This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

113 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 113
Material to categorize
  1. Ideas, Evidence, and Method: Hume's Skepticism and Naturalism Concerning Knowledge and Causation. [REVIEW]Jonathan Cottrell - 2017 - Philosophical Review 126 (3):393-398.
  2. La fuente de Hume de la distinción “impresión-idea”.Marco Sgarbi - 2012 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 29 (2):561-576.
    In this paper I aim to investigate Hume’s well-known distinction between impressions and ideas, following the methodology of the history of ideas, and showing its specificity and suggesting a possible source, which has not been given much attention by the scholarship, namely the logical doctrines of the physician and anatomist William Harvey, which provide the key concepts to understand Hume’s logic of ideas. After some introductory remarks, the second part deals with the many issues involved in Hume’s distinction, and in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Hume's Impressions of Belief.Stacy J. Hansen - 1988 - Hume Studies 14 (2):277-304.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
Hume: Abstract Ideas
  1. Hume's Legacy: A Cognitive Science Perspective.Mark Collier - 2018 - In Angela Coventry & Alex Sager (eds.), The Humean Mind. Routledge. pp. 434-445.
    Hume is an experimental philosopher who attempts to understand why we think, feel, and act as we do. But how should we evaluate the adequacy of his proposals? This chapter examines Hume’s account from the perspective of interdisciplinary work in cognitive science.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Recent Scholarship on Hume's Theory of Mental Representation.David Landy - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):333-347.
    In a recent paper, Karl Schafer argues that Hume's theory of mental representation has two distinct components, unified by their shared feature of having accuracy conditions. As Schafer sees it, simple and complex ideas represent the intrinsic imagistic features of their objects whereas abstract ideas represent the relations or structures in which multiple objects stand. This distinction, however, is untenable for at least two related reasons. Firstly, complex ideas represent the relations or structures in which the impressions that are the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Hume on Spatial Properties.Jani Hakkarainen - 2015 - In Guigon Ghislain & Rodriguez-Pereyra Gonzalo (eds.), Nominalism About Properties: New Essays. Routledge. pp. 79-94.
    I defend a reading of David Hume’s nominalism that he comes close to Keith Campbell's contemporary trope theory in the specific case of spatial properties. I argue that Hume's view should be construed as classifying spatial properties as Campbellian tropes (particular properties): abstract, particular, determinate and qualitatively simple properties. This has implications for reconstructing Hume's answer to the problem of universals. I argue that Hume’s account of objects resembling each other in respect of spatial properties is grounded in the resemblance (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Hume as a Trope Nominalist.Jani Hakkarainen - 2012 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (S1):55-66.
    In this paper, I argue that Hume's solution to a problem that contemporary metaphysicians call “the problem of universals” would be rather trope-theoretical than some other type of nominalism. The basic idea in different trope theories is that particular properties, i.e., tropes are postulated to account for the fact that there are particular beings resembling each other. I show that Hume's simple sensible perceptions are tropes: simple qualities. Accordingly, their similarities are explained by these tropes themselves and their resemblance. Reading (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. A Puzzle About Hume's Theory of General Representation.David Landy - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (2):257-282.
    according to hume’s theory of general representation, we represent generalities by associating certain ideas with certain words. On one prominent understanding of this theory, calling things by one name or another does not represent any real qualities of those things or any real relations between them. This interpretation runs into difficulty when we turn our attention to Hume’s own use of such general terms throughout the Treatise. It would seem that Hume’s own distinctions—such as the impression-idea distinction and simple-complex distinction—require (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. A Puzzle About Fictions in the Treatise.Jonathan Cottrell - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (1):47-73.
    in the treatise, hume claims to identify many “fictions of the imagination” among both “vulgar” and philosophical beliefs. To name just a few, these include the fiction of one aggregate composed of many parts,1 the fiction of a material object’s identity through change, and the fiction of a human mind’s identity through change and interruption in its existence. Hume claims that these fictions and others like them are somehow defective: in his words, they are “improper,” “inexact,” or not “strict”. I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7. Wittgensteinian Pragmatism in Humean Concepts.David Hommen - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (1):117-135.
