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Summary

Hume approaches topics in metaphysics and epistemology via his theory of ideas and the cognitive faculties. In metaphysics, his primary interest is in questions not of the form ‘What is X?’ but of the form ‘What can we conceive X to be?’ His best-known contribution is his argument that causation, as far as we can conceive it, is just regular succession among objects or events, plus our habit of inferring one object or event from another. He also made important contributions concerning space and time, existence, identity, substances, and free will. In epistemology, his primary interest is in questions of the form ‘Which of our cognitive faculties is responsible for our belief in X?’ His best-known contribution is his argument that habit, not reason, engages us to suppose that unobserved events will resemble observed ones (a view concerning what philosophers now call induction). He also made important contributions concerning the distinction between the a priori and the a posteriori, belief in the external world, and religious belief.

Key works

Books that discuss Hume's views about a range of topics in metaphysics and epistemology (construed broadly, so as to include philosophy of mind, action and language) include Stroud 1977Garrett 1997 and Allison 2008Fogelin 1985 and Loeb 2002 are devoted to his epistemology. For three different approaches to his theory of causation, see Blackburn 1990, Kail 2007 and Millican 2009. For two different approaches to his argument about induction, see Owen 1999 and Peter Millican's article 'Hume's Sceptical Doubts Concerning Induction,' in Millican 2001.

Introductions

Three introductory books that take quite different approaches to Hume's metaphysics and epistemology are Ayer 1980Blackburn 2008 and Wright 2009Norton & Taylor 2006 contains helpful introductory articles on Hume's views about several topics in metaphysics and epistemology.

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  1. Hume's Dual Criteria for Memory.Maité Cruz - 2019 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 100 (2):336-358.
    In his brief treatment of memory, Hume characterizes memory using two kinds of criteria: ideas’ phenomenal character and their correspondence to the past experiences from which they derived. These criteria have seemed so perplexing to interpreters, both individually and jointly, that Hume’s account of memory is commonly considered one of the weakest parts of his philosophical system. This paper defends Hume’s criteria by showing that they achieve two theoretical aims: a scientific classification of ideas and a definition of ‘memory.’ In (...)
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  2. Skeptical Influences on Hume's View of Animal Reasoning.Richard J. Fry - 2019 - Hume Studies 42 (1):137-165.
    In his writings on non-human animals, David Hume draws comparisons between non-human animals' cognitive capacities and the cognitive capacities of humans. That Hume draws such comparisons might seem to be evidence that Hume was influenced on this issue by epistemologically skeptical thinkers such as Sextus Empiricus, Michel de Montaigne, and Pierre Bayle. This is enticing, as Hume was influenced by them on other issues and they too make comparisons between human and non-human animal reasoning. Comparing Hume's arguments in the sections (...)
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  3. Hume’s Conceivability Arguments Reconsidered.Bo Chen & Jingxian Liu - 2019 - Axiomathes 29 (5):541-559.
    This paper examines Hume’s formulations and uses of the conceivability principle and the inconceivability principle. In Hume’s works, we identify different versions of CP and ICP, including proper CP, proper ICP, the weak versions of CP and ICP, the epistemic versions of CP and ICP, and show that Hume not only expresses ICP, but also really maintains it. Assuming an axiomatic characterization of modalities, we argue that if there is a sharp distinction between levels of modalities, then Hume’s conceivability arguments (...)
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  4. Hume, Teleology, and the 'Science of Man'.Lorenzo Greco & Dan O'Brien - 2019 - In William Gibson, Dan O'Brien & Marius Turda (eds.), Teleology and Modernity. New York-London: Routledge. pp. 147-164.
    There are various forms of teleological thinking central to debates in the early modern and modern periods, debates in which David Hume (1711–1776) is a key figure. In the first section, we shall introduce three levels at which teleological considerations have been incorporated into philosophical accounts of man and nature, and sketch Hume’s criticisms of these approaches. In the second section, we turn to Hume’s non-teleological ‘science of man’. In the third section, we show how Hume has an account of (...)
