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  1. Knowledge and Sensory Knowledge in Hume's Treatise.Graham Clay - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 10.
    In this paper, I argue that we should attribute to Hume an account of knowledge that I call the ‘Constitutive Account.’ On this account, Hume holds that (i) every instance of knowledge must be an immediately present perception (i.e., an impression or an idea); (ii) an object of this perception must be a token of a knowable relation; (iii) this token knowable relation must have parts of the instance of knowledge as relata (i.e., the same perception that has it as (...)
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  2. Descartes and Hume on I-Thoughts.Luca Forgione - 2018 - Thémata: Revista de Filosofía 57:211-228.
    Self-consciousness can be understood as the ability to think I-thou-ghts which can be described as thoughts about oneself ‘as oneself’. Self-consciousness possesses two specific correlated features: the first regards the fact that it is grounded on a first-person perspective, whereas the second concerns the fact that it should be considered a consciousness of the self as subject rather than a consciousness of the self as object. The aim of this paper is to analyse a few considerations about Descartes and Hume’s (...)
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  3. The Importance of "Mere Conception" in David Hume's Theory of Belief.Catherine Elaine Kemp - 1995 - Dissertation, State University of New York at Stony Brook
    Belief is a species of mere conception, and is modifiable, rather than bivalent (believing or disbelieving). The attendant-impression theory of transformation of conception into belief expresses the moral dimension of one and the same thing, of which the manner-of-conception (without attendant impression) theory of the transformation refers to the epistemic dimension of that same thing. These two aspects of the transformation of conception into belief point to an ambiguity in Hume's use of the term IDEA: as act and as content. (...)
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  4. Hume's True Scepticism by Donald C. Ainslie.Miriam Schleifer McCormick - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):167-168.
    In this rigorous and thorough discussion of David Hume’s A Treatise of Human Nature 1.4, entitled “Of the sceptical and other systems of philosophy,” Donald Ainslie aims both to provide detailed textual exegeses of all seven sections, and to offer a way of understanding them as unified by the recurring theme of the dangers of “false” philosophy and a defense of “true” philosophy or “true scepticism.” To understand the compatibility of Hume’s skeptical conclusions and his philosophical ambitions, and so to (...)
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  5. Hume’s Causal Reconstruction of the Perceptual Relativity Argument in Treatise 1.4.4: Dialogue.Annemarie Butler - 2009 - Dialogue 48 (1):77-101.
    ABSTRACT: In Treatise 1.4.4, on behalf of modern philosophers, Hume described a causal argument that shows that our impressions of secondary qualities do not resemble qualities of objects themselves. However, in their respective arguments, Hume’s philosophical predecessors did not argue causally, but appealed to contrary qualities. I argue that Hume’s presentation was not simply a “gratuitous” stylistic difference, but an important correction of his predecessors in light of his own philosophical discoveries. RÉSUMÉ : Dans le Traité 1.4.4, Hume a présenté (...)
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  6. Philosophy and the Good Life: Hume's Defence of Probable Reasoning.David Owen - 1996 - Dialogue 35 (3):485-504.
    Could John Locke defend his view that the knowledge we acquire in intuition and demonstration is infallible, and should he try to defend it? Peter Schouls thinks the project is unviable, and I think Schouls is right. But I also think Locke should not even bother trying. I shall elaborate on the argument that he could not defend the view, indicate why I think he should abandon infallibility, given his other views, and then investigate what he might usefully say about (...)
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  7. David Hume: His Theory of Knowledge and Morality.Hume: Theory of Knowledge.G. P. Henderson - 1952 - Philosophical Quarterly 2 (8):270-271.
  8. Hume's "gematigd" scepticisme: futiel of fataal?Patricia De Martelaere - 1981 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 43:427-464.
    The aim of this paper is to make clear in what sense Hume's actually very radical scepticism can nevertheless be called moderate, and not only leaves intact the praxis in daily life but is even compatible with a — modest and experimental — form of science. The first part stresses the theoretical profoundness of Hume's scepticism, and more specifically the arguments concerning the validity of reason and those concerning some typically 'metaphysical' objects. The former culminate in the impossibility of determining (...)
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  9. Sellars on Hume and Kant on Representing Complexes.David Landy - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):224-246.
    No Abstract In his graduate-seminar lectures on Kant—published as Kant and Pre-Kantian Themes (Sellars, 2002)—Wilfrid Sellars argues that because Hume cannot distinguish between a vivacious idea and an idea of something vivacious he cannot account for the human ability to represent temporally complex states of affairs. The first section of this paper aims to show that this argument is not properly aimed at the historical Hume who can, on a proper reading, distinguish these kinds of representations. This is not, however, (...)
