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  1. added 2020-04-08
    Hume, Humans and Animals.Michael-John Turp - 2020 - Journal of Ethics 24 (1):119-136.
    Hume’s Treatise, Enquiries and Essays contain plentiful material for an investigation into the moral nature of other animals and our moral relations to them. In particular, Hume pays considerable attention to animal minds. He also argues that moral judgment is grounded in sympathy. As sympathy is shared by humans and some other animals, this already hints at the possibility that some animals are morally considerable, even if they are not moral agents. Most contributions to the literature on animal ethics assume (...)
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  2. added 2020-03-28
    A Humean Approach to the Boundaries of the Moral Domain.Mark Collier - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):1-16.
    Hume maintains that the boundaries of morality are widely drawn in everyday life. We routinely blame characters for traits that we find disgusting, on this account, as well as those which we perceive as being harmful. Contemporary moral psychology provides further evidence that human beings have a natural tendency to moralize traits that produce feelings of repugnance. But recent work also demonstrates a significant amount of individual variation in our sensitivities to disgust. We have sufficient reason to bracket this emotion, (...)
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  3. added 2019-06-06
    Slaves of the Passions. [REVIEW]Melissa Barry - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (2):225-228.
    In Slaves of the Passions, Mark Schroeder provides a systematic, rigorously argued defense of a Humean theory of reasons for action, taking pains to respond to influential objections to the view. While inspired by Hume, Schroeder makes it clear that he aims to develop a Humean theory, not necessarily one that Hume himself embraced, and for this reason little is said about Hume in the book. One respect in which Schroeder takes himself to be departing from Hume is in developing (...)
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  4. added 2019-06-06
    Précis of Projection and Realism in Hume’s Philosophy.P. J. E. Kail - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (1):61-65.
    The title of my book, Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy, might mislead. One might protest, with some justification, that since neither "projection" nor "realism" is Hume's term and that both carry a severe threat of anachronism, discussing them in connection with Hume is misguided. Why might the readers of this journal wish to read such a work?Well, the first thing to note is that Hume's name has come to be associated with the metaphor of projection, understood as having some (...)
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  5. added 2019-06-06
    Depression and Reason: A Progress of Sentiments: Reflections on Hume's Treatise by Annette C. Baier.Pall S. Ardal - 1993 - Ethics 103 (3):540-550.
  6. added 2019-06-06
    The Role of Reason in Hume's Second Enquiry.Robert B. Ashmore - 1980 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 54:207.
  7. added 2019-06-06
    The Moral Philosophy of David Hume. By R. David Broles. (Martinus Nijhoff; The Hague 1964. Pp. 97. Price 10.80 Guilders.). [REVIEW]Páll S. Árdal - 1965 - Philosophy 40 (154):354-355.
  8. added 2019-03-08
    Obligation, Justice, and the Will in Hume’s Moral Philosophy.Margaret Watkins Tate - 2005 - Hume Studies 31 (1):93-122.
    Some scholars have recently found commonalities between Hume's motivational psychology and Kantian understandings of reason and obligation. Although this trend corrects certain misreadings of Hume, it goes too far in other respects. This essay argues that we can understand Hume's explanation of the artificial virtue of justice in a way that avoids such mistakes. I begin by considering Stephen Darwall's argument that features of Hume's account of justice reveal an inadequacy in the empirical naturalist tradition and underlying commitments to the (...)
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  9. added 2018-10-20
    Tra Hume e Kant: il rapporto tra ragione e passioni e il carattere pratico della morale.Stefano Bacin - 2010 - In Etiche antiche, etiche moderne. Temi di discussione. Bologna BO, Italia: pp. 193-220.
  10. added 2018-09-10
    Fruitless Remorses: Hume's Critique of the Penitential Project of The Whole Duty of Man.Alison McIntyre - 2014 - Hume Studies 40 (2):143-167.
    Familiarity with the doctrines presented in Richard Allestree’s devotional work The Whole Duty of Man, which Hume reported having read as a boy, can illuminate the strategy of argument Hume employs in Treatise 2.1.6–2.1.8 to undermine views he attributes to “the vulgar systems of ethicks.” Hume’s explicit critique of the view that pride is a sin and humility a virtue in Treatise 2.1.7 relies on assumptions that are already present in Allestree’s account of pride and humility and are described using (...)
