This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

239 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 239
  1. added 2020-03-17
    Remarks on McCormick’s Comments.Walter Ott - 2009 - Philosophia 37 (3):475-476.
    This is my reply to Miriam McCormick’s comments on my paper, ‘What Can Causal Claims Mean?’, delivered at the Meaning and Modern Empiricism conference.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. added 2020-02-23
    The Age of Trickery.Ghislain Guigon - manuscript
    This is partly fictional. It is chiefly a reconstruction (not always faithful) of Hume’s fundamental uses of notions of similarity, mostly based on Enquiry. It is the first part (out of four) of a monograph on the evolution of similarity toolmaking. Histories of doctrines are common in our discipline, not so for histories of tools; this is what it’s about. What’s disturbing: I write as if I were talking about the customs and beliefs of ancient tribes instead of real philosophers. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. added 2019-10-20
    Constancy and Coherence in 1.4.2 of Hume’s Treatise: The Root of “Indirect” Causation and Hume’s Position on Objects.Stefanie Rocknak - 2013 - The European Legacy (4):444-456.
    This article shows that in 1.4.2.15-24 of the Treatise of Human Nature, Hume presents his own position on objects, which is to be distinguished from both the vulgar and philosophical conception of objects. Here, Hume argues that objects that are effectively imagined to have a “perfect identity” are imagined due to the constancy and coherence of our perceptions (what we may call ‘level 1 constancy and coherence’). In particular, we imagine that objects cause such perceptions, via what I call ‘indirect (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. added 2019-10-20
    Hume's Reality: A Lesson in Causality.Stefanie Rocknak - 2003 - In Proceedings Metaphysics 2003 Second World Conference. Rome, Metropolitan City of Rome, Italy:
    In Book I, III §9 of the Treatise, Hume makes the claim that “[all general] belief arises only from causation” (T 107). Following, he makes the even stronger claim that all general beliefs are to be thought of as beliefs in reality, and thus, all belief in reality is dependent on pre-established beliefs in both specific causal relations and the causal relation in general (T 108). In the first part of this paper, I explain Hume’s motivation behind both claims, while (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. added 2019-10-18
    A Defense of Shepherd’s Account of Cause and Effect as Synchronous.David Landy - 2020 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 2 (1):1.
    Lady Mary Shepherd holds that the relation of cause and effect consists of the combination of two objects to create a third object. She also holds that this account implies that causes are synchronous with their effects. There is a single instant in which the objects that are causes combine to create the object which is their effect. Hume argues that cause and effect cannot be synchronous because if they were then the entire chain of successive causes and effects would (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. added 2019-06-06
    Causes as Proximate Events: Thomas Brown and the Positivist Interpretation of Hume on Causality.Cristina Paoletti - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):37-44.
    A neglected episode in the intellectual history of the Scottish Enlightenment, Thomas Brown’s philosophy has been recently reassessed and reconnected with the emergence of the Positivist interpretation of David Hume. In fact, aiming to defend Hume’s philosophy from the common charges of atheism and scepticism, Brown popularised an interpretation of Humean texts which was later to become the standard view on Hume. In this essay, I aim to identify Brown’s historical sources and connect his reading of Hume with the medical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. added 2019-06-06
    Précis of Projection and Realism in Hume’s Philosophy.P. J. E. Kail - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (1):61-65.
    The title of my book, Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy, might mislead. One might protest, with some justification, that since neither "projection" nor "realism" is Hume's term and that both carry a severe threat of anachronism, discussing them in connection with Hume is misguided. Why might the readers of this journal wish to read such a work?Well, the first thing to note is that Hume's name has come to be associated with the metaphor of projection, understood as having some (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. added 2019-06-06
    “Whatever Begins to Be Must Have a Cause of Existence”: Hume’s Analysis and Kant's Response.Henry E. Allison - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):525-546.
  9. added 2019-06-06
    Projection and Realism in Hume’s Philosophy. [REVIEW]Stephen Buckle - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (1):163-165.
  10. added 2019-06-06
    Hume, Association, and Causal Belief.João Paulo Monteiro - 2007 - Abstracta 3 (2):107-122.
    The associationist interpretation of Hume's account of causal belief is criticized. The origin of this mistaken interpretation is explained. The difference between Hume's views in the Treatise of Human Nature and in An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding is examined.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. added 2019-06-06
    Hume’s Theory of Causation: A Quasi-Realist Interpretation. [REVIEW]P. J. E. Kail - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (1):190-192.
  12. added 2019-06-06
    A Posteriori Necessity in Singular Causation and the Humean Argument.M. J. García-Encinas - 2003 - Dialectica 57 (1):41-55.
