About this topic
Summary

Hume approaches topics in metaphysics and epistemology via his theory of ideas and the cognitive faculties. In metaphysics, his primary interest is in questions not of the form ‘What is X?’ but of the form ‘What can we conceive X to be?’ His best-known contribution is his argument that causation, as far as we can conceive it, is just regular succession among objects or events, plus our habit of inferring one object or event from another. He also made important contributions concerning space and time, existence, identity, substances, and free will. In epistemology, his primary interest is in questions of the form ‘Which of our cognitive faculties is responsible for our belief in X?’ His best-known contribution is his argument that habit, not reason, engages us to suppose that unobserved events will resemble observed ones (a view concerning what philosophers now call induction). He also made important contributions concerning the distinction between the a priori and the a posteriori, belief in the external world, and religious belief.

Key works

Books that discuss Hume's views about a range of topics in metaphysics and epistemology (construed broadly, so as to include philosophy of mind, action and language) include Stroud 1977Garrett 1997 and Allison 2008Fogelin 1985 and Loeb 2002 are devoted to his epistemology. For three different approaches to his theory of causation, see Blackburn 1990, Kail 2007 and Millican 2009. For two different approaches to his argument about induction, see Owen 1999 and Peter Millican's article 'Hume's Sceptical Doubts Concerning Induction,' in Millican 2001.

Introductions

Three introductory books that take quite different approaches to Hume's metaphysics and epistemology are Ayer 1980Blackburn 2008 and Wright 2009Norton & Taylor 2006 contains helpful introductory articles on Hume's views about several topics in metaphysics and epistemology.

Related categories

6240 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 6240
Material to categorize
  1. Contra Una Interpretación Reduccionista Del Método Experimental de David Hume.Sofia Calvente - 2022 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 63 (151):55-78.
    RESUMEN Existe cierta interpretación restringida de la metodología humeana que entiende su experimentalismo únicamente en términos de la reducción de los enunciados epistémicos a impresiones sensibles de carácter privado accesibles mediante la introspección. Nos proponemos revisar esta interpretación a partir de la crítica a la vinculación que establece entre la máxima de no ir más allá de la experiencia y el principio de la copia. Mostraremos que esta interpretación no se condice con el modo en que Hume concibe el método (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. The Necessity of Memory for Self-Identity: Locke, Hume, Freud and the Cyber-Self.Shane J. Ralston - 2000 - Cyberphilosophy Journal 1 (1).
    John Locke is often understood as the inaugurator of the modern discussion of personal human identity—a discussion that inevitably falls back on his own theory with its critical reliance on memory. David Hume and Sigmund Freud would later make arguments for what constituted personal identity, both relying, like Locke, on memory, but parting from Locke's company in respect the role that memory played. The purpose of this paper will be to sketch the groundwork for Locke's own theory of personal identity (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. A Guide to Kant’s Psychologism: Via Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Wittgenstein.Wayne Waxman - 2019 - Routledge.
    This book presents an interpretation of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason as a priori psychologism. It groups Kant's philosophy together with those of the British empiricists--Locke, Berkeley, and Hume--in a single line of psychologistic succession and offers a clear explanation of how Kant's psychologism differs from psychology and idealism. The book reconciles Kant's philosophy with subsequent developments in science and mathematics, including post-Fregean mathematical logic, non-Euclidean geometry, and both relativity and quantum theory. Finally, the author reveals the ways in which (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. David Hume: His Theory of Knowledge and Morality.D. G. C. Macnabb - 1951 - Routledge.
    This book, first published in 1951, is an examination of Hume's 'Treatise of Human Nature', 'An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals', and 'An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding'. It lucidly clarifies and makes alive the new discoveries of Hume's works in a study that makes plain the importance of this philosopher to the world today.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Hume’s Theory of the Understanding.Ralph W. Church - 1935 - Routledge.
    This book, first published in 1935, is an examination of Hume's theories of causal inference and belief in substance and his analysis of the understanding.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Complex Ideas and Hume’s Separability Principle.Hsueh M. Qu - 2022 - Mind 131 (522):517-534.
    In this paper, I will argue that a number of Hume’s claims generate a putative inconsistency with regard to complex ideas and independent existence. I first provide a prima facie argument for the existence of this inconsistency. Then, I examine a number of attempts to rescue Hume from this problem, and argue that each of them fails, before proposing my own solution.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Hsueh M. Qu, Hume's Epistemological Evolution.Nathan I. Sasser - 2022 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 20 (1):80-84.