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  11. added 2018-06-14
    Cultivating Strength of Mind: Hume on the Government of the Passions and Artificial Virtue.Lauren Kopajtic - 2015 - Hume Studies 41 (2):201-229.
    Several authors have recently noted Hume’s relative silence on the virtue of strength of mind and how it is developed. In this paper I suggest that Hume had good reasons for this silence, and I argue that Hume’s discussion of artificial virtue, especially the virtue of allegiance, reveals a complex view of the limitations on human efforts at self-reform. Further, it reveals the need for government and externally-imposed regulative structures to enable the development of strength of mind. I argue that (...)
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  12. added 2018-05-14
    Depression and the Emotions: An Argument for Cultivating Cheerfulness.Derek McAllister - 2018 - Philosophia 46 (3):771-784.
    In this paper, I offer an argument for cultivating cheerfulness as a remedy to sadness and other emotions, which, in turn, can provide some relief to certain cases of depression. My thesis has two tasks: first, to establish the link between cheerfulness and sadness, and second, to establish the link between sadness and depression. In the course of accomplishing the first task, I show that a remedy of cultivating cheerfulness to counter sadness is supported by philosophers as diverse as Thomas (...)
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  13. added 2017-07-16
    Hume's Unreasonable Desires.Berent Enç - 1996 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (2):239 - 254.
    In this paper two main claims are presented. (1) Hume's theory of action, which was tailored to complement his Moral Philosophy perfectly, has independent strengths, and it is possible to defend Hume's arguments for the autonomy of desire and to show that Hume was being fully consistent in allowing reason to be a cause of action and also in arguing for his two theses. (2) A recurrent theme can be isolated in Hume's writings in which Hume, on the one hand, (...)
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  14. added 2017-06-17
    Hume’s Confusion About Sympathy.Douglas Chismar - 1988 - Philosophy Research Archives 14:237-246.
    David Hume argues that the prevalence of human sympathizing justifies our attributing to humans a certain degree of benevolence. This move from sympathy to having a concern for others has been challenged by recent critics. A more fine-grained look at Hume’s concept of sympathy may reveal the reasons why he thought that experiencing sympathy implied having a benevolent attitude. Two arguments from the Treatise are analyzed and found wanting. It is suggested that Hume’s confusion may derive from ambiguities surrounding the (...)
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  15. added 2017-06-09
    Objectivity and Perfection in Hume’s Hedonism.Dale Dorsey - 2015 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (2):245-270.
    In this paper, I investigate David Hume’s theory of well-being or prudential value. That Hume was some sort of hedonist is typically taken for granted in discussions of his value theory, but I argue that Hume was a hedonist of pathbreaking sophistication. His hedonism intriguingly blends traditional hedonism with a form of perfectionism yielding a version of qualitative hedonism that not only solves puzzles surrounding Hume’s moral theory, but is interesting and important in its own right.
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  16. added 2017-06-09
    Paixão e interesse natural na investigação de Hume sobre a justiça: Passion and natural interest in the Hume’s investigation on justice.André Olivier da Silva - 2011 - Controvérsia 7 (3).
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  17. added 2017-06-09
    Reason in Hume’s Passions.Nathan Brett & Katharina Paxman - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (1):43-59.
    Hume is famous for the view that “reason is, and ought only to be, the slave of the passions.” His claim that “we are no sooner acquainted with the impossibility of satisfying any desire, than the desire itself vanishes” is less well known. Each seems, in opposite ways, shocking to common sense. This paper explores the latter claim, looking for its source in Hume’s account of the passions and exploring its compatibility with his associationist psychology. We are led to the (...)
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  18. added 2017-06-09
    Utilidade e simpatia: Hume contra o egoísmo cético.André Olivier da Silva - 2007 - Controvérsia 3 (2).
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  19. added 2017-06-09
    Morals, Motivation and Convention. [REVIEW]Alan Dutton - 1992 - Philosophical Books 33 (4):209-210.
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  20. added 2017-06-07
    Her Conclusions—With Which He Is in Love: Why Hume Would Fancy Anscombe: Articles.Margaret Watkins - 2008 - Christian Bioethics 14 (2):175-186.
    Elizabeth Anscombe tangos with Hume in the middle of her march toward the three theses of "Modern Moral Philosophy" that we should abandon moral philosophy "until we have an adequate philosophy of psychology"; that the concepts of moral obligation and moral duty, of what is morally right and wrong, and of the moral sense of 'ought' "ought to be jettisoned if this is psychologically possible;" and that "the differences between the well-known English writers on moral philosophy from Sidgwick to the (...)
