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  1. Descartes and Hume on I-Thoughts.Luca Forgione - 2018 - Thémata: Revista de Filosofía 57:211-228.
    Self-consciousness can be understood as the ability to think I-thou-ghts which can be described as thoughts about oneself ‘as oneself’. Self-consciousness possesses two specific correlated features: the first regards the fact that it is grounded on a first-person perspective, whereas the second concerns the fact that it should be considered a consciousness of the self as subject rather than a consciousness of the self as object. The aim of this paper is to analyse a few considerations about Descartes and Hume’s (...)
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  2. Hume on External Existence: A Sceptical Predicament.Dominic K. Dimech - 2018 - Dissertation, University of Sydney
    This thesis investigates Hume’s philosophy of external existence in relation to, and within the context of, his philosophy of scepticism. In his two main works on metaphysics – A Treatise of Human Nature (1739–40) and the first Enquiry (first ed. 1748) – Hume encounters a predicament pertaining to the unreflective, ‘vulgar’ attribution of external existence to mental perceptions and the ‘philosophical’ distinction between perceptions and objects. I argue that we should understand this predicament as follows: the vulgar opinion is our (...)
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  3. Theory of Substance in Locke, Berkeley, and Hume.Allan R. Bower - unknown
    B.A. Thesis --University of Illinois, 1895.
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  4. Solução de Aristóteles e David Hume aos Paradoxos de Zenão: um estudo sobre o conceito de espaço.Marcos César Seneda & Arthur Falco de Lima - 2017 - Horizonte Científico 11 (1):1-28.
    Este trabalho é uma investigação sobre os conceitos de espaço presentes tanto no livro IV da Física de Aristóteles, bem como no Livro 1, parte 2, do Tratado da Natureza Humana de David Hume. Nosso ponto de partida são os paradoxos de Zenão. Sabemos que Aristóteles debate diretamente com Zenão no livro IV da Física, enquanto Hume, no Tratado da Natureza Humana discute com a posição de Zenão acerca do espaço renovada por Bayle. Tendo isto em vista, o principal objetivo (...)
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  5. Humeanism Without Humean Supervenience: A Projectivist Account of Laws and Possibilities.Barry Ward - 2002 - Philosophical Studies 107 (3):191-218.
    Acceptance of Humean Supervenience and the reductive Humean analyses that entail it leads to a litany of inadequately explained conflicts with our intuitions regarding laws and possibilities. However, the non-reductive Humeanism developed here, on which law claims are understood as normative rather than fact stating, can accommodate those intuitions. Rational constraints on such norms provide a set of consistency relations that ground a semantics formulated in terms of factual-normative worlds, solving the Frege-Geach problem of construing unasserted contexts. This set of (...)
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  6. On the Compatibility Between Euclidean Geometry and Hume’s Denial of Infinite Divisibility.Emil Badici - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (2):231-244.
    It has been argued that Hume’s denial of infinite divisibility entails the falsity of most of the familiar theorems of Euclidean geometry, including the Pythagorean theorem and the bisection theorem. I argue that Hume’s thesis that there are indivisibles is not incompatible with the Pythagorean theorem and other central theorems of Euclidean geometry, but only with those theorems that deal with matters of minuteness. The key to understanding Hume’s view of geometry is the distinction he draws between a precise and (...)
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  7. Hume's Determinism.Peter Millican - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):611-642.
    David Hume has traditionally been assumed to be a soft determinist or compatibilist,1 at least in the 'reconciling project' that he presents in Section 8 of the first Enquiry, entitled 'Of liberty and necessity.'2 Indeed, in encyclopedias and textbooks of Philosophy he is standardly taken to be one of the paradigm compatibilists, rivalled in significance only by Hobbes within the tradition passed down through Locke, Mill, Schlick and Ayer to recent writers such as Dennett and Frankfurt.3 Many Hume scholars also (...)
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  8. Realism and Appearances: An Essay in Ontology.John W. Yolton - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book addresses one of the fundamental topics in philosophy: the relation between appearance and reality. John Yolton draws on a rich combination of historical and contemporary material, ranging from the early modern period to present-day debates, to examine this central philosophical preoccupation, which he presents in terms of distinctions between phenomena and causes, causes and meaning, and persons and man. He explores in detail how Locke, Berkeley and Hume talk of appearances and their relation to reality, and offers illuminating (...)