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  5. Character and Causation: Hume's Philosophy of Action by Constantine Sandis. [REVIEW]Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - forthcoming - Hume Studies.
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  6. David Hume Sobre a Identidade Pessoal Nos Livros I E II Do "Tratado da Natureza Humana".Vinícius França Freitas - 2019 - Filosofia Unisinos 20 (1).
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  7. Hume, Causation and Counterfactuals.Joshua Anderson - 2019 - Humanites Bulletin 2 (1):36-49.
    What is offered here is an interpretation of Hume’s views on causation. While it might not be literally Hume’s view, it is certainly consistent with Hume, and is probably what Hume should say on causation, in light of recent developments in science and logic. As a way in, it is argued that the considerations that Hume brings against rationalist theories of causation can be applied to counterfactual theories of causation. Since, counterfactuals, possible worlds and modality were not ideas that would (...)
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  8. João Paulo Monteiro E o Conceito Pré-Darwiniano de Seleção Natural Em David Hume.Rubens Sotero dos Santos - 2017 - Prometeus: Filosofia em Revista 10 (23).
    Nosso objetivo aqui consiste em mostrar a hipótese inicialmente apresentada e defendida por João Paulo Monteiro e, posteriormente, por seu pupilo, José Claudio M. Matos que fizeram uma leitura darwiniana da epistemologia de David Hume. A hipótese consiste em mostrar que há um conceito pré-darwiniano de seleção natural em Hume que permitiria a aproximação desses dois autores. Essa hipótese se constitui a partir da interpretação do que Hume chama de “sabedoria ordinária da natureza”. Dessa forma, inicialment.
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  9. O Projeto Naturalista de David Hume À Luz da Epistemologia Contempor'nea: Willard Quine E Philip Kitcher.Claudiney José de Sousa - 2017 - Prometeus: Filosofia em Revista 10 (23).
    A partir de comparações entre a epistemologia de Hume e os trabalhos de naturalistas contemporâneos, como Willard O. Quine e Philip Kitcher, procuraremos destacar, neste artigo, em que sentido seria possível identificar a revolução epistemológica empreendida por Hume, em seu estudo da natureza humana, como uma espécie de naturalismo, que anteciparia as discussões recentes do tema. A partir dessas discussões, acreditamos poder apresentar mais claramente a sugestão de que, embora Hume não defenda explicitamente este modo de conceber a empresa filosófica, (...)
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  10. Of Probability; and the Idea of Cause and Effect.David Hume - 2018 - Philosophy Pathways 225 (1).
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  11. Whence the Chemistry of Hume’s Mind? [REVIEW]Miren Boehm - 2016 - Hume Studies 42 (1/2):241-242.
    Reading Tamás Demeter's recent book, "David Hume and the Culture of Scottish Newtonianism," feels like visiting a curiosity shop. There are some general themes that are meant to harmonize the work, such as the emphasis on the conceptual and methodological unity of natural and moral philosophy. This merging of cultures of inquiry is nicely illustrated with the case study of anger in the period. There is the main thesis: that Hume's science of mind was influenced, not as much by Newton's (...)
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  12. Causality and Hume’s Foundational Project.Miren Boehm - 2018 - In Angela Coventry & Alexander Sager (eds.), The Humean Mind. Routledge.
    The last few decades have witnessed intense debates in Hume scholarship concerning Hume’s account of causation. At the core of the “old–new Hume” debate is the question of whether causation for Hume is more than mere regularity, in particular, whether Hume countenances necessary connections in mind-independent nature. This chapter assesses this debate against the background of Hume’s “foundational project” in the Treatise. The question of the role and import of Hume’s account of the idea of cause is examined and compared (...)
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  13. Hume's Science of Human Nature: Scientific Realism, Reason, and Substantial Explanation by David Landy.Miren Boehm - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (2):350-351.