  8. Religion in Context: History and Policy in Hume's Natural History of Religion.Hannah Lingier - 2022 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 20 (1):41-54.
    Hume's Natural History of Religion is generally regarded as a reductionist project, in which religion is traced to its universal natural roots in the passions and imagination. This interpretation neglects: Hume's view that humankind is social by nature, which implies that any naturalist explanation of religion cannot appeal to facts about individual minds alone, and Hume's interest in religion as it concerns religion's effects on morality and society, effects that occur within socio-historical contexts. Religion is generated out of universal propensities, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Responsibility Naturalized: A Qualified Defence of Hume.Paul Russell - 1995 - In Freedom and Moral Sentiment: Hume's Way of Naturalizing Responsibility. New York, NY, USA: pp. 170-185.
    This concluding chapter of FREEDOM AND MORAL SENTIMENT (OUP 1995) provides a qualified defense of Hume's naturalistic approach to the problem of free will and moral responsibility. A particularly important theme is the contrast between Hume's naturalistic approach and the “rationalistic” approach associated with classical compatibilism. Whereas the rationalistic approach proceeds as an a priori, conceptual investigation into the nature and conditions of moral responsibility, the naturalistic approach is committed to an empirically oriented (i.e., psychologically informed) examination of these issues (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Breves considerações sobre a epistemologia de David Hume.Rubin Souza - 2014 - Jus Navigandi 1 (1):1-12.
    O objetivo do artigofoi especular sobre a epistemologia proposta por David Hume (1711-1776), especificamente a perspectiva empirista e cética. Procurou-se, assim, expor os principais conceitos da sua filosofia, especialmente acrítica à concepção de causalidade, o problema da probabilidade e os conceitos de percepções, imagens e ideias. Finalmente buscou-se expor uma interpretação que entende haver um ceticismo mitigado no autor e a superação de uma teoria do conhecimento exclusivamente psicológica.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Comments on Rocknak's Imagined Causes.Donald L. M. Baxter - 2019 - Hume Studies 45 (1):51-58.
    Stefanie Rocknak has written an ambitious and challenging book1 in which she argues for a new interpretation of Hume's account of how we come to believe in external objects, and what it is we believe in. I am hampered by the fact that she and I seem to agree on so little. Thus, my criticisms run the danger of simply not seeing what she is up to.A preliminary terminological point: where Rocknak uses the word "object," I will often use the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. What, in the World, Was Hume Thinking? Comments on Rocknak's Imagined Causes.Don Garrett - 2019 - Hume Studies 45 (1):59-68.
    Stefanie Rocknak's stimulating, challenging, and highly original new book, Imagined Causes: Hume's Conception of Objects, is helpfully summarized on its back cover as follows: This book provides the first comprehensive account of Hume's conception of objects in Book I of A Treatise of Human Nature. What, according to Hume, are objects? Ideas? Impressions? Mind-independent objects? All three? None of the above? Through a close textual analysis, Rocknak shows that Hume thought that objects are imagined ideas. But, she argues, he struggled (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. Précis of Imagined Causes.Stefanie Rocknak - 2019 - Hume Studies 45 (1):47-50.
    By Hume's own account, his most ambitious project, the Treatise on Human Nature, was a notoriously immature undertaking, choked with immutable difficulties.1 Perhaps as a result of this immaturity, and perhaps because, as Kant suggests above, Hume is perpetually misread, his view on objects remains obscured. What are they? Are they ideas? Impressions? Mindindependent objects? All three? None of the above? To date, scholars have not provided a unified, much less exhaustive, answer to these questions. Rather, four somewhat fragmented interpretations (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Reply to My Critics.Donald C. Ainslie - 2019 - Hume Studies 45 (1):129-141.
    I owe thanks to Annemarie Butler, Jonathan Cottrell, and Barry Stroud for their thoughtful criticism of my interpretation in Hume's True Scepticism of David Hume's epistemology and philosophy of mind as presented in A Treatise of Human Nature.1 Butler focuses on my account of the mental mechanisms Hume provides for our everyday beliefs about external objects. She also challenges my appeal to what Hume calls "secondary" ideas in my explanation of Humean introspection. Cottrell raises questions about my interpretation of perceptions (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Comments on Ainslie's Hume's True Scepticism.Barry Stroud - 2019 - Hume Studies 45 (1):121-127.