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  9. Hume on Causation.Helen Beebee - 2006 - Routledge.
    Hume is traditionally credited with inventing the ‘regularity theory’ of causation, according to which the causal relation between two events consists merely in the fact that events of the first kind are always followed by events of the second kind. Hume is also traditionally credited with two other, hugely influential positions: the view that the world appears to us as a world of unconnected events, and inductive scepticism: the view that the ‘problem of induction’, the problem of providing a justification (...)
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  10. Hume's Difficulty: Time and Identity in the Treatise.Donald L. M. Baxter - 2007 - Routledge.
    In this volume--the first, focused study of Hume on time and identity--Baxter focuses on Hume’s treatment of the concept of numerical identity, which is central to Hume's famous discussions of the external world and personal identity. Hume raises a long unappreciated, and still unresolved, difficulty with the concept of identity: how to represent something as "a medium betwixt unity and number." Superficial resemblance to Frege’s famous puzzle has kept the difficulty in the shadows. Hume’s way of addressing it makes sense (...)
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  11. David Hume : Self Identity.Walter Frank Browning - unknown
    In the 'Appendix' to the Treatise of Human Nature David Hume asserts that he has been unable to explain the principles which can adequately account for the unity and the identity of the self. There exists in Book I of the Treatise, a principle, which can in fact account for the unity and identity of the self. Hume utilizes the principle in his explication of our belief in the continued and independent existence of a material world. He did not, however, (...)
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  12. Hume on the Idea of a Vacuum.Lorne Falkenstein - 2013 - Hume Studies 39 (2):131-168.
    Hume had two principal arguments for denying that we can have an idea of a vacuum, an argument from the non-entity of unqualified points and an argument from the impossibility of forming abstract ideas of manners of disposition. He also made two serious concessions to the opposed view that we can indeed form ideas of vacua, namely, that bodies that have nothing sensible disposed between them may permit the interposition of other bodies without any apparent motion or occlusion and that (...)
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  13. The Problem of the Self and Personal Identity in David Hume.James Carlton Morrison - 1962
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  14. Causation, Quasi-Realism, and David Hume.Angela Michelle Coventry - 2004 - Dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Despite the widely recognized importance of Hume's theory of causation, there is no agreement amongst commentators about the upshot of that theory. Causal realists interpret Hume as believing that causal statements are true or false due to the existence in the universe of a power linking causes to effects, while causal anti-realists read him as denying that the existence of powers makes causal statements true or false, and as holding instead either that causal statements can be reduced to statements about (...)
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  15. La Nature du Temps Comme Fondement Philosophique de l'Identite Personnelle Chez David Hume.Genevieve Dubois-Flynn - 1997 - Dissertation, Universite Laval (Canada)
    La question de Hume, au regard de l'identite, n'est pas de savoir en quoi consiste l'identite ou s'il y a une identite, mais comment il est possible de l'affirmer. Elle concerne en fait, la question du fondement de l'identite. Il s'agit de prouver comment, a partir de la definition d'un soi envisage comme faisceau de perceptions, les perceptions du soi peuvent etre unifiees entre elles. ;Les conclusions auxquelles Hume parvient, dans le Livre I du Traite de la nature humaine, sont (...)
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  16. Space, Time and Measure: A Study in the Philosophy of David Hume.Sidney Trivus - 1974 - Dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles
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  17. Reason and Conduct in the Philosophy of David Hume and in the Philosophies of His Predecessors.Stanley Tweyman - 1972 - Dissertation, University of Toronto (Canada)
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  18. La causalidad en David Hume.Clemente Fernandez - 1996 - Pensamiento 52 (202):49-74.
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  19. Partly Whole: Husserl and Hume's Problem of Time.Eleanor Frances Pope Katz - 1990 - Dissertation, The Claremont Graduate University
    In Husserl's view of time, he offers a solution to the dilemma of the past and to its relation to the present and the future. The experience of the past exerts no influence causally. The body of past experience is not, in that sense, an entity at all. Husserl tells us that neither past is ever altogether absented from the present, for they form an integral whole. Temporal moments are conjointly experienced and conserved in the form of a series of (...)