    David Hume’s and later Ludwig Wittgenstein’s views on concepts are generally presented as standing in stark opposition to each other. In a nutshell, Hume’s theory of concepts is taken to be subjectivistic and atomistic, while Wittgenstein is metonymic with a broadly pragmatistic and holistic doctrine that gained much attention during the second half of the 20th century. In this essay, I shall argue, however, that Hume’s theory of concepts is indeed much more akin to the views of Wittgenstein and his (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Ideas e imágenes: un estudio de la teoría de las ideas abstractas en Hume.Ana García Varas - 2010 - Revista de filosofía (Chile) 66:93-106.
    La relación entre ideas e imágenes en sus distintas formulaciones filosóficas a lo largo de la modernidad es uno de los elementos clave para la definición de unas y otras, tanto en la teoría epistemológica como en la estética. Este artículo se centra en el estudio de la teoría de las ideas abstractas de Hume, basada en su concepción de las ideas como imágenes. Investigo así sus raíces en la obra de Berkeley, para analizar seguidamente la pretensión humeana de presentar (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Dismantling the Straw Man: An Analysis of the Arguments of Hume and Berkeley Against Locke's Doctrine of Abstract Ideas.Rhys Mckinnon - 2005 - Sorites 16:38-45.
    Many believe that George Berkeley and, subsequently, David Hume offer devastating arguments against John Locke's theory of abstract ideas. It is the purpose of this paper to clarify the attacks given a close reading of Locke. It will be shown that many of the arguments of Berkeley and Hume are of a straw man nature and, moreover, that some of their conclusions are actually in accord with Locke.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Idea y Abstracción En Hume.Jose Luis del Barco Collazos - 1992 - Anuario Filosófico 25 (3):463-491.
    Hume propounds the aporetic principle of correspondence betwen impres-sions and ideas, in order to solve the problem of the genesis of the ideas. This principle, which lacks universal validity, reduces the idea to image and deprives it of universality. In this way is postulated a rigorous and uni-versal nominalism, which converts the ideas into non referential unities the same as the Urimpressions (Husserl) and sets aside the possibility of metaphysics.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. García Varas, Ana. "Ideas e imágenes: un estudio de la teoría de las ideas abstractas en Hume", Revista de Filosofía [Universidad de Chile] 66 : 93-106. [REVIEW]Carlos E. Acuña Feijoo - 2013 - Ideas Y Valores 62 (151):288-291.
    El presente trabajo investiga las tesis sobre el poder civil de Alonso de la Veracruz que buscan incorporar en la comunidad política española a los habitantes autóctonos del Nuevo Mundo, tesis que suelen relacionarse con F. de Vitoria y el tomismo español, y que últimamente son consideradas parte del republicanismo novohispano elaborado desde la periferia americana. Se busca demostrar que su propósito era aplicar una teoría de derechos naturales, sin que ello implique participación política de los indios americanos. Se analiza (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Hume's Unified Theory of Mental Representation.Karl Schafer - 2015 - European Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):978-1005.
    On its face, Hume's account of mental representation involves at least two elements. On the one hand, Hume often seems to write as though the representational properties of an idea are fixed solely by what it is a copy or image of. But, on the other, Hume's treatment of abstract ideas makes it clear that the representational properties of a Humean idea sometimes depend, not just on what it is copied from, but also on the manner in which the mind (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13. Could There Be a Humean Sex-Neutral General Idea of Man?Bat-Ami Bar On - 1987 - Philosophy Research Archives 13:367-377.
    In this paper I suggest that the Humean male and Humean female of Hume’s Treatise would have different mental lives due to a great extent to what Hume takes to be the socio-culture in place. Specifically, I show that the Humean male would be incapable but the Humean female would be capable of forming a Humean sex-neutral general idea of man. The Humean male’s inability is not innate but the result of the trauma he experiences when discovering sexuality, reproduction and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Hume's Theory of General Ideas.Andrew Ushenko - 1955 - Review of Metaphysics 9 (2):236 - 251.