    In his bold and excellent book on Hume's scientific methodology, David Landy positions himself between the "Deductive-Nomological" reading, which explains particular phenomena in terms of empirical regularities, and the "New Hume" position, which considers empirical regularities to be the explananda and unknowable essences the explanans. Landy sides with the New Humeans, except that for him the essences, or "theoretical posits," are knowable. These essences become knowable, despite their being in principle unobservable, through the tool of "perceptible models." Landy argues that (...)
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  14. Hume and Berkeley in the Prussian Academy: Louis Frédéric Ancillon’s “Dialogue Between Berkeley and Hume” of 1796.J. C. Laursen S. Charles - 2001 - Hume Studies 27 (1):85-98.
    Louis Frédéric Ancillon was a member of the Prussian Academy of Sciences and Belles Lettres whose imagined dialogue between Berkeley and Hume was read to the Academy in 1796 and published in 1799. It is important as an indicator of the reception of Hume and Berkeley in francophone philosophical circles in late eighteenth-century Prussia. Our introduction is followed by an English translation with notes.
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  15. Zur Epistemologie des Wunders: Swinburne versus Hume.Jörg Disse - 2019 - In Ulrich L. Lehner & Ronald K. Tacelli (eds.), Wort und Wahrheit. Fragen der Erkenntnistheorie. Stuttgart: Kohlhammer. pp. 171-191.
    Der Aufsatz befasst sich mit der Frage der Möglichkeit von Wundern in Auseinandersetzung mit dem Wunderverständnis von Richard Swinburne und David Hume./The article deals with the question of the possibility of miracles opposing the theory of miracles of Richard Swinburne and David Hume.
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  16. Tamás Demeter. David Hume and the Culture of Scottish Newtonianism: Methodology and Ideology in Enlightenment Inquiry. Xi + 221 Pp., Bibl., Indexes. Leiden/Boston: Brill, 2016. €115 . ISBN 9789004327320. [REVIEW]Stefanie Rocknak - 2019 - Isis 110 (1):163-164.
    Tamas Demeter presents a clear and compelling new perspective of Hume’s methodology and conceptual structure in David Hume and the Culture of Scottish Newtonianism. Hume, he argues, is a Newtonian of the Scottish tradition, but not the mechanical kind that is modeled after the Principia. Instead, Hume should be understood as a kind of European Enlightenment “vitalist.” As a result, his work reflects the more organic methodology that defines Newton’s Opticks.
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  17. Do eu como feixe de percepções ao eu das paixões: Hume e a identidade pessoal no Tratado.Susie Kovalczyk - 2016 - In Jaimir Conte, Marília Côrtes de Ferraz & Flávio Zimmermann (eds.), Ensaios sobre a filosofia de Hume. Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brésil: pp. 311-329.
    No Tratado da Natureza Humana David Hume (2009, p. 285-6 / T 1.4.6 (§5)) prescreve que “devemos distinguir a identidade pessoal enquanto diz respeito a nosso pensamento e imaginação, e enquanto diz respeito a nossas paixões ou ao interesse que temos por nós mesmos”. Enquanto o primeiro escopo é por ele abordado em seção específica no Livro I da obra em questão e pode ser sintetizado através da tese de que a atribuição de identidade sincrônica e diacrônica ao eu é (...)
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  18. Laying Down Hume's Law.Hsueh Qu - 2019 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 100 (1):24-46.
    In this paper, I argue for an interpretation of Hume's Law that sees him as dismissing all possible arguments from is to ought on the basis of a comparison with his famous argument on induction.
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  19. Hume’s Optimism and Williams’s Pessimism From ‘Science of Man’ to Genealogical Critique.Paul Russell - 2018 - In Sophie Grace Chappell & Marcel van Ackeren (eds.), Ethics Beyond the Limits: New Essays on Bernard Williams' Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 37-52.