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  20. The Reluctant Revolutionary: An Essay on David Hume's Account of Necessary Connection.Alan Kenneth Schwerin - 1988 - Dissertation, Rice University
    Through close critical analyses of Hume's texts I have attempted to develop a new interpretative framework that makes Hume's arguments and positions more accessible, if not more plausible. More positively, The Reluctant Revolutionary is an attempt to defend what may be called a subjectivist interpretation of Hume's views on necessary connection. My central thesis is the suggestion that Hume identifies necessary connection or power with a specific psychological disposition of the mind--as he puts it in the Treatise: necessary connection 'is (...)
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  21. Humean Causality: Inference or Relation?Peter Dalton - 2010 - Journal of Philosophical Research 35:1-24.
    At the close of his account of causality in the Treatise, Hume acknowledges that he had to adopt the “seemingly preposterous method” of examining the causal inference prior to analyzing the causal relation since the relation “depends so much on the inference” . This dependence emerges in his two definitions of ‘cause’ which, he concedes, seem “extraneous” to the causal relation. In this paper, I try to do what Hume did not do but could have done: fully describe the causal (...)
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  22. What is a Non-Humean Theory of Causation?Vytautas Grenda - 2006 - Problemos 69.
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  23. Causation as a Natural and as a Philosophical Relation.Rebecca Kukla - 1992 - Eidos: The Canadian Graduate Journal of Philosophy 10: 161-178.
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  24. Intrinsic Causation in Humean Supervenience.Daniel Kodaj - 2015 - Ratio 28 (2):135-152.
    The paper investigates whether causation is extrinsic in Humean Supervenience in the sense that being caused by is an intrinsic relation between token causes and effects. The underlying goal is to test whether causality is extrinsic for Humeans and intrinsic for anti-Humeans in this sense. I argue that causation is typically extrinsic in HS, but it is intrinsic to event pairs that collectively exhaust almost the whole of history.
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  25. On Hume's Search for the Source of the Idea of Necessary Connection.Alan Schwerin - 1989 - South African Journal of Philosophy 8 (1):30-40.
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  26. How Justified Are the Humean Doubts About Intrinsic Causal Links?Peter Menzies - 1998 - Communication and Cognition. Monographies 31 (4):339-364.
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  27. Humes Idea of Necessary Connection.Mark Sainsbury - 1997 - Manuscrito 20:213-230.
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  28. Kant’s Challenge: The Second Analogy as a Response to Hume.C. Delaney - 1990 - Dialogue: Journal of Phi Sigma Tau 32.
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  29. Bayle, Berkeley, and Hume’s Metaphysics. David - 1986 - In V. Cauchy (ed.), Philosophy and Culture: Proceedings of the 17th World Congress Of Philosophy, v. 4. Montreal: Editions Montmorency.
  30. Unidentified Awareness: Hume’s Perceptions of Self.Christian K. Campolo - 1992 - Auslegung 18.
  31. Reply to Strawson:'David Hume: Objects and Power'.Helen Beebee - 2013 - In Stewart Duncan & Antonia LoLordo (eds.), Debates in Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses. Routledge. pp. 242.
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  32. Hume’s Causal Account of the Self.N. Brett - 1990 - In Schwarz, McNeil & Bonnel (eds.), Lumen. Edmonton: Academic Printing and Publishing. pp. 23-32.
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  33. Hume on Virtue, Beauty, Composites, and Secondary Qualities.D. Baxter - 1990 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 71 (2):103-118.
    Hume’s account of virtue (and beauty) entails that distinct things--a quality in the contemplated and a perception in the contemplator--are the same thing--a given virtue. I show this inconsistency is consistent with his intent. A virtue is a composite of quality and perception, and for Hume a composite is distinct things--the parts--falsely supposed to be a single thing. False or unsubstantiated supposition is for Hume the basis of most of our beliefs. I end with an argument that for Hume secondary (...)
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  34. Hume on Personal Identity.W. Chen - 1985 - Philosophical Review (Taiwan) 8.
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  35. Humean Supervenience, Vectorial Fields, and the Spinning Sphere.Ralf Busse - 2009 - Dialectica 63 (4):449-489.
  36. The Secret Connexion: Causation, Realism, and David Hume. [REVIEW]George Botterill - 1992 - Philosophical Books 31 (4):203-205.
  37. David Hume on the Relation of Causality: Constant Conjunction Versus Necessary Connection.Nusrat Jahan Kazal - 2006 - Philosophy and Progress 39:39.
