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  1. Hume's Internalist Epistemology in EHU 12.Hsueh Qu - 2018 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 3 (96):517-539.
    Much has been written about Kemp Smith’s (1941) famous problem regarding the tension between Hume’s naturalism and his scepticism. However, most commentators have focused their attention on the Treatise; those who address Enquiry often take it to express essentially the same message as the Treatise. When Hume’s scepticism in the Enquiry has been investigated in its own right, commentators have tended to focus on Hume’s inductive scepticism in Sections 4 and 5. All in all, it seems that Section 12 has (...)
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  2. Humeanism and the epistemology of testimony.Dan O’Brien - forthcoming - Synthese:1-23.
    A contemporary debate concerning the epistemology of testimony is portrayed by its protagonists as having its origins in the eighteenth century and the respective views of David Hume and Thomas Reid. Hume is characterized as a reductionist and Reid as an anti-reductionist. This terminology has been widely adopted and the reductive approach has become synonymous with Hume. In Sect. 1 I spell out the reductionist interpretation of Hume in which the justification possessed by testimonially-acquired beliefs is reducible to the epistemic (...)
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  3. Hume’s Theory of Knowledge.Vernon J. Bourke - 1938 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 13 (4):693-694.
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  4. Contagion, Community, and Virtue in Hume's Epistemology.Rico Vitz - 2014 - In Jon Matheson & Rico Vitz (eds.), The Ethics of Belief: Individual and Social. Oxford, UK:
    My aim in this chapter is twofold. I attempt to provide an example of how (1) careful analysis in the history of philosophy can (2) elucidate contemporary debates about philosophical issues. My analysis of Hume’s account of the contagion of belief unfolds in three parts. In section one, I offer a summary of Hume’s account of the nature of beliefs concerning matters of fact. In section two, I elucidate his account of the “contagion of opinion” itself, explaining how beliefs are (...)
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  5. David Hume’s Empiristic Theory of Judgment.Witold Marciszewski - 1971 - Studia Semiotyczne—English Supplement 2:88-109.
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  6. Hume’s Deontological Response to Scepticism.Hsueh Qu - 2019 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 6.
    In this paper, I offer a novel interpretation of THN 1.4.7, which sees his sceptical problem and solution in THN 1.4.7 as taking a broadly deontological structure. Briefly, I read the ‘Dangerous Dilemma’ (THN 1.4.7.6-7) as embodying a false dichotomy between two deontological extremes concerning reflection, that is, thinking carefully about our mental states and faculties. The two horns of the Dangerous Dilemma are as follows: either embracing an absolute duty to constantly and incessantly reflect (leading to excessive scepticism); or (...)
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  7. David Hume’s Epistemology and Its Contemporary Importance.Vadim V. Vasilyev - 2020 - Epistemology and Philosophy of Science 57 (1):166-180.
    The paper is about some epistemological ideas of David Hume. At first, I give a review of his most influential epistemological conceptions: his exposition of the problem of induction in the context of his investigation of the nature of empirical reasonings, his analysis of epistemic status of the principle of causation, and his skeptical arguments concerning existence of external world and demonstrative knowledge. Then I discuss those Hume’s epistemological ideas which, as I believe, are usually not rightly understood in literature (...)
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  8. Knowledge and Sensory Knowledge in Hume's Treatise.Graham Clay - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 10.
    I argue that the Hume of the Treatise maintains an account of knowledge according to which (i) every instance of knowledge must be an immediately present perception (i.e., an impression or an idea); (ii) an object of this perception must be a token of a knowable relation; (iii) this token knowable relation must have parts of the instance of knowledge as relata (i.e., the same perception that has it as an object); and any perception that satisfies (i)-(iii) is an instance (...)
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  9. Hume's Epistemology: The State of the Question.Hsueh M. Qu - 2019 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 57 (3):301-323.
    This article surveys the state of the literature on Hume’s epistemology, focusing on treatments of what has come to be known as the ‘Kemp Smith problem’, that is, the problem of reconciling Hume’s scepticism with his naturalism. It first surveys the literature on this issue with regard to the Treatise, moving on to briefly compare the Treatise and the Enquiry in virtue of their epistemological frameworks, before finally examining the literature with regard to the first Enquiry.
