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  1. Hume's Considered View on Causality.Lee Archie - unknown
    Hume presents two definitions of cause in his \textit{Enquiry} which correspond to his two definitions in his \textit{Treatise}. The first of the definitions is ontological and the second is psychological; indeed, the definitions are extensionally and intensionally distinct. The critical mistake of the skeptical interpretation is the assumption that the two definitions are equivalent, and the critical mistake of the necessitarian is the assumption an association of ideas can be had from one experiment. This paper attempts to clarify Hume's finally (...)
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  2. Is Hume a Neutral Monist?Wilf K. Backhaus - 1991 - Southwest Philosophy Review 7 (2):1-15.
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  3. On the Compatibility Between Euclidean Geometry and Hume’s Denial of Infinite Divisibility.Emil Badici - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (2):231-244.
    It has been argued that Hume’s denial of infinite divisibility entails the falsity of most of the familiar theorems of Euclidean geometry, including the Pythagorean theorem and the bisection theorem. I argue that Hume’s thesis that there are indivisibles is not incompatible with the Pythagorean theorem and other central theorems of Euclidean geometry, but only with those theorems that deal with matters of minuteness. The key to understanding Hume’s view of geometry is the distinction he draws between a precise and (...)
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  4. Hume on Heaps and Bundles.Annette Baier - 1979 - American Philosophical Quarterly 16 (4):285 - 295.
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  5. Hume on Virtue, Beauty, Composites, and Secondary Qualities.D. Baxter - 1990 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 71 (2):103-118.
    Hume’s account of virtue (and beauty) entails that distinct things--a quality in the contemplated and a perception in the contemplator--are the same thing--a given virtue. I show this inconsistency is consistent with his intent. A virtue is a composite of quality and perception, and for Hume a composite is distinct things--the parts--falsely supposed to be a single thing. False or unsubstantiated supposition is for Hume the basis of most of our beliefs. I end with an argument that for Hume secondary (...)
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  6. Replies to Perry, Falkenstein, and Garrett. [REVIEW]Donald L. M. Baxter - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 146 (3):445 - 455.
    Pace Perry, wondering whether perceived things are identical is thinking about them, for Hume, with no thought of perceptions of them. Hume is not a proto-Fregean; Hume's Difficulty is not a version of Frege's Puzzle. Pace Falkenstein, wondering about an identity is not wondering whether clearly distinct things--stages, surfaces, names--are connected in some way. Pace Garrett, wondering about the identity of an observed object is wondering whether it is really one or two things, not whether there is one F or (...)
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  7. Hume's Difficulty: Time and Identity in the Treatise.Donald L. M. Baxter - 2007 - Routledge.
    In this volume--the first, focused study of Hume on time and identity--Baxter focuses on Hume’s treatment of the concept of numerical identity, which is central to Hume's famous discussions of the external world and personal identity. Hume raises a long unappreciated, and still unresolved, difficulty with the concept of identity: how to represent something as "a medium betwixt unity and number." Superficial resemblance to Frege’s famous puzzle has kept the difficulty in the shadows. Hume’s way of addressing it makes sense (...)
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  8. A Humean Temporal Logic.Donald L. M. Baxter - 2000 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2000 (Analytic Philosophy and Logic):209-216.
    Hume argues that the idea of duration is just the idea of the manner in which several things in succession are arrayed. In other words, the idea of duration is the idea of successiveness. He concludes that all and only successions have duration. Hume also argues that there is such a thing as a steadfast object—something which co-exists with many things in succession, but which is not itself a succession. Thus, it seems that Hume has committed himself to a contradiction: (...)
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  9. Hume's Puzzle About Identity.Donald L. M. Baxter - 2000 - Philosophical Studies 98 (2):187-201.
    Hume's puzzle about identity is not semantic, like Frege's, but concerns representation-as. It concerns not what there is which a representation represents, but rather what the representation represents there as being. Hume asks, what do we represent there as being when we realize that something and something are for all we know numerically identical and for all we know numerically distinct? I show that we must represent there as perhaps being something that perhaps is distinct from itself. But we have (...)