    Bernard Williams is widely recognized as belonging among the greatest and most influential moral philosophers of the twentieth-century – and arguably the greatest British moral philosopher of the late twentieth-century. His various contributions over a period of nearly half a century changed the course of the subject and challenged many of its deepest assumptions and prejudices. There are, nevertheless, a number of respects in which the interpretation of his work is neither easy nor straightforward. One reason for this is that (...)
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  20. Scott Yenor, David Hume's Humanity: The Philosophy of Common Life and Its Limits.Nathan Sasser - 2019 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 17 (1):86-93.
  21. Hume's Perceptual Relationism.Dan Kervick - 2016 - Hume Studies 42 (1 & 2):61-87.
    My topic in this paper will be Hume’s claim that we have no idea of a vacuum. I offer a novel interpretation of Hume’s account of our ideas of extension that makes it clear why those ideas cannot include any ideas of vacuums, and I distinguish my interpretation from prominent readings offered by other Hume scholars. An upshot of Hume’s account, I will argue, is his commitment to a remarkable and distinctly Humean view I call “perceptual relationism.” Perceptual relationism is (...)
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  22. Hume’s Theory of Causation: Is There More Than One?James Hill - 2011 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 33 (2):233-249.
    It is traditionally assumed that there is only one theory of causality in Hume's writings. In this article it is shown that we can distinguish between an early and mature theory. It is argued that the mature theory, strongly influenced by Newton's physics, accords with the New Hume interpretation by asserting that real causal relations are not accessible to the human mind.
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  23. David Hume and the Science of Man.Zuzana Parusniková - 2011 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 33 (2):205-231.
    Hume built his philosophical system with the ambition to become a Newton of human nature. His science of man is the fulfillment of this project. Hume was inspired by the Newtonian experimental empirical method excluding hypotheses, and he applied this method to moral sciences; he took those to be the basis of all other knowledge. The observation of human cognitive faculties, however, brought him to sceptical conclusions concerning the rational justification of empirical sciences. His original ambitions are thus undermined and (...)
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  24. Hume’s Scepticism in Masaryk’s Essay About Probability and in His Other Papers.Zdeněk Novotný - 2011 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 33 (2):179-203.
    It was Hume's concept of knowledge that marked Masaryk's philosophy more than influential Kant. Masaryk devoted Hume his inaugural lecture The Probability Calculus and Hume's Scepticism at Prague University in 1882. He tried to face his scepticism concerning causation and induction by a formula P = n: or P = : where P means the increasing probability that an event that had happened n times in the past will happen again. Hume stresses that there is an essential difference between probability (...)
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  25. Five Philosophers on Free Will: Plato, Hobbes, Hume, Leibniz, and Hegel.Robert Waxman PhD - manuscript
    Over the past 2500 years, the concept of free will has been debated by some of the most brilliant minds in ancient and modern history. This paper discusses landmark theories by five well-known philosophers. There are several definitions of free-will. Sometimes, it is described as an innate characteristic possessed by human beings. In juxtaposition, causal determinism states that free will is limited or does not exist. Philosophical arguments are presented by: Plato, Hobbes, Hume, Leibniz, and Hegel. Plato offers a dual (...)
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  26. Does Reid Have Anything to Say to Hume?Terence Cuneo - 2015 - In Todd Buras & Rebecca Copenhaver (eds.), Thomas Reid on Mind, Knowledge and Value. Oxford University Press.
    Advocates of the so-called New Hume maintain that, contrary to the traditional interpretation, Hume is neither a non-cognitivist nor a moral skeptic. Rather, if these philosophers are correct, Hume is a sentimentalist who defends views very similar to Hutcheson’s. Reid’s attack on Hume’s moral philosophy, however, depends on an interpretation according to which Hume is a non-cognitivist and a moral skeptic. Does this mean that, if advocates of the New Hume are correct, Reid’s objections to Hume entirely fail to make (...)
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  27. David Hume y la distinción entre filosofía especulativa y experimental.Sofía Beatriz Calvente - 2018 - Dianoia 63 (81):109-131.
