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  1. Hume's Ideas About Necessary Connection.Janet Broughton - 1987 - Hume Studies 13 (2):217-244.
  2. The Eightfold Way: Why Analyticity, Apriority and Necessity Are Independent.Douglas Ian Campbell - 2017 - Philosophers' Imprint 17:1-17.
    This paper concerns the three great modal dichotomies: (i) the necessary/contingent dichotomy; (ii) the a priori/empirical dichotomy; and (iii) the analytic/synthetic dichotomy. These can be combined to produce a tri-dichotomy of eight modal categories. The question as to which of the eight categories house statements and which do not is a pivotal battleground in the history of analytic philosophy, with key protagonists including Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kripke, Putnam and Kaplan. All parties to the debate have accepted that some categories are (...)
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  3. Production and Necessity.Louis DeRosset - 2009 - Philosophical Review 118 (2):153-181.
    A major source of latter-day skepticism about necessity is the work of David Hume. Hume is widely taken to have endorsed the Humean claim: there are no necessary connections between distinct existences. The Humean claim is defended on the grounds that necessary connections between wholly distinct things would be mysterious and inexplicable. Philosophers deploy this claim in the service of a wide variety of philosophical projects. But Saul Kripke has argued that it is false. According to Kripke, there are necessary (...)
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  4. Hume on Knowledge of Metaphysical Modalities.Daniel Dohrn - 2010 - Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 13.
    I outline Hume’s views about conceivability evidence. Then I critically scrutinize two threats to conceivability-based modal epistemology. Both arise from Hume’s criticism of claims to knowing necessary causal relationships: Firstly, a sceptical stance towards causal necessity may carry over to necessity claims in general. Secondly, since – according to a sceptical realist reading – Hume grants the eventuality of causal powers grounded in essential features of objects, conceivability-based claims to comprehensive metaphysical possibilities seem endangered. I argue that although normal conceivability-based (...)
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  5. Hume on Causal Necessity: A Study From the Perspective of Hume's Theory of Passions.Berent Enç - 1985 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (3):235 - 256.
  6. Hume and Physical Necessity.A. Flew - 1990 - Iyyun:251-266.
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  7. What Impressions of Necessity?Antony Flew - 1992 - Hume Studies 18 (2):169-177.
  8. Another Idea of Necessary Connection.Antony Flew - 1982 - Philosophy 57 (222):487 - 494.
    One of the greatest of Hume's philosophical achievements, which becomes in its turn an assumption presupposed by some of the others, is perhaps best stated at the end of the First Enquiry : ‘If we reason a priori , anything may appear able to produce anything. The falling of a pebble may, for aught we know, extinguish the sun; or the wish of a man control the planets in their orbits. It is only experience, which teaches us the nature and (...)
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  9. David Hume and Necessary Connections.T. Foster Lindley - 1987 - Philosophy 62 (239):49-58.
    David Hume's claim that necessary connection is essential to causality was at the expense of a useful causal distinction we sometimes note with the words ‘necessity’ and ‘contingency’. And since, as J. L. Mackie has stated, Hume made ‘the most significant and influential single contribution to the theory of causation’, subsequent writers on causality, regardless of their support for, or opposition to, Hume, have joined him in trampling this distinction. The object of this paper is not so much to undermine (...)
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  10. A Posteriori Necessity in Singular Causation and the Humean Argument.M. J. García-Encinas - 2003 - Dialectica 57 (1):41–55.
    The absence of a necessary connection in singular causation is a key step in the Humean argument against any form of necessity in causation. I argue that Hume's defence of this step is unsuccessful, and that the step could be skipped, accepting the possibility of necessary a posteriori truths. Still this does not suffice to guarantee a necessary connection in singular causation. Necessary a posteriori truths should be backed by necessary a priori truths. Thus, a main object of this paper (...)
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  11. Necessity in Hume's Causal Theory.Leonard Greenberg - 1954 - Review of Metaphysics 8 (4):612 - 623.
  12. Hume's Idea of Necessary Connexion.Oswald Hanfling - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (210):501 - 514.
    The following beliefs can be ascribed to Hume on the basis of his writings: There is no more to our idea of cause and effect than constant conjunction and a resulting habit of mind. There is more to it than that, namely the interaction of bodies. Behind the constant conjunctions, including the interactions of bodies, there are ‘secret’ causes, not knowable by man. The principle of causality is true. Our belief in the principle arises from experience. There is no justification (...)
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  13. Hume and Nonlogical Necessity.R. Harré - 1976 - Hume Studies 2 (2):95-103.
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  14. Causal Necessities: An Alternative to Hume.Charles Hartshorne - 1954 - Philosophical Review 63 (4):479-499.