    I understand the title of this book, Hume's True Scepticism,1 not as a promise to identify some thesis, or doctrine, that is a statement of Hume's scepticism and is true, but rather to explain what Hume's scepticism really amounts to, what it truly is—the real thing. That is what I too would like to discuss. And I applaud Ainslie's concentration on the concluding section of Book 1 of the Treatise as the best place to look for an expression of that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Comments on Ainslie's Hume's True Scepticism.Annemarie Butler - 2019 - Hume Studies 45 (1):101-108.
    Donald C. Ainslie's Hume's True Scepticism is a wonderful book—clearly written and forcefully argued—and was deservedly honored with Journal of the History of Philosophy's Book Prize for 2016. The focus of the book is part four of the first Book of Hume's Treatise, "Of the sceptical and other systems of philosophy." Ainslie develops an interpretation that takes seriously Hume's psychological claims, using them to solve puzzles in Hume scholarship, including the extent of Hume's scepticism, the nature of his sceptical crisis, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Perceptions, Minds, and Hume's Self-Doubts: Comments on Ainslie's Hume's True Scepticism.Jonathan Cottrell - 2019 - Hume Studies 45 (1):109-119.
    In Hume's True Scepticism, Donald C. Ainslie offers a highly original, systematic interpretation of Treatise Book 1, part 4, and of much else in the Treatise besides. Along the way, he provides new solutions to two of the main outstanding problems of Hume scholarship: what is the relationship between Hume's skepticism and his commitment to pursuing a naturalistic science of man? And what "very considerable mistake" about personal identity does Hume mean to report in the Appendix? These are fantastic achievements. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Précis of Hume's True Scepticism.Donald C. Ainslie - 2019 - Hume Studies 45 (1):95-99.
    In Hume's True Scepticism, I offer a new interpretation of David Hume's epistemology and philosophy of mind as presented in A Treatise of Human Nature.1 I approach this task by developing what I take to be the first comprehensive2 investigation of Part 4 of Book 1. The arguments Hume offers there have frequently been addressed by the secondary literature in a piecemeal fashion, especially his account of personal identity and of our belief in the external world. But I argue in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. The Foundational Document of Cognitive Science.Tamás Demeter - 2021 - In Judit Gervain, Gergely Csibra & Kristóf Kovács (eds.), A Life in Cognition: Studies in Cognitive Science in Honor of Csaba Pléh. Springer Verlag. pp. 163-174.
    David Hume’s Treatise of Human Nature is arguably the best candidate for the first ever overarching attempt at a descriptive-explanatory science of the mind. This paper characterizes the key tenets of Hume’s undertaking and situates its central features in the context of then-contemporary science. According to the present argument, Hume’s science of man provides a chemical-organismic account of mental functioning that fits an intellectual environment dominated by post-Newtonian natural philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Hume über das Selbst, die Person und die Identität der Person.Jens Kulenkampff - 2021 - In Roland Kipke, Nele Röttger, Johanna Wagner & Almut Kristine V. Wedelstaedt (eds.), Zusammendenken: Festschrift Für Ralf Stoecker. Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden. pp. 3-17.
    Wie es scheint, hat Hume in Of personal identity die Identität der Person bestritten. Tatsächlich hat er lediglich eine falsche Auffassung von Person und Selbst kritisiert und daran anschließend zu erklären versucht, durch welche psychischen Mechanismen es zur Bildung dieser falschen „idea of self“ kommt. Diese Erklärung ist misslungen und von Hume im Appendix revoziert worden. Hume selbst hat dagegen einen vollkommen unspektakulären und alltäglichen Begriff der Person vertreten, wie in Of pride and humility so beiläufig wie überzeugend deutlich wird.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Hume’da Ben İdesinin Bilgikuramsal Temellerinin Bir Çözümlemesi.Funda Neslioglu Serin - 2017 - Kaygi 1 (29):125-138.
    Öz David Hume İnsan Doğası Üzerine Bir İnceleme’de ben idesinin bilgikuramsal temellerini araştırırken, bir yandan hiç kuşku duyulmaksızın kabul edilen ben’e ilişkin bilgimizin güvenilir temellere dayanmadığını göstermeye çalışıyor, diğer yandan da bu tür bir araştırmanın ancak bir bilim aracılığıyla yapılması gereğine dikkat çekiyordu. Ben idesi için görgül kanıt arayışı, oluşturmaya çalıştığı insan biliminin deneysel temelleri olması gerektiği gibi insan doğasına ilişkin araştırmalar için yeni bir uslamlamayı da imliyordu. Hume’un önerdiği uslamlama yöntemi, geleneksel felsefenin insan zihnine dair yaklaşımının artık savunulamaz olduğunun (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. The B Side of Imagination: Hume on Imperfect Ideas.Sofía Calvente - 2021 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual 1 (34):53-72.