    The absence of a necessary connection in singular causation is a key step in the Humean argument against any form of necessity in causation. I argue that Hume's defence of this step is unsuccessful, and that the step could be skipped, accepting the possibility of necessary a posteriori truths. Still this does not suffice to guarantee a necessary connection in singular causation. Necessary a posteriori truths should be backed by necessary a priori truths. Thus, a main object of this paper (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  13. added 2019-06-06
    Sense, Reason and Causality in Hume and Kant.A. T. Nuyen - 1990 - Société Française de Philosophie, Bulletin 81 (1):57.
    It is argued that Hume has two notions of causation, one psychological and the other philosophical. Kant's criticism of Hume overlooks the fact that Hume's scepticism is directed only at the latter. At the psychological level, Hume could have accepted Kant's argument without abandoning his own account of causation. The real difference between Hume and Kant is that Hume is not and Kant is concerned with the conditions for the possibility of sense experience. Hume is concerned only with the philosophical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. added 2019-06-06
    No Glue in the Universe: Hume’s Revolution.Joe Barnhart - 1989 - Southwest Philosophy Review 5 (1):39-45.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. added 2019-06-06
    Theism and the Rationale of Hume’s Skepticism About Causation.Donald W. Livingston - 1985 - Idealistic Studies 15 (2):151-164.
    Hume is famous for having introduced a radical theory of the nature of causation. To say that A causes B is just to say that A is constantly conjoined with B and that experience of the conjunction determines the mind to expect the one on the appearance of the other. It was this theory that awoke Kant from his dogmatic slumbers and established Hume as a founding figure of the various forms of positivism that emerged from the nineteenth century. A. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. added 2019-06-06
    Marcello Pera, "Hume, Kant E l'Induzione". [REVIEW]Maurice A. Finocchiaro - 1984 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (4):484.
  17. added 2019-06-06
    Tom L. Beauchamp and Alexander Rosenberg, "Hume and the Problem of Causation". [REVIEW]Robert J. Fogelin - 1983 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (3):429.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. added 2019-06-06
    It Ain't Necessity, So..Alan Hausman - 1982 - Hume Studies 8 (2):87-101.
  19. added 2019-06-06
    Hume’s Psychological Explanation of the Idea of Causality.A. K. Phalén - 1977 - International Philosophical Quarterly 17 (1):43-57.
  20. added 2019-06-06
    Kant and Hume on Simultaneity of Causes and Effects.Robert J. Fogelin - 1976 - Société Française de Philosophie, Bulletin 67 (1):51.
  21. added 2019-06-06
    The Legacy of Hume's Analysis of Causation.Jerrold Aronson - 1971 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 2 (2):135.
  22. added 2019-06-06
    IX.—The Idea of Necessary Connexion.A. J. D. Porteous - 1934 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 35 (1):149-176.
  23. added 2019-06-06
    Lovejoy on Kant's Reply to Hume.David F. Swenson - 1906 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 3 (12):333.
  24. added 2019-06-05
    Kant and Hegel's Responses to Hume's Skepticism Concerning Causality: An Evolutionary Epistemological Perspective.Adam Christian Scarfe - 2012 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 8 (1):227-288.
    According to Hume, determinations of necessary causal connection are without empirical warrant, but, as he maintains, the concept of causality qua necessary connection is indispensable to human beings, having survival value for them, a claim which points to the biological significance of this concept. In contrast to Hume, Kant argues that the causal principle qua necessary connection belongs to the a priori conceptual framework by which rational beings constitute their experience and render the world intelligible. In “Kant’s Doctrine of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. added 2019-06-03
    Hume’s Defence of Causal Inference. [REVIEW]François Beets - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (2):404-406.
    À la question de savoir si la pensée de Hume peut encore représenter un enjeu pour le philosophe des sciences de ce XXe siècle finissant, il faudra répondre oui, et produire l’ouvrage de Fred Wilson comme pièce à conviction. À la question de savoir si le.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. added 2019-03-07
    Hume, Newton, & Maclaurin.Charles R. Twardy - manuscript
    Paper presented to the Twenty-seventh Hume Society Conference, 26 July 2000, Williamsburg, Virginia. -/- At the time I thought there was a stronger link between Maclaurin and Hume, but in discussions at and after the meeting, decided Hume was not taking his mechanics out of Maclaurin’s Account. Although I still have found Maclaurin useful in interpreting Hume -- see Sapadin 1997 for a discussion of popular Newtonianism in Hume's day -- I suspect my draft suffers somewhat from ambivalence. There are (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. added 2019-02-25
    Hume, The Causal Principle, and Kemp-Smith.David C. Stove - 1975 - Hume Studies 1 (1):1-24.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28. added 2019-02-12
    Quasi-Realism and Inductive Scepticism in Hume’s Theory of Causation.Dominic K. Dimech - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (4):637-650.