  15. It Ain't Necessity, so .Alan Hausman - 1982 - Hume Studies 8 (2):87-101.
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  16. Hume's Absolute Necessity.Thomas Holden - 2014 - Mind 123 (490):377-413.
    Hume regards the ‘absolute’ necessity attending demonstrable propositions as an expression of the limitations of human imagination. When we register our modal commitments in ordinary descriptive language, affirming that there are such-and-such absolute necessities, possibilities, and impossibilities, we are projecting our sense of what the human mind can and cannot conceive. In some ways the account parallels Hume’s famous treatment of the necessity of causes, and in some respects it anticipates recent expressivist theories of absolute modality. I marshal the evidence (...)
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  17. Hausman on Certainty and Necessity in Hume.Robert A. Imlay - 1976 - Hume Studies 2 (1):47-52.
  18. Hume on Character, Action and Causal Necessity.Clarence Shole Johnson - 1990 - Auslegung 16 (2):149-164.
  19. Projection and Necessity in Hume.P. J. E. Kail - 2001 - European Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):24–54.
    This paper discusses the metaphor of projection in relation to Hume’s treatment of causal necessity. I argue that the best understanding of projection shows it to be compatible with taking Hume to be a ‘sceptical realist’ about causal necessity, albeit an agnostic one.
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  20. Conceivability and Modality in Hume: A Lemma in an Argument in Defense of Skeptical Realism.Peter Kail - 2003 - Hume Studies 29 (1):43--61.
    This paper examines the ramifications of Hume's view of the relation of conceivability to metaphysical possibility. It argues that the limitations Hume places of the representations involved in moves to conceivability to metaphysical possibility preclude any straightforward argument against full-blooded causal realism in Hume from conceivability. Furthermore, our finding certain states of affairs conceivable when they are not metaphysically possible is perfectly compatible with the thrust of the causal realist position.
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  21. Hume on the Projection of Causal Necessity.Jennifer Smalligan Marušić - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (4):263-273.
    A characteristically Humean pattern of explanation starts by claiming that we have a certain kind of feeling in response to some objects and then takes our having such feelings to provide an explanation of how we come to think of those objects as having some feature that we would not otherwise be able to think of them as having. This core pattern of explanation is what leads Simon Blackburn to dub Hume ‘the first great projectivist.’ This paper critically examines the (...)
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  22. Hume : Necessary Connections and Distinct Existences.Alexander Miller - 2009 - In Robin Le Poidevin (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Metaphysics. Routledge.
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  23. Comments on 'Hume and the Idea of Causal Necessity'.L. J. O'Neill - 1978 - Philosophical Studies 33 (1):61 - 63.
    Stroud's interpretation of hume leaves unexplained (1) 'necessity', In particular causal judgments where no general causal principle is known and (2) why a regular sequence of psychological events, But not of physical events, Can give rise to an idea of compulsion or inevitability.
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  24. Hume's Dynamism: The Problem of Power.Augustín Riška - 2008 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 15 (1):20-28.
    In this essay, I investigate the dynamic foundations of Hume’s philosophy which is so heavily dependent upon Newton’s physics. Hume’s ubiquitous phrase „force and vivacity” is symptomatic of his dynamic, rather than voluntaristic, position that dominates his interpretation of impressions, ideas, and causality in particular. After pointing out some inconsistencies of Hume’s Newtonism, I concentrate on Hume’s treatment of power. It is a well-known fact that Hume rejected natural powers, in fear of their occult character, but accepted human powers giving (...)
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  25. Necessary Connexions in Mechanics.Patrick Sibelius - 1990 - Synthese 82 (1):53 - 76.
    Hume's conception of causation and induction is discussed in the context where the causal evolution is represented by the motion of a free particle in space. The difference between classical and relativistic mechanics is shown to be significant for the discussion.
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  26. Hume and the Idea of Causal Necessity.Barry Stroud - 1978 - Philosophical Studies 33 (1):39 - 59.
  27. Modal Reasoning in Hume's Billiard Ball Argument.Dennis Temple - 1984 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 1 (2):203 - 211.
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  28. What is Hume's Dictum, and Why Believe It?Jessica M. Wilson - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 80 (3):595 - 637.
    Hume's Dictum (HD) says, roughly and typically, that there are no metaphysically necessary connections between distinct, intrinsically typed, entities. HD plays an influential role in metaphysical debate, both in constructing theories and in assessing them. One should ask of such an influential thesis: why believe it? Proponents do not accept Hume's arguments for his dictum, nor do they provide their own; however, some have suggested either that HD is analytic or that it is synthetic a priori (that is: motivated by (...)
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