    My aim is to look into the representational aspect of ideas, exploring not only to what Hume refers as adequate ideas, but also these cases where for a number of reasons an idea does not reach that standard. It has been suggested that the latter are fictions, but an in-depth examination of Hume texts reveals that there are several types of imperfections, such as incompleteness or imprecision that prevent an idea from being adequate. This leads to an analysis of the (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Hume and Reliabilism.Qu Hsueh - 2021 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual 1 (34):27-51.
    Hume's epistemological legacy is often perceived as a predominantly negative sceptical one. His infamous problem of induction continues to perplex philosophers to this day, and many of his sceptical worries maintain their interest in contemporary eyes (e.g. with regard to reason, the senses, substance, causation). Yet Hume's positive epistemological contributions also hold significance for philosophy in this day and age. In this paper, I aim to situate Hume's epistemology in a more contemporary context, particularly with regard to the theme of (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Towards a Humean Epistemic Ideal: Contested Alternatives and the Ideology of Modern Science.Demeter Tamás - 2021 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual 1 (34):7-25.
    I suggest that it is fruitful to read Hume's Enquiry concerning Human Understanding as a concise exposition of an epistemic ideal whose complex philosophical background is laid down in A Treatise of Human Nature. Accordingly, the Treatise offers a theory of cognitive and affective capacities, which serves in the Enquiry as the foundation for a critique of chimerical epistemic ideals, and the development of an alternative ideal. Taking the "mental geography" of the Treatise as his starting point, this is the (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Recasting Hume and Early Modern Philosophy: Selected Essays.Paul Russell - 2021 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.
    In this collection of essays, philosopher Paul Russell addresses major figures and central topics of the history of early modern philosophy. Most of these essays are studies on the philosophy of David Hume, one of the great figures in the history of philosophy. One central theme, connecting many of the essays, concerns Hume's fundamental irreligious intentions. Russell argues that a proper appreciation of the significance of Hume's irreligious concerns, which runs through his whole philosophy, serves to discredit the deeply entrenched (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Modal Metaphysics and the Priority of Causes in Hume's Treatise.Ariel Melamedoff - manuscript
    At the start of his discussion of causation, Hume claims to demonstrate that simultaneous causation is absolutely impossible; all causes must precede their effects in time. I argue that considering Hume’s modal theory can reveal two important and previously unaddressed features of this argument. First, his modal metaphysics resolves one of the most pressing extant interpretive issues: how Hume is able to infer from the claim that it is possible for some object to be simultaneously caused to the claim that (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. How Good Was Shepherd’s Response to Hume’s Epistemological Challenge?Travis Tanner - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 30 (1):71-89.
    Recent work on Mary Shepherd has largely focused on her metaphysics, especially as a response to Berkeley and Hume. However, relatively little attention has thus far been paid to the epistemological aspects of Shepherd’s program. What little attention Shepherd’s epistemology has received has tended to cast her as providing an unsatisfactory response to the skeptical challenge issued by Hume. For example, Walter Ott and Jeremy Fantl have each suggested that Shepherd cannot avoid Hume’s inductive skepticism even if she is granted (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Kant on Time II: The Law of Evidence of the Critique of Pure Reason.David Hyder - forthcoming - Kant-Studien.
    Dieter Henrich ‘s “Notion of a Deduction” (1989), opened up approaches to both Deductions in terms of legal as opposed to syllogistic reasoning. Since the CpR is shot through with juridical metaphors and analogies, many points of connection suggest themselves. In this paper, I extend and modify Henrich’s approach, in order to extract a particular logic of evidence. I argue that the three syntheses of the A-Deduction correspond to parts of a deductive procedure, and that their names have been chosen (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Deleuze's Hume: Philosophy, Culture and the Scottish Enlightenment.Jeffrey A. Bell - 2008 - Edinburgh University Press.
    This book offers the first extended comparison of the philosophies of Gilles Deleuze and David Hume. Jeffrey Bell argues that Deleuze's early work on Hume was instrumental to Deleuze's formulation of the problems and concepts that would remain the focus of his entire corpus. Reading Deleuze's work in light of Hume's influence, along with a comparison of Deleuze's work with William James, Henri Bergson, and others, sets the stage for a vigorous defence of his philosophy against a number of recent (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Contraries, Oppositions, and Contradictions: A Species/Genus Account of Humean Contrariety.Brent Delaney - 2022 - Synthese 200 (1):1-22.