    The premise of functional meaning is to the effect that the appropriate use of words--the employment of words in accordance with the standard usage--discloses their meaning. In its extreme or radical version the premise is a downright identification of a meaning with an act, or acts, of using words, i.e., with actual occurrences. Since actual occurrences are particulars, this extreme form would appeal to a nominalist who wants to eschew universals, especially in a concern with meaning. But the radical premise (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Berkeley and Hume on Abstraction and Generalization.D. E. Bradshaw - 1988 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 5 (1):11 - 22.
  16. 'Abstraction and Representation in Locke, Berkeley and Hume'.Alexander Stewart - unknown
  17. Hume and Abstract General Ideas.George S. Pappas - 1977 - Hume Studies 3 (1):17-31.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  18. Abstract General Ideas in Hume.George S. Pappas - 1989 - Hume Studies 15 (2):339-352.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. Hume, Images and Abstraction.Sonia Sedivy - 1995 - Hume Studies 21 (1):117-133.
  20. Explaining General Ideas.Janet Broughton - 2000 - Hume Studies 26 (2):279-289.
    Hume declared himself a scientist of man; his aim was to identify the principles according to which our impressions give rise to our thoughts, beliefs, passions and actions. He took it that there are things about these products of experience that need to be explained, and as a scientist of man he aimed to provide the needed explanation by finding principles that govern the operations of the mind. In what follows I want to consider Hume’s account of general ideas, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  21. Hume's Attack on Abstract Ideas: Real and Imagined.Gerald Vision - 1979 - Dialogue 18 (4):528-537.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Abstraction, Inseparability, and Identity.Donald L. M. Baxter - 1997 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (2):307-330.
    Berkeley and Hume object to Locke's account of abstraction. Abstraction is separating in the mind what cannot be separated in reality. Their objection is that if a is inseparable in reality from b, then the idea of a is inseparable from the idea of b. The former inseparability is the reason for the latter. In most interpretations, however, commentators leave the former unexplained in explaining the latter. This article assumes that Berkeley and Hume present a unified front against Locke. Hume (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. Hume and Cognitive Science: The Current Status of the Controversy Over Abstract Ideas.Mark Collier - 2005 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):197-207.
    In Book I, Part I, Section VII of the Treatise, Hume sets out to settle, once and for all, the early modern controversy over abstract ideas. In order to do so, he tries to accomplish two tasks: (1) he attempts to defend an exemplar-based theory of general language and thought, and (2) he sets out to refute the rival abstraction-based account. This paper examines the successes and failures of these two projects. I argue that Hume manages to articulate a plausible (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
Hume: Association of Ideas
  1. Hume on Thought and Belief.Edward Craig - 1986 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 20:93-110.
    This is an introduction to hume's doctrines of impressions and ideas and of the acquisition of belief by association and enlivenment, with some critical discussion and an explanation of the way in which hume's historical position made these topics centrally important for him.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Hume's Legacy: A Cognitive Science Perspective.Mark Collier - 2018 - In Angela Coventry & Alex Sager (eds.), The Humean Mind. Routledge. pp. 434-445.
    Hume is an experimental philosopher who attempts to understand why we think, feel, and act as we do. But how should we evaluate the adequacy of his proposals? This chapter examines Hume’s account from the perspective of interdisciplinary work in cognitive science.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Hume´s Principle.João Paulo Monteiro - 1999 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 3 (2):165-186.
    Hume's project aimed at the discovery of the principles of human nature, and among these the most important in most respects is not association of ideas, but the one he calls "custom or habit." But what is the real nature of Hume's principle? It would be philosophically naïve to decide that Hume's concept of habit simply reproduces the dominant conception. In the latter the main element is time, and the possibility of habit depending only on repetition is absent in the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. El principio de semejanza en Hume. Hacia una fundamentación filosófica de los derechos humanos.Mario Edmundo Chávez Tortolero - 2017 - Logos. Revista de Filosofía 129 (1665-8620):151-164.
    En el presente artículo se propone una interpretación del pensamiento de Hume para la comprensión de temas y problemas filosóficos que Hume, en su tiempo, no tuvo en consideración, pero que el día de hoy son relevantes. En primer lugar, se analiza el principio de semejanza y se postula la tesis de la unidad de las percepciones a partir de dicho principio. En segundo lugar, mediante un razonamiento analógico se trata de aplicar la doctrina de las percepciones en Hume para (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Hume, Association, and Causal Belief.João Paulo Monteiro - 2007 - Abstracta 3 (2):107-122.