    Resumen: Ante las críticas insistentes a la distinción entre el empirismo y el racionalismo, se han propuesto alternativas para comprender de manera más adecuada el quehacer de los filósofos modernos. Entre ellas está la distinción entre filosofía especulativa y experimental. Intentaré evaluar la validez de esta distinción para la filosofía moral experimental del siglo XVIII y, en particular, para la propuesta de Hume. Mostraré que si la distinción se entiende en términos excluyentes, resulta inapropiada porque el mismo Hume plantea que (...)
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  28. Ideas, Evidence, and Method: Hume's Skepticism and Naturalism Concerning Knowledge and Causation, by Graciela De Pierris: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, Pp. Xv + 318, £47.50. [REVIEW]Anik Waldow - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (3):609-612.
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  29. Hume's True Scepticism, by Donald Ainslie: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, Pp. Xiv + 286, £40. [REVIEW]Karl Schafer - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (3):600-603.
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  30. Hume’s Two Causalities and Social Policy: Moon Rocks, Transfactuality, and the UK’s Policy on School Absenteeism.Leigh Price - 2014 - Journal of Critical Realism 13 (4):385-398.
    Hume maintained that, philosophically speaking, there is no difference between exiting a room out of the first-floor window and using the door. Nevertheless, Hume’s reason and common sense prevailed over his scepticism and he advocated that we should always use the door. However, we are currently living in a world that is more seriously committed to the Humean philosophy of empiricism than he was himself and thus the potential to act inappropriately is an ever-present potential. In this paper, I explore (...)
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  31. Philosophy Without God? God Without Philosophy?: Critical Reflections on Antony Flew's God and Philosophy 1.Brayton Polka - 2006 - The European Legacy 11 (1):35-46.
    In this paper it is argued that, while the case that Antony Flew makes against philosophically invalid arguments for the existence of God is generally sound, he fails to comprehend the power and cogency of the ontological argument. Thus, his conception of the grounds of morality, separate from the biblical tradition of theology, is by no means compelling. This paper aims to show that the rational concept of morality that Flew rightly claims to uphold is not only consistent with but (...)
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  32. David Hume, Sceptic.Zuzana Parusniková - 2016 - Springer Verlag.
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  33. In Defense of Newtonian Induction: Hume’s Problem of Induction and the Universalization of Primary Qualities.Ori Belkind - 2018 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 9 (1):14.
    This paper aims to advance two claims. First, it aims to show that Hume's argument against the rationality of induction is sound. However, I claim that the conclusion does not follow merely from the self-defeating attempts to justify the rule of induction, unlike traditional readings of the argument. Rather, the skeptical conclusion must also take into account Hume's argument that the secret powers that are present in bodies and give rise to sensible qualities are unknowable. The paper's second aim is (...)
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  34. Hume on the Laws of Dynamics: The Tacit Assumption of Mechanism.Matias Slavov - 2016 - Hume Studies 42 (1-2):113-136.
    I shall argue that when Hume refers to the laws of dynamics, he tacitly assumes a mechanism. Nevertheless, he remains agnostic on whether the hidden micro-constitution of bodies is machinelike. Hence this article comes to the following conclusion. Hume is not a full-blown mechanical philosopher. Still his position on dynamic laws and his concept of causation instantiate a tacitly mechanical understanding of the interactions of bodies.
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  35. Una Vez Más En la Brecha: La Respuesta de Kant a Hume, Para Variar. Lewis White Beck.David Rojas Lizama - 2015 - Alpha (Osorno) 40:217-221.
  36. David Hume and the Culture of Scottish Newtonianism.Tamas Demeter - 2016 - Brill.
  37. Hume on the Problem of Other Minds.Byoungjae Kim - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (3):535-555.
    ABSTRACTHume is not often cited as a philosopher who posited a solution to the Problem of Other Minds. He instead seems to assume the belief in other minds in his moral philosophy without justification. However, Hume needs to explain how we experience and respond to others’ affections, and hence generate moral sentiments, given how central the latter are to his moral theory. Two recent interpretations of Hume’s solution to the Problem are the Wittgensteinian Interpretation, and the Simulation Theory Interpretation. Both (...)