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  21. added 2017-01-29
    Simpatia ed etica: in difesa della prospettiva humeana.Greco Lorenzo - 2016 - I Castelli di Yale 4 (2):1–14.
  22. added 2017-01-12
    Jacqueline A. Taylor, Reflecting Subjects: Passions, Sympathy, and Society in Hume's Philosophy (Oxford-New York: Oxford University Press, 2015). [REVIEW]Greco Lorenzo - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy (6):1-4.
  23. added 2017-01-09
    Passion, Convention Et Institution Dans la Pensée de Hume.Paulette Carrive - forthcoming - Les Etudes Philosophiques.
  24. added 2017-01-09
    The Moral Sentiments in Hume’s Treatise.Åsa Carlson - 2014 - Hume Studies 40 (1):73-94.
    In the Treatise, Hume writes several seemingly incompatible things about the moral sentiments, thus there is no general agreement about where they fit within his taxonomy of the perceptions. Some passages speak in favor of the view that moral sentiments are indirect passions, a few in favor of the view that they are direct passions, and yet a couple of explicit statements strongly suggest otherwise. Due to these tensions in Hume’s text, we find at least five competing characterizations in the (...)
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  25. added 2016-12-14
    Emotion and Thought in Hume's Treatise.John Bricke - 1975 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 5 (sup1):53-71.
    In this paper I examine Hume's theory of the emotions, as presented in his *Treatise of Human Nature*, paying particular attention to what he has to say about the relationships between emotion and thought. I begin by presenting, in some detail, Hume's views about the nature of the emotions, their causes, and their objects. I then consider the bearing of the private language argument on Hume's theory, and try to show that it is not sufficient to reveal the weaknesses in (...)
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  26. added 2016-12-08
    Humean Moral Pluralism.Michael B. Gill - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Michael B. Gill offers a new account of Humean moral pluralism: the view that there are different moral reasons for action, which are based on human sentiments. He explores its historical origins, and argues that it offers the most compelling view of our moral experience. Together, pluralism and Humeanism make a philosophically powerful couple.
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  27. added 2016-09-22
    La Généalogie du Moi Dans la Philosophie de Hume.Frédéric Brahami - 2001 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 126 (2):169.
    Hume pense le moi comme une idée fictive, produit de l'imagination sans référent spirituel objectif ni assise substantielle. Cessant d'être un principe pour devenir un effet, le moi peut être objet de science. Derrière l'apparente hétérogénéité des deux explications humiennes du moi, l'une par la mémoire et l'autre par l'orgueil, l'unité profonde de la doctrine dévoile les enjeux à la fois anthropologiques et politiques d'une conception qui demande qu'on abandonne le dualisme dogmatique du moi et du non-moi, de l'individu et (...)
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  28. added 2016-09-15
    Hume’s Theory of Passions.Gabor Boros - 2012 - Archiwum Historii Filozofii I Myśli Społecznej 57.
    The paper’s main task is to show how much Hume’s philosophy of passions is indebted to and continues the tradition of the philosophy of affects of the 17th century, in spite of the obvious fact that he departed from the main philosophical project of the 17th century, the tripartite unity of mathematics, metaphysics, and mechanical physics. A restructuring of Hume’s order of passions and its comparison to the order followed by Descartes will show up a special „cognitivist” character of Hume’s (...)
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  29. added 2016-09-15
    Practical Reasoning and Practical Reasons in Hume.Karl Schafer - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (2):189-208.
    Can desires and actions be evaluated as responsive or unresponsive to reasons, in ways that extend beyond the instrumental implications of one's (other) desires? And does there exist any form of inference or reasoning that is practical in nature? Hume is generally supposed to have given an unambiguously negative reply to both of these questions. In particular, he is often taken to have held that no desire, passion, or action may ever be said to be opposed to reasons, except (perhaps) (...)
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  30. added 2016-09-01
    Normativity and Individualism: An Essay on Hume.Robert K. Armstrong - 2004 - Dissertation, Columbia University
    Hume's theory of practical rationality, it has been claimed, fails to account for the intrinsically social character of practical deliberation and of the norms governing action. While the standard way of pressing this critique is unsuccessful, it can be advanced in another way. It is alleged that Hume cannot explain how it is possible to act contrary to reason because he holds that practical reasons are grounded in brute desires which are beyond the reach of rational criticism. But Hume offers (...)