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  10. Is Hume Really a Reductivist?Michael Welbourne - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (2):407-423.
    Coady misrepresents Hume as a reductivist about testimony. Hume occasionally writes carelessly as if what goes for beliefs based on induction will also go for beliefs obtained from testimony. But, in fact, he has no theory of testimony at all, though in his more considered remarks he rightly thinks, as does Reid, that the natural response to a bit of testimony is simply to accept the information which it contains. The sense in which we owe the beliefs we get from (...)
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  11. Imagination and Experimentalism in Hume’s Philosophy.Andrew Ward - 2012 - Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (1):165-175.
  12. The Rules for Dispositional Judgment in Hume’s Treatise.Walter Brand - 1992 - Southwest Philosophy Review 8 (2):1-11.
  13. Inference, Reason and Reasoning in Book One of Hume’s Treatise.David Owen - 1994 - Southwest Philosophy Review 10 (1):17-27.
  14. Response to Andrew Ward, “Imagination and Experimentalism in Hume’s Philosophy”.J. W. Mock - 2012 - Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (2):65-68.
  15. Hume’s First Principle, His Missing Shade, and His Distinctions of Reason.Karánn Durland - 1996 - Hume Studies 22 (1):105-121.
  16. Custom and Reason in Hume: A Kantian Reading of the First Book of the Treatise. [REVIEW]Paul Guyer - 2009 - Hume Studies 35 (1-2):236-239.
    Henry Allison offers a new understanding of Hume's theory of knowledge, as contained in the first book of his Treatise. Allison provides a comprehensive and detailed critical analysis of Hume's views on the subject, and an extensive comparison with Kant on a range of issues including space and time, causation, existence, and the self.
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  17. Philosophical Relations, Natural Relations, and Philosophic Decisionism in Belief in the External World: Comments on P. J. E. Kail, Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy[REVIEW]Eric Schliesser - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (1):67-76.
    My critical comments on Part I of P. J. E. Kail's Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy are divided into two parts. First, I challenge the exegetical details of Kail's take on Hume's important distinction between natural and philosophical relations. I show that Kail misreads Hume in a subtle fashion. If I am right, then much of the machinery that Kail puts into place for his main argument does different work in Hume than Kail thinks. Second, I offer a brief (...)
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  18. Hume’s Epistemic Naturalism in the Treatise.Tim Black - 2011 - Hume Studies 37 (2):211-242.
    We can understand epistemic naturalism as the view that there are cases in which we are justified in holding a belief and cases in which we are not so justified, and that we can distinguish cases of one sort from cases of the other with reference to non-normative facts about the mechanisms that produce them. By my lights, Hume is an epistemic naturalist of this sort, and I propose in this paper a novel and detailed account of his epistemic naturalism. (...)
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  19. The Vulgar Conception of Objects in “Of Skepticism with Regard to the Senses”.Stefanie Rocknak - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (1):67-90.
    In this paper, we see that contrary to most readings of T 1.4.2 in the Treatise, Hume does not think that objects are sense impressions. This means that Hume’s position on objects is not to be conflated with the vulgar perspective. Moreover, the vulgar perspective undergoes a marked transition in T 1.4.2, evolving from what we may call vulgar perspective I into vulgar perspective II. This paper presents the first detailed analysis of this evolution, which includes an explanation of T (...)
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  20. Belief and Introspective Knowledge in Treatise 1.3.7.Jennifer Smalligan Marušić - 2011 - Hume Studies 37 (1):99-122.
    Hume argues that the difference between belief and mere conception consists in a difference in the manner of conception. His argument assumes that the difference between belief and mere conception must be a function of either the content conceived or of the manner of conception; however, it is unclear what justifies this assumption. I argue that the assumption depends on Hume’s confidence that we can know immediately that we believe when we believe, and that we can only have such knowledge (...)
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  21. Naturalism, Normativity, and Scepticism in Hume’s Account of Belief.Lorne Falkenstein - 1997 - Hume Studies 23 (1):29-72.
  22. Walking the Tightrope of Reason: The Precarious Life of a Rational Animal. [REVIEW]Ira Singer - 2005 - Hume Studies 31 (1):169-172.
    This lively little book — 170 small-format pages, excluding front and end matter — has its origin in the author’s 1995 Romanell-Phi Beta Kappa lectures at Dartmouth College. Consistent with this origin, it speaks primarily to a general audience rather than to philosophical specialists. Nevertheless, even specialist readers will find Walking the Tightrope of Reason valuable. It revisits figures and issues that have long and productively occupied Fogelin, and here we see his thoughts about these figures and issues clearly and (...)
