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  1. Garrett on the Theological Objection to Hume's Compatibilism.John Abbruzzese - 2000 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2):345 – 352.
  2. Review: Hume, a Scottish Socrates? [REVIEW]Donald C. Ainslie - 2003 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (1):133 - 154.
  3. Illustrations of Mr. Hume's Essay Concerning Liberty and Necessity, in Answer to Dr. Gregory [in His Philosophical and Literary Essays] by a Necessitarian [J. Allen]. [REVIEW]John Allen & James Gregory - 1795
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  4. Humean Libertarianism: Outline of a Revisionist Account of the Joint Problem of Free Will, Determinism and Laws of Nature.Marius Backmann - 2013 - Frankfurt: ontos.
    3 LIBERTARIANISM Now that we have discussed determinism and laws of nature, let us finally turn to libertarianism. Traditionally, libertarianism has been viewed as an incompatibilist theory of free will, as it requires the existence of real ...
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  5. Humean Compatibilism.Helen Beebee & Alfred R. Mele - 2002 - Mind 111 (442):201-223.
    Humean compatibilism is the combination of a Humean position on laws of nature and the thesis that free will is compatible with determinism. This article's aim is to situate Humean compatibilism in the current debate among libertarians, traditional compatibilists, and semicompatibilists about free will. We argue that a Humean about laws can hold that there is a sense in which the laws of nature are 'up to us' and hence that the leading style of argument for incompatibilism?the consequence argument?has a (...)
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  6. Hume on Liberty and Necessity.George Botterill - 2002 - In Peter Millican (ed.), Reading Hume on Human Understanding: Essays on the First Enquiry. Clarendon Press.
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  7. Freedom and Moral Sentiment: Hume's Way of Naturalizing Responsibility Paul Russell Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995, 200 Pp., $66.95. [REVIEW]Nathan Brett - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (3):659-.
  8. Penelhum, Terence. Themes in Hume: The Self, the Will, Religion. [REVIEW]John Bricke - 2002 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (4):871-873.
  9. Hume, Freedom to Act, and Personal Evaluation.John Bricke - 1988 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 5 (2):141 - 156.
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  10. Locke, Hume and the Nature of Volitions.John Bricke - 1985 - Hume Studies 1985 (1):15-51.
  11. Determinismo moral em Hume: A aposta na regularidade.Andrea Cachel - 2007 - Philósophos - Revista de Filosofia 12 (1).
    In second book of the Treatise of Human Nature and also in the book An Enquire concerning Human Understanding, Hume sustain his position that the will act according to necessity, not according to freedom. Humean philosophy defends the existence of a necessary cause to the voluntary human actions, and that this cause is not the will´s own movement, but something prior to it, that establishes the generation of necessary effects. This paper aims to show his arguments and intents to indicate (...)
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  12. David Hume and the Concept of Volition.John M. Connolly & Thomas Keutner - 1987 - Hume Studies 13 (2):275-275.
  13. Liberty, Necessity and the Foundations of Hume's 'Science of Man'.Tamás Demeter - 2012 - History of the Human Sciences 25 (1):15-31.
    In this article I suggest that section VIII of Hume’s Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding could be read as a contribution to the foundational issues of a characteristic 18th-century enterprise, namely the ‘science of man’. More specifically, it can be read as a summary of his attempt to place this science on an experimental footing, with an awareness of the lessons he has drawn in the previous sections of the Enquiry. This interpretation fits with an overall reading of the work as (...)
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  14. Paul Russell on Hume's `Reconciling Project'. [REVIEW]Antony Flew - 1984 - Mind 93 (372):587-588.
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  15. James Harris , Of Liberty and Necessity: The Freewill Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy, Oxford: Oxford University Press 2005. Xvi + 264pp. ISBN 0-19-926860-. [REVIEW]Roger Gallie - 2006 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 4 (1):86-88.
  16. A Powerless Conscience: Hume on Reflection and Acting Conscientiously.Lorenzo Greco - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (3):547–564.
    If one looks for the notion of conscience in Hume, there appears to be a contrast between the loose use of it that can be found in his History of England, and the stricter use of it Hume makes in his philosophical works. It is my belief that, notwithstanding the problems Hume’s philosophy raises for a notion such as conscience, it is possible to frame a positive Humean explanation of it. I want to suggest that, far from corresponding to a (...)
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  17. Review of James A. Harris, Of Liberty and Necessity: The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy[REVIEW]Sean Greenberg - 2006 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (3).