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  10. Skepticism in Hume's Politics and Histories.Peter S. Fosl - 2018 - Araucaria 20 (40).
    This essay argues that Hume's political and historical thought is well read as skeptical and skeptical in a way that roots it deeply in the Hellenistic traditions of both Pyrrhonian and Academical thought. It deploys skeptical instruments to undermine political rationalism as well as theologically and metaphysically political ideologies. Hume's is politics of opinion and appearance. It labors to oppose faction and enthusiasm and generate suspension, balance, tranquility, and moderation. Because Hume advocate the use of reflectively generated but epistemically and (...)
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  11. Descartes and Hume on I-Thoughts.Luca Forgione - 2018 - Thémata: Revista de Filosofía 57:211-228.
    Self-consciousness can be understood as the ability to think I-thou-ghts which can be described as thoughts about oneself ‘as oneself’. Self-consciousness possesses two specific correlated features: the first regards the fact that it is grounded on a first-person perspective, whereas the second concerns the fact that it should be considered a consciousness of the self as subject rather than a consciousness of the self as object. The aim of this paper is to analyse a few considerations about Descartes and Hume’s (...)
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  12. Donald C. Ainslie, Hume's True Scepticism.Christopher A. Shrock - 2018 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 16 (1):91-93.
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  13. The Importance of "Mere Conception" in David Hume's Theory of Belief.Catherine Elaine Kemp - 1995 - Dissertation, State University of New York at Stony Brook
    Belief is a species of mere conception, and is modifiable, rather than bivalent (believing or disbelieving). The attendant-impression theory of transformation of conception into belief expresses the moral dimension of one and the same thing, of which the manner-of-conception (without attendant impression) theory of the transformation refers to the epistemic dimension of that same thing. These two aspects of the transformation of conception into belief point to an ambiguity in Hume's use of the term IDEA: as act and as content. (...)
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  14. Righting Epistemology: Hume's Revolution.Bredo Johnsen - 2017 - Oup Usa.
    Righting Epistemology defends an unrecognized Humean conception of epistemic justification, showing that he is no skeptic, and an argument of his that refutes all extant alternative conceptions. It goes on to trace the development of his thought in Sir Karl Popper, Nelson Goodman, W. V. Quine and Ludwig Wittgenstein.
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  15. Hume's True Scepticism by Donald C. Ainslie.Miriam Schleifer McCormick - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):167-168.
    In this rigorous and thorough discussion of David Hume’s A Treatise of Human Nature 1.4, entitled “Of the sceptical and other systems of philosophy,” Donald Ainslie aims both to provide detailed textual exegeses of all seven sections, and to offer a way of understanding them as unified by the recurring theme of the dangers of “false” philosophy and a defense of “true” philosophy or “true scepticism.” To understand the compatibility of Hume’s skeptical conclusions and his philosophical ambitions, and so to (...)
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  16. Probability and Hume's Inductive Scepticism.D. C. Stove - 1973 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 35 (3):646-647.
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  17. Hume's Philosophy of Belief.Jack Kaminsky - 1962 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 23 (2):295-296.
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  18. Probability and Hume's Inductive Scepticism.D. C. Stove - 1977 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 7 (1):203-211.
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  19. Hume’s Causal Reconstruction of the Perceptual Relativity Argument in Treatise 1.4.4: Dialogue.Annemarie Butler - 2009 - Dialogue 48 (1):77-101.
    ABSTRACT: In Treatise 1.4.4, on behalf of modern philosophers, Hume described a causal argument that shows that our impressions of secondary qualities do not resemble qualities of objects themselves. However, in their respective arguments, Hume’s philosophical predecessors did not argue causally, but appealed to contrary qualities. I argue that Hume’s presentation was not simply a “gratuitous” stylistic difference, but an important correction of his predecessors in light of his own philosophical discoveries. RÉSUMÉ : Dans le Traité 1.4.4, Hume a présenté (...)
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  20. Hume's Theory of Knowledge. A Critical Examination.Constance Maund - 1937 - Philosophy 12 (48):488-489.