    The associationist interpretation of Hume's account of causal belief is criticized. The origin of this mistaken interpretation is explained. The difference between Hume's views in the Treatise of Human Nature and in An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding is examined.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. Kaila's Reception of Hume.Jani Hakkarainen - 2012 - Acta Philosophica Fennica 89:147-162.
    In this paper, I discuss Eino Kaila's (1890-1958) understanding of David Hume. Kaila was one of the leading Finnish philosophers of the 20th century and a correspondent of the Vienna Circle. He introduced logical empiricism into Finland and taught Georg Henrik von Wright. Final draft.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Deleuze Transcendental Empiricism as Exercise of Thought: Hume’s Case.Emilian Margarit - 2012 - Meta 4 (2):377-403.
    This paper aims to clarify the program of Deleuze’s work on Hume’s philosophy. Also, I plan to make clear the operational meaning of Deleuze’s own hallmark regarding his approaches to philosophy. I start to follow Deleuze’s plot by engendering three functions of his interpretation of Hume’s Treatise that will be the area of three thematic chapters. The first tries to sort the polemical function of empiricism that is launched through Deleuze’s Hume; the second attempts to figure the domain of subjectivity (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. La teoría de la asociación en Hume.Jose Luis del Barco Collazos - 1981 - Anuario Filosófico 14 (2):49-70.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. David Hume's Assoziationslehre.Maria Dieckmann - 1917 - Dissertation, University of Berlin
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Association, Ideas, and Images in Hume.Fred Wilson - 1992 - In Phillip D. Cummins & Guenter Zoeller (eds.), Minds, Ideas, and Objects: Essays in the Theory of Representation in Modern Philosophy. Ridgeview Publishing Company.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Hume: três problemas centrais.João Paulo Monteiro - 2005 - Doispontos 1 (2).
    O objetivo deste artigo é discutir três problemas centrais na filosofia de David Hume. O primeiro é o do papel da associação de idéias: no Tratado há dois conceitos distintos dessa associação, falha corrigida na primeira Investigação, em que é eliminado o conceito de “associação costumeira” e não se atribui à associação qualquer papel na formação de inferências causais. O segundo diz respeito ao verdadeiro papel da indução. A filosofia humeana trata da descoberta dos poderes causais dos objetos, sem nunca (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Hume on Resemblance, Relevance, and Representation.Steven Gamboa - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (1):21-40.
    I consider a class of argument implying that Hume’s position on general representation is irredeemably circular in that it presupposes what it is meant to explain. Arguments of this sort (the most famous being Sellars’ “myth of the given”) threaten to undermine any empiricist account of general representation by showing how they depend on the naïve assumption that the relevant resemblances required for the sorting of experience into concepts for use in reasoning are simply given in experience itself. My aim (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13. The Necessity of “Necessity”: Hume's Psychology of Sophisticated Causal Inference.Abraham Sesshu Roth - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):263-287.
    Much of what Hume calls probable reasoning is deliberate and reflective. Since there are aspects to Hume’s psychology that tempt some commentators to think, on the contrary, that for Hume all such reasoning is simple and immediate, I will be concerned to emphasize Hume’s recognition of the sophisticated sort of probable reasoning (section I). Though some of the details of my case may be new, the overall point of this section should not be news to recent scholarship. But once we (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Aquinas and Hume on the Laws of Association.John K. Ryan - 1938 - New Scholasticism 12 (4):366-377.
  15. Why History Matters: Associations and Causal Judgment in Hume and Cognitive Science.Mark Collier - 2007 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 28 (3):175-188.
    It is commonly thought that Hume endorses the claim that causal cognition can be fully explained in terms of nothing but custom and habit. Associative learning does, of course, play a major role in the cognitive psychology of the Treatise. But Hume recognizes that associations cannot provide a complete account of causal thought. If human beings lacked the capacity to reflect on rules for judging causes and effects, then we could not (as we do) distinguish between accidental and genuine regularities, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Has Anything Changed? Hume's Theory of Association and Sympathy After the Treatise.Remy Debes - 2007 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):313 – 338.
