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  1. The Powers and Mechanisms of the Passions.Lilli Alanen - 2006 - In Saul Traiger (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Hume's Treatise. Blackwell. pp. 179--198.
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  2. Hume and Davidson on Pride.Pall S. Árdal - 1989 - Hume Studies 15 (2):387-394.
  3. Hume's Account of Our Absurd Passions.Annette Baier - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (11):643-651.
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  4. Hume's Analysis of Pride.Annette Baier - 1978 - Journal of Philosophy 75 (1):27-40.
  5. Hume on the Passions.Stephen Buckle - 2012 - Philosophy 87 (2):189-213.
    Hume's account of the passions is largely neglected because the author's purposes tend to be missed. The passions were accepted by early modern philosophers, of whatever persuasion, as the mental effects of bodily processes. The dualist and the materialist differed over whether reason is a higher power able to judge and control them: thus Descartes affirms, whereas Hobbes denies, this possibility.Hume's account lines up firmly behind Hobbes. Although he shies away from Hobbes's dogmatic physiological claims, he affirms all the key (...)
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  6. Hume's Tragic Emotions.Malcolm Budd - 1991 - Hume Studies 17 (2):93-106.
  7. Hume on Pride and Humility.Robert W. Burch - 1975 - New Scholasticism 49 (2):177-188.
  8. Hume's Science of Emotions: Feeling Theory Without Tears.Mark Collier - 2011 - Hume Studies 37 (1):3-18.
    We must rethink the status of Hume’s science of emotions. Contemporary philosophers typically dismiss Hume’s account on the grounds that he mistakenly identifies emotions with feelings. But the traditional objections to Hume’s feeling theory are not as strong as commonly thought. Hume makes several important contributions, moreover, to our understanding of the operations of the emotions. His claims about the causal antecedents of the indirect passions receive support from studies in appraisal theory, for example, and his suggestions concerning the social (...)
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  9. Mirrors to One Another: Emotion and Value in Jane Austen and David Hume by Dadlez, E. M.Timothy M. Costelloe - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (2):179-181.
  10. Mirrors to One Another: Emotion and Value in Jane Austen and David Hume.E. M. Dadlez - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    A compelling exploration of the convergence of Jane Austen’s literary themes and characters with David Hume’s views on morality and human nature. Argues that the normative perspectives endorsed in Jane Austen's novels are best characterized in terms of a Humean approach, and that the merits of Hume's account of ethical, aesthetic and epistemic virtue are vividly illustrated by Austen's writing. Illustrates how Hume and Austen complement one another, each providing a lens that allows us to expand and elaborate on the (...)
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  11. Hume's Cognitive Theory of Pride.Donald Davidson - 1976 - Journal of Philosophy 73 (19):744-757.
  12. Hume on the Passions.Paul J. Dietl - 1968 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 28 (4):554-566.
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  13. Hume on Causal Necessity: A Study From the Perspective of Hume's Theory of Passions.Berent Enç - 1985 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (3):235 - 256.
  14. Hume's Classification of the Passions and Its Precursors.James Fieser - 1992 - Hume Studies 18 (1):1-17.
  15. Baier on Hume's Absurd Passions.Robert J. Fogelin - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (11):652.
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  16. The Poetry and the Pity: Hume's Account of Tragic Pleasure.Elisa Galgut - 2001 - British Journal of Aesthetics 41 (4):411-424.
    I defend Hume's account of tragic pleasure against various objections. I examine his account of the emotions in order to clarify his "conversion theory". I also argue that Hume does not give us a theory of tragedy as an aesthetic genre, but rather elucidates the felt experience of a particular work of tragedy. I offer a partial reading of King Lear by way of illustration. Finally, I suggest that the experiences of aesthetic pleasure, and aesthetic sadness, share certain qualities. "Tragic (...)
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  17. Hume on Curiosity.Axel Gelfert - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):711-732.
    Hume concludes Book II of his Treatise of Human Nature with a section on the passion of curiosity, ‘that love of truth, which was the first source of all our enquiries’. At first sight, this characterisation of curiosity – as the motivating factor in that specifically human activity that is the pursuit of knowledge – may seem unoriginal. However, when Hume speaks of the ‘source of all our enquiries’, he is referring both to the universal human pursuit of knowledge and (...)