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  31. added 2016-05-04
    Hume on the Stoic Rational Passions and "Original Existences".Jason R. Fisette - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):609-639.
    I argue that Hume’s characterization of the passions as “original existences” is shaped by his preoccupation with Stoicism, and is not (as most commentators suppose) a ridiculous or trifling remark. My argument has three parts. First, I show that Hume’s description of the passions as “original existences” is properly understood as part of his argument against the possibility of passions caused by reason alone (rational passions). Second, I establish that Hume was responding to the Stoics, who claimed that a rational (...)
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  32. added 2016-01-30
    La teoría de las pasiones de Hume.Antonio José Cano López - 2011 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 52:101-115.
    Desde al menos Aristóteles, los filósofos han intentado explicar la vida pasional de los seres humanos. El propósito de este ensayo es mostrar la teoría de las pasiones de Hume. Este autor analiza las pasiones como parte de la ciencia del hombre en el Libro II del Tratado de la naturaleza humana y en la posterior Disertación de las pasiones. Hume distingue entre pasiones “serenas” y “violentas”. Él identifica los sentimientos estéticos y morales como ejemplos de pasiones “serenas”, mientras que (...)
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  33. added 2016-01-30
    Mirrors to One Another: Emotion and Value in Jane Austen and David Hume.E. M. Dadlez - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    A compelling exploration of the convergence of Jane Austen’s literary themes and characters with David Hume’s views on morality and human nature. Argues that the normative perspectives endorsed in Jane Austen's novels are best characterized in terms of a Humean approach, and that the merits of Hume's account of ethical, aesthetic and epistemic virtue are vividly illustrated by Austen's writing. Illustrates how Hume and Austen complement one another, each providing a lens that allows us to expand and elaborate on the (...)
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  34. added 2016-01-30
    Aesthetics and Morals in the Philosophy of David Hume.Timothy M. Costelloe - 2007 - Routledge.
    The book has two aims. First, to examine the extent and significance of the connection between Hume's aesthetics and his moral philosophy; and, second, to consider how, in light of the connection, his moral philosophy answers central questions in ethics. The first aim is realized in chapters 1-4. Chapter 1 examines Hume's essay "Of the Standard of Taste" to understand his search for a "standard" and how this affects the scope of his aesthetics. Chapter 2 establishes that he treats beauty (...)
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  35. added 2016-01-30
    JONES, P.: Hume's sentiments: their Ciceronian and French context. [REVIEW]R. Brandt - 1987 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 69 (1):120.
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  36. added 2016-01-30
    KYDD, R. M. -Reason and Conduct in Hume's Treatise. [REVIEW]A. C. Ewing - 1946 - Mind 55:273.
  37. added 2015-12-05
    Review of Sophie Botros, Hume, Reason and Morality: A Legacy of Contradiction[REVIEW]Tamra Frei - 2006 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (9).
  38. added 2015-11-07
    Locke, Hume, and Modern Moral Theory: A Legacy Cf Seventeenth - and Eighteenth-Century Philosophies of Mind.P. Foot - 1990 - In Rousseau (ed.), The Languages of Psyche: Mind and Body in Enlightenment Thought. University of California Press.
    Analyses in detail the accounts given respectively by Locke and by Hume of the mental factors such as pleasure, pain, uneasiness, and desire, which they see as causing all human actions. Foot argues that this enterprise was misconceived. Philosophers should no more try to describe a mechanism underlying acting on a reason (as e.g. a prudential or moral reason) than a mechanism underlying believing on a reason. Practical and theoretical reasoning are here on a par, the first issuing in action (...)
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  39. added 2015-11-07
    Self-Interest and History: Hume on Social Institutions.Stephen Paul Foster - 1984 - Dissertation, Saint Louis University
    Self-interest and History: Hume on Social Institutions offers an interpretation of Hume's approach to the study of social institutions. The thesis is that the concept of self-interest is paramount for Hume, both theoretically and normatively. There is implicit in Hume's explanation of social phenomena, what I term, an Individual Rational Choice model of human behavior. Attributed to Hume, in a reconstructive mode, is a game-theoretic view of social-interaction. Hume assumes that individuals are expected utility maximizers, i.e., the individual choice-making which (...)
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  40. added 2015-10-30
    Baier on Hume's Absurd Passions.Robert J. Fogelin - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (11):652.