    Many prominent scholars of Hume's philosophy have suggested that Hume eventually abandoned his associationist account of sympathy, which he made so much of in the Treatise, by the time he came to write the second Enquiry. In this paper I reconsider the seeming disappearance of the associationist account of sympathy, but with the ultimate aim of defending a no-change hypothesis. That is, I’ll argue that careful analysis reveals that Hume not only retained the associationist theory of sympathy in his later (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  17. Hume and the Mechanics of Mind : Impressions, Ideas, and Association.David Owen - 2009 - In David Fate Norton & Jacqueline Anne Taylor (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Hume. Cambridge University Press.
    Hume introduced important innovations concerning the theory of ideas. The two most important are the distinction between impressions and ideas, and the use he made of the principles of association in explaining mental phenomena. Hume divided the perceptions of the mind into two classes. The members of one class, impressions, he held to have a greater degree of force and vivacity than the members of the other class, ideas. He also supposed that ideas are causally dependent copies of impressions. And, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
Hume: Ideas, Misc
  1. Hume’s Answer to Bayle on the Vacuum.Jonathan Cottrell - 2019 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 101 (2):205-236.
    Hume’s discussion of space in the Treatise addresses two main topics: divisibility and vacuum. It is widely recognized that his discussion of divisibility contains an answer to Bayle, whose Dictionary article “Zeno of Elea” presents arguments about divisibility as support for fideism. It is not so widely recognized that, elsewhere in the same article, Bayle presents arguments about vacuum as further support for fideism. This paper aims to show that Hume’s discussion of vacuum contains an answer to these vacuum-based fideistic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Hume on Thought and Belief.Edward Craig - 1986 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 20:93-110.
    This is an introduction to hume's doctrines of impressions and ideas and of the acquisition of belief by association and enlivenment, with some critical discussion and an explanation of the way in which hume's historical position made these topics centrally important for him.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Unperceived Existence and Hume's Theory of Ideas.Jonathan Cottrell - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 9.
  4. Hume's Scepticism and Realism - His Two Profound Arguments Against the Senses in An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding.Jani Hakkarainen - 2007 - Tampere, Finland: University of Tampere.
    The main problem of this study is David Hume’s (1711-76) view on Metaphysical Realism (there are mind-independent, external, and continuous entities). This specific problem is part of two more general questions in Hume scholarship: his attitude to scepticism and the relation between naturalism and skepticism in his thinking. A novel interpretation of these problems is defended in this work. The chief thesis is that Hume is both a sceptic and a Metaphysical Realist. His philosophical attitude is to suspend his judgment (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5. Hume on the Distinction Between Primary and Secondary Qualities.Jani Hakkarainen - 2011 - In Dana Jalobeanu & Peter Anstey (eds.), Vanishing Matter and the Laws of Nature: Descartes and Beyond. London: Routledge. pp. 235-259.
    In this paper, I argue that Hume has an insight into the heart of most of “new philosophy” when he claims that according to it, proper sensibles are not Real properties of material substance and Real bodies. I call this tenet “the Proper Sensibles Principle” (PSP). In the second part of the paper, I defend the interpretation - mainly against Don Garrett’s doubts - that the PSP is a rational tenet in Hume’s view and he thus endorses it. Its rationality (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6. Vivacity and Force as the Source of Hume’s Irregular Arguments.Paul Neiman - 2006 - Philo 9 (2):131-143.
    In the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, Philo and Cleanthes make use of irregular arguments—arguments whose veracity is founded on the force and vivacity with which they strike the mind. This paper provides an analysis of the irregular arguments by the two characters in the Dialogues and by Hume in the Treatise of Human Nature. Since both characters accept the veracity of irregular arguments, it seems that they are in agreement at the end of the Dialogues. The similarity between their arguments (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Hume’s First Principle, His Missing Shade, and His Distinctions of Reason.Karánn Durland - 1996 - Hume Studies 22 (1):105-121.
1 — 50 / 113