    Abstract: Hume’s account of contrariety in Book I of the Treatise poses several interpretive puzzles. I consider each in turn and offer a novel interpretation of contrariety based on Hume’s discussion of the passions. That Book II and Book I form a complete chain of reasoning suggests that the way in which passions are related is analogous to the way in which ideas are related in the understanding. I argue that Hume identifies three species of empirical contrariety in Book II: (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. David Hume’s An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding.Irfan Ajvazi - manuscript
  32. Kant, Hume, and the Metaphysical Tradition.Graciela T. De Pierris - 2021 - In Camilla Serck-Hanssen & Beatrix Himmelmann (eds.), The Court of Reason: Proceedings of the 13th International Kant Congress. De Gruyter. pp. 467-474.
  33. Jacobis Philosophie. Über den Widerspruch zwischen System und Freiheit, by Birgit Sandkaulen; David Hume über den Glauben oder Idealismus und Realismus, by Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi.Rolf Ahlers - 2021 - Idealistic Studies 51 (3):279-296.
  34. Hume's Rhetorical Strategy: Three Views.Daryl Ooi - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (3):243–259.
    In the Fragment on Evil, Hume announces that he “shall not employ any rhetoric in a philosophical argument, where reason alone ought to be hearkened to.” To employ the rhetorical strategy, in the context of the Fragment, just is to “enumerate all the evils, incident to human life, and display them, with eloquence, in their proper colours.” However, in Part 11 of the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, Hume employs precisely this rhetorical strategy. I discuss three interpretations that might account for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Hume's Rhetorical Strategy: Three Views.Daryl Ooi - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 3 (19):243–259.
    In the Fragment on Evil, Hume announces that he “shall not employ any rhetoric in a philosophical argument, where reason alone ought to be hearkened to.” To employ the rhetorical strategy, in the context of the Fragment, just is to “enumerate all the evils, incident to human life, and display them, with eloquence, in their proper colours.” However, in Part 11 of the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, Hume employs precisely this rhetorical strategy. I discuss three interpretations that might account for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Kant, Hume, and the Interruption of Dogmatic Slumber by Abraham Anderson.Robert Gressis - 2021 - Hume Studies 44 (2):275-277.
    The Germans have a lovely word: Millimeterarbeit. Literally, it means "millimeter work" but a more accurate translation would be "very precise work." Abraham Anderson's Kant, Hume, and the Interruption of Dogmatic Slumber qualifies as Millimeterarbeit, because the entire book is devoted to unpacking the meaning of a single sentence from page 4:260 of the Prolegomena to Any Future Metaphysics That Will Be Able to Come Forward as Science: "I freely confess: it was the objection of David Hume that first, many (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Hume's Pivotal Argument, and His Supposed Obligation of Reason.Peter Millican - 2021 - Hume Studies 44 (2):167-208.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Impressions, Ideas, and Ontological Type.Peter Loptson - 2021 - Hume Studies 44 (2):123-157.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. "Distinction of Reason" is an Incomplete Symbol.James Van Cleve - 2021 - Hume Studies 44 (2):159-166.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Spatial and Temporal Dimensions of Hume on Probability and the Passions.Angela Coventry - 2021 - Revista Estudos Hum(E)Anos 9 (1):7-28.
    This paper is about Hume on the impact of space and time on probability judgements and the passions. Hume's approach to probability judgements in space-time may be considered a precursor to recent work on the cognitive psychology of decision-making. When it comes to the passions, Hume’s observations on the effect of distance in time in particular can be compared to discussions of temporal discounting, central in disciplines such as behavioral economics, neuroscience, psychology, environmental policy, and recent debates in experimental psychology (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. The Aristotelian Tradition and the Rise of British Empiricism: Logic and Epistemology in the British Isles.Marco Sgarbi - 2012 - Dordrecht, Netherland: Springer.
    Offers an extremely bold, far-reaching, and unsuspected thesis in the history of philosophy: Aristotelianism was a dominant movement of the British philosophical landscape, especially in the field of logic, and it had a long survival. British Aristotelian doctrines were strongly empiricist in nature, both in the theory of knowledge and in scientific method; this character marked and influenced further developments in British philosophy at the end of the century, and eventually gave rise to what we now call British empiricism, which (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  42. A Treatise of Human Nature: Being an Attempt to Introduce the Experimental Method of Reasoning Into Moral Subjects and Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion.David Hume - 1739 - London, England: Printed for John Noon, at the White-Hart, Near Mercer's Chapel, in Cheapside.