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  38. Hume’s Finite Geometry: A Reply to Mark Pressman.Lorne Falkenstein - 2000 - Hume Studies 26 (1):183-185.
  39. Hume's Scepticism and Realism: His Two Profound Arguments Against the Senses in An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (Review).Constantine Sandis - 2009 - Hume Studies 35 (1-2):240-242.
  40. Hume on What There Is.V. C. Chappell - 1971 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 5:88-98.
    Ontology was never Hume's main interest, but he certainly had opinions as to what there is, and he often expressed these in his philosophical works. Indeed it seems clear that Hume changed his ontological views while writing the Treatise, and that not just one but two different ontologies are to be found there. The ontology of Parts I, II, and III of Book I is more or less Lockean. There are minds and their operations and qualities. There are physical entities, (...)
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  41. Coerenza e realtà: la geometria in Hume.M. Frasca Spada - 1986 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 41 (4):675-694.
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  42. Hume's Metaphysics and its Influence.C. Hartshorne - 1983 - In Hartshorne (ed.), Insights and Oversights of Great Thinkers.
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  43. Hume e as 'Causas Ocultas'.R. Carrion - 1979 - Rivista Latino- Americana de Filosofia 5 (3):263.
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  44. Hume and Ducasse on Causal Inferences From a Single Experiment.P. F. Wilson - 1979 - Philosophical Studies 35:305-10.
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  45. The Concept of Body in Hume's Treatise.Miren Boehm - 2013 - ProtoSociology:206-220.
    Hume’s views concerning the existence of body or external objects are notoriously difficult and intractable. The paper sheds light on the concept of body in Hume’s Treatise by defending three theses. First, that Hume’s fundamental tenet that the only objects that are present to the mind are perceptions must be understood as methodological, rather than metaphysical or epistemological. Second, that Hume considers legitimate the fundamental assumption of natural philosophy that through experience and observation we know body. Third, that many of (...)
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  46. Hume's Correlationism: On Meillassoux, Necessity and Belief.Paul O'Mahoney - 2013 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 21 (1):132-160.
    The article argues that Meillassoux's 'After Finitude' underestimates the nature and profundity of Hume's sceptical challenge; it neglects the fact that Hume's scepticism concerns final causes (and agrees fundamentally with Bacon and Descartes in this respect), and that in Hume even the operations of reason do not furnish entirely a priori knowledge. We contend that Hume himself institutes a form of correlationism (which in part showed Kant the way to counter the sceptical challenge via transcendental idealism), and sought not merely (...)
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  47. Hume on Causation, Relations and “Necessary Connexions”.Jason Zarri - manuscript
    A specter is haunting Hume scholarship: the specter of the “New Hume.” Contrary to more traditional interpretations, according to which Hume rejects belief in any conception of causation that invokes (metaphysically) necessary connections between distinct existences, proponents of the New Hume hold that Hume at the least allowed for the possibility of such connections—it’s just that he thought we couldn’t know much, if anything, about them, if we assume that they do exist. -/- I will argue that the views of (...)
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  48. Mémoire et Identité de l'homme chez Descartes, Hume et Bergson.Su-Young Hwang - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 54:43-49.
    Le problème de l’identité personnelle est une préoccupation essentielle des philosophes modernes depuis que la conscience est mise en scène philosophiquement. Cependant parmi eux il n’y en a pas beaucoup qui considèrent la mémoire comme le fondement de l’identité humaine, bien qu’aujourd’hui, et grâce aux neurosciences, on sache pourtant qu’elle joue un rôle capital. D’une manière générale, les empiristes s’y intéressent davantage que les rationnalistes. Ceux‐ci ayant comme idéal normatif les systèmes mathématiques ne pensent pas qu’elle puisse contribuer à élargir (...)
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  49. Hume et le procès de la métaphysique.François Chirpaz - 2011 - Archiwum Historii Filozofii I Myśli Społecznej 56.
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  50. Hume's Labyrinth.Alan Schwerin - 2012 - Annales Philosophici 5:69 - 84.
    In the appendix to his Treatise Hume admits that his philosophy of mind is defective. Reluctantly he asserts that his thought has ensnared him in a labyrinth. Referring specifically to the section in the Treatise on personal identity and the self, the young Scot admits that he is “involv’d in such a labyrinth, that, I must confess, I neither know how to correct my former opinions, nor how to render them consistent.” (Treatise 633) My paper is a critical investigation of (...)
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