  41. added 2015-09-05
    Passion and Value in Hume's Treatise. [REVIEW]C. E. - 1968 - Review of Metaphysics 21 (4):745-745.
    This critical work proceeds in a scholarly manner to show that Hume's Treatise, which has been ignored as a source for his moral theory, is of definite value for a correct and complete interpretation of his ethics. It is the author's contention that Hume's moral theory is closely connected to his psychology, which is set out in the Treatise. The author presents various interpretations he considers incorrect, exposing their faults and then suggesting an alternative view. Árdal is not attempting a (...)
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  42. added 2015-09-03
    L'invention des conventions de justice chez Hume et sa skepsis envers la rétribution.Ignace Haaz - 2009 - In Philippe Saltel (ed.), L'invention philosophique humienne. Vrin - Recherches sur la philosophie et le langage No 26. pp. 235-272.
    Promise keeping and the virtue of integrity are understandable only if the sense of justice and of injustice doesn't come from nature but results from education and of some of the most inventive human conventions. We comment this argument that we find in the Treatise of Nature, book III and present how it impacts the notion of retribution and punishment in general.
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  43. added 2015-08-29
    Binmore’s Humeanism.Dieter Birnbacher - 2006 - Analyse & Kritik 28 (1):66-70.
    David Hume is quoted in Binmore’s book Natural Justice more than any other author, past or present, and throughout with a markedly positive attitude. It is argued that this affinity is reflected in many characteristic features of Binmore’s approach to fairness and social justice and especially in the central role motivational issues are made to play in his theory. It is further argued that Binmore shares with Hume not only important strengths but also certain weaknesses, among them a tendency to (...)
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  44. added 2015-08-29
    Calling All Knaves: Hume on Moral Motivation.Susan Dimock - 1992 - Eidos: The Canadian Graduate Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):179-197.
  45. added 2015-08-29
    Reason and Sympathy in Hume's "Treatise.".John Edward Dixon - 1974 - Dissertation, The University of British Columbia (Canada)
  46. added 2015-08-24
    The Self as Narrative in Hume.Lorenzo Greco - 2015 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (4):699-722.
    In this paper, I return to the well-known apparent inconsistencies in Hume’s treatment of personal identity in the three books of A Treatise of Human Nature, and try to defend a Humean narrative interpretation of the self. I argue that in Book 1 of the Treatise Hume is answering (to use Marya Schechtman’s expressions in The Constitution of Selves) a “reidentification” question concerning personal identity, which is different from the “characterization” question of Books 2 and 3. That is, I maintain (...)
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  47. added 2015-08-13
    Strength of Mind and the Calm and Violent Passions.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (3):1-21.
    Hume’s distinction between the calm and violent passions is one whose boundaries are not entirely clear. However, it is crucial to understanding his motivational theory and to identifying an unusual virtue he calls “strength of mind,” the motivational prevalence of the calm passions over the violent. In this paper, I investigate the boundaries of the calm passions and consider the constitution of strength of mind and why Hume regards it as an admirable trait. These are provocative issues for two reasons. (...)
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  48. added 2015-07-03
    Hume’s Nonreductionist Philosophical Anthropology.Herman De Dijn - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):587-603.
    Hume's *A Treatise of Human Nature* constitutes a philosophical anthropology quite different from a philosophy of (self-)consciousness or of the subject. According to Hume, the Self or Subject is itself a product of human nature, that is, of the workings of a structured set of principles which explains all typically human phenomena. On the same basis, Hume discusses all "moral" subjects, such as science, morality and politics (including economics), art and religion as well as the different reflections about all these (...)
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  49. added 2015-07-03
    Simpatía y Espectáculo En la Moral de David Hume.Ángela Calvo de Saavedra - 1994 - Universitas Philosophica 22:11-28.
    La investigación humeana acerca de los principios de la moral parte de la pasión como motivo de la acción y al mismo tiempo pretende que su valoración ha de guiarse por la utilidad. Si bien son dos afirmaciones difíciles de combinar, la tesis del presente estudio es que la posibilidad de tender un puente entre la aspiración a la felicidad privada y el interés por el bienestar público está anclada, en su origen, en el sentimiento de benevolencia que el autor (...)
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  50. added 2015-06-30
    Hume on Morality, Action, and Character.William Davie - 1985 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (3):337 - 348.
1 — 50 / 97