    Interpreters of Hume on causation consider that an advantage of the ‘quasi-realist’ reading is that it does not commit him to scepticism or to an error theory about causal reasoning. It is unique to quasi-realism that it maintains this positive epistemic result together with a rejection of metaphysical realism about causation: the quasi-realist supplies an appropriate semantic theory in order to justify the practice of talking ‘as if’ there were causal powers in the world. In this paper, I problematise the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29. added 2018-09-16
    The New Hume Debate (Review). [REVIEW]Paul Russell - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):132-134.
  30. added 2018-06-04
    Ideas, Evidence, and Method: Hume's Skepticism and Naturalism Concerning Knowledge and Causation. [REVIEW]Jonathan Cottrell - 2017 - Philosophical Review 126 (3):393-398.
  31. added 2018-06-02
    Locke Hume, and the Principle of Causality: A Note.John K. Kearney - 1977 - The Thomist 41 (3):418.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. added 2017-10-25
    The Necessity of “Necessity”: Hume’s Psychology of Sophisticated Causal Inference.Abraham Sesshu Roth - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):263-287.
    Much of what Hume calls probable reasoning is deliberate and reflective. Since there are aspects to Hume’s psychology that tempt some commentators to think, on the contrary, that for Hume all such reasoning is simple and immediate, I will be concerned to emphasize Hume’s recognition of the sophisticated sort of probable reasoning (section I). Though some of the details of my case may be new, the overall point of this section should not be news to recent scholarship. But once we (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. added 2017-10-23
    Hume's Attack on Human Rationality.Idan Shimony - 2005 - Dissertation, Tel Aviv University
  34. added 2017-03-07
    Humen syyn määritelmä.Jani Hakkarainen - 2007 - In Heta Gylling, Ilkka Niiniluoto & Risto Vilkko (eds.), Syy. Helsinki: Suomen Filosofinen Yhdistys. pp. 63–73.
    Title in English: Hume's Definition of Cause. Esitän artikkelissa tulkintani Humen kuuluisista kahdesta määritelmästä ”syylle”. Väitteeni on, että Hume ei esitä kahta erillistä määritelmää, joiden suhde olisi ongelmallinen, vaan syyn kahden oleellisen aspektin määritelmät. Yhdistänkin lopuksi määritelmät yhdeksi Humen syyn määritelmäksi. Artikkelini on luonteeltaan tulkitseva ja väittävä. Tarkoituksenani on tulkita erästä kausaliteetin klassikkoa mahdollisimman tarkasti ja siten estää tiettyjä tyypillisiä väärinymmärryksiä, ilman että voin ottaa Humen määritelmää kritiikin kohteeksi. Artikkelin rajoissa ei ole myöskään mahdollista perustella tulkintaani yksityiskohtaisesti eikä tarkastella Humen (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. added 2016-12-21
    Kaila's Reception of Hume.Jani Hakkarainen - 2012 - Acta Philosophica Fennica 89:147-162.
    In this paper, I discuss Eino Kaila's (1890-1958) understanding of David Hume. Kaila was one of the leading Finnish philosophers of the 20th century and a correspondent of the Vienna Circle. He introduced logical empiricism into Finland and taught Georg Henrik von Wright. Final draft.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. added 2016-12-08
    Production and Necessity.Louis DeRosset - 2009 - Philosophical Review 118 (2):153-181.
    A major source of latter-day skepticism about necessity is the work of David Hume. Hume is widely taken to have endorsed the Humean claim: there are no necessary connections between distinct existences. The Humean claim is defended on the grounds that necessary connections between wholly distinct things would be mysterious and inexplicable. Philosophers deploy this claim in the service of a wide variety of philosophical projects. But Saul Kripke has argued that it is false. According to Kripke, there are necessary (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  37. added 2016-12-08
    Review: Helen Beebee: Hume on Causation. [REVIEW]P. J. E. Kail - 2008 - Mind 117 (466):451-456.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. added 2016-12-08
    Humes Old and New: Four Fashionable Falsehoods, and One Unfashionable Truth.Peter Millican - 2007 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):163-199.
    Hume has traditionally been understood as an inductive sceptic with positivist tendencies, reducing causation to regular succession and anticipating the modern distinctions between analytic and synthetic, deduction and induction. The dominant fashion in recent Hume scholarship is to reject all this, replacing the ‘Old Hume’ with various New alternatives. Here I aim to counter four of these revisionist readings, presenting instead a broadly traditional interpretation but with important nuances, based especially on Hume’s later works. He asked that we should treat (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  39. added 2016-05-19
    Causation and Modern Philosophy.Keith Allen & Tom Stoneham (eds.) - 2010 - Routledge.