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  38. David Hume e o “curioso ajuste das causas finais”.Fernão de Oliveira Salles - 2014 - Discurso 43:51-76.
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  39. Um Comentário Sobre “as Regras Para Se Julgar Sobre Causas E Feitos” de David Hume.Mark Julian Richter Cass - 2014 - Discurso 44:127-144.
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  40. Hume’s Second Thoughts on Personal Identity.Sunny Yang - 2018 - Problemos 94:182.
    [full article, abstract in English; only abstract in Lithuanian] In this paper, I present an interpretation on how Hume can escape from his intellectual ordeal concerning personal identity in the Appendix of the Treatise. First of all, I present the source of Hume’s despair to offer an interpretation on what would have truly bothered Hume in the Appendix, and I identify several lines of interpretation. Recently Jonathan Ellis has distinguished various ways of understanding Hume’s predicament. Of the four groups of (...)
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  41. Kant’s Response to Hume in the Second Analogy: A Critique of Gerd Buchdahl’s and Michael Friedman’s Accounts.Saniye Vatansever - 2018 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 8 (2):310–346.
    This article presents a critical analysis of two influential readings of Kant’s Second Analogy, namely, Gerd Buchdahl’s “modest reading” and Michael Friedman’s “strong reading.” After pointing out the textual and philosophical problems with each, I advance an alternative reading of the Second Analogy argument. On my reading, the Second Analogy argument proves the existence of necessary and strictly universal causal laws. This, however, does not guarantee that Kant has a solution for the problem of induction. After I explain why the (...)
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  42. Hume’Un Dış Dünyanın Varlığına İlişkin Tartışmadaki Niyeti.Nurten Öztanrikulu Özel - 2017 - Beytulhikme An International Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):123-143.
    Dış dünyanın varlığı konusu felsefe tarihinde çoğu zaman epistemolojik bir sorgulamanın içinde yer almaktadır. Pek çok filozof dış dünyanın varlığının bilinip bilinemeyeceği ya da nasıl bilineceği sorularıyla meşgul olmuştur. Bu filozoflardan biri de David Hume’dur. Hume dış dünyanın varlığına ilişkin tasarımlarımızı inancın konusu olarak ele almaktadır. Dış nesnenin algılanmadığında bile devamlı ve ayrı var olduğu inancını sorgulamaktadır. Bu çalışmada dış dünyanın varlığının algıdan bağımsız ve ayrı bir şekilde var olduğu inancının nasıl türetildiği; bunun türetilmesinde hangi yetimizin etkin olduğu araştırılacak ve (...)
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  43. David Hume’un Siyaset Felsefesinin Epistemolojik ve Etik İçerimleri.Mehmet Türkan & Zehragül Aşkın - 2013 - Beytulhikme An International Journal of Philosophy 3 (2):25-51.
    Siyaset felsefesinde David Hume, adaletin kökenine ilişkin tartışmalarda rasyonalist ve sözleşmeci yaklaşımlara karşı güçlü bir empirist karşı çıkışı ifade eder. Nitekim adaletin apriori ve ussal bir temeli olduğu argümanına karşıt bir yaklaşımla, düşüncelerini tarihsel-şüpheci bir çizgiye oturtan Hume’un adaletin kökenine ilişkin açıklamaları 20. yüzyılda Hayek ve Nozik’te yeniden yaşam bulmuştur. Bu bağlamda makale Hume’un adalet kuramının etik içerimini konu edinmektedir.
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  44. The ‘First Cause’ in Hume’s Philosophy.Mustafa Çevik - 2013 - Beytulhikme An International Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):151-157.