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  21. Hume's Scepticism.Robert E. Butts & The Editors - 1959 - Journal of the History of Ideas 20 (3):413.
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  22. Philosophy and the Good Life: Hume's Defence of Probable Reasoning.David Owen - 1996 - Dialogue 35 (3):485-504.
    Could John Locke defend his view that the knowledge we acquire in intuition and demonstration is infallible, and should he try to defend it? Peter Schouls thinks the project is unviable, and I think Schouls is right. But I also think Locke should not even bother trying. I shall elaborate on the argument that he could not defend the view, indicate why I think he should abandon infallibility, given his other views, and then investigate what he might usefully say about (...)
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  23. David Hume: His Theory of Knowledge and Morality.Hume: Theory of Knowledge.G. P. Henderson - 1952 - Philosophical Quarterly 2 (8):270-271.
  24. Hume’s Moral Epistemology.Stewart R. Sutherland - 1978 - Philosophical Quarterly 28 (110):77-78.
  25. Hume's Theory of Knowledge: A Critical Examination.M. B. Singer - 1937 - International Journal of Ethics 48 (1):128-130.
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  26. On the Nature and Significance of Hume's Scepticism.Constance Maund - 1952 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 6 (20):168-183.
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  27. Hume's "gematigd" scepticisme: futiel of fataal?Patricia De Martelaere - 1981 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 43:427-464.
    The aim of this paper is to make clear in what sense Hume's actually very radical scepticism can nevertheless be called moderate, and not only leaves intact the praxis in daily life but is even compatible with a — modest and experimental — form of science. The first part stresses the theoretical profoundness of Hume's scepticism, and more specifically the arguments concerning the validity of reason and those concerning some typically 'metaphysical' objects. The former culminate in the impossibility of determining (...)
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  28. Hume on Knowledge, by Harold Noonan. [REVIEW]P. J. E. Kail - 2001 - Mind 110 (440):1102-1105.
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  29. Hume's Skepticism in the Treatise of Human Nature.Robert J. Fogelin - 1986 - Mind 95 (379):392-396.
  30. Hume: Theory of Knowledge.D. C. Yalden-Thomson - 1954 - Philosophy of Science 21 (3):270-270.
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  31. Sellars on Hume and Kant on Representing Complexes.David Landy - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):224-246.
    No Abstract In his graduate-seminar lectures on Kant—published as Kant and Pre-Kantian Themes (Sellars, 2002)—Wilfrid Sellars argues that because Hume cannot distinguish between a vivacious idea and an idea of something vivacious he cannot account for the human ability to represent temporally complex states of affairs. The first section of this paper aims to show that this argument is not properly aimed at the historical Hume who can, on a proper reading, distinguish these kinds of representations. This is not, however, (...)
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  32. Is Hume Really a Reductivist?Michael Welbourne - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (2):407-423.
    Coady misrepresents Hume as a reductivist about testimony. Hume occasionally writes carelessly as if what goes for beliefs based on induction will also go for beliefs obtained from testimony. But, in fact, he has no theory of testimony at all, though in his more considered remarks he rightly thinks, as does Reid, that the natural response to a bit of testimony is simply to accept the information which it contains. The sense in which we owe the beliefs we get from (...)
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  33. Imagination and Experimentalism in Hume’s Philosophy.Andrew Ward - 2012 - Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (1):165-175.
  34. The Rules for Dispositional Judgment in Hume’s Treatise.Walter Brand - 1992 - Southwest Philosophy Review 8 (2):1-11.
  35. Inference, Reason and Reasoning in Book One of Hume’s Treatise.David Owen - 1994 - Southwest Philosophy Review 10 (1):17-27.
  36. Response to Andrew Ward, “Imagination and Experimentalism in Hume’s Philosophy”.J. W. Mock - 2012 - Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (2):65-68.
  37. Hume’s First Principle, His Missing Shade, and His Distinctions of Reason.Karánn Durland - 1996 - Hume Studies 22 (1):105-121.