  18. Of Liberty and Necessity: The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy.James A. Harris - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    The eighteenth century was a time of brilliant philosophical innovation in Britain. In Of Liberty and Necessity James A. Harris presents the first comprehensive account of the period's discussion of what remains a central problem of philosophy, the question of the freedom of the will. He offers new interpretations of contributions to the free will debate made by canonical figures such as Locke, Hume, Edwards, and Reid, and also discusses in detail the arguments of some less familiar writers. Harris puts (...)
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  19. Of Liberty and Necessity: The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy. [REVIEW]Benjamin Hill - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 646-647.
    Early modern historians and philosophers interested in human freedom can profitably read this book, which provides a synoptic view of the eighteenth-century British free will debate from Locke through Dugald Stewart. Scholars have not ignored the debate, but as they have tended to focus on canonical figures , the author’s inclusion of lesser-known yet significant thinkers such as Lord Kames, Jonathan Edwards, and James Beattie is especially welcome. The main thesis of James Harris’s book is that the eighteenth-century British debate (...)
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  20. Broad and Hume on Causation and Volition.R. F. A. Hoernlé - 1927 - Journal of Philosophy 24 (2):29-36.
  21. Hume On Liberty, Necessity, Morality And Religion.James Humber - 1999 - Philosophical Inquiry 21 (2):17-31.
  22. Our Freedom Reconciled with Determinism.David Hume - manuscript
    It might reasonably be expected in questions which have been canvassed and disputed with great eagerness since the first origin of science and philosophy, that the meaning of all the terms, at least, should have been agreed upon among the disputants; and our enquiries, in the course of two thousand years, been able to pass from words to the true and real subject of the controversy. For how easy may it seem to give exact definitions of the the terms employed (...)
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  23. Themes in Hume: The Self, the Will, Religion. [REVIEW]Singer Ira - 2003 - Ethics 113 (4).
  24. Of Liberty and Necessity: The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy – James A. Harris. [REVIEW]P. J. E. Kail - 2007 - Philosophical Quarterly 57 (228):484–487.
  25. Moral Agency and Free Choice: Clarke's Unlikely Success Against Hume.Erin Kelly - 2002 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 84 (3):297-318.
  26. David Hume and the Concept of Volition: Introduction.Thomas Keutner - 1987 - Hume Studies 13 (2):275-275.
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  27. Hume, Liberty and the Object of Moral Evaluation.André Klaudat - 2003 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 44 (108):191-208.
  28. Hume and Reid on Newtonianism, Naturalism and Liberty.Chris Lindsay - 2012 - In Ilya Kasavin (ed.), David Hume and Contemporary Philosophy. Cambridge Scholars Press.
    There has been a recent flurry of work comparing and contrasting the respective methodologies of David Hume and his contemporary Thomas Reid. Both writers are explicit in their commitments to a Newtonian methodology. Yet they diverge radically on the issue of human liberty. In this paper I want to unpack the methodological commitments underlying the two different accounts of liberty. How is it that two avowed Newtonians end up diametrically opposed to one another with respect to such a fundamental aspect (...)
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  29. Of Liberty and Necessity: The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy. [REVIEW]P. Mayer - 2009 - Philosophical Review 118 (2):247-250.
  30. Hume's Determinism.Peter Millican - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):611-642.
    David Hume has traditionally been assumed to be a soft determinist or compatibilist,1 at least in the 'reconciling project' that he presents in Section 8 of the first Enquiry, entitled 'Of liberty and necessity.'2 Indeed, in encyclopedias and textbooks of Philosophy he is standardly taken to be one of the paradigm compatibilists, rivalled in significance only by Hobbes within the tradition passed down through Locke, Mill, Schlick and Ayer to recent writers such as Dennett and Frankfurt.3 Many Hume scholars also (...)
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  31. Hume, Causal Realism, and Free Will: The State of the Debate.Peter Millican - unknown
    all objects, which are found to be constantly conjoin’d, are upon that account only to be regarded as causes and effects. … the constant conjunction of objects constitutes the very essence of cause and effect … (T 1.4.5.32, my emphasis).
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  32. Themes in Hume: The Self, the Will, Religion.Terence Penelhum - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    Since the 1950s, Terence Penelhum has been a leading contributor to studies on the thought of David Hume. In this collection, he presents a selection of the best of his essays on Hume. Most of the essays are quite recent and three are previously unpublished.
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  33. Critical Notice of Paul Russell's Freedom and Moral Sentiment: Hume's Way of Naturalizing Responsibility.Terence Penelhum - 1998 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):81-94.
    Russell's study of Hume's theories of freedom and responsibility is the first extended treatment of these themes in the literature and shows in detail how what is regarded by most readers as merely the first statement of "compatibilism" is part of a full naturalistic analysis of praise, blame, punishment and responsibility. The notice seeks to bring out how Russell's account of Hume's view of freedom illuminates his psychology and ethics and concludes with a few "libertarian" criticisms of Hume's position.