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  10. Hume on Infinite Divisibility.Donald L. M. Baxter - 1988 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 5 (2):133-140.
    Hume seems to argue unconvincingly against the infinite divisibility of finite regions of space. I show that his conclusion is entailed by respectable metaphysical principles which he held. One set of principles entails that there are partless (unextended) things. Another set entails that these cannot be ordered so that an infinite number of them compose a finite interval.
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  11. A Dilemma for Hume.Monroe C. Beardsley - 1943 - Philosophical Review 52 (1):28-46.
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  12. Self Inconsistency or Mere Self Perplexity?Tom L. Beauchamp - 1979 - Hume Studies 5 (1):37-44.
  13. Hume on Causal Contiguity and Causal Succession.Tom L. Beauchamp - 1974 - Dialogue 13 (2):271-282.
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  14. Reply to Strawson:'David Hume: Objects and Power'.Helen Beebee - 2013 - In Stewart Duncan & Antonia LoLordo (eds.), Debates in Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses. Routledge. pp. 242.
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  15. Hume on Causation.Helen Beebee - 2006 - Routledge.
    Hume is traditionally credited with inventing the ‘regularity theory’ of causation, according to which the causal relation between two events consists merely in the fact that events of the first kind are always followed by events of the second kind. Hume is also traditionally credited with two other, hugely influential positions: the view that the world appears to us as a world of unconnected events, and inductive scepticism: the view that the ‘problem of induction’, the problem of providing a justification (...)
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  16. Hume. Metaphysics and Epistemology.Helen Beebee & Markus Schrenk (eds.) - 2010 - mentis.
    The articles in this special issue of the yearbook Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy all concern, in one way or another, Hume’s epistemology and metaphysics. -/- There are discussions of our knowledge of causal powers, the extent to which conceivability is a guide to modality, and testimony; there are also discussions of our ideas of space and time, the role in Hume’s thought of the psychological mechanism of ‘completing the union’, the role of impressions, and Hume’s argument against the (...)
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  17. Hume's Labyrinth.David P. Behan - 1985 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (3):309 - 321.
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  18. Hume on Causation.Martin Bell - 2009 - In David Fate Norton & Jacqueline Anne Taylor (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Hume. Cambridge University Press.
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  19. The Self : A Humean Bundle and/or a Cartesian Substance ?Jiri Benovsky - 2009 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 5 (1):7 - 19.
    Is the self a substance, as Descartes thought, or is it 'only' a bundle of perceptions, as Hume thought ? In this paper I will examine these two views, especially with respect to two central features that have played a central role in the discussion, both of which can be quickly and usefully explained if one puts them as an objection to the bundle view. First, friends of the substance view have insisted that only if one conceives of the self (...)
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  20. Essays in Quasi-Realism.Simon Blackburn - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume collects some influential essays in which Simon Blackburn, one of our leading philosophers, explores one of the most profound and fertile of philosophical problems: the way in which our judgments relate to the world. This debate has centered on realism, or the view that what we say is validated by the way things stand in the world, and a variety of oppositions to it. Prominent among the latter are expressive and projective theories, but also a relaxed pluralism that (...)
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  21. Hume and Thick Connexions.Simon Blackburn - 1990 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50:237-250.
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  22. The Concept of Body in Hume's Treatise.Miren Boehm - 2013 - ProtoSociology:206-220.
    Hume’s views concerning the existence of body or external objects are notoriously difficult and intractable. The paper sheds light on the concept of body in Hume’s Treatise by defending three theses. First, that Hume’s fundamental tenet that the only objects that are present to the mind are perceptions must be understood as methodological, rather than metaphysical or epistemological. Second, that Hume considers legitimate the fundamental assumption of natural philosophy that through experience and observation we know body. Third, that many of (...)
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  23. The Secret Connexion: Causation, Realism, and David Hume. [REVIEW]George Botterill - 1992 - Philosophical Books 31 (4):203-205.
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  24. Hume on Induction: A Genuine Problem or Theology's Trojan Horse?Stephen J. Boulter - 2002 - Philosophy 77 (1):67-86.
