary fame" has too easily encouraged the view that he gave up serious philosophizing after writing the _Treatise<D>. The most prominent casualty of this outlook is the first _Enquiry<D>. The article shows "the love of literary fame" to be an entirely appropriate motive for the serious intellectual writer, not an admission of frivolousness. Some further obstacles to taking the _Enquiry<D> seriously are considered, before a short sketch of the _Enquiry<D>'s (...)
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  43. Hume's Philosophical Biography.Stephen Buckle - 1999 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (1):1-25.
  44. On Natural Selection and Hume's Second Problem.Armando Aranda-Anzaldo - 1998 - Evolution and Cognition 4 (2):156-172.
    David Hume's famous riddle of induction implies a second problem related to the question of whether the laws and principles of nature might change in the course of time. Claims have been made that modern developments in physics and astrophysics corroborate the translational invariance of the laws of physics in time. However, the appearance of a new general principle of nature, which might not be derivable from the known laws of physics, or that might actually be a non-physical one (this (...)
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  45. Expos'e Succinct de la Contestation Qui S'est 'Elev'ee Entre M. Hume Et M. Rousseau Avec les Piáeces Justificatives & la Lettre de Monsieur de Voltaire Áa Ce Sujet.David Hume, Jean Le Rond D' Alembert & Jean-Pierre Jackson - 1998
  46. Hume and the Bellman, Zerobabel MacGilchrist.Roger L. Emerson - 1997 - Hume Studies 23 (1):9-28.
  47. “The Fittest Man in the Kingdom”.Paul Wood - 1997 - Hume Studies 23 (2):277-313.
  48. The David Hume Library.M. A. Box - 1996 - Hume Studies 22 (2):383-385.
  49. Time, Revolution, and Prescriptive Right in Hume's Theory of Government: Frederick G. Whelan.Frederick G. Whelan - 1995 - Utilitas 7 (1):97-119.
    Hume's theory of government and allegiance falls into two parts. In its better known segment Hume explains the conjectural origin of government in general as a convention necessary to enforce the rules of justice and provide other public goods, and he grounds the general duty of allegiance on the utility of government in making stable social life possible. To his credit, however, Hume goes on to give separate treatment to the topic of what he terms the ‘objects of allegiance”, or (...)
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  50. Boswell’s Life of Hume.W. B. Carnochan - 1992 - Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century 305.
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