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  18. David Hume's Philosophy of the Passions.Paolo Guietti - 1998 - Dissertation, The Catholic University of America
    This dissertation distinguishes Hume's anti-rationalist position from irrationalism. Hume's skepticism is a form of anti-rationalism, basically a defense of common life and tradition against the conceit of the rationalists' concept of reason. Modern rationalism is based on two fundamental dogmas. The first is the "principle of autonomy," which leads to the systematic elimination of the other as the irrational. In modern epistemology this means the disappearance of intentionality and, at the summit of modern moral philosophy, all forms of heteronomy are (...)
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  19. David Hume on Personal Identity and the Indirect Passions.Robert S. Henderson - 1990 - Hume Studies 16 (1):33-44.
  20. Hume on Religious Affect.Thomas Holden - 2007 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 89 (3):283-306.
    Although various points of Hume's canonical works hint at a critique of religious affect, his most explicit attack on such sentiments occurs in a letter of June 30th 1743 to his friend William Mure. In this letter Hume sets out an objection to all affective attitudes that are putatively directed toward God, and maintains that the Deity is not in fact the ‘natural object’ of any human passion. I examine this claim and canvass three possible interpretations of Hume's challenge to (...)
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  21. A Dissertation on the Passions.David Hume - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Tom Beauchamp presents the definitive scholarly edition of two famous works by David Hume, both originally published in 1757. In A Dissertation on the Passions Hume sets out his original view of the nature and central role of passion and emotion. The Natural History of Religion is a landmark work in the study of religion as a natural phenomenon. Authoritative critical texts are accompanied by a full array of editorial matter.
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  22. Hume's Dissertation on the Passions.John Immerwahr - 1994 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (2):225-240.
  23. The Origin of the Indirect Passions in the Treatise: An Analogy Between Books 1 and 2.Haruko Inoue - 2003 - Hume Studies 29 (2):205-221.
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  24. Despair and Hope in Hume's Introduction to the Treatise of Human Nature.James T. King - 1994 - Hume Studies 20 (1):59-71.
  25. Hume, Malebranche, and the Self-Justification of the Passions.Éléonore Le Jallé - 2012 - Hume Studies 38 (2):201-220.
    The Physiological Library’s catalogue shows that Hume had access to Malebranche’s sixth edition of De la recherche de la vérité while a student in Edinburgh.1 The Recherche is also included in the David Hume’s Library.2 While Hume did not agree with Malebranche on all things, a number of commentators have argued that Hume borrowed many points from Malebranche, not only concerning causality and the famous example of the billiard balls3 but also on other subjects. Charles McCracken’s Malebranche and British Philosophy (...)
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  26. Mirrors to One Another: Emotions and Moral Value in Jane Austen and David Hume, E. M. Dadlez. [REVIEW]Alice MacLachlan - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (2).
  27. Deleuze Transcendental Empiricism as Exercise of Thought: Hume’s Case.Emilian Margarit - 2012 - Meta 4 (2):377-403.
    This paper aims to clarify the program of Deleuze’s work on Hume’s philosophy. Also, I plan to make clear the operational meaning of Deleuze’s own hallmark regarding his approaches to philosophy. I start to follow Deleuze’s plot by engendering three functions of his interpretation of Hume’s Treatise that will be the area of three thematic chapters. The first tries to sort the polemical function of empiricism that is launched through Deleuze’s Hume; the second attempts to figure the domain of subjectivity (...)
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  28. Strength of Mind: Prospects and Problems for a Humean Account.Jane Mcintyre - 2006 - Synthese 152 (3):393-401.
    References to strength of mind, a character trait implying “the prevalence of the calm passions above the violent”, occur in a number of important discussions of motivation in the Treatise and the Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals. Nevertheless, Hume says surprisingly little about what strength of mind is, or how it is achieved. This paper argues that Hume’s theory of the passions can provide an interesting and defensible account of strength of mind. The paper concludes with a brief comparison (...)
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  29. Hume's “New and Extraordinary” Account of the Passions.Jane L. McIntyre - 2006 - In Saul Traiger (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Hume's Treatise. Blackwell. pp. 199--215.
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  30. Strange Fits of Passion: Epistemologies of Emotion, Hume to Austen. By Adela Pinch.N. Meeker - 2002 - The European Legacy 7 (1):126-127.
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  31. Pasjoner Og Personer En Analyse Av David Humes Læe Om de Menneskelige Føelsene.Petter Nafstad - 1999
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  32. Emotion, Thought, and Therapy.Jerome Neu - 1977 - Routledge.