    In this paper I offer a straight solution to Hume's problem of induction by defusing the assumptions on which it is based. I argue that Hume's problem only arises if we accept (i) that there is no necessity but logical necessity, or (ii) that it is unreasonable to believe that there is any form of necessity in addition to logical necessity. I show that Hume's arguments in favour of (i) and (ii) are unsound. I then offer a suggestion as to (...)
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  25. Theory of Substance in Locke, Berkeley, and Hume.Allan R. Bower - unknown
    B.A. Thesis --University of Illinois, 1895.
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  26. Hume’s Causal Account of the Self.N. Brett - 1990 - In Schwarz, McNeil & Bonnel (eds.), Lumen. Edmonton: Academic Printing and Publishing. pp. 23-32.
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  27. Hume's Debt to Kant.Nathan Brett - 1983 - Hume Studies 9 (1):59-73.
  28. Substance and Mental Identity in Hume's Treatise.Nathan Brett - 1972 - Philosophical Quarterly 22 (87):110-125.
    This essay is an attempt to restore Hume’s account of personal identity to its place in the treatise and to show that it becomes far more plausible in that setting. In this chapter Hume undertakes the tasks of showing how the mistaken idea of a substantial self arises and providing a model for re-thinking the question and eliminating the mistake. It is argued that Hume does not end up dealing with a false question (as some have claimed), and that this (...)
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  29. Hume's Argument Concerning the Idea of Existence.John Bricke - 1991 - Hume Studies 17 (2):161-166.
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  30. David Hume : Self Identity.Walter Frank Browning - unknown
    In the 'Appendix' to the Treatise of Human Nature David Hume asserts that he has been unable to explain the principles which can adequately account for the unity and the identity of the self. There exists in Book I of the Treatise, a principle, which can in fact account for the unity and identity of the self. Hume utilizes the principle in his explication of our belief in the continued and independent existence of a material world. He did not, however, (...)
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  31. Humean Fictions.Anthony L. Brueckner - 1986 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 46 (4):655-664.
    In "Of Personal Identity,", Hume attempts to explain how one arrives at the fiction of a substantial self which retains its numerical identity through time. In "Of Scepticism with Regard to the Senses," Hume offers a similar explanation of the origin of another fiction - that of objects which enjoy a continued and distinct existence. In this paper, I will argue that his pair of parallel explanations does not jointly account for the pair of fictions to be explained.
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  32. Humean Counterfactuals.Martin Bunzl - 1982 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (2):171-177.
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  33. Humean Supervenience, Vectorial Fields, and the Spinning Sphere.Ralf Busse - 2009 - Dialectica 63 (4):449-489.
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  34. Unidentified Awareness: Hume’s Perceptions of Self.Christian K. Campolo - 1992 - Auslegung 18.
  35. Hume e as 'Causas Ocultas'.R. Carrion - 1979 - Rivista Latino- Americana de Filosofia 5 (3):263.
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  36. Causation: One Word, Many Things.Nancy Cartwright - 2004 - Philosophy of Science 71 (5):805-819.
    We currently have on offer a variety of different theories of causation. Many are strikingly good, providing detailed and plausible treatments of exemplary cases; and all suffer from clear counterexamples. I argue that, contra Hume and Kant, this is because causation is not a single, monolithic concept. There are different kinds of causal relations imbedded in different kinds of systems, readily described using thick causal concepts. Our causal theories pick out important and useful structures that fit some familiar cases—cases we (...)
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  37. Hume on What There Is.V. C. Chappell - 1971 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 5:88-98.
    Ontology was never Hume's main interest, but he certainly had opinions as to what there is, and he often expressed these in his philosophical works. Indeed it seems clear that Hume changed his ontological views while writing the Treatise, and that not just one but two different ontologies are to be found there. The ontology of Parts I, II, and III of Book I is more or less Lockean. There are minds and their operations and qualities. There are physical entities, (...)
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  38. Hume on Personal Identity.W. Chen - 1985 - Philosophical Review (Taiwan) 8.
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  39. Hume et le procès de la métaphysique.François Chirpaz - 2011 - Archiwum Historii Filozofii I Myśli Społecznej 56.