    Influencing ethics, metaphysics, and philosophy of science, David Hume's Treatise of Human Nature remains unrivalled by perhaps any other works in philosophy. The Treatise is of interest, and not merely historical interest, to professional academic philosophers. It is remarkable that it can, and often does, also serve as one of the best introductions to philosophy-to what philosophers really do-for the novice.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43. What is a Law of Nature?David Malet Armstrong - 1983 - Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
    This is a study of a crucial and controversial topic in metaphysics and the philosophy of science: the status of the laws of nature. D. M. Armstrong works out clearly and in comprehensive detail a largely original view that laws are relations between properties or universals. The theory is continuous with the views on universals and more generally with the scientific realism that Professor Armstrong has advanced in earlier publications. He begins here by mounting an attack on the orthodox and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44. How a Critical Humean Naturalism is Possible: Contesting the Neo-Aristotelian Reading.Martin Hartmann - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 47 (9):1088-1103.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 47, Issue 9, Page 1088-1103, November 2021. Ethical naturalists such as Philippa Foot, John McDowell or Sabina Lovibond have critically distinguished their version of naturalism from the version ascribed to David Hume. This article defends Hume’s naturalism against this criticism in constructing a more plausible version of it. The article briefly delineates John McDowell’s reading of Hume in his well-known ‘Two Sorts of Naturalism’. Based on Nietzsche, the article then offers the concept of ‘historical naturalism’ (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. Metafisica dogmatica e metafisica critica: ancora su Hume e Kant.Miguel Lobos Zuzunaga - 2021 - Quaestio 20:534-538.
    Quaestio, Volume 20, Issue, Page 534-538, January 2020.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Perceiving Causality in Action.Robert Reimer - 2021 - Synthese 199 (5-6):14201-14221.
    David Hume and other philosophers doubt that causality can be perceived directly. Instead, observers become aware of it through inference based on the perception of the two events constituting cause and effect of the causal relation. However, Hume and the other philosophers primarily consider causal relations in which one object triggers a motion or change in another. In this paper, I will argue against Hume’s assumption by distinguishing a kind of causal relations in which an agent is controlling the motion (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Hume’s and Kant’s understanding of epistemic normativity.Petar Nurkić - 2021 - Theoria, Beograd 64 (3):91-112.
    Question (d) how do we form beliefs?, implies descriptive answers. On the other hand, the question (n) how should we form beliefs?, implies normative answers. Can we provide answers to (n) questions without answering (d) questions? This (n) - (d) relation can be characterized as epistemic normativity. Hume and Kant provide answers to both questions. Hume is more inclined to psychologize these answers through an empirical approach to questions related to beliefs. While Kant is more inclined to consider a priori (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Induction Ain’T What It Used to Be: Skepticism About the Future of Induction.Mark Walker & Milan Ćirković - 2021 - Journal of Ethics and Emerging Technologies 30 (1):11-28.
    We argue that, in all probability, the universe will become less predictable. This assertion means that induction, which some scientists conceive of as a tool for predicting the future, will become less useful. Our argument claims that the universe will increasingly come under intentional control, and objects that are under intentional control are typically less predictable than those that are not. We contrast this form of skepticism about induction, "Skeptical-Dogmatism," with David Hume's Pyrrhonian skepticism about induction.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Hume and Kant and Managers Epistemology. An Interview with Paul Griseri.Wim Vandekerckhove - 2021 - Philosophy of Management 20 (4):485-494.
    This article is a transcript of an interview with the previous editor-in-chief of Philosophy of Management. It discusses his career, the use of and hopes for field of philosophy of management, and leading the journal.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Hume’s “Projectivism” Explained.Miren Boehm - 2020 - Synthese 199 (1-2):815-833.
    Hume appeals to a mysterious mental process to explain how to world appears to possess features that are not present in sense perceptions, namely causal, moral, and aesthetic properties. He famously writes that the mind spreads itself onto the external world, and that we stain or gild natural objects with our sentiments. Projectivism is founded on these texts but it assumes a reading of Hume’s language as merely metaphorical. This assumption, however, conflicts sharply with the important explanatory role that “spreading” (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 6240