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  23. Projection and Realism in Hume’s Philosophy. [REVIEW]Stephen Buckle - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (1):163-165.
  24. Hume's Probability Argument of I,Iv,1.Richard DeWitt - 1985 - Hume Studies 11 (2):125-140.
  25. Stability and Justification in Hume’s Treatise. [REVIEW]David Owen - 2004 - International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (2):271-273.
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  26. The Distinction Between Coherence and Constancy in Hume's Treatise I.Iv.2.Tim Black - 2007 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):1-25.
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  27. Hume’s Naturalism About Cognitive Norms.Janet Broughton - 2003 - Philosophical Topics 31 (1/2):1-19.
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  28. A Via Media Between Scepticism and Dogmatism?: Newman’s and MacIntyre’s Anti-Foundationalist Strategies.Gerald McCarthy - 2009 - Newman Studies Journal 6 (2):57-81.
    Beginning with an overview of the knowledge claims proposed by John Locke and David Hume, this essay first explores the respective responses of Newman and W. G. Ward and then updates the discussion by bringing Newman into dialogue with the thoughtof Alasdair MacIntyre.
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  29. The Consequences of Hume’s Epistemology.Aristotelis Santas - 1995 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 10 (1):1-8.
  30. Norman Kemp Smith on “Natural Belief”.Thomas K. Hearn - 1969 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 7 (1):3-7.
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  31. The Concept of Truth in Hume’s Treatise.Lilly-Marlene Russow - 1981 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):217-228.
  32. Hume’s Scepticism Regarding ‘Probable Reasoning’ in the Treatise.Owen Raynor - 1964 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 2 (3):103-106.
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  33. Epistemological Skepticism(s) and Rational Self-Control.Brian Ribeiro - 2002 - The Monist 85 (3):468-477.
    In this paper I aim to do two things. First, I attempt to illustrate an interesting pattern of argument one can find in Hume's work. Next, I employ this Humean pattern of argument to show that IF there is a cogent and intuitive argument for any form of epistemological skepticism, which despite its cogency and intuitiveness has a unbelievable conclusion, THEN we lack a very important form of doxastic self-control, which I call rational self-control, over the beliefs problematized by that (...)
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  34. Hume's Theory of Consciousness.Wayne Waxman - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a comprehensive analysis and re-evaluation of Hume's Treatise of Human Nature. Kant viewed Hume as the sceptical destroyer of metaphysics. Yet for most of this century the consensus among interpreters is that for Hume scepticism was a means to a naturalistic, anti-sceptical end. The author seeks here to achieve a balance by showing how Hume's naturalism leads directly to a kind of scepticism even more radical than Kant imagined. In the process it offers the first systematic treatment (...)
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  35. Human Nature and Historical Knowledge: Hume, Hegel and Vico.Leon Pompa - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents a study of the nature and conditions of historical knowledge, conducted through a study of the relevant theories of Hume, Hegel and Vico. It is usually thought that in order to establish historical facts, we have to have a theory of human nature to support our arguments. Hume, Hegel and Vico all subscribed to this view, and are therefore discussed in detail. Professor Pompa goes on to argue that there is in fact no way of discovering anything (...)
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  36. Hume and Peirce on the Ultimate Stability of Belief.Ryan Pollock & David W. Agler - 2016 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2):245-269.
    Louis Loeb has argued that Hume is pessimistic while Peirce is optimistic about the attainment of fully stable beliefs. In contrast, we argue that Hume was optimistic about such attainment but only if the scope of philosophical investigation is limited to first-order explanatory questions. Further, we argue that Peirce, after reformulating the pragmatic maxim to accommodate the reality of counterfactuals, was pessimistic about such attainment. Finally, we articulate and respond to Peirce's objection that Hume's skeptical arguments in T 1.4.1 and (...)
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  37. 5. Hume on Testimony and Its Epistemological Problems.Fred Wilson - 2008 - In The External World and Our Knowledge of It: Hume's Critical Realism, an Exposition and a Defence. University of Toronto Press. pp. 332-366.
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  38. Reasons to Act and Believe: Naturalism and Rational Justification in Hume’s Philosophical Project.Don Garrett - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 132 (1):1-16.
    Is Hume a naturalist? Does he regard all or nearly all beliefs and actions as rationally unjustified? In order to settle these questions, it is necessary to examine their key terms and to understand the character-especially the normative character-of Hume's philosophical project. This paper argues that Hume is a naturalist-and, in particular, both a moral and an epistemic naturalist-in quite robust ways; and that Hume can properly regard many actions and beliefs as "rationally justified" in several different senses of that (...)