    This book is a study of Hume and Spinoza and the relationship of philosophical theories of the emotions to psychological theories of therapy. Arguing that Spinoza's cognitivist theory of emotions is closer to the truth, it is shown that that provides the beginning of an understanding of how Freudian or, more generally, analytic therapies make philosophic sense. That is, we can begin to understand how people's emotional lives might be transformed by consideration and interpretation of their memories, beliefs, fantasies; in (...)
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  33. Introduction to Hume on Motivation and Virtue.Charles Pigden - 2009 - In Hume on Motivation and Virtue. pp. 1-29.
    This includes a methodological meditation (in blank verse) on the history of philosophy as a contribution to philosophy (rather than as a contribution to history) plus a conspectus of the issues surrounding Hume, the Motivation Argument and the Slavery of Reason Thesis. However I am posting it here mainly because it contains a novel restatement of the Argument from Queerness. Big Thesis: the Slavery of Reason Thesis (via the Motivation Argument) provides no support for non-cognitivism or emotivism, but there is (...)
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  34. The Moral Self and the Indirect Passions.Susan M. Purviance - 1997 - Hume Studies 23 (2):195-212.
    I argue that Hume and Kant avoid any scepticism about the unity of the self which would undermine a practical notion of the moral self. Specifically, David Hume provides for the authenticity of a moral self unified by the indirect passions of pride and humility. These passions take the self as their object and, thus, make moot any worries about personal identity from Book One of Hume's Treatise. This account of the moral self, which I call the fact of agency (...)
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  35. Rozum i namiętności w Hume'owskiej teorii działania.Marek Pyka - 1995 - Przeglad Filozoficzny - Nowa Seria 15 (3):75-85.
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  36. The Simple Duality: Humean Passions.Hsueh Qu - 2012 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (S1):98-116.
    Hume views the passions as having both intentionality and qualitative character, which, in light of his Separability Principle, seemingly contradicts their simplicity. I reject the dominant solution to this puzzle of claiming that intentionality is an extrinsic property of the passions, arguing that a number of Hume’s claims regarding the intentionality of the passions (pride and humility in particular) provide reasons for thinking an intrinsic account of the intentionality of the passions to be required. Instead, I propose to resolve this (...)
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  37. Conscious Ambivalence.Hili Razinsky - 2016 - Human Studies 39 (3):365–384.
    Although ambivalence in a strict sense, according to which a person holds opposed attitudes, and holds them as opposed, is an ordinary and widespread phenomenon, it appears impossible on the common presupposition that persons are either unitary or plural. These two conceptions of personhood call for dispensing with ambivalence by employing tactics of harmonizing, splitting, or annulling the unitary subject. However, such tactics are useless if ambivalence is sometimes strictly conscious. This paper sharpens the notion of conscious ambivalence, such that (...)
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  38. 17th and 18th Century Theories of Emotions.Amy Morgan Schmitter - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    1. Introduction: 1.1 Difficulties of Approach; 1.2 Philosophical Background. 2. The Context of Early Modern Theories of the Passions: 2.1 Changing Vocabulary; 2.2 Taxonomies; 2.3 Philosophical Issues in Theories of the Emotions. SUPPLEMENTARY DOCUMENTS: Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance Theories of the Emotions; Descartes; Hobbes; Malebranche; Spinoza; Shaftsbury; Hutcheson; Hume.
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  39. Hume and the Nortons on the Passions and Morality in Hume's Treatise.Jacqueline Taylor - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (2):305-312.
  40. Sympathy, Belief, and the Indirect Passions.Stanley Tweyman - 1995 - In David Hume: Critical Assessments. Routledge. pp. 427--36.
  41. Passion and Volition in Hume's "Treatise".Maurice Lemont Wade - 1982 - Dissertation, Stanford University
    Book II of A Treatise of Human Nature is David Hume's only sustained expression of a theory of human emotion and motivation. Hume's theory has been much maligned and even dismissed as incoherent and philosophically uninteresting. This work shows that Hume's account of passion is indeed coherent and possessed of philosophical merit. In addition, this work shows that even though Hume's theory is an example of antiquated empirical psychology it is also and more importantly an instance of interesting conceptual analysis (...)
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  42. Hume's Use of The Game Analogy.S. K. Wertz - 1972 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 3 (2):127-135.
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