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  40. In Defence of Hume's Historical Method.Alix Cohen - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (3):489 – 502.
    A tradition among certain Hume scholars, best known as the ‘New Humeans’, proposes a novel reading of Hume’s work, and in particular of his conception of causality.2 The purpose of this paper is to conduct a similar move regarding Hume’s historical method. It is similar for two reasons: firstly, it is intended to reintegrate Hume’s theory into present-day debates on the nature of history; and secondly, the reading I propose is directed against the standard interpretation of Hume’s history. This interpretation (...)
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  41. Contrariety and Causality in Hume.Benjamin Cohen - 1978 - Hume Studies 4 (1):29-39.
    In the "treatise", Hume treats contrariety as both a relation of 'knowledge' and a relation of 'probability', But these two classes of relations are disjoint. To resolve this apparent inconsistency in hume's theory of relations it is shown that hume implicitly operates with two concepts of contrariety: one is causal and empirical; the other (under a certain restriction) amounts to logical contradiction.
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  42. Motives, Causal Necessity, and Moral Accountability.Mendel F. Cohen - 1964 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 42 (3):322 – 334.
    The author argues, Contra hume, That "the motives of human action are not related to the action in the way in which the causes of the sort of physical behaviour to which hume refers are related to that behaviour." the author contends this because he is opposed to the consequence of hume's theory that "moral appraisal presupposes 'necessity' or determinism." he concludes that we do have to explain morality in terms of human motives, But that a different sort of causality (...)
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  43. Hume and the Second-Quality Analogy.John Corvino - 2008 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 6 (2):157-173.
    In this paper I consider Hume's position on the analogy between moral qualities and secondary qualities. Although some have suggested that Hume's use of the analogy is important to his moral philosophy, others have disputed its significance to Hume. My position in this paper is that Hume believes there are indeed similarities between moral and secondary qualities that illuminate the nature of virtue. This paper is divided into two parts. In the first, I consider Hume's point(s) in raising the analogy (...)
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  44. Hume on the Very Idea of a Relation.Michael Costa - 1998 - Hume Studies 24 (1):71-94.
  45. Hume's Theory of Causation: A Quasi-Realist Interpretation.Angela Coventry - 2006 - Continuum Books.
    Presents an interpretation of David Hume's account of what a 'cause' is. This book emphasises on the connections between Hume's theories of cause, space and time, morals, and aesthetics.
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  46. Causation, Quasi-Realism, and David Hume.Angela Michelle Coventry - 2004 - Dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Despite the widely recognized importance of Hume's theory of causation, there is no agreement amongst commentators about the upshot of that theory. Causal realists interpret Hume as believing that causal statements are true or false due to the existence in the universe of a power linking causes to effects, while causal anti-realists read him as denying that the existence of powers makes causal statements true or false, and as holding instead either that causal statements can be reduced to statements about (...)
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  47. Humean Humility.Aisling Crean - 2010 - Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy (Special Issue edited by Helen Beebee and Markus Schrenk) 13.
    This paper sets up and then solves a puzzle for the sceptical realist interpretation of Hume. The puzzle takes off when the sceptical realist attributes to Hume the following metaphysical theses: -/- (NH1) Causal powers grounding necessary connections in nature exist. (NH2) Causal powers grounding necessary connections in nature are what make things happen. -/- It then attributes an epistemological thesis to him: -/- (NH3) We have no knowledge of causal powers in nature nor of the necessary connections in nature (...)
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  48. Goodbye, Humean Supervenience.Troy Cross - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 7:129-153.
    Reductionists about dispositions must either say the natural properties are all dispositional or individuate properties hyperintensionally. Lewis stands in as an example of the sort of combination I think is incoherent: properties individuated by modal profile + categoricalism.
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  49. Bayle, Leibniz, Hume and Reid on Extension, Composites and Simples.Phillip Cummins - 1990 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 7 (3):299--314.
  50. Hendel on Hume's Atomism.Cecil Currie - 1964 - Dialogue 3 (3):299-307.
1 — 50 / 687