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  39. La santé du sceptique : Hume, Montaigne.Frédéric Brahami - 2008 - Philosophia Scientae 12:177-192.
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  40. Bundling Hume with Kripkenstein.Michael E. Levin - 2007 - Synthese 155 (1):35-64.
    It is argued that the intuition driving Kripke’s famous version of Wittgenstein’s meaning skepticism is precisely the one that prompted Hume to despair of his bundle theory of the self: there are no necessary connections between distinct mental states. This interpretation is shown to throw light on Wittgenstein’s notorious idea that all proofs “create concepts.” Wittgenstein has invented a new form of skepticism. Personally I am inclined to regard it as the most radical and original skeptical problem that philosophy has (...)
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  41. Kevin Meeker, Hume's Radical Scepticism and the Fate of Naturalized Epistemology, Palgrave Innovations in Philosophy, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, 216 Pp., £55 , ISBN 9781137025548. [REVIEW]P. J. E. Kail - 2015 - Dialectica 69 (4):623-630.
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  42. Realism and Appearances: An Essay in Ontology.John W. Yolton - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book addresses one of the fundamental topics in philosophy: the relation between appearance and reality. John Yolton draws on a rich combination of historical and contemporary material, ranging from the early modern period to present-day debates, to examine this central philosophical preoccupation, which he presents in terms of distinctions between phenomena and causes, causes and meaning, and persons and man. He explores in detail how Locke, Berkeley and Hume talk of appearances and their relation to reality, and offers illuminating (...)
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  43. Hume, Reason and Morality: A Legacy of Contradiction.Sophie Botros - 2005 - Routledge.
    Covering an important theme in Humean studies, this book focuses on Hume's hugely influential attempt in book three of his _Treatise of Human Nature _to derive the conclusion that morality is a matter of feeling, not reason, from its link with action. Claiming that Hume's argument contains a fundamental contradiction that has gone unnoticed in modern debate, this fascinating volume contains a refreshing combination of historical-scholarly work and contemporary analysis that seeks to expose this contradiction and therefore provide a significant (...)
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  44. Hume's Naturalism.Howard Mounce & H. O. Mounce - 1999 - Routledge.
    _Hume's Naturalism_ provides a clear and concise guide to the debates over whether Hume's empiricism or his 'naturalism' in the tradition of the Scottish 'Common Sense' school of philosophy gained his upper hand. This debate is central to any understanding of Hume's thought. H.O. Mounce presents a beautifully clear guide to Hume's most important works, _The Treatise on Human Nature_ and _Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion_. Accessible to anyone coming to Hume for the first time, _Hume's Naturalism_ affords a much needed (...)
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  45. Reason Without Freedom: The Problem of Epistemic Normativity.David Owens - 2000 - Routledge.
    We call beliefs reasonable or unreasonable, justified or unjustified. What does this imply about belief? Does this imply that we are responsible for our beliefs and that we should be blamed for our unreasonable convictions? Or does it imply that we are in control of our beliefs and that what we believe is up to us? Reason Without Freedom argues that the major problems of epistemology have their roots in concerns about our control over and responsibility for belief. David Owens (...)
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  46. Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Hume on Knowledge.Harold Noonan - 1999 - Routledge.
    David Hume was one of the most important British philosophers of the eighteenth century. The first part of his _Treatise on Human Nature_ is a seminal work in philosophy. _Hume on Knowledge_ introduces and assesses: * Humes life and the background of the _Treatise_ * The ideas and text in the _Treatise_ * Humes continuing importance to philosophy.
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  47. Belief, Morality, and Reasoning in Hume's Philosophy.Stanley Tweyman - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (3):723-741.
  48. Hume’s Radical Scepticism and the Fate of Naturalized Epistemology, Written by Kevin Meeker.Peter S. Fosl - 2015 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 5 (3):263-268.
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  49. Hume’s Epistemology in the Treatise: A Veritistic Interpretation by Frederick F. Schmitt. [REVIEW]Daniel Flage - 2015 - Review of Metaphysics 69 (1):151-153.
  50. Uma teoria naturalista da justificação das crenças na epistemologia de David Hume.Claudiney José de Souza - 2014 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 18 (2):227.
    One of the first difficulties in interpreting Hume’s epistemological writings concerns precisely the meaning of the words ‘knowledge’ and ‘belief’. In this article it is shown, initially, how, from a humean point of view, the traditional epistemic criterion to define ‘knowledge’ and ‘belief’ appears very restrictive. Hume’s theory of causal belief is then briefly reviewed in the light of epistemological naturalism of the Michael J. Costa and Louis E. Loeb. Finally, it is submitted that the examination of all these topics (...)
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