    This volume brings together a collection of new essays by leading scholars on the subject of causation in the early modern period, from Descartes to Lady Mary Shepherd. Aimed at researchers, graduate students and advanced undergraduates, the volume advances the understanding of early modern discussions of causation, and situates these discussions in the wider context of early modern philosophy and science. Specifically, the volume contains essays on key early modern thinkers, such as Descartes, Hobbes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Hume, Kant. It also (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. added 2016-05-14
    EFFICIENT CAUSATION – A HISTORY. Edited by Tad M. Schmaltz. Oxford Philosophical Concepts. Oxford New York: Oxford University Press. [REVIEW]Andreea Mihali - forthcoming - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.
    A new series entitled Oxford Philosophical Concepts (OPC) made its debut in November 2014. As the series’ Editor Christia Mercer notes, this series is an attempt to respond to the call for and the tendency of many philosophers to invigorate the discipline. To that end each volume will rethink a central concept in the history of philosophy, e.g. efficient causation, health, evil, eternity, etc. “Each OPC volume is a history of its concept in that it tells a story about changing (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. added 2016-04-19
    The Secret Connexion: Causation, Realism, and David Hume: Revised Edition.Galen Strawson - 2014 - Oxford University Press UK.
    In this revised and updated edition of The Secret Connexion, Galen Strawson explores one of the most discussed subjects in all philosophy: David Hume's work on causation. Strawson challenges the standard view of Hume, according to which he thinks that there is no such thing as causal influence, and that there is nothing more to causation than things of one kind regularly following things things of another kind. He argues that Hume does believe in causal influence, but insists that we (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. added 2016-02-23
    The Idea of Power and Locke's Taxonomy of Ideas.Patrick J. Connolly - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (1):1-16.
    Locke's account of the idea of power is thought to be seriously problematic. Commentators allege that the idea of power causes problems for Locke's taxonomy of ideas, that it is defined circularly, and that, contrary to Locke's claims, it cannot be acquired in experience. This paper defends Locke's account. Previous commentators have assumed that there is only one idea of power. But close attention to Locke's text, combined with background features of his theory of ideas, supports the drawing of a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. added 2015-09-06
    Kant and the Discipline of Reason.Brian A. Chance - 2016 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (2):87-110.
    Kant's notion of ‘discipline’ has received considerable attention from scholars of his philosophy of education, but its role in his theoretical philosophy has been largely ignored. This omission is surprising since his discussion of discipline in the first Critique is not only more extensive and expansive in scope than his other discussions but also predates them. The goal of this essay is to provide a comprehensive reading of the Discipline that emphasizes its systematic importance in the first Critique. I argue (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44. added 2015-07-08
    The Second Analogy and the Kantian Answer to Hume: Why “Cause” has to Be an a Priori Concept.Andrea Faggion - 2012 - Revista de Filosofia Aurora 24 (35):61.
    The main goal of Kant’s Second Analogy of Experience was to answer Humean objectionsconcerning the aprioricity of the principle of “every-event-some-cause”. This paper intendsto suggest an interpretation of the Kantian argument that, even though cannot show thatHume should be satisfied with the answer, makes clear Kant’s reasons for that anti-Humeangoal. In the first part of this paper, I intend to discuss summarily Hume’s objection againstthe possibility of a demonstration of the principle “every-event-some-cause” and his thesisconcerning its validity. In the second (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. added 2015-07-08
    Veritas Filia Temporis: Hume On Time And Causation.Thomas M. Lennon - 1985 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (July):275-290.
  46. added 2015-06-21
    Cause and Effect (From the Enquiry).David Hume - unknown
  47. added 2015-06-21
    Hume on Knowledge of Metaphysical Modalities.Daniel Dohrn - 2010 - Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 13.
    I outline Hume’s views about conceivability evidence. Then I critically scrutinize two threats to conceivability-based modal epistemology. Both arise from Hume’s criticism of claims to knowing necessary causal relationships: Firstly, a sceptical stance towards causal necessity may carry over to necessity claims in general. Secondly, since – according to a sceptical realist reading – Hume grants the eventuality of causal powers grounded in essential features of objects, conceivability-based claims to comprehensive metaphysical possibilities seem endangered. I argue that although normal conceivability-based (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48. added 2015-06-21
    The Misunderstandings of Hume's Paradox of Causation.Oded Balaban - 2001 - Giornale di Metafisica 23 (3):377-398.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. added 2015-06-20
    The Normativity of Experience and Causal Belief in Hume’s Treatise.Miren Boehm - 2013 - Hume Studies 39 (2):203-231.
    What is the source of normativity in Hume’s account of causal reasoning? In virtue of what are causal beliefs justified for Hume? To answer these questions, the literature appeals, almost invariably, to custom or some feature thereof. I argue, in contrast, that causal beliefs are justified for Hume because they issue from experience. Although he denies experience the title of justifying reason, for Hume experience has normative authority. I offer an interpretation of the source and nature of the normativity of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50. added 2015-06-20
    Fred Wilson, Hume's Defence of Causal Inference.M. Bradley - 1999 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (3):376-377.
1 — 50 / 239