This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

22 found
Order:
  1. U. Thiel, The Early Modern Subject: Self-Consciousness and Personal Identity From Descartes to Hume. [REVIEW]Christian Barth - 2013 - Philosophy in Review 33 (1):85-88.
  2. Hume and Husserl on Time and Time-Consciousness.P. Bossert - 1976 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 7 (1):44-52.
  3. Strawson, Hume, and the Unity of Consciousness.D. H. M. Brooks - 1985 - Mind 94 (October):583-86.
  4. The Early Modern Subject: Self-Consciousness and Personal Identity From Descartes to Hume, by Udo Thiel. [REVIEW]Angela Coventry - 2012 - Mind 121 (484):1132-1135.
    In The Early Modern Subject, Udo Thiel explores early modern writings spanning approximately the seventeenth century to the first half of the eighteenth century on two topics of self consciousness, the human subject’s ‘awareness or consciousness of one’s own self’, and personal identity, the human subject’s tendency to regard one’s own self as the same identical self or person that persists through time (p. 1). The aim of the book is twofold. First, to provide an account of the development of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Hume's Theory of Consciousness.Daniel E. Flage - 1996 - International Philosophical Quarterly 36 (2):236-238.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. A Powerless Conscience: Hume on Reflection and Acting Conscientiously.Lorenzo Greco - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (3):547–564.
    If one looks for the notion of conscience in Hume, there appears to be a contrast between the loose use of it that can be found in his History of England, and the stricter use of it Hume makes in his philosophical works. It is my belief that, notwithstanding the problems Hume’s philosophy raises for a notion such as conscience, it is possible to frame a positive Humean explanation of it. I want to suggest that, far from corresponding to a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. The Self as Narrative in Hume.Lorenzo Greco - 2015 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (4):699-722.
    In this paper, I return to the well-known apparent inconsistencies in Hume’s treatment of personal identity in the three books of A Treatise of Human Nature, and try to defend a Humean narrative interpretation of the self. I argue that in Book 1 of the Treatise Hume is answering (to use Marya Schechtman’s expressions in The Constitution of Selves) a “reidentification” question concerning personal identity, which is different from the “characterization” question of Books 2 and 3. That is, I maintain (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Kaila's Reception of Hume.Jani Hakkarainen - 2012 - Acta Philosophica Fennica 89:147-162.
    In this paper, I discuss Eino Kaila's (1890-1958) understanding of David Hume. Kaila was one of the leading Finnish philosophers of the 20th century and a correspondent of the Vienna Circle. He introduced logical empiricism into Finland and taught Georg Henrik von Wright. Final draft.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Hard Problems, Interpretive Concepts, and Humean Laws.John F. Halpin - unknown
    Conceptual problems for consciousness are analogous to a Humean’s problem with scientific laws. Just as consciousness is often seen to involve further facts beyond the physical, laws would seem to involve reality beyond the Humean’s occurrent facts1. I will attempt to show that a Lewis-style best-system solution to the problem for laws should be applied to the related problem for consciousness. The leading idea of a best-system account is that law and chance claims are true in virtue of their place (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Deleuze Transcendental Empiricism as Exercise of Thought: Hume’s Case.Emilian Margarit - 2012 - Meta 4 (2):377-403.
    This paper aims to clarify the program of Deleuze’s work on Hume’s philosophy. Also, I plan to make clear the operational meaning of Deleuze’s own hallmark regarding his approaches to philosophy. I start to follow Deleuze’s plot by engendering three functions of his interpretation of Hume’s Treatise that will be the area of three thematic chapters. The first tries to sort the polemical function of empiricism that is launched through Deleuze’s Hume; the second attempts to figure the domain of subjectivity (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. The Early Modern Subject: Self-Consciousness and Personal Identity From Descartes to Hume.Raymond Martin - 2012 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 86 (1):284-286.
  12. Hume's Bundles, Self-Consciousness and Kant.S. C. Patten - 1976 - Hume Studies 2 (2):59-75.
  13. Hume's Theory of Consciousness. [REVIEW]A. E. Pitson - 1996 - Philosophical Books 37 (2):112-114.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Hume on Mental Transparency.Hsueh Qu - forthcoming - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly:n/a-n/a.
    This article investigates Hume's account of mental transparency. In this article, I will endorse Qualitative Transparency – that is, the thesis that we cannot fail to apprehend the qualitative characters of our current perceptions, and these apprehensions cannot fail to be veridical – on the basis that, unlike its competitors, it is both weak enough to accommodate the introspective mistakes that Hume recognises, and yet strong enough to make sense of his positive employments of mental transparency. Moreover, Qualitative Transparency is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15. Hume and Husserl: The Problem of the Continuity or Temporalization of Consciousness.Louis N. Sandowsky - 2006 - International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (181):59-74.
    This paper examines Husserl’s fascination with the issues raised by Hume’s critique of the philosophy of the ego and the continuity of consciousness. The path taken here follows a continental and phenomenological approach. Husserl’s 1905 lecture course on the temporalization of immanent time-consciousness is a phenomenological-eidetic examination of how the continuity of consciousness and the consciousness of continuity are possible. It was by way of Husserl’s reading of Hume’s discussion of “flux” or “flow” that his discourse on temporal phenomena led (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. The Early Modern Subject: Self-Consciousness and Personal Identity From Descartes to Hume.Udo Thiel - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    The Early Modern Subject explores the understanding of self-consciousness and personal identity--two fundamental features of human subjectivity--as it developed in early modern philosophy. Udo Thiel presents a critical evaluation of these features as they were conceived in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. He explains the arguments of thinkers such as Descartes, Locke, Leibniz, Wolff, and Hume, as well as their early critics, followers, and other philosophical contemporaries, and situates them within their historical contexts. Interest in the issues of self-consciousness and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  17. Hume's Notions of Consciousness and Reflection in Context.Udo Thiel - 1994 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 2 (2):75 – 115.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18. Consciousness and Personal Identity.Owen Ware & Donald C. Ainslie - 2014 - In Aaron Garrett (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Eighteenth Century Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 245-264.
    This paper offers an overview of consciousness and personal identity in eighteenth-century philosophy. Locke introduces the concept of persons as subjects of consciousness who also simultaneously recognize themselves as such subjects. Hume, however, argues that minds are nothing but bundles of perceptions, lacking intrinsic unity at a time or across time. Yet Hume thinks our emotional responses to one another mean that persons in everyday life are defined by their virtues, vices, bodily qualities, property, riches, and the like. Rousseau also (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Hume's Theory of Consciousness.Wayne Waxman - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a comprehensive analysis and re-evaluation of Hume's Treatise of Human Nature. Kant viewed Hume as the sceptical destroyer of metaphysics. Yet for most of this century the consensus among interpreters is that for Hume scepticism was a means to a naturalistic, anti-sceptical end. The author seeks here to achieve a balance by showing how Hume's naturalism leads directly to a kind of scepticism even more radical than Kant imagined. In the process it offers the first systematic treatment (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  20. On Hume's Theory of Consciousness.Fred Wilson - 1995 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 18 (1):271-275.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Wayne Waxman's Hume's Theory of Consciousness. [REVIEW]John P. Wright - 1995 - Hume Studies 21 (2):344-350.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Review: Theil, Udo, The Early Modern Subject: Self-Consciousness and Personal Identity From Descartes to Hume[REVIEW]Melissa Zinkin - 2013 - Review of Metaphysics 67 (1):193-195.