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  34. Of Liberty and Necessity.A. E. Pitson - 2006 - Hume Studies 32 (1):187-191.
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  35. Liberty, Necessity, and the Will.Tony Pitson - 2006 - In Saul Traiger (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Hume's Treatise. Blackwell. pp. 216--231.
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  36. Natural Necessity and Freedom-on the Theory of Causality of Kant as a Response to Hume.B. Rang - 1990 - Kant-Studien 81 (1):24-56.
  37. Paul Russell, Freedom and Moral Sentiment: Hume's Way of Naturalizing Responsibility. [REVIEW]Kenneth A. Richman - 1996 - Philosophy in Review 16 (5):371-373.
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  38. Free Will and Four English Philosophers: Hobbes, Locke, Hume and Mill.Joseph Rickaby - 1906 - Freeport, N.Y., Books for Libraries Press.
  39. Hume's Lengthy Digression: Free Will in the Treatise.Paul Russell - 2015 - In Donald Ainslie & Annemarie Butler (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Hume's Treatise. Cambridge, UK: pp. 231-251.
    David Hume’s views on the subject of free will are among the most influential contributions to this long-disputed topic. Throughout the twentieth century, and into this century, Hume has been widely regarded as having presented the classic defense of the compatibilist position, the view that freedom and responsibility are consistent with determinism. Most of Hume’s core arguments on this issue are found in the Sections entitled “Of liberty and necessity,” first presented in Book 2 of A Treatise of Human Nature (...)
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  40. Hume on Free Will.Paul Russell - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    David Hume is widely recognized as providing the most influential statement of the “compatibilist” position in the free will debate — the view that freedom and moral responsibility can be reconciled with (causal) determinism. The arguments that Hume advances on this subject are found primarily in the sections titled “Of liberty and necessity”, as first presented in A Treatise of Human Nature (2.3.1-2) and, later, in a slightly amended form, in the Enquiry concerning Human Understanding (sec. 8). Although there is (...)
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  41. Freedom and Moral Sentiment: Hume's Way of Naturalizing Responsibility.Paul Russell - 1995 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Russell examines Hume's notion of free will and moral responsibility. It is widely held that Hume presents us with a classic statement of a compatibilist position--that freedom and responsibility can be reconciled with causation and, indeed, actually require it. Russell argues that this is a distortion of Hume's view, because it overlooks the crucial role of moral sentiment in Hume's picture of human nature. Hume was concerned to describe the regular mechanisms which generate moral sentiments such as (...)
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  42. Hume's `Reconciling Project': A Reply to Flew.Paul Russell - 1985 - Mind 94 (376):587-590.
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  43. Freedom and Moral Sentiment. [REVIEW]Kathleen Schmidt - 1999 - Hume Studies 25 (1/2):263-265.
  44. Terence Penelhum, Themes in Hume: The Self, the Will, Religion:Themes in Hume: The Self, the Will, Religion.Ira Singer - 2003 - Ethics 113 (4):905-907.
  45. :Freedom, and Moral Sentiment: Hume's Way of Naturalizing Responsibility. [REVIEW]Ira Singer - 1999 - Ethics 109 (2):459-461.
    In this book, Russell examines Hume's notion of free will and moral responsibility. It is widely held that Hume presents us with a classic statement of the "compatibilist" position--that freedom and responsibility can be reconciled with causation and, indeed, actually require it. Russell argues that this is a distortion of Hume's view, because it overlooks the crucial role of moral sentiment in Hume's picture of human nature. Hume was concerned to describe the regular mechanisms which generate moral sentiments such as (...)
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  46. The Will in Hume's Treatise.R. F. Stalley - 1986 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 24 (1):41-53.
    Hume regards the will as an impression which normally is followed by an appropriate bodily movement. It is unclear why he adopts this theory instead of saying that passions are directly followed by actions (a view which would in some respects suit him better). I suggest that he needs impressions of the will to explain our knowledge of our own acts. They thus play an indispensible role in hume's newtonian science of the mind.
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  47. Hume on Liberty and Necessity.Godfrey Vesey - 1986 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 20:111-127.
    David Hume described the question of liberty and necessity as ‘the most contentious question of metaphysics, the most contentious science’ . He was right about it being contentious. Whether it is metaphysical is another matter. I think that what is genuinely metaphysical is an assumption that Hume, and a good many other philosophers, make in their treatment of the question. The assumption is about language and reality. I call it ‘the conformity assumption’. But more about that shortly. Let us begin (...)
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