    Özet: Hume çalışmalarında iki türlü ‘neden‘ kabul etmektedir. Bunlardan biri tek tek varlıkların nedenleridir. Diğeri de evrenin her yerinden çıkarabileceğimiz bir nedendir. Yaygın olarak bilindiği gibi nedensellik kuramına dair düşüncelerini ilk iki eseri olan Treatise of Human Nature ve Enquiry Concarning Human Understanding isimli çalışmasında şekillendirir. Fakat daha sonraki iki temel çalışması olan Natural History of religion ve Dialogues Concernin Natural Religion kitaplarında Hume evrenin nedeni hakkında tartışmalara yer verir. Bu çalışmada Hume’un bu ikinci tür ‘neden’ini bir tür ‘ilk neden’ (...)
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  45. David Hume’da Mucize ve Nedensellik.Mustafa Çevik - 2012 - Beytulhikme An International Journal of Philosophy 2 (2):1-16.
    Bu yazıda kimi felsefi ve dini metinlerde yer alan mucize tanımının içerdiği sorunlar tartışılmaktadır. Tanımlamalar konusunda daha çok David Hume ve İslami kaynaklardan yararlanılmıştır. Mucizenin doğurduğu felsefi problemler iki başlık altında ele alınmıştır. Bunlardan birincisi tarihsel bir olay olarak mucizenin imkânı, diğeri ise “doğa yasası” olarak mucizenin imkânıdır. Burada özellikle “yasa” ve “yasanın ihlali” terimleri üzerinde durulmuştur.
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  46. 7. The Second-Order Idealism of David Hume.William Boos - 2018 - In Metamathematics and the Philosophical Tradition. De Gruyter. pp. 233-305.
  47. “Till at Last There Remain Nothing” Hume’s Treatise 1.4.1 in Contemporary Perspective.Jeanne Peijnenburg & David Atkinson - forthcoming - Synthese.
    In A Treatise of Human Nature, David Hume presents an argument according to which all knowledge reduces to probability, and all probability reduces to nothing. Many have criticized this argument, while others find nothing wrong with it. In this paper we explain that the argument is invalid as it stands, but for different reasons than have been hitherto acknowledged. Once the argument is repaired, it becomes clear that there is indeed something that reduces to nothing, but it is something other (...)
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  48. Narratividade Histórica E Natureza Humana Em Hume.Fabiano Lemos - 2014 - Veritas – Revista de Filosofia da Pucrs 59 (3):523-549.
    O artigo pretende discutir o estatuto da narratividade na obra de Hume, não apenas como metodologia, mas como o único meio através do qual a natureza humana ela mesma pode ser abordada no interior de seu projeto de uma ciência do homem. Em uma perspectiva exclusivamente empírica, a história se revela como o nível de composição de narrações – tanto no estudo dos costumes quanto ao lidar com a formação das relações de ideias. A leitura de muitos comentadores de Hume, (...)
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  49. Till at Last There Remain Nothing.David Atkinson & Jeanne Peijnenburg - forthcoming - Synthese.
    In A Treatise of Human Nature, David Hume presents an argument according to which all knowledge reduces to probability, and all probability reduces to nothing. Many have criticized this argument, while others find nothing wrong with it. In this paper we explain that the argument is invalid as it stands, but for different reasons than have been hitherto acknowledged. Once the argument is repaired, it becomes clear that there is indeed something that reduces to nothing, but it is something other (...)
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  50. Inferences, External Objects, and the Principle of Contradiction: Hume's Adequacy Principle in Part II of the Treatise.Wilson Underkuffler - 2016 - Florida Philosophical Review 16 (1):23-40.
    This paper considers whether elements of T 1.2 Of the Ideas of Space and Time in Hume’s Treatise is inconsistent with skepticism regarding the external world in T 1.4.2 Of Scepticism with regard to the Senses. This apparent tension vexes commentators, and efforts to resolve it drives the recent scholarship on this section of Hume’s Treatise. To highlight this tension I juxtapose Hume’s “Adequacy Principle” with what I call his “skeptical causal argument” in T 1.4.2. The Adequacy Principle appears to (...)
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