  38. Custom and Reason in Hume: A Kantian Reading of the First Book of the Treatise. [REVIEW]Paul Guyer - 2009 - Hume Studies 35 (1-2):236-239.
    Henry Allison offers a new understanding of Hume's theory of knowledge, as contained in the first book of his Treatise. Allison provides a comprehensive and detailed critical analysis of Hume's views on the subject, and an extensive comparison with Kant on a range of issues including space and time, causation, existence, and the self.
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  39. Philosophical Relations, Natural Relations, and Philosophic Decisionism in Belief in the External World: Comments on P. J. E. Kail, Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy[REVIEW]Eric Schliesser - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (1):67-76.
    My critical comments on Part I of P. J. E. Kail's Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy are divided into two parts. First, I challenge the exegetical details of Kail's take on Hume's important distinction between natural and philosophical relations. I show that Kail misreads Hume in a subtle fashion. If I am right, then much of the machinery that Kail puts into place for his main argument does different work in Hume than Kail thinks. Second, I offer a brief (...)
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  40. Hume’s Epistemic Naturalism in the Treatise.Tim Black - 2011 - Hume Studies 37 (2):211-242.
    We can understand epistemic naturalism as the view that there are cases in which we are justified in holding a belief and cases in which we are not so justified, and that we can distinguish cases of one sort from cases of the other with reference to non-normative facts about the mechanisms that produce them. By my lights, Hume is an epistemic naturalist of this sort, and I propose in this paper a novel and detailed account of his epistemic naturalism. (...)
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  41. The Vulgar Conception of Objects in “Of Skepticism with Regard to the Senses”.Stefanie Rocknak - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (1):67-90.
    In this paper, we see that contrary to most readings of T 1.4.2 in the Treatise, Hume does not think that objects are sense impressions. This means that Hume’s position on objects is not to be conflated with the vulgar perspective. Moreover, the vulgar perspective undergoes a marked transition in T 1.4.2, evolving from what we may call vulgar perspective I into vulgar perspective II. This paper presents the first detailed analysis of this evolution, which includes an explanation of T (...)
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  42. Belief and Introspective Knowledge in Treatise 1.3.7.Jennifer Smalligan Marušić - 2011 - Hume Studies 37 (1):99-122.
    Hume argues that the difference between belief and mere conception consists in a difference in the manner of conception. His argument assumes that the difference between belief and mere conception must be a function of either the content conceived or of the manner of conception; however, it is unclear what justifies this assumption. I argue that the assumption depends on Hume’s confidence that we can know immediately that we believe when we believe, and that we can only have such knowledge (...)
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  43. Naturalism, Normativity, and Scepticism in Hume’s Account of Belief.Lorne Falkenstein - 1997 - Hume Studies 23 (1):29-72.
  44. Walking the Tightrope of Reason: The Precarious Life of a Rational Animal. [REVIEW]Ira Singer - 2005 - Hume Studies 31 (1):169-172.
    This lively little book — 170 small-format pages, excluding front and end matter — has its origin in the author’s 1995 Romanell-Phi Beta Kappa lectures at Dartmouth College. Consistent with this origin, it speaks primarily to a general audience rather than to philosophical specialists. Nevertheless, even specialist readers will find Walking the Tightrope of Reason valuable. It revisits figures and issues that have long and productively occupied Fogelin, and here we see his thoughts about these figures and issues clearly and (...)
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  45. Projection and Realism in Hume’s Philosophy. [REVIEW]Stephen Buckle - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (1):163-165.
  46. Hume's Probability Argument of I,Iv,1.Richard DeWitt - 1985 - Hume Studies 11 (2):125-140.
  47. Stability and Justification in Hume’s Treatise. [REVIEW]David Owen - 2004 - International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (2):271-273.
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  48. The Distinction Between Coherence and Constancy in Hume's Treatise I.Iv.2.Tim Black - 2007 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):1-25.
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  49. Hume’s Scepticism: Natural Instincts and Philosophical Reflection.Barry Stroud - 1991 - Philosophical Topics 19 (1):271-291.
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  50. Hume’s Naturalism About Cognitive Norms.Janet Broughton - 2003 - Philosophical Topics 31